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Inside Today: HISD throws out offers to sell Law Enforcement High School • Page 12B

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SATURDAY | July 27, 2013 | Vol. 59 | No. 39 | www.theleadernews.com | @heightsleader

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THE INDEX.

Public Safety Hipstrict Topics Obituaries Coupons Puzzles Sports Classifieds

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An In-Depth Edition

Future of area must keep eye on past T

his is what we still love about newspapers. We get to do this. We get to turn an entire edition of The Leader upside down. And we think you’ll like it. What’s more, we get to spend this edition explaining something absolutely none of us knows for sure. (Or, as some might say, we get to do exactly what the media always do. We get to make stuff up.) Here’s what happened: For a number of years, The Leader has published an edition called “Those Were the Days.” As you might guess, the edition (publishing every other July) was a look back on days of old. It was a time for advertisers to share stories about their businesses when colas cost a nickel and phone numbers didn’t need area codes, much less seven digits. It was a place to pay homage to the men and women who came before us and built this community into the one we enjoy today. Some would argue there was no need to change our historical look at this community. But during a meeting one day in our office, a member of our team made a comment that rang true: “There’s only so many times a business can share its history. Seems like we’ve been doing the same thing year after year.” And that’s when the mouths in this office started mumbling Dr. Seuss... “Oh the places (we’ll) go.” We wondered, aloud, if we could JONATHAN take the history of the Heights, Garden Oaks, MCELVY Oak Forest, and all our neighborhoods in bePublisher tween, and morph that into a look ahead. Could we talk to the folks who shaped our history about what they see for the generation of tomorrow? Was there any possible way, with all the resources in our community, to publish a VISION? Not too long ago, in a conversation with The Leader, someone questioned where we wanted to take this community. Did we want to turn North Shepherd into Upper Kirby? Did we want 19th to become Six Pines Drive in The Woodlands? Ella to become Times Boulevard in West University Place? In a strange way, the person asked if we – The Leader – had an agenda for what we wanted this community to, one day, become. The answer is difficult. We believe those who built, preserved and protected this community deserve to be protected. We believe the charm of our neighborhoods is a combination of antiquity and modernity, with a nod to the former. We also believe the new generation of homeowners – the young families swarming our ZIP codes – deserve their due. They are the ones paying big prices for small lots and smaller homes. They are funding the investment returns for the men and women who built this community. As such, we believe the new generation should have a hand in rebuilding, regentrifying, the neighborhoods and family homes they’ll leave to the next generation. So in a strange sort of answer, our vision of this community cannot be defined, mainly because that is not our role – despite what our name may say. Sure, we’d like to have a hand in promoting the small businesses in our market. And yes, we’d like to help inform and entertain you about the growth of our community. And in our own way, there is no doubt we’d like to be part of the vision for our community, in whatever manner that will one day be. But you all are the creators of that vision. You are the ones who will determine which businesses flourish and which ones fail. You will decide whether to rebuild your home or leave this community and head for the ’burbs. You are the ones who will determine the successes of our public and private schools, simply by your investment in time. And you are the ones who will elect and hold accountable those people charged with maintaining the public good. You are the creators of this vision. We are simply the documenters of what you discover. In the pages that follow, we’ve talked to public officials and grocery shoppers. We’ve asked for ideas and prognostications, and we even asked for a little poetry from our readers. What we’ve compiled is not even close to what we all can dream about our neighborhoods. In the end, though, maybe it will give us a vision to consider.

A QUICK GUIDE TO WHAT YOU CAN FIND INSIDE TODAY ’S LEADER On Page 3A

On Page 6A Thirty years later/ and the two-ninety feeder/ is still not complete That’s right. Our Betsy Denson took to social media, asking readers to share haikus about our neighborhoods. Needless to say, the creativity of our readers is superb.

Dr. Stephen Klineberg has studied the demographics of Houston for 32 years running. He gives you some insight into how fast we’ve grown and the million more people we can expect in the next decade.

On Page 4A We asked some of our local leaders about the future of our neighborhoods. What kinds of businesses can we expect? Are we finished with the growth spurt? Are we ready to handle the growth?

On Page 2A One important movement to improve quality of life in our area is a plan to restore the bayous all over Houston. White Oak Bayou, like most, became concrete in 1965. The city has a plan that might create a super trail of bayous that some say will imporove our neighborhoods.

On Page 8A The legacy of Clayton Lee Jr. lives on with his history of the Heights, published in today’s Leader. Read about our beginnings, and catch up with his wife, Libby, and how she puts our history in perspective.

On Page 12A This section is only possible because businesses in our community supported it. Please take the time to read about the families that keep our local businesses open.


Page 2A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • @heightsleader

White Oak Bayou

Can nature be restored into future Greater Heights super trail? by Ken Fountain For The Leader On a relatively mild summer morning in Houston, several dozen people gathered July 20 in the parking lot of Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church on 11th Street near T.C. Jester, many of them in hiking boots and hats, holding cameras and water bottles. They were about to embark on an adventure: walking an undeveloped stretch of White Oak Bayou that, if all goes according to plan, will one day serve as a jewel in the city’s new crown of bayou parkways. The occasion was a walking tour organized by the Houston Parks Board to acquaint residents with one of the key stretches of the envisioned project, which will add a vital link between Leader-area neighborhoods with the burgeoning effort to connect the city’s 10 major bayous into one interwoven system. Leading the tour was Kevin Shanley, managing principal of the Houston office of the international design firm SWA Group and former president of the White Oak Preservation Association. Shanley has long been an advocate for restoring Houston’s bayou to something akin to their natural state before the city’s rapid urbanization turned them into concrete channels (see http://www.theleadernews.com/?p=3376). Shanley, along with his mixedbreed Labrador Chico Blue, led the hardy adventurers along the upper ridge of the bayou, down a concrete bank to cross a ravine, and even across a dilapidated railroad trestle (reinforced with wooden planks), to describe how the future improvements would tie several different parts of the bayou system together. Area residents (including the early leaders of the White Oak Bayou Association) have worked for years to bring improvements to the landscape, often meeting resistance, Shanley said. “It takes a lot of energy to push government to do something, and that’s what they did,” Shanley said of the pioneers of the movement. More recently, however, the city’s political leadership and civic organizations combined forces to promote last November’s referendum to create the citywide interconnected bayou system. The referendum, which passed with 68.2 percent of the vote, will raise $10 million from bond sales, and an expected $105 million in outside funds (including private donations and outside grants, including from the federal government.) The funds will go toward building new hike and bike paths, Shanley pointed out to the group that nearly all Houston residents live within a mile of some tributary that connects to one of the city’s major bayous. “They’re like the veins on a ma-

At top, left, a view of White Oak Bayou near T.C. Jester in Timbergrove in 1956. The bayou was set in concrete in 1965. In the far distance can be seen an oil well, one of several in the West 18th/T.C. Jester area at that time known as the Eureka Heights oil fields that covered the Lazybrook and Timbergrove neighborhoods. (File photo) Today, folks like Kevin Shanley, right, are working to restore the bayous into their more natural state, which could create the crown jewel of a super trail of bayous through the city. (Photos by Ken Fountain) ple leaf,” he said of the tributaries. While the bond initiative will make improvements only along those major waterways, using National Trail Standards, local communities will be encouraged to use their own resources to develop their own connections to the main trails. Shanley said the hope is to use new “low-impact development” techniques to eliminate much of the concrete channelization of the bayou, created by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the early days of the city to drain water away from the city as quickly as possible. That would ultimately be replaced by a more natural system to use the watershed to its best effect. Along with the flood control benefits of the new improvements, planners hope to rid the area of much of the invasive species such as the Chinese tallow tree from along the bayou’s banks. At the same time, Shanley said, they plan to create more natural meadows that will include “a richer palette of vegetation” to make them more appealing to visitors. That will include wildflowers, which Shanley said also brings the benefit to the flood control district of not having to explain to resi-

dents why they don’t mow along the bayous more often. When it’s completed (envisioned by 2020), the White Oak trail system will connect to the east with the Heights Hike & Bike Trail (formerly the MKT rail line) and to the west with the Cypress area. There are even ideas to connect the system with Memorial Park, he said. Among the residents on the tour was the Sutherland family of Cottage Grove. Mom Annette led daughter Rachel, 4, by hand (sometimes stopping to pick flowers), while dad Wes pushed younger sons Henry and Owen in a two-child carriage. With some assistance, they were able to continue even up and down the bayou as the group crossed a small ford. “We use the (Heights) trail quite a bit,” Annette said. “We’re really excited that it’s going to be connected (to our neighborhood).” Eric Lukas, an energy industry consultant, was along on the tour after having volunteered during last fall’s referendum. A cyclist and a runner, Lukas said he was excited by both the recreational and environmental benefits of the proposed system. “It’s a win-win for everybody,” he said.

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Page 3A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • @heightsleader

Houston’s star seer, Klineberg, says the future is now by Cynthia Lescalleet For The Leader Yep. Things are changing – and the pace of it appears to be picking up steam. Many neighborhoods in the near northwest corridor, built as suburbs a half-century and more ago, are finding themselves amid the new urban core, thus in the crosshairs of greater Houston’s growth trends and issues. Look for a continuation of such examples as higher density living, a wider diversity of residents, and more choices in types of housing, said Rice University sociology professor Stephen Klineberg, codirector of the Kinder Institute for Urban Research. Since he has been documenting the city’s transformation for 32 years via the annual Houston Area Survey, he’s a go-to expert on Houston’s urban challenges and attitudes. There’ll be more public spaces, too, he said, but you’ll be sharing them with more people; Harris County is expected to add another million residents over the next 20 years. “Houston is going to have to figure out how to guide the growth,” despite its lack of zoning, Klineberg said. Some challenges are uniquely Houston’s, the nation’s least dense metro area and one “built by, for and on behalf of the automobile. (We have built a city predicated on the ‘culture of privatism,’ literally the bubble driving us from home to work to play.)” But even the car-centric lifestyle has been demoted a bit, he said. His anecdotal example: “No one takes a ‘Sunday Drive’ anymore.” While it’s not likely that the family’s need for a car here in Hous-

ton will ever be eliminated, you might only need one instead of two or three, he said, as the range of housing options and walkable destinations expand. Houston trends are also affected by a national “revolution” toward more sustainable urban communities, he said. Suburbia’s former lock on community life appears to be giving way. At the same time, however, suburbs are cultivating town centers and walkable urban zones for enrichment and entertainment. Local examples include Sugar Land and The Woodlands. Demographics also play into this shift. In the 1960s and 1970s, families with children living at home accounted for more than half of all American households, he explained. Today, they are less than a third. Meanwhile, the percentage of empty nesters and young, unmarried adults has increased dramatically along with single-adult households in all age groups. Many of them are interested in alternatives to their lifestyle choices. “We used to be a child-focused society.” Today, adults have fewer children and live longer without children. Their interests lie elsewhere and they’ve more time to cultivate and pursue them.

Adding, expanding resources

For a taste of the future, look how Houston’s innermost areas have been transforming, Klineberg said. There has been an explosion of townhomes built inside the Loop, the addition of new parks (such as Discovery Green) and shade trees, more sports venues and recreation facilities, more hike and bike trails, and more support

for an ever-more enriched arts community fueled by the “young creatives” settling in, he said. The bayous, once treated as little more than drainage conduits, for example, have been reimagined as linear parks and recreational resources. “This is transformative,” he said. Though much remains to be done, the city appears to be “self-consciously re-inventing itself.” And this is good, because Houston needs to attract the best and the brightest as it grows forward, he said. “It has to become an urban destination of choice, the city that people who can live anywhere will choose.”

Dr. Stephen Klineberg, who has conducted the Houston Area Survey for the past 32 years, says the trend that saw so many residents move to suburbia has changed, largely because the demographics of the city have also changed. (Submitted Photo)

The people’s choice

Most of Houston demographic growth since the oil industry’s bust in 1982 has been non-Anglo. This means the city has had three decades to get used to “being a magnet for the new immigration that is transforming America. Once an amalgam of European nationalities, we’re becoming a microcosm of the world. “We’re all minorities now.” Houston’s population today is the USA’s in 2050. “This is where the American future is going to be worked out. “People are growing more comfortable with the diversity,” he said, especially those under age 45. “Increasing numbers of Houstonians say they would like to live more urban, less car-dependent lifestyles. This entails a willingness to share urban spaces – the streets, parks, and mass transit – with people who may not look the same, or have the same proclivities, or the same incomes. Houstonians’ growing comfort with the new diversity underlies their increasing interest in walkable urbanism.”

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by Charlotte Aguilar charlotte@theleadernews.com Back in the idealistic 1960s-‘70s, there was a popular saying that showed up on psychedelic posters and cards, turning it eventually into one of those cheesy “Have a nice day (insert Happy Face)” or “Keep on truckin’”clichés. There were variations, but it went something like this: “Imagine the future, because you’re going to spend the rest of your life there.” Houston is a city without a general plan, without zoning –– but abounding in dreamers who are spending their present in the future. They have their own organizations imagining, visioning, using Facebook and Survey Monkey, focus groups, town meetings and workshops, grants and donations, to come up with high tech versions of the Ouija board or crystal ball. A glimpse into the future as they’d like to see it. Future overload? This is by no means a comprehensive directory but instead The Leader’s abbreviated guide to futuristic enterprises in Houston. (Yes, there are more than these.) They might strike some as quixotic, trying to overlay hopeful concepts on a city mired in 177 years of no zoning, limited planning and a property-rights-trump-all mentality. But most would tell you it never hurts to dream a little.

1) Center for Houston’s Future.

An impressive think tank –– a collection of leaders from all walks of Houston life searching for short-term and long-term solutions to quality-of-life issues of education, health care, energy and more. Their Community Engagement and Collaborations are a good indicator of who they are and the seriousness they attach to their name. http://www.futurehouston. com/cfhf.cfm?a=cms,c,351,3,31

O 2) Houston Tomorrow

A leader in creating a community conversation, this organization, formerly the Gulf Coast Institute, has as its goal for Houston’s 200th birthday in 2036 for it to be “home to the healthiest, happiest, most prosperous people in the United States.” Specifically, they address issues of safe, walkable neighborhoods, transportation, environmental issues, the food supply and greenspace. Even if you don’t go beyond their website, www. houstontomorrow.org, you’ll have learned something. It’s a clearing house for blogs and notices from all kinds of forward-thinking groups.

3) Better Houston

This group of planners, urban designers, researchers and policy analysts echoes Houston Tomorrow’s emphasis with goals to improve transit and create stronger urban neighborhoods that are safe, walkable and alive with mixed-use developments. www.betterhouston.org

4) Blueprint Houston

This well-funded and –supported organization has the most urgent approach with a goal of creating a general plan. “The city of Houston is changing before our eyes,” it says on its website, www. blueprinthouston.org. “Are we

ready to seize the moment or simply watch it slip away?” It describes Houston being at a crossroads that will determine whether it becomes a “great global city.” Or not.

5) Houston-Galveston Area Council

Known better by its acronym, H-GAC is a council of governments that studies regional issues long-term and funnels government funding to local projects. It studies everything from emergency planning to solid waste issues to mobility, including creating a network of roadways for bicyclists. See more on Houston’s visionary groups online at www.theleadernews.com

Back Row L to R: Arthur, Dan, Bert & Duane Front Row L to R: Tina & Janet

wners Jim and Kathy Stratton and Duane through the unique selection of gifts for wine Myers purchased C&D Hardware in 1999 enthusiasts, Jim Shore collectibles, candles and from Mrs. Alice Dailey and her mother, Rosie scented oils, seasonal decorations, crosses and Cobb, widow of Sam Cobb. The store, located more. Recently-added products include Traeger at 314 East 11th in the Heights, was once the site Wood Pellet Grills, G.E. Energy Smart Bulbs, of a recording studio and record store owned by Bona Wood and Hard Surface Cleaners, Science Pappy Daily and his sons. With its small-town Diet Pet Foods. The store also provides services appeal, C&D Hardware still prides itself on being that include: metal screens made and repaired, key a family-owned and operated business serving the cutting, glass cutting, lock re-keying, sharpening Heights since 1951. The store has grown through service, carpet cleaner rental, pipe cutting and the years and is constantly adding products to keep treading, and computer paint color matching. up with customers’ needs and expectations. C & D Hardware carved out a niche for itself long ago Call 713-861-3551 for helpful advice, to place an and continues to strive to maintain outstanding order, or check for a needed item in stock. You can also visit us online at www.CandDHardware. customer service. Although C & D Hardware prides itself on being a fullline hardware store, the store also carries a large selection 314 E. 11th Street • 713-861-3551 of home and garden decor. Looking for a gift? Browse Weekdays 8am-6:30pm • Saturday 9am-6pm • Sunday 10am-5pm

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Page 4A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • @heightsleader

ELLEN COHEN • TERRY BURGE • SCOTT LESTER • ANDY ADAMS • DENNIS WOODWARD

Ellen Cohen, Houston City Council • District C In a decade or two, I expect to see the products of many exciting trends in Leader neighborhoods. This area contains some of the city’s hottest home markets, and as the area continues to grow its selection of community-friendly restaurants and rejuvenated public schools, I foresee these neighborhoods becoming more and more attractive to young families. As the city continues to pay down its prior debt through the ReBuild Houston program, more dollars will be freed up for pay-as-you-go infrastructure projects, which means we can look forward to better roads and drainage systems. Furthermore, I see the Leader neighborhoods becoming increasingly pedestrian and bike-friendly, due to the voter-approved implementation of the most extensive hike and bike trail system in the country, which will span through the Leader area along Buffalo Bayou, White Oak Bayou, and their tributaries. For businesses looking to build or relocate their headquarters in Houston, amenities such as these that a city can offer potential employees can be a critical factor in their decision. It’s an exciting time to be living in District C! Cohen, founder and longtime executive director of the Houston Area Women’s Center and a former state representative, now represents District C on Houston City Council. Her district includes portions of the Greater Heights as well as southwest Houston.

Area Leaders Speak Vision for community expands on present

Terry Burge, President, Greater Heights Chamber of Commerce People are drawn to our area by its location, natural beauty and a sense of community that is unequaled in this city. The first two of those will, of course, endure the next decade of growth. It’s up to those of us who live and work here to preserve the latter. I am convinced that we will. Roots run deep here. More so than any other part of our sprawling metroplex, multiple generations of families continue to call this area home, fostering a profound sense of civic pride. As long as we value and nurture that, our future as a community -our identity as the small town in a big city - will be assured. Despite Houston’s increasing urban density, singlefamily homes will still predominate in our area. As the gentrification of our neighborhoods accelerates, land will gradually convert to higher and better use. Machine shops and small manufacturing facilities will all but disappear in the Heights and Shady Acres, replaced by more compatible retail and service. We’ll enjoy even more shopping and dining choices. Commercial corridors like North Shepherd/Durham, Ella, Yale, North Main and West 34th will gradually undergo a commercial revival. Now that the threat of flooding has been mitigated to a significant degree, the greatest problems that will continue to challenge us will be public safety and infrastructure. Our community leaders will have to lobby aggressively to ensure that this area receives the attention it needs from city and county governments that will be facing tougher and tougher fiscal challenges struggling to meet the demands of quantum regional growth. That said, I would not want to be in any other part of Houston for now and the future!

Scott Lester, Bank Office President, Allegiance Bank Texas I foresee the Heights area continuing to prosper. I envision the continued housing trend of older structures being replaced with NEW high density housing units, just as we are currently experiencing. The density will also be fueled by multifamily structures as more and more people are gravitating to the central business district. The populace of this newer and more densely populated area will naturally bring in more business to cater to their need for convenience. This transformation is being witnessed firsthand with all the new restaurants, larger grocery stores and retail shops that have been opening over the past couple of years. Business development always follows residential development or in this case redevelopment. I am proud that Allegiance Bank Texas was at the forefront of this redevelopment, taking a run-down lot used as a dumping ground on Durham and 23rd St. and constructing what we feel is a beautiful building that compliments the area. I envision the Shepherd/Durham corridor will continue this transformation with much nicer, upscale businesses and restaurants. However, this transformation will be a challenge for the Heights area to maintain its “small town in big city” feel.

Andy Adams, Vice President & General Counsel, Adams Insurance I am typing this 100 feet from where I was born at Heights Hospital in 1972. Fortunately, Houston and more specifically, the Heights have gone much farther in life. I am old enough to remember the Heights as a “transitional” neighborhood on the decline and to have witnessed the unlikely comeback story (wow, I sound like an old coot!). What will we see in the next ten years? To be sure, the destiny of the Heights is entwined with Houston’s destiny. Houston’s future looks very bright. Our city responded to the Great Recession by adding two jobs for every one it lost, all without a government bailout. We are a boom town once again, but a boom town with a diverse portfolio. The Heights is smack dab in the middle of that boom town. So, it is no brave leap of faith to predict a bright future for the Heights. The true leap of faith was made by the good men and women that stayed here, worked here, opened businesses here, and raised families here over the last 20 to 30 years. They kept the Heights a place friendly to businesses and families alike. Guess what? Families and businesses noticed and came back here in abundance. It is good to see the fruits of that former generation’s labor being reaped. Want to see it continue for the next decade? Just follow their lead. P.S. I would love to see a good bagel shop open in the Heights!

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JoAnn Lord

J

o Ann Lord is the owner/operator of Royalty Pet Center, Inc., established by Jo Ann and her father on Valentine’s Day 1976 and named in honor of her late father, Royal T. Johnson. Having been in business for 35 years, Jo Ann has taken care of several generations of satisfied customers and their pets. Jo Ann, along with her son, Gary Humphreys, and a staff of four, operate Royalty Pet Center. They offer all breed professional dog and cat grooming services and provide a boarding facility with both indoor and outdoor runs. Royalty Pet Center carries a full assortment of dog and cat supplies and premium pet foods. The business is conveniently located at 9900 North Houston Rosslyn (at Alabonson). Visit the center’s Web site at www.RoyaltyPetCenter.com for information. Call 713-849-9000 to schedule an appointment.

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T

he Texas Cafeteria formerly Texas Café many years ago, is still a family owned and operated restaurant. George and Polly Koumonduros opened the original restaurant in November, 1965 and after many good meals have been served and a lot of good times and interesting people have walked through the doors, the Koumonduros family still operates this good family restaurant. Their motto is “start your day with a fresh cooked breakfast or come an join us for lunch to try out home style cooked meals or home baked rolls and cornbread. All of our fried items are hand breaded and everything is prepared fresh daily.” They pride themselves with good meals at a good price. They have consistently good food said Alex. That

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Helping the community achieve its vision since 1956 First known as Montrose National Bank of Houston from 1956 to 1961. The location at 2100 Travis Street was Central National Bank of Houston from 1961 to 1988. Central Bank’s “little” location on North Shepherd was once a coffee and donut shop.

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is what keeps our customers coming back and that is why we have the kids and grandchildren of my parent’s customers coming in today. Home style cooking at Fast food prices is what we have. We start the day serving great breakfasts. Lunch specials every day consist of meat, 2 vegetables, a salad and rolls, not to mention we have great desserts if you have room after our plentiful portions. Seafood, special salads and barbeque are served on certain days. Texas Cafeteria is in the process of remodeling and updating their property now and are proud that they can give a fresh new look when you come to visit. The changes will be ongoing for a while, but I’m sure you will be able to enjoy seeing these changes as you enjoy the consistent good food served by the same great staff in the down-home atmosphere of the Koumonduros Family dining room.

Large or Small At Our Place or Yours!

Dennis Woodward, Restorative Planter It’s time for our neighborhoods to acquire the knowledge needed to grow food for themselves, provide habitat for native wildlife, and reduce or eliminate maintenance costs of public and private property. Plants in our environment could be as crucial to health as medical professionals. Food, medicine, and nourishment can be as close and the nearest restored land. Trading recipes for native animals, plants, and medicines made from plants could become the norm. My vision will become a reality when a prothonotary warbler nests along a bayou or creek and native plantings and vegetable beds replace lawns. Woodward is a resident of Shepherd Park Plaza who practices restorative planting on public lands and writes a column on gardening for The Leader.

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Page 5A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • @heightsleader

Rick Perry’s big question: Now what do I do? R

ick Perry, who has served as Texas governor longer than anyone, says he’s stepping down after this term. At that time he’ll still able to jog, shoot menacing coyotes, and text while driving through school crossings, but what else will Perry do? There are plenty of examples, because the former Aggie yell leader is the 47th governor of Texas, and all but one had an afterlife upon leaving the Governor’s Mansion (which Perry is leaving a far a different house than when he first moved in). So let’s take a look at what happened to our ex-guvs. We begin with Henry Smith, Texas’ ineffective provisional governor for three months in 1836. He later went to California with his sons as a 49er, and died in his tent without striking it rich. David G. Burnet was our interim president. He ran for the official presidency against Sam Houston, and lost. He died penniless. The Republic of Texas’ constitution prevented Houston from running for re-election (now there’s a new idea), but he later became president again, then was kicked out of office and moved to Huntsville, where he died. . Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar -- put that on a bumper sticker -- left office, wrote a book of poetry and died penniless. Our last president was Anson Jones. After leaving office, he farmed a bit and

ASHBY AT

LARGE

then shot himself. After annexation, Texas had governors, the first being J. Pinckney Henderson, who stepped aside to lead a Texas regiment in the Mexican-American War, then resumed his post. He later became a U.S. senator. George T. Wood left office and built a huge house, which was uncompleted when he died. Peter Bell resigned as governor to take a seat in the U.S. Congress. Later he became -- one guess -- destitute. A grateful Texas Legislature awarded him the first governor’s pension: $100 a year. (Incidentally, a gold mine for this is June Welch’s “The Texas Governor.”) We can skip James Wilson Henderson. Elisha Marshall Pease had a speech impediment and was our first governor to live in the Mansion. Hardin Runnels is best remembered as the only person ever to defeat Houston in an election. Runnels died on Christmas day, another first. O.M. Roberts was defeated for re-elec-

tion and served in the Confederate Army. Francis Lubbock did not seek re-election, joined Jefferson Davis’ staff and spent two years in a Union prison. He later became Texas state treasurer. Gov. Pendleton Murrah presided over the fall of the Texas Confederacy, fled to Mexico (all the other Dixie governors had been jailed) and died in Monterrey. After the Civil War, our leaders were appointed Unionists –– then old Confederates came back in power. One was Richard Hubbard who weighed 300 pounds. After leaving office he became the U.S. minister to Japan. Oran Milo Roberts created the University of Texas and later became a law professor there. His son became the law school’s night watchman. Sul Ross was one of our most fascinating governors -- Indian fighter (he helped find Cynthia Ann Parker), Texas Ranger, Confederate general. He became president of Texas A&M. After leaving the governorship, Pat Neff turned down presidency of UT to become president of Baylor. Silly choice. When Jim Hogg left office, Miss Ima Hogg once told me, “We were so poor, Daddy had to borrow money to move out of the Governor’s Mansion.” He invested in Spindletop and real estate, and died extremely wealthy. Finally a rich ex-guv! Gov. Charles Culberson went on to serve 24 years in the U.S.

Editor’s Note: Publisher Jonathan McElvy’s column appears on Page 1A today.

THE READER. The last lost boy

Posted to THE LEADER on Facebook Growing up in Oak Forest I know this story all too well. This is only the last one because the powers that be at the time quit looking for more bodies because they didn’t want to be known for having the worst serial killer of all time. Kim Yrose VonBruno

Seeing the other side

Dear Editor: Walking a mile in another man’s shoes is the ultimate in compassion. Too often we base our opinion of another person only by the way we perceive them, and not how they perceive us. Nice article, I enjoyed the read. William Scott Dear Editor: I am an African American man that has lived in Houston most of my life and mostly in the Greater Heights area. I have seen this area in the days before and now during the “Great Renovation”. I must applaud you on your brave and admirable editorial on diversity and I agree with all of it. I don’t agree with most of what you say as I assume we are on different sides of the political divide, but in this case we are on the same side. I feel however, most folks in the area you cover in the Leader is not on this side and they don’t value diversity as they would like to see their very own City of Mayberry from The Andy Griffith Show materialize. And if I am not mistaken, there was no diversity in Mayberry. I hope your words will give people something to think about as there will never be a Mayberry in the middle of Houston, so they must accept diversity, as that is America. M. Fitch

Dear Editor: George Zimmerman is Hispanic and our “diverse city” is 50% Hispanic. Stop being like all the rest of the media trying to kiss butt. You should read what Charles Barkley had to say about the Zimmerman verdict. Or maybe you should check out Rev Manning. Just whatever you do do not help put nails in our “gradually losing our civil rights everyday by losing our freedom to speech” coffin. Oh and ps, take away that stupid looking picture of the white guy with a ski hat on and pointing a gun under police reports. Its very racial. Phyllis Editor’s note: The picture to which you refer is a paid advertisement that sponsors our crime reports.

Veteran’s harsh security searches

Senate. Next came Joseph Draper Sayers who practiced law in San Antonio and Austin. Willis Tucker Lanham, our last Confederate to become governor, spent $20 on his campaign. Thomas Campbell later ran for other offices and was defeated. He died of leukemia in Galveston. O.B. Colquitt didn’t do much. James Ferguson tried to run the University of Texas, was impeached and resigned. That’ll teach him. But he remained a political power. Lt. Gov. William Hobby, a newspaperman -- there goes the neighborhood -- took over after Ferguson was bounced. Later Hobby bought the Beaumont Enterprise and the Houston Post. Ferguson’s wife, Miriam “Ma” Ferguson, was elected to two non-consecutive terms, but was finally defeated, then ran again, with no luck. The governor’s

job paid $4,000 a year, but Dan Moody was so broke he didn’t seek re-election. He stayed active in politics. Ross Sterling was a rich oilman when he took office, lost it all while serving, then made it back again before dying. Jimmy Allred became a federal judge. Gov. W. Lee O’Daniel later served an “undistinguished” term as a U.S. senator. Coke Stevenson carried all 254 counties running for guv, but later ran for senator and lost to Lyndon Johnson by 87 magical votes. Beauford Jester is our only governor to die in office -- aboard a Pullman on the way to Galveston. Lt. Gov. Allan Shivers took over and served three terms. He later was on bank boards and handled his wife’s inheritance. Price Daniel ran for a fourth term but was defeated by John Connally. Daniel became a judge on the Texas

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The Puzzles. Solutions in this issue’s classsied section.

Posted to www.theleadernews.com BNSF did not build a restaurant next to its tracks. When the parking lot was put in, the owner of Cottonwood should have been thinking of the safety of his patrons. Sometimes people have to take responsibility for what they do or in this case build. Badyen

get involved on this page! If you want to send us a letter, we might edit it a little, and we won’t let you personally attack your pesky neighbor. But we’ll publish as many letters as our readers choose to write.

CLUES DOWN

Email letters to news@theleadernews.com

CLUES ACROSS 1. __ Dhabi, Arabian capital 4. Invests in little enterprises 8. Stalk of a moss capsule 12. Beach material 14. Maneuver in a game 15. A castrated male chicken 16. Write bad checks 17. Sewer inhabitants 18. Farewell (Spanish) 19. Player makes 3 goals in one game 22. Greek rainbow goddess

23. Tax collector 24. Make unhappy 27. Hygienic 32. Double-reed instrument 33. Beetle Bailey’s dog 34. Fee, ___, foe, fum 35. One dish meal 38. Goatlike antelope 40. Consumed food 41. Peels 42. Emerald Isle 43. Duties helpful to others

SUDOKU

hub of technology” to continue to attract skilled workers and the tax base that they form. Gonzalez said the permitting process needs to become more effective, so prospective business owners will set up shop in Houston and that the city needs ideas from the community, regarding the future. Costello, who owns a civil engineering firm, said the city has

been re-investing in infrastructure, but they need to do a better job of communicating their progress with the citizens. Costello said government, as opposed to private industry, can take a longer time to show progress. “The city moves glacially, you have to patient,” Costello said. “It’s an exercise in community relations.”

ACROSS Cont... 45. Fragments of cloth 47. Frozen water 48. Spanish river 49. Stated an inquiry 56. Laid-back California county 57. Fearless and daring 58. Sound after its source has stopped 59. Blackboard rock 60. A domed or vaulted recess 61. Six (Spanish) 62. French city 63. Herringlike clupeid sh 64. Oriental sauce

Driving onto the tracks

Houston City Councilmember Ed Gonzalez spoke to the American Institute of Architects Houston Urban Design Committee about the future of the city last week. (Photo by Michael Sudhalter)

lucy@theleadernews.com

Any erroneous statement which may appear in The Leader will be corrected when brought to the attention of the publisher. In the event of errors or omissions in The Leader advertisements, the publisher does not hold himself liable for damages further than the amount received by him for such advertisements. The Leader’s distribution is independently audited by the Circulation Verification Council.

Councilmembers share vision for city’s future Houston City Councilmembers Stephen Costello and Ed Gonzalez shared some of their ideas on the city’s future during “Vision for The City of Houston,” an American Institute of Architects (AIA) Houston Urban Design Committee event on July 17 in downtown Houston. Gonzalez, a retired Houston Police Department sergeant who was elected to council in 2009 to represent north Houston areas that include the Heights, said he’s an “eternal optimist.” Even though he and Costello, who was also elected in 2009, may be term-limited by 2015, he hopes their current actions make an impact now and in the future. “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago,” Gonzalez said. “The second best time is today.” Speaking specifically about the Heights, Gonzalez said “it’s going to continue to grow.” Ensuring proper infrastructure and receiving sufficient community input will be keys to responsible growth in the Heights, Gonzalez said. Speaking generally about the city, Gonzalez asked the audience how many great boulevards the city has, and one person replied, “Post Oak.” He said the city needs more of them, and that it must “become a

© Copyright 2013 McElvy Media LLC

Jonathan McElvy

Posted to THE LEADER on Facebook We should be outraged that any American has to go through this... not just veterans. Shawn Salyers

by Michael Sudhalter michael@theleadernews.com

Supreme Court. Connally ran for president, was acquitted on a bribery charge, went into business with Ben Barnes and ended up bankrupt. Then prospects started to improve. Dolph Briscoe retired to his ranch as one of the largest landowners in Texas. Mark White joined a Houston law firm. Bill Clements went back to his squillion dollar oil biz. Ann Richards did well in private business. George W. Bush is rich from his days with the Texas Rangers. So, Rick Perry has predecessors to follow. Or he may wish to do nothing. As guv he makes $150,000 a year and already receives another $92,376 annually in state pensions. He has at least $1.4 million in assets. Not bad for someone who has been a state employee all his adult life. Ashby governs at ashby2@comcast.net

1. Requests 2. Spoken in the Dali region of Yunnan 3. Up to the time of 4. Common ankle injury 5. Tedium 6. 9th Greek letter 7. Abnormal closed body sac 8. One who obtains pleasure from other’s pain 9. Long narrative heroic poem 10. Possessed by force 11. Autonomic nervous system 13. Treats with contempt 15. Bears 20. Before 21. Light ringing sound 24. Blends of soul and calypso 25. Fall off in intensity 26. Gives medicine 27. Gross receipts 28. Square measures 29. Ablaze 30. Incapable of exibility 31. Bears, sheep or goats 33. An open skin infection 36. Effeminate 37. Competed in a speed test 39. Supplies with air 44. Short stays 45. Sown a lawn 46. 60 min. units (abbr.) 48. Second largest Oklahoma city 49. Fence picket 50. 2nd largest Algerian port city 51. Camel or goat fabrics 52. 19th Hebrew letter 53. Frosts 54. 17th state 55. Inquisitorial 56. Manuscripts (abbr.)


Page 6A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • @heightsleader

by Betsy Denson betsy@theleadernews.com If you’re prognosticating, you might as well be poetic about it. For The Leader’s Visions issue, I took to social media and asked people to haiku their predictions about life in the hood 25 years from now. Here was my mine: We’re the new West U?/Retail and dining galore/Nostalgia begins The following responses are in no particular order. (And we know – some aren’t technically haiku, but who’s counting syllables? It’s the visionary thought that counts.) Kirk Rodgers Happy bulldozers / Force the grudging rebirth of / An urban hometown I think what we need / more than anything else is / one more drive through bank

Carol Etzel The wind blows the Oaks/Whether past, now or future/A Forest of change. Lisa Gutierrez Central location / Looming McMansions now shade / Where modest homes stood Great community / A decent grocery store / I’m still hoping for Sierra Gray Jones Happy bungalows/Perilous inequity/ Calm after the storm Quiet little homes/Crashing, smashing, gone for good/Neighborhood wanted Bill Mallin Trees outside the loop/New construction, storms, and wind/Plant new seeds and grow. Facebook and Karno/Oak Forest has a

new face/Bat walk anyone? Melissa Hamous First, tiny acorn/Then mighty oaks and neighbors/Peace, Love, Squirrels, and home.

Families old, young/ welcoming as expected/the Oak Forest thrives.

but/ no more Starbucks, please

Ansley Stewart The Oaks always grow,/Our neighborhood always shows,/The past never fades.

Robert Mark Megna Each home on ground/ Where time’s heart beats together/ Tempos old and new!

Chris Lombardo Families, old and new,/Saw the Forest for the trees./An old Oak grew strong.

Robert Hayes taxes suck so they say./bigger houses in a day./neighborhood in array.

Garrett Tyra Frank Sharp plants a seed/Stray dogs roam looking for feed/This great home we need!!!

Peter Nester Thirty years later/ and the two-ninety feeder/ is still not complete Living so close to/ downtown has its pros and cons/ work from home trumps all Remember the time/ when cars ruled the road, now bikes/ make the freeways moot Light rail has finally/ made it to the neighborhood/ now we use jet packs Property values/ continue to climb,

Tracy Brandon Old and new abound/trying to make sense of it/change in the forest. Peace, Love, and Squirrels/Is our Neighborly Motto/Can’t Help But Love It! Loved my neighborhood/then higher taxes set in/must leave neighborhood!

Kyle Jones View from my porch swing,/Taller pines and taller homes./My grass still won’t grow. Juan Pl Oak Forest: Where the Past endears with the Future Marlene Perez Greatest schools around/with big houses everywhere/Is this river oaks?! Family friendly/Also very pet friendly/ Don’t forget your bikes!

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Page 7A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • www.theleadernews.com

What Do You Want?

Residents share their thoughts on the Vision for this area “My husband and I are investing in our property we’ve owned for the past five years. We’re hoping it will increase and the area will thrive. People are so creative that as businesses keep popping up, I’ll think “I never knew I needed that”, but I do.”

“I hope to see more small businesses and that the community keeps the characteristics and older small town feel. The area is going crazy. It’s going to be a lot harder for the area to keep small businesses with more population and becoming more expensive.”

“I hope it grows to its potential and there’s more influx of people coming in. The population will rise. Hopefully, businesses in the communal areas will follow. We have one bike path. I’d like to see them connect to two other bike paths, and I’d like to see more parks.”

- Cay Taylor, Heights

- Erin Simpson, Washington Heights

- Bryan Harvey, Heights “I’m relatively new to the Heights. I lived a couple of years in Austin. I’m hoping it’ll maintain the small town feel within the city of Houston. I hope there continues to be nightlife, bar scene and more live music as well.”

“I hope the core of what made it a nice place to live in the first place (continues). I think it’s going to become the next Bellaire where nice middle class families will be priced out of it.”

“I hope we don’t get any more of those giant square apartments like they’re trying to build at 6th and Yale...(Otherwise), I love the way the Heights is growing. I hope people will come back to the public schools.”

- Trisha Cramblet, Oak Forest

- Guusje Moore, Heights “I’d like to see more buildings, more businesses. more jobs to make it a better place -- retail, real estate, technology.”

- London Douglas, North Houston

- Charlie Herrmann, Heights

“I would have to say continued growth in the direction it’s going. I hope for increased property values, strong vibrant businesses, and maybe more restaurants.”

“I would expect it would continue to re-develop. I’m excited to see lots of new shops on 19th Street. It seems like it’s becoming more walkable.”

- George Herrera, Candlelight Forest

- Taylor Jackson, Heights

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Page 8A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • @heightsleader

History of the Houston Heights by Clayton Lee Jr.

The old timers were known to say that in the Houston Heights, the top of the trees tickled the toes of the angels… To really talk about the Heights, we should talk about Mr. Oscar Martin Carter, the father of the Houston Heights. Mr. Carter was born Sept. 2, 1842 in Salem Mass. and was orphaned by the age of six. He moved from family to family and was treated so poorly that he ran away and joined up with some people heading West. In one small town he worked as a tinsmith. He was a genius and an adventurer. At one time he was a teamster on wagon trains and even panned for gold successfully in Colorado while there. It made him a millionaire, so he returned to Omaha, Neb., where he eventually owned six banks. He had holdings in real estate and became well known in business circles in New York and Washington, D.C. He even met the president of the United States. In 1887, he heard about Houston, Texas, and after looking it over, formed the Omaha and South Texas land Company and bought 1,765 acres of land from the Allen brothers, who were in need of funds. The Allen brothers had paid $4 an acre and sold to Mr. Carter for $45 an acre. The land, located in the northwest area, was to become the “Houston Heights,” so named because it was 23 feet higher in elevation than the rest of the city. Soon, people would escape from the epidemics of the city to the healthier “Houston Heights.” Mr. Carter returned to Omaha to engage some of his friends in his adventure. Mr. Daniel Denton Cooley (treasurer of the Land Company) built the first home in the Heights on the northeast corner of Heights Boulevard and 18th Street. Mr. Cooley was the grandfather of the renowned heart surgeon, Dr. Denton Cooley. The home was demolished in the 1960s and the property acquired by the Houston Heights Association. The property is the home of Marmion Park, so named for the last mayor of the Houston Heights (1914-1918), Mr. J.B. Marmion Sr. and Kaiser Pavillion, named for Dr. and Mrs. C.H. Kaiser, who donated the “seed” money for the project. Note: There were four mayors of the Heights: Judge Love, John Milroy, David Barker (home on the northwest corner of 16th Street at Harvard, National Register), and Mr. Isbell (639 Heights Blvd. Home had a large open room upstairs that was used for meetings.) Mr. John Milroy built his home on the northeast corner of Heights Boulevard at 11th Street. The home, still standing, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Both Mr. Milroy and Mr. Cooley built homes and sold lots. It is said that even through the Great Depression, not a home was repossessed by either man. When a man could start paying again, he simply picked up where he had left off. The Heights was a planned community with roads, utilities, transportation and industries. The Heights was laid out with a beautiful wide boulevard that ran North and South. Originally there were wooden bridges over White Oak Bayou. The street was later paved with bricks. The streets running North and South were named for universities, and the streets running East and West were numbered. Mr. Carter knew there would have to be transportation so he bought horse-drawn trolleys (later electrified trolleys) that went north on the Boulevard to 19th Street, west to Nicholson (Railroad Street), along the railroad track. After several near fights with the train men who would leave boxcars on the tracks, the trolley moved its tracks one block south to Ashland. From 17th Street, the trolley would go south on the Boulevard to Washington and east to the city of Houston. There was also the shuttle for people to go to No. 1 – Kaplan Ben-Hur the industrial area and homes around it. Around 26th Street was the South Texas Cotton Seed Mill, the Pickle Factory, the Mattress Factory, which later became the Oriental Textile Mill, the Furniture Factory, the Lumber Yard and Mill Shop, and the Clock Tower on West 22nd Street and Lawrence, one block east of Shepherd. No. 2 – Baptist Temple Restoration of the clock tower was a project I worked on, and the work was done by Mr. Bade Jensen of the Heights. My wife and sister would take a broomstick and some twine and walk four blocks to the Heights Ice Plant to get 25 pounds of ice for 10 cents. I have a coupon book and a card you could hang in your window to show the ice man how much ice to deliver. No. 3 – Houston Fire Department The Omaha and South Texas Land Company and its developers spent over a half-million dollars before the first lot was ever sold on May 5, 1891. There was a large two-story hotel on the northeast corner of 19th and Ashland, for business people to stay in while visiting the Heights. It later became a sanitarium and burned in 1915. There was a two-story brick building that housed a drug store below and No. 4 – Heights High School Photo Dr. Miller Robinson and Dr. Sinclair had offices upstairs. On the other corner was located Harolds in the Heights. I can remember an old two-story brick building where Mr. Charlie Kaplan had a bicycle repair shop. On 7th and the Boulevard, now Donovan Park, was Mr. Scott Wimberly’s grocery store. The park was named for Mr. James G. Donovan, the city attorney for Houston Heights from its beginning No. 5 – Main Street until it was incorporated by the city of Houston in 1918. Mr. Donovan was on the school board for many years. He is better known as the father of Marcella D. Perry, whom we all call “Mrs. Heights.” Mrs. Perry is well known as the founder of Heights Savings and for her “Econocasts” reports on radio and TV for many years. There was only one brick Victorian home built on the Boulevard at 10 1/2 Street. It became a lovely bed-and-breakfast called the Webber House, owned by the Jacksons. Three more bed-andbreakfasts on the Boulevard – the Durham House and Angel Arbor, owned by Marguerite and Dean Swanson, and Sara’s, owned by Donna & Tillman Arledge and their daughter, Sara. At the corner of 17th Street and Rutland was the Dexter Store, owned by Fred Dexter Sr. who was once the choirmaster at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Houston. There was a room upstairs used for various meetings. The building was later used by Fred Dexter Jr. in his business, Dexter Diaper Service. Fred Jr. invented the “no-fold” diaper still used by many diaper services. The Dexter family home was on the southwest corner of Yale at 17th Street and was called “Rose Lawn” for the beautiful rose garden. Further down at 124 W. 17 St. was the home of Edmond V. and Maude Whitty who started the first theater group in the Heights. The home then was owned by Dennis and Laura Virgadamo. In 1912, Dave and Bessie Kaplan opened Kaplan Ben-Hur department store at Yale and 22nd Street. It was referred to as the “Neiman Marcus of the Heights.” (See inset photo No. 1) In 1911, my father, Clayton Lee, started Clayton Lee Plumbing Company (still in operation in the Heights and Conroe). We have always had a great number of churches in the Heights. The Heights Presbyterian Church was the first one built, on the southeast corner of 18th Street and Rutland. In 1908, Baptist Temple was formed while meeting above Simon Lewis’ grocery store, and in 1912 built its first building on the southeast corner of 20th Street and Rutland. (See inset photo No. 2) It grew to cover the entire block to Yale Street, along with an additional building on 19th Street. I am proud to be a founding member of the Lifeline Sunday School class, which boasts 148 members! All Saints Catholic Church built their first building in 1909 on the northeast corner of 10th and Harvard, a beautiful brick structure, and a new one in 1918. Then came the Grace Methodist Church on 13th and Heights Boulevard, and the Heights Church of Christ at 16th and Harvard, founded by Mr. Woodard who lived in the 1600 block of Heights Boulevard, followed by many more. At 1846 Harvard is the Houston Heights Woman’s Club founded in the 1900. The property was given to Mrs. D.D. Cooley as a birthday present from her husband, and she donated it to the club of which she was a charter member in 1911. The clubhouse was built in 1912. The club meets the first Wednesday of the month, October through May. There were many small clubs for women in the Heights at the time, including the Needlepoint Club, Literary Club, Mandolin Club and others which eventually combined to form the departmental club known as the Houston Heights Woman’s Club.

Longtime Heights resident Libby Lee holds a photo of her late husband, Clayton Lee Jr., last week at her home in the Heights. (Photo by Michael Sudhalter)

Libby Lee reflects on the Heights by Michael Sudhalter michael@theleadernews.com As she approaches her 95th birthday, longtime Heights resident Libby Lee, the widow of the late Heights civic leader Clayton Lee Jr., reflected on the changes in the area. “The Heights is an old, wonderful place to live -- good neighbors, good schools and all that,” said Lee, who turns 95 on Aug. 8. Lee, who attended Hamilton Middle School and graduated from Reagan High in 1936, moved to Houston from Palestine, Texas when she was 8 years old. Her family joined the Baptist Temple Church, and she’s been a member for nearly 87 years. Her husband was a member from his birthday in 1921 to his death at age 80 in 2002. She’s sad that the church property has been sold, although the chapel will be retained. Lee has a friendly relationship with many of her neighbors, but the former Reagan Redcoat drum major reflected on a time when ev-

eryone knew each other. “It was like a big family at one time,” she said. “I always hoped it would stay like it was.” Lee said she’d like to see more restaurants in the Heights area. She’s proud of the many accomplishments of her husband, who passed away of a heart attack 11 years ago. One of them was his work on the John H. Reagan World War II Monument on Heights Boulevard. Mr. Lee was a World War II Navy veteran. “He used to say, ‘it took longer to get the city of Houston officials to approve a World War II monument on Heights Boulevard/11th Street than the war lasted,” she said. Clayton Lee Jr., who owned and operated Clayton Lee Plumbing, was known as “Mr. Heights” for his civic leadership through the Houston Heights Association and the Rotary Club of the Heights. “He was a Rotarian from head to toe,” Libby said. Libby said her late husband would be proud of the neighborhood, but he was too polite to publicly say anything bad about it.

Early accomplishments include starting the first library in the Heights and funding many of its projects over the years and starting the first PTA at Cooley School on 17th Street as well as donating the use of the clubhouse to the American Red Cross during both World War I and World War II. The City Hall, fire station and jail was located on 12th Street between Heights Boulevard and Yale. Now owned by the city of Houston, the building which was used as a fire station was vacated because the doors were too small for the modern fire equipment to go through. (See inset photo No. 3) The Houston Heights Association leases the building from the city for use as a community meeting place and museum. Just across Yale Street was the two-story frame Heights High School, which burned on March 13, 1924. (See inset photo No. 4) The site is now Milroy Park. A new building was built at 20th Street and Heights Boulevard, which is now Hamilton Middle School. When the new Reagan High School was built, the students marched in parade from the old location. The neighborhood swimming hole from 1896-1942 was called the Natatorium and was located at the south end of Harvard at White Oak Bayou. There is an office building at that location named “Coombs Park” after the owners of the Natatorium. On the northeast corner of 11th and Harvard is the second home of the Reagan Masonic Lodge. As in many cases during the Depression, they were unable to handle the mounting debts and lost the building. It became a condominium. After the loss of the building, they met at a telephone company building on the northwest corner of 8th Street and Harvard. A new lodge was eventually built at the corner of 16th Street and Heights Boulevard. Across Harvard Street was a lovely old stucco home called the “Alamo” house that was on the annual Heights Home Tour. My sister, Anna Doris (Patton) was riding her bicycle and pulling me on the skates as we were going to the Natatorium one day, and she stopped and ran up onto the porch of the house and told the lady that she was going to faint. The lady took her in, and I was calling to her to hurry that we would be late to go swimming. I remember having our garbage picked up in the alley by mule-drawn wagons. Phenix Dairy had a building on 10th Street and Railroad (Nicholson). It still has the numbers overhead where the horse-drawn wagons would park. Eggs were 5 cents a dozen, and once I had a malt with a dozen raw eggs. Mildred Dupuis of the Yale Pharmacy was one of the first women pharmacists in the state of Texas. Her father owned the Gramlin Dairy, north of town. You can still get the best hamburger and malts at the soda fountain at Yale Pharmacy. The first Heights Theater had a hand crank projector that was later electrified. On Saturday, you wouldn’t want to miss the cliffhanger continued serial and the great cowboy movies for 5 to 15 cents. Next door was the Heights Confectionary with ice cream and candy. Across the street was the famous Mrs. Bender’s Hamburgers for a nickel. For a dime, you could get a hamburger as big as a dinner plate! When Robert L. Cole was going away to military school, Mrs. Bender told him to come in and eat all the hamburgers he wanted. He ate 12! At that location is now the famous Harolds in the Heights. (See inset photo No. 5 of Main Street) Next to Mrs. Bender’s was the Sweetheart Ice Cream shop that belonged to Mr. Ples Kennerly who lived on West 18th Street. There was also a man who had a large stone wheel that he pushed down the sidewalk. He would blow a loud whistle that ranged from low to high to let you know he could sharpen scissors and knives. There was a medicine show that would come through. They would sell salve that was good for whatever ails you. It would even grow hair! I’m just sorry I didn’t get a stock of it! I can remember a circus that came and set up on the southeast corner of 18th Street and Heights Boulevard. I fell in love with GiGi, the “Wonder Girl.” We did have fun way back then! We had a great Boy Scout Troop #24 whose leader was Bateman Hardcastle. My next-door neighbor, Frank Harrowing, gave me a WWI Army bugle that I still have. I learned to blow it and was able to be in our Scout drum and bugle corps. I blew the bugle morning and evening to raise and lower the flag at Hamilton Middle School at 20th and Heights Boulevard. Our troop also had a large sailboat called the Jolly Roger. In 1930 we had a Field Day and I recently gave a movie of it to the San Jacinto Council. Mr. Fritchie delivered the Chronicle in a two-wheeled horse-drawn cart. He would blow a whistle and yell, “Chronicle boy!” He must have been 75 years old at the time. I still have a photo of me on a pony that was taken by a photographer that would go from houseto-house taking pictures of the children. We used to have lots of fun at the Heights Cliffs, located behind what is now the SPJST Lodge at the west end of West 15th Street. One of my fondest memories is the night after a picnic in Hermann Park celebrating the vote that made the Heights “dry” from alcohol in November 1937. Mr. Donovan got in touch with me to get a band together. We were on the back of a flatbed truck, and the people would hear the music and come to hear Mr. Donovan talk as to why they should vote the Heights “dr.” Some of my friends in the band and I were able to get the leftover lemon juice from the picnic and trade it to Abe Hoyt for root bear. We drank all of the root beer and went skinny dipping in the Bayou at the Cliffs. We started squirting on each other, and then some of us shimmied down the cliffs, and that is when it all started. The guys on top started throwing dirt clods down on us. Believe me, it is hard to throw clods up the cliffs and hit anybody. There we were, at the bottom of the cliffs like a bunch of jaybirds, so we went downstream a ways and got back on top, crawling in the grass that was about two feet tall. I saw a 1931 Chevy coming toward us, and it looked just like mine. I stood up in the grass waving my arm, yelling, “Over here!” The only trouble was that it wasn’t my ’31 Chevy. I still don’t know whom it was. The Heights sure is a good place to live and raise children because it is “high and dry.” Clayton Lee passed away in 2002. He operated the plumbing company inherited from his father that still is in the family. His widow, Libby, believes he wrote this history sometime in the late 1960s.

Timbergrove Manor resident Melvalene Cohen stands at the Melvalene & Carl Cohen Plaza on Heights Boulevard. The Cohens were business and civic leaders in the Heights. (Photo by Michael Sudhalter)

Cohens were on the cutting edge for customers by Michael Sudhalter michael@theleadernews.com Carl and Melvalene Cohen epitomized the type of entrepreneurship that has come to define the Heights in recent years. The Cohens started the Studewood Food Market with three employees in 1950 and increased that number to 125 by the time they sold it 20 years later. “It’s a thriving area – everybody wants to live in the Heights,” said Melvalene, who celebrated her 90th birthday last weekend with 51 family members and friends. She pointed to the growth on White Oak as proof of that growth. “I can remember when there were maybe two stores there,” she said. Carl Cohen passed away at age 78 in 1999 after a seven-year battle with Leukemia. Before the era of supermarkets, the Cohens were on the cutting edge of meeting the customer’s needs. “We were innovative before our time,” said Melvalene, who still lives in the Timbergrove Manor home that the couple purchased in 1955. They had 12 checkout machines, which was a lot for the time, as well as the first self-service meat counter in Houston. The store had a pharmacy, a check cashing counter, five utility companies where customers could pay their bills, a post office and a snack bar. The Cohens also sold a lot of school supplies and were the first store to sell hula hoops in Houston. These things seem common now, but they weren’t a half-century ago. Carl was president of city-wide and statewide grocers associations, and he was the driving force behind putting photos on driver’s licenses in Texas, which saved merchants a lot of money, said Melvalene. Beyond their contributions to the economic engine of the community, the Cohens were dedicated civic leaders. “Someone asked me, ‘why are you and Carl working so hard in the Heights? Is he running for office?” Melvalene said. “He wasn’t. I said, ‘we’re just doing it for the community and to make the Heights a better place to live.” Carl served as the president of the Houston Heights Assocation, and Melvalene was active in it, too. She’s been a member of the Houston Heights Woman’s Club for the past 40 years. Their sons, Danny and Kevin, attended public schools and graduated from Waltrip High. Kevin lives with Melvalene and helps her out, while Danny lives with his wife, Allison, and two children, Casey and Kylie, in Westport, Conn. For their efforts, Carl and Melvalene were honored with the Melvalene & Carl Cohen Plaza on Heights Boulevard, something Melvalene described as a big honor. The Cohens’ story began in 1943 when two people from the “Greatest Generation” met at the Walgreen’s Drug Store at 1023 Main in Houston. Melvalene and one of her friends were waiting to see “For Whom The Bells Toll”, when Carl, on a weekend pass from the U.S. Army, came into the store, began a conversation and ended up seeing the movie with them. The movie, starring Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman, was a love story, but it couldn’t compare to the real life love story that was the Cohen’s 53-year-marriage.

Melvalene Cohen, a longtime business and civic leader in the Heights, was honored at her 90th birthday last Saturday. (Submitted Photo)


Page 8A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • @heightsleader

History of the Houston Heights by Clayton Lee Jr.

The old timers were known to say that in the Houston Heights, the top of the trees tickled the toes of the angels… To really talk about the Heights, we should talk about Mr. Oscar Martin Carter, the father of the Houston Heights. Mr. Carter was born Sept. 2, 1842 in Salem Mass. and was orphaned by the age of six. He moved from family to family and was treated so poorly that he ran away and joined up with some people heading West. In one small town he worked as a tinsmith. He was a genius and an adventurer. At one time he was a teamster on wagon trains and even panned for gold successfully in Colorado while there. It made him a millionaire, so he returned to Omaha, Neb., where he eventually owned six banks. He had holdings in real estate and became well known in business circles in New York and Washington, D.C. He even met the president of the United States. In 1887, he heard about Houston, Texas, and after looking it over, formed the Omaha and South Texas land Company and bought 1,765 acres of land from the Allen brothers, who were in need of funds. The Allen brothers had paid $4 an acre and sold to Mr. Carter for $45 an acre. The land, located in the northwest area, was to become the “Houston Heights,” so named because it was 23 feet higher in elevation than the rest of the city. Soon, people would escape from the epidemics of the city to the healthier “Houston Heights.” Mr. Carter returned to Omaha to engage some of his friends in his adventure. Mr. Daniel Denton Cooley (treasurer of the Land Company) built the first home in the Heights on the northeast corner of Heights Boulevard and 18th Street. Mr. Cooley was the grandfather of the renowned heart surgeon, Dr. Denton Cooley. The home was demolished in the 1960s and the property acquired by the Houston Heights Association. The property is the home of Marmion Park, so named for the last mayor of the Houston Heights (1914-1918), Mr. J.B. Marmion Sr. and Kaiser Pavillion, named for Dr. and Mrs. C.H. Kaiser, who donated the “seed” money for the project. Note: There were four mayors of the Heights: Judge Love, John Milroy, David Barker (home on the northwest corner of 16th Street at Harvard, National Register), and Mr. Isbell (639 Heights Blvd. Home had a large open room upstairs that was used for meetings.) Mr. John Milroy built his home on the northeast corner of Heights Boulevard at 11th Street. The home, still standing, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Both Mr. Milroy and Mr. Cooley built homes and sold lots. It is said that even through the Great Depression, not a home was repossessed by either man. When a man could start paying again, he simply picked up where he had left off. The Heights was a planned community with roads, utilities, transportation and industries. The Heights was laid out with a beautiful wide boulevard that ran North and South. Originally there were wooden bridges over White Oak Bayou. The street was later paved with bricks. The streets running North and South were named for universities, and the streets running East and West were numbered. Mr. Carter knew there would have to be transportation so he bought horse-drawn trolleys (later electrified trolleys) that went north on the Boulevard to 19th Street, west to Nicholson (Railroad Street), along the railroad track. After several near fights with the train men who would leave boxcars on the tracks, the trolley moved its tracks one block south to Ashland. From 17th Street, the trolley would go south on the Boulevard to Washington and east to the city of Houston. There was also the shuttle for people to go to No. 1 – Kaplan Ben-Hur the industrial area and homes around it. Around 26th Street was the South Texas Cotton Seed Mill, the Pickle Factory, the Mattress Factory, which later became the Oriental Textile Mill, the Furniture Factory, the Lumber Yard and Mill Shop, and the Clock Tower on West 22nd Street and Lawrence, one block east of Shepherd. No. 2 – Baptist Temple Restoration of the clock tower was a project I worked on, and the work was done by Mr. Bade Jensen of the Heights. My wife and sister would take a broomstick and some twine and walk four blocks to the Heights Ice Plant to get 25 pounds of ice for 10 cents. I have a coupon book and a card you could hang in your window to show the ice man how much ice to deliver. No. 3 – Houston Fire Department The Omaha and South Texas Land Company and its developers spent over a half-million dollars before the first lot was ever sold on May 5, 1891. There was a large two-story hotel on the northeast corner of 19th and Ashland, for business people to stay in while visiting the Heights. It later became a sanitarium and burned in 1915. There was a two-story brick building that housed a drug store below and No. 4 – Heights High School Photo Dr. Miller Robinson and Dr. Sinclair had offices upstairs. On the other corner was located Harolds in the Heights. I can remember an old two-story brick building where Mr. Charlie Kaplan had a bicycle repair shop. On 7th and the Boulevard, now Donovan Park, was Mr. Scott Wimberly’s grocery store. The park was named for Mr. James G. Donovan, the city attorney for Houston Heights from its beginning No. 5 – Main Street until it was incorporated by the city of Houston in 1918. Mr. Donovan was on the school board for many years. He is better known as the father of Marcella D. Perry, whom we all call “Mrs. Heights.” Mrs. Perry is well known as the founder of Heights Savings and for her “Econocasts” reports on radio and TV for many years. There was only one brick Victorian home built on the Boulevard at 10 1/2 Street. It became a lovely bed-and-breakfast called the Webber House, owned by the Jacksons. Three more bed-andbreakfasts on the Boulevard – the Durham House and Angel Arbor, owned by Marguerite and Dean Swanson, and Sara’s, owned by Donna & Tillman Arledge and their daughter, Sara. At the corner of 17th Street and Rutland was the Dexter Store, owned by Fred Dexter Sr. who was once the choirmaster at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Houston. There was a room upstairs used for various meetings. The building was later used by Fred Dexter Jr. in his business, Dexter Diaper Service. Fred Jr. invented the “no-fold” diaper still used by many diaper services. The Dexter family home was on the southwest corner of Yale at 17th Street and was called “Rose Lawn” for the beautiful rose garden. Further down at 124 W. 17 St. was the home of Edmond V. and Maude Whitty who started the first theater group in the Heights. The home then was owned by Dennis and Laura Virgadamo. In 1912, Dave and Bessie Kaplan opened Kaplan Ben-Hur department store at Yale and 22nd Street. It was referred to as the “Neiman Marcus of the Heights.” (See inset photo No. 1) In 1911, my father, Clayton Lee, started Clayton Lee Plumbing Company (still in operation in the Heights and Conroe). We have always had a great number of churches in the Heights. The Heights Presbyterian Church was the first one built, on the southeast corner of 18th Street and Rutland. In 1908, Baptist Temple was formed while meeting above Simon Lewis’ grocery store, and in 1912 built its first building on the southeast corner of 20th Street and Rutland. (See inset photo No. 2) It grew to cover the entire block to Yale Street, along with an additional building on 19th Street. I am proud to be a founding member of the Lifeline Sunday School class, which boasts 148 members! All Saints Catholic Church built their first building in 1909 on the northeast corner of 10th and Harvard, a beautiful brick structure, and a new one in 1918. Then came the Grace Methodist Church on 13th and Heights Boulevard, and the Heights Church of Christ at 16th and Harvard, founded by Mr. Woodard who lived in the 1600 block of Heights Boulevard, followed by many more. At 1846 Harvard is the Houston Heights Woman’s Club founded in the 1900. The property was given to Mrs. D.D. Cooley as a birthday present from her husband, and she donated it to the club of which she was a charter member in 1911. The clubhouse was built in 1912. The club meets the first Wednesday of the month, October through May. There were many small clubs for women in the Heights at the time, including the Needlepoint Club, Literary Club, Mandolin Club and others which eventually combined to form the departmental club known as the Houston Heights Woman’s Club.

Longtime Heights resident Libby Lee holds a photo of her late husband, Clayton Lee Jr., last week at her home in the Heights. (Photo by Michael Sudhalter)

Libby Lee reflects on the Heights by Michael Sudhalter michael@theleadernews.com As she approaches her 95th birthday, longtime Heights resident Libby Lee, the widow of the late Heights civic leader Clayton Lee Jr., reflected on the changes in the area. “The Heights is an old, wonderful place to live -- good neighbors, good schools and all that,” said Lee, who turns 95 on Aug. 8. Lee, who attended Hamilton Middle School and graduated from Reagan High in 1936, moved to Houston from Palestine, Texas when she was 8 years old. Her family joined the Baptist Temple Church, and she’s been a member for nearly 87 years. Her husband was a member from his birthday in 1921 to his death at age 80 in 2002. She’s sad that the church property has been sold, although the chapel will be retained. Lee has a friendly relationship with many of her neighbors, but the former Reagan Redcoat drum major reflected on a time when ev-

eryone knew each other. “It was like a big family at one time,” she said. “I always hoped it would stay like it was.” Lee said she’d like to see more restaurants in the Heights area. She’s proud of the many accomplishments of her husband, who passed away of a heart attack 11 years ago. One of them was his work on the John H. Reagan World War II Monument on Heights Boulevard. Mr. Lee was a World War II Navy veteran. “He used to say, ‘it took longer to get the city of Houston officials to approve a World War II monument on Heights Boulevard/11th Street than the war lasted,” she said. Clayton Lee Jr., who owned and operated Clayton Lee Plumbing, was known as “Mr. Heights” for his civic leadership through the Houston Heights Association and the Rotary Club of the Heights. “He was a Rotarian from head to toe,” Libby said. Libby said her late husband would be proud of the neighborhood, but he was too polite to publicly say anything bad about it.

Early accomplishments include starting the first library in the Heights and funding many of its projects over the years and starting the first PTA at Cooley School on 17th Street as well as donating the use of the clubhouse to the American Red Cross during both World War I and World War II. The City Hall, fire station and jail was located on 12th Street between Heights Boulevard and Yale. Now owned by the city of Houston, the building which was used as a fire station was vacated because the doors were too small for the modern fire equipment to go through. (See inset photo No. 3) The Houston Heights Association leases the building from the city for use as a community meeting place and museum. Just across Yale Street was the two-story frame Heights High School, which burned on March 13, 1924. (See inset photo No. 4) The site is now Milroy Park. A new building was built at 20th Street and Heights Boulevard, which is now Hamilton Middle School. When the new Reagan High School was built, the students marched in parade from the old location. The neighborhood swimming hole from 1896-1942 was called the Natatorium and was located at the south end of Harvard at White Oak Bayou. There is an office building at that location named “Coombs Park” after the owners of the Natatorium. On the northeast corner of 11th and Harvard is the second home of the Reagan Masonic Lodge. As in many cases during the Depression, they were unable to handle the mounting debts and lost the building. It became a condominium. After the loss of the building, they met at a telephone company building on the northwest corner of 8th Street and Harvard. A new lodge was eventually built at the corner of 16th Street and Heights Boulevard. Across Harvard Street was a lovely old stucco home called the “Alamo” house that was on the annual Heights Home Tour. My sister, Anna Doris (Patton) was riding her bicycle and pulling me on the skates as we were going to the Natatorium one day, and she stopped and ran up onto the porch of the house and told the lady that she was going to faint. The lady took her in, and I was calling to her to hurry that we would be late to go swimming. I remember having our garbage picked up in the alley by mule-drawn wagons. Phenix Dairy had a building on 10th Street and Railroad (Nicholson). It still has the numbers overhead where the horse-drawn wagons would park. Eggs were 5 cents a dozen, and once I had a malt with a dozen raw eggs. Mildred Dupuis of the Yale Pharmacy was one of the first women pharmacists in the state of Texas. Her father owned the Gramlin Dairy, north of town. You can still get the best hamburger and malts at the soda fountain at Yale Pharmacy. The first Heights Theater had a hand crank projector that was later electrified. On Saturday, you wouldn’t want to miss the cliffhanger continued serial and the great cowboy movies for 5 to 15 cents. Next door was the Heights Confectionary with ice cream and candy. Across the street was the famous Mrs. Bender’s Hamburgers for a nickel. For a dime, you could get a hamburger as big as a dinner plate! When Robert L. Cole was going away to military school, Mrs. Bender told him to come in and eat all the hamburgers he wanted. He ate 12! At that location is now the famous Harolds in the Heights. (See inset photo No. 5 of Main Street) Next to Mrs. Bender’s was the Sweetheart Ice Cream shop that belonged to Mr. Ples Kennerly who lived on West 18th Street. There was also a man who had a large stone wheel that he pushed down the sidewalk. He would blow a loud whistle that ranged from low to high to let you know he could sharpen scissors and knives. There was a medicine show that would come through. They would sell salve that was good for whatever ails you. It would even grow hair! I’m just sorry I didn’t get a stock of it! I can remember a circus that came and set up on the southeast corner of 18th Street and Heights Boulevard. I fell in love with GiGi, the “Wonder Girl.” We did have fun way back then! We had a great Boy Scout Troop #24 whose leader was Bateman Hardcastle. My next-door neighbor, Frank Harrowing, gave me a WWI Army bugle that I still have. I learned to blow it and was able to be in our Scout drum and bugle corps. I blew the bugle morning and evening to raise and lower the flag at Hamilton Middle School at 20th and Heights Boulevard. Our troop also had a large sailboat called the Jolly Roger. In 1930 we had a Field Day and I recently gave a movie of it to the San Jacinto Council. Mr. Fritchie delivered the Chronicle in a two-wheeled horse-drawn cart. He would blow a whistle and yell, “Chronicle boy!” He must have been 75 years old at the time. I still have a photo of me on a pony that was taken by a photographer that would go from houseto-house taking pictures of the children. We used to have lots of fun at the Heights Cliffs, located behind what is now the SPJST Lodge at the west end of West 15th Street. One of my fondest memories is the night after a picnic in Hermann Park celebrating the vote that made the Heights “dry” from alcohol in November 1937. Mr. Donovan got in touch with me to get a band together. We were on the back of a flatbed truck, and the people would hear the music and come to hear Mr. Donovan talk as to why they should vote the Heights “dr.” Some of my friends in the band and I were able to get the leftover lemon juice from the picnic and trade it to Abe Hoyt for root bear. We drank all of the root beer and went skinny dipping in the Bayou at the Cliffs. We started squirting on each other, and then some of us shimmied down the cliffs, and that is when it all started. The guys on top started throwing dirt clods down on us. Believe me, it is hard to throw clods up the cliffs and hit anybody. There we were, at the bottom of the cliffs like a bunch of jaybirds, so we went downstream a ways and got back on top, crawling in the grass that was about two feet tall. I saw a 1931 Chevy coming toward us, and it looked just like mine. I stood up in the grass waving my arm, yelling, “Over here!” The only trouble was that it wasn’t my ’31 Chevy. I still don’t know whom it was. The Heights sure is a good place to live and raise children because it is “high and dry.” Clayton Lee passed away in 2002. He operated the plumbing company inherited from his father that still is in the family. His widow, Libby, believes he wrote this history sometime in the late 1960s.

Timbergrove Manor resident Melvalene Cohen stands at the Melvalene & Carl Cohen Plaza on Heights Boulevard. The Cohens were business and civic leaders in the Heights. (Photo by Michael Sudhalter)

Cohens were on the cutting edge for customers by Michael Sudhalter michael@theleadernews.com Carl and Melvalene Cohen epitomized the type of entrepreneurship that has come to define the Heights in recent years. The Cohens started the Studewood Food Market with three employees in 1950 and increased that number to 125 by the time they sold it 20 years later. “It’s a thriving area – everybody wants to live in the Heights,” said Melvalene, who celebrated her 90th birthday last weekend with 51 family members and friends. She pointed to the growth on White Oak as proof of that growth. “I can remember when there were maybe two stores there,” she said. Carl Cohen passed away at age 78 in 1999 after a seven-year battle with Leukemia. Before the era of supermarkets, the Cohens were on the cutting edge of meeting the customer’s needs. “We were innovative before our time,” said Melvalene, who still lives in the Timbergrove Manor home that the couple purchased in 1955. They had 12 checkout machines, which was a lot for the time, as well as the first self-service meat counter in Houston. The store had a pharmacy, a check cashing counter, five utility companies where customers could pay their bills, a post office and a snack bar. The Cohens also sold a lot of school supplies and were the first store to sell hula hoops in Houston. These things seem common now, but they weren’t a half-century ago. Carl was president of city-wide and statewide grocers associations, and he was the driving force behind putting photos on driver’s licenses in Texas, which saved merchants a lot of money, said Melvalene. Beyond their contributions to the economic engine of the community, the Cohens were dedicated civic leaders. “Someone asked me, ‘why are you and Carl working so hard in the Heights? Is he running for office?” Melvalene said. “He wasn’t. I said, ‘we’re just doing it for the community and to make the Heights a better place to live.” Carl served as the president of the Houston Heights Assocation, and Melvalene was active in it, too. She’s been a member of the Houston Heights Woman’s Club for the past 40 years. Their sons, Danny and Kevin, attended public schools and graduated from Waltrip High. Kevin lives with Melvalene and helps her out, while Danny lives with his wife, Allison, and two children, Casey and Kylie, in Westport, Conn. For their efforts, Carl and Melvalene were honored with the Melvalene & Carl Cohen Plaza on Heights Boulevard, something Melvalene described as a big honor. The Cohens’ story began in 1943 when two people from the “Greatest Generation” met at the Walgreen’s Drug Store at 1023 Main in Houston. Melvalene and one of her friends were waiting to see “For Whom The Bells Toll”, when Carl, on a weekend pass from the U.S. Army, came into the store, began a conversation and ended up seeing the movie with them. The movie, starring Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman, was a love story, but it couldn’t compare to the real life love story that was the Cohen’s 53-year-marriage.

Melvalene Cohen, a longtime business and civic leader in the Heights, was honored at her 90th birthday last Saturday. (Submitted Photo)


Page 9A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • www.theleadernews.com

Curing Pain For Over 30 Years F

or the past three decades, residents suffering pain from an injury of chronic condition have found long-lasting relief by visiting Dr. George Junkin and the bilingual staff at Northwest Chiropractic Center, located at 11510 Northwest Freeway. At the heart of his practice, there is a simple philosophy: treat the problem itself, not just the symptoms. Dr. Junkin said the best results are achieved with a combination of chiropractic adjustments while living a healthy lifestyle. Dr. Junkin earned his doctorate at the Texas Chiropractic College and has been in practice since 1979. He is board-certified in spinal trauma and industrial consulting, and has a diplomate degree in nutrition to help with patients’ weight loss and nutritional issues. Dr. Junkin was named by Texas H magazine as one of Houston’s top chiropractors between 2004-2009. To help patients achieve total wellness, Northwest Chiropractic Center offers free spinal care and nutrition classes. Regular office hours are 9 a.m. to noon, and 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., Monday-Thursday and 9am-Noon, Friday. The center is open 9 a.m. to noon Thursday. Call 713-686-0828 or visit www.drjunkin.com for information, or spinal care and nutrition class dates and times. Dr. Junkin 1979

Descendants of Olivewood Cemetery vice president/treasurer Charles Cook speaks to some Aldine Eisenhower students about the history of Olivewood. (Photo by Michael Sudhalter)

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by Michael Sudhalter michael@theleadernews.com Preserving the history of Olivewood Cemetery has become a community effort. “We’re the voices of Olivewood,” said Descendants of Olivewood vice president/treasurer Charles Cook. “We want to tell the Olivewood story.” Olivewood, which became the first incorporated African-American cemetery in Houston, is located on White Oak Bayou, just north of I-10. The cemetery was established in 1875 and is the final resting place for many prominent members of the African-American community in the 19th and early 20th century. The number of people buried at the cemetery is unknown, since it was a slave burial ground prior to the Civil War. There haven’t been any burials there since the 1960s, and due to inclement weather, vandalism and lack of upkeep, Olivewood was in bad shape by the 1990s. Cook, 57, who had volunteered at another cemetery, went on a tour of Olivewood. He began volunteering there and only later found out that he had relatives buried there. He’s the volunteer with the longest tenure, having logged 3,000 volunteer hours in 20 years. Cook enthusiastically educates new volunteers about the cemetery, such as a group of Aldine Eisenhower High students who came to clean up last Saturday. They clear out dead trees and beautify the grounds. “We have respect for people that are buried here,” Eisenhower junior Olga Vargas said. “Being able to help out (is good).” Volunteers clean up the cemetery on the first and third Saturdays of the month, and among the volun-

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The Heights Lodge 225 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows donated a riding lawnmower to the Descendants of Olivewood Cemetery. (Photo by Michael Sudhalter) teer who come on the third Saturday of every month are members of the Heights Lodge 225 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. The fraternal organization donated a 20-horsepower riding lawnmower to the Descendants of Olivewood last Saturday. There are seven members of the Descendants of Olivewood board, 15 on its advisory board and several volunteers. Margott Williams, a 50-year-old North Houston resident, is the group’s co-president/co-director. She has several relatives buried at Olivewood. Williams said the organization has an email list of 360 people that they contact regarding volunteer opportunities. They rely on donations of time and money to maintain the cemetery. They also keep the history of the cemetery alive through a database, descendantsofolivewood.org, which has a history of some of the people buried there. “I love history and the fascinating stories,” Descendants of Olivewood history coordinator Lisa Mouton, a 34-year-old high school history teacher said.

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here is always a feeling of family and familiarity when you eat at Triple A Restaurant, which has been a local favorite since it opened as Trucker’s Café in 1942. TOwner Cecil Schmidt is the 3rd generation of Schmidt’s to run Triple A. Cecil was raised in the Heights area and married Janet Hartman of the Heights Hartmans (her grandmother was a buyer for Kaplan BenHur). This is truly a family affair! Cecil’s Great Uncle, George “Papa” Schmidt, and wife. Lillian, opened 71 years ago. Lillian’s recipes for Southern home cooking are still served by the superb cooks today who have tweaked the favorites for modern lifestyles. Like cooking with canola oil and soy oil. Cecil’s Dad and Mom, Sonny & Lucille Schmidt, ran Triple A for 35 years. Cecil & Janet are passing down the Schmidt work ethic to their 3 children, Matthew, Christine and Michael ( who all work with Mom and Dad). Many of the past and present staff has worked side by side with the Schmidt family for decades. Cecil said that the cooks are very picky about the food that they dish just like Aunt Lillian expected.

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Page 10A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • @heightsleader

HISD offers pre K-12 IB in Heights Heights families now have the option of their youngsters attending a pre-K through 12th-grade International Baccalaureate program, with Hogg Middle School and Reagan High School receiving word last week that they’ve earned official authorization. Harvard Elementary School already offers an IB program, earning its authorization in March 2012. One-quarter of all HISD IB programs will now be offered in the Heights, with a total of 12 programs districtwide. “Building this continuum has been in the works for many years and has involved the support and dedication from Reagan and Hogg staff, parents, district leaders, and the Heights community,” said Reagan High School Principal Connie Berger. The 45-year-old IB program offers a rigorous education instilling intellectual, personal, emotional and social skills that enable students to compete in a world that increasingly requires ability to function at a global level. The IB authorization process, typically lasting about three years, requires two extensive applications, an onsite visit and specialized teacher training. “Implementing the program required changing the culture of our entire school community

SUMMER TEETH Chase Baker, D.D.S.

The marquee at Hogg Middle School proudly proclaims the campus’ new status as an International Baccalaureate School. (Photo by Charlotte Aguilar)

A

s summer is finally into full swing, I have become reminded that this is the time of year for dental related accidents. Pools, skateboards, bike rides, baseballs, a bounce house at a birthday party ... all of these fun summertime activities are only a hop, skip, trip and fall away from some trauma to your child’s teeth (or yours if you’re one to join in the fun!) Here are a few tips if you are unfortunate enough to experience any trauma this summer: If a tooth has been knocked out, in some cases, the tooth can be successfully re-implanted. The tooth should be cleaned and placed in milk or saliva and not allowed to dry out. A dentist should be seen immediately to assess the trauma and re-implant the tooth if possible. Primary (baby) teeth are not usually re-implanted. If a tooth is chipped or broken, the area should be rinsed clean, and ice should be placed to address any possible swelling. A towel can be placed with pressure to help stop any bleeding. A dentist should evaluate the tooth to determine what the proper restorative treatment should be. One of the best treatments for a cut lip is a Popsicle. Once the area is cleaned and bleeding has been controlled, an ice pack (or Popsicle) will help prevent swelling. Larger lacerations may require some stitches to help them to close and heal. Be sure to always follow up with your dentist to be certain proper treatment is provided to achieve the best of outcomes.

Prepared as a public service to promote better dental health. From the office of: Chase Baker, D.D.S., 3515 Ella Blvd., 713-682-4406.

to ensure that all instruction on campus is student centered with a focus on international-mindedness,” said Hogg Middle School Principal Mina Schnitta. “Our teachers and support staff have worked extremely hard to achieve this honor, which will ultimately benefit our students, parents, and the entire Heights community.” Durham Elementary School in Shepherd Park Plaza is one of

eight elementary schools currently in the candidate phase, seeking authorization to become an IB program. Other HISD IB schools are Northline, River Oaks, Roberts and Twain elementary; Lanier, Fondren and Grady middle schools and Lamar and Bellaire high schools. For more information, go to www.ibo.org.

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Oak Forest resident continues controversial ‘quiet zone’ push by Michael Sudhalter michael@theleadernews.com I hear the train a’ comin, it’s rolling ‘round the bend...and it just woke up my infant. That’s the sentiment of a group of area residents looking to quell the noise produced by train horns along 34th Street. Oak Forest resident Chris Lombardo is reviving the effort to implement a Quiet Zone on 34th Street, but there’s plenty of opposition against it and getting it funded will be a challenge. “We put out a call for personal stories on our Facebook page (which has about 215 followers) of how people are affected by the train noise,” Lombardo said. “The vast majority of them are younger families with young kids. The problem isn’t necessarily with the adults but that it is keeping the kids up. It’s having an impact on their lifestyle.” The Quiet Zone is a classic example of an issue that divides new vs. old residents in Oak Forest and surrounding areas. A Quiet Zone modifies railroad crossings so trains can pass through without sounding their horns. It puts the gates down be-

fore the train arrives. Signs and safety devices are also installed at each crossing. A Quiet Zone, which has been achieved successfully in other parts of the Houston area such as Washington Ave., Bellaire and West University, doesn’t guarantee that the horn will never be blown. But that would only happen if a person, animal or vehicle is on the tracks. Many longtime residents say the train horn is “soothing and comforting” and part of living in the area. Lombardo raised the issue at an Oak Forest HOA meeting earlier this month, requesting support for the cause. He’s worked with Garden Oak Civic Club president Mark Klein and hopes to work with other neighborhood leaders, since he said the issue affects the entire 34th Street corridor. Lombardo’s lived in Oak Forest for a year but said the same train noise affected his family when he lived in the Heights for six years. He’s contacted Burlington North Santa Fe Railroad and received a cost estimate of approximately $1.8 million for the Quiet Zone. He hopes that residents and businesses get involved to provide

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Page 11A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • www.theleadernews.com

NEWS FROM YOUR PEWS Christ the King holding fundraising dinner

Christ the King Catholic Church, 4419 N. Main St., is sponsoring a fundraising dinner from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. July 27. They will also have raffles and Bingo. Call 713-869-1449 for information.

Garage sale at St. Ambrose

The Guadalupana Association at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, 4213 Mangum Road, will be hosting a garage sale 8 a.m.-4 p.m. July 27 and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. July 28. The church will be accepting donations Friday 5-8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Call 713-686-3497 or visit the website at www.stambrosehouston.org for information.

Top left, Hannah Mott, a student at Wellesley College near Boston, works on paper cranes as part of the ‘Ride for the Future’ project. (Photo by Michael Sudhalter)

From left, Daphne Chang, Omar Navarro, Ernest Botello, Erik Rundquist, Kaela Bamberger and Hannah Mott are part of the ‘Ride for the Future’ project, which emphasizes environmental awareness in action throughout the Gulf Coast region. They’re staying at Bethel United Church of Christ during their time in Houston. (Photo by Michael Sudhalter)

Barbecue fund-raising event at Zion Lutheran

Zion Lutheran Men in Mission will have their annual Seminary Scholarship fund-raising barbecue dinner from noon-2 p.m. July 28, at Zion Lutheran Church, 3606 Beauchamp, in the great room. The men’s group has awarded seminary students with scholarships for many years. A free will offering will be accepted as a donation for the meal. The community is welcome. Call 713-869-6844 for information.

Above, Kaela Bamberger, a student at Ithaca College in Ithaca, N.Y., holds responses from residents that the group has met during their bicycle trip from New Orleans to Houston as part of the ‘Ride for the Future’ project. (Photo by Michael Sudhalter)

Free pancake breakfast at St. Matthew’s

St. Matthew’s United Methodist Church, 4300 N. Shepherd Dr., will host the monthly free pancake breakfast from 8:30-10 a.m. Aug. 3, in the fellowship hall. The community is welcome to come enjoy pancakes, eggs, sausage, fruit and breakfast drinks.

Visitors with children are encouraged to attend the Children’s Church and Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m., followed by 10:30 a.m. Sunday school. For information visit www.stmatthewsmethodist. org or call 713-697-0671.

MANNA helping apply for social services

MANNA has partnered with the Health and Human Services Commission to assist individuals in applying for social service programs using the online application. This project will help increase awareness and utilization of online applications reducing the need to go to offices and streamlining the eligibility process. MANNA will provide assistance to individuals every Wednesday, starting Aug. 7, from 9 a.m.-noon at St. James Church located at 1602 W. 43rd St. Assistance will be provided for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Medicaid, Long-term Care Services, and Children’s Health Insurance Programs. For information, visit the website at www.mannahouston.org.

Noah’s Ark to be christened at Heights Christian

Heights Christian Church, 1730 Heights Blvd., will have a christening ceremony for Noah’s Ark in the playground at noon Aug. 18. Children can enjoy the festivities with water balloons. The community is welcome. For information call 713-861-0016 or visit www. hcchouston.org.

‘Ride for the Future’ takes young environmentalists to Heights church Candlelight resident Miranda directs fundraising play ‘Grace and Glorie’ by Michael Sudhalter michael@theleadernews.com

‘The future should belong to clean energy such as solar and wind’ is the message that a group of six twenty-something environmentally conscious bicyclists have been delivering throughout the Gulf Coast. Daphne Chang, Omar Navarro, Ernest Botello, Erik Rundquist, Kaela Bamberger and Hannah Mott are participating in the Ride for the Future, a part of the Massachusetts-based non-profit, Better Future Project. The riders have visited many Gulf Coast towns in Louisiana and Texas to discuss the negative environmental and health effects caused by the oil and gas industry. They also discuss how extreme weather events/climate change are caused by the pollution caused by fossil fuels. They’ve stayed at local churches along the way and are currently

lodging at Bethel United Church of Christ, 1107 Shepherd Drive. Tara Escudero of the Better Future Project, coordinated the group’s travel plans at the different churches. They buy their own food along the way, with a $6 per person per day food allowance, per person. “These young people are trying to change the culture,” said Bethel UCC vice president Dennis Woodward. “It is certainly something we should all be working towards.” Throughout the trip, the riders have interacted with residents and presented their view of a clean environment. They said most of the people have been receptive to listening and even those who didn’t agree with them were polite. They kept track of their verbal interactions in art form and also created 1,000 paper cranes, a tradition started to honor Sadako Sasaki, an 11-year-old Hiroshima survivor who died of leukemia. A Japanese legend says that folding

1,000 papers grants one wish. The group participated in an environmentally conscious festival in Manchester/Harrisburg, southeast Houston neighborhoods that are completely surrounded by industry. Five of the six riders attend colleges in the northeast states. Navarro is a Houston native and St. Thomas High graduate who recently graduated from St. Edward’s University in Austin. “I wanted to learn more about energy impact on Louisiana and Texas,” Navarro said. “There a lot of negative health impact for the communities near the refineries. Statistically, they’re more likely to develop cancer, leukemia and other respiratory illness.” Navarro said that current environmental laws aren’t always enforced. He said the trip has been a positive, eye-opening experience, and he’d like to work for a nongovernment organization, “giving marginalized people a voice.”

Candlelight Plaza resident Stephen Miranda, who attends college in Oklahoma is directing the play, Grace and Glorie, that will be performed at St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church, 2003 W. 43rd St. at 7:30 p.m. July 28 as a fundraiser for Oklahoma tornado relief. Admission is free, but a voluntary donation will be collected at the performance. St. Stephen’s and Urban Access Properties are sponsoring the play, with money going to the United Methodist Committee on Relief to towns devastated by recent tornadoes. All donations are tax-deductible. Pamela Vogel (Glorie) and Sue Marsh (Grace) are featured in this heartwarming play about facing life’s hardest moments and finding the inner-peace to endure. Grace Stiles, a fiery 90 year-old cancer

patient, has checked herself out of the hospital and returned to her one-room, homestead cottage in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia to die alone. Against her wishes, a local hospice volunteer, Gloria Whitmore, arrives to care for her as she transitions from this world to the next. Gloria, “Glorie,” is a Harvard MBA recently transplanted to this rural backcountry from Upper East-Side Manhattan. She is tense, unhappy and guiltridden, her only child having been killed in an auto accident while she was driving. As she attempts to help and comfort the ever-so cantankerous Grace, she gains new perspectives on values and how to ride life’s highs and lows. Both women, having to confront death, are forced to set aside their societal differences and lean on each other in this hard time. Through tears, laughter, and lots of arguing, a

powerful friendship blossoms. The production crew includes Miranda as director, designer Gabriel Borja, and poster artist Allen Robbins. Seating is limited so early arrival is advised. Grace and Glorie is appropriate for audiences of all ages.

FREE

CLASS

(LICENSED ZUMBA® INSTRUCTORS)

(Certified Zumba® Instructors)

Candlelight CommunityCenter Center Candlelight Community **FREE FREEINTRODUCTORY INTRODUCTORY CLASS* CLASS* July 31, 2013 (6:45pm-7:45pm)

July 10, 2013 (7:00pm - 8:00pm)

Call 713-634-9315

CALL 713-634-9315

Dear Heart of Jesus, in the past I have asked for favors. This time I ask you this very special one. (Mention favor). Take it Dear Jesus, and place it within your own heart where your Father sees it. Then in your merciful eyes it will become your favor not mine. Amen. Say this prayer for 3 days, promise publication and favor will be granted. Never known to fail. J.B.

Church Guide

Sunday 10:30 am Worship and The Word Children’s Church Wednesday 7:30 pm Life Equip classes for all ages

4040 Watonga • 713-688-5227 Reverend John Cain, Pastor

Worship Services 8:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. (Nursery Provided) Sunday School & Bible Classes 9:15 a.m.

1624 W 34th • 713-686-7689

www.gethsemanelutheran.org

Oaks Presbyterian Church

Grace United Methodist Church “The Heart of the Heights”

1245 Heights Blvd.

Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship - 10:30 a.m. Nursery Provided

Sunday School . . . . . . . 9:30 AM Sunday Worship . . . . . 10:45 AM Nursery Provided Reverend Hill Johnson, Pastor

Food Pantry, Thurs. 2-4:30 PM www.graceintheheights.org

(Disciples of Christ)

1216 Bethlehem at Ella Blvd. (713) 688-7761

Preschool Program • Mon. - Fri. 9-2 p.m.

www.gospeltruthchurch.org

713 862-8883

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GETHSEMANE LUTHERAN CHURCH

Gospel Truth Church

Ministering to the Oak Forest Community since 1948 Reverend Noelie Day

(713) 682-2556 1576 Chantilly @ Piney Woods

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Member of MANNA

Sunday School 9:30 AM Morning Worship10:45 AM

First Baptist Church Heights

Pastor Don Joseph Member of MANNA Visit us on FaceBook www.oakscchouston.org

Sunday Worship 10:30am Wednesday 6:00pm Friday Youth 6:00pm Sunday School 9:30 am

Nursery Provided Spirit Led Worship 713-861-3102 201 E. 9th St. • Houston TX 77007

Candlelight Church of Christ Join us for Services in English or Spanish Sunday Worship 10am & 5pm Sunday Bible Classes 9am Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

MESSAGE OF THE WEEK

WORTHINESS

S

hame and fear are the twin enemies of feeling worthy. Most of us feel that there are certain things that we dare not share with others, dark secrets so shameful that were we to reveal them no one would accept us. But, all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God, and we should not doubt that God loves us even so. God’s making us was no mistake, and he certainly knew the many ways in which we would fall short. God’s only requirement for us is that we have the courage to confess our sins and own up to our shortcomings. Confessing those sins and shortcomings to our fellow man takes even more courage than confessing them to God, but the payoff is worth it. We will thereby discover which of our friends and family members will accept us just as we are. One of the earliest meanings of the word “courage” is “to speak one’s mind,” or literally “to tell one’s heart.” And indeed, courage is required to “tell one’s heart.” Remember, though, that being worthy is less about being blameless and more about opening our heart to others and trusting that they will accept us.

“Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed.” James 5:16

4215 Watonga Blvd. • 713-681-9365 Houston, TX 77092

Sunday SundayWorship WorshipServices Service

1822 W. 18th

at 8:30am & 11:00am 10:45 am

Sunday - Bible Study For All Ages .. 9:30am Morning Worship............ 10:45am Age Graded Zones ...........6:15pm Wed. Prayer Meeting & Missions Organization .....................6:15pm Dr. John W. Neesley - Senior Pastor

713-864-1470

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Bible Study 9:30 am 3206 N. Shepherd

713-864-4447 � Website www.gobc.org JimBob Daniel Interim Pastor Pastor Dr. Overton

A House of Hope and Prayer in the Heart of Houston Rev. Herschel Moore, Pastor

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Page 12A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • @heightsleader

Business: Past, Present and Future

Central Bank celebrates its long history in the community

Central Bank employees celebrate the opening of the Timbergrove location in May 1997. Pictured third from left is Ventina Lewis, who will be celebrating 39 years with Central Bank in October. (Submitted photo) On June 6, 1955, L.E. Cowling, the owner of a Houston insurance company, formed an organization committee for the formation of Montrose National Bank of Houston. The bank was officially chartered on May 31, 1956. In 1961, the bank changed its name to Central National Bank of Houston and relocated its headquarters to 2100 Travis. For many years the building known as Central National Bank Square was the center of Houston commerce. In 1974, a prominent Houston businessman, Jack Josey, became the bank’s majority shareholder, and his son-in-law, John Young, immediately took

an active role on the board of directors and has served as chairman since 1991. Young is a law school graduate but has spent most of his career operating his own oil and gas business. The bank changed from a national bank to a state chartered bank in 1979 and amended its name to Central Bank of Houston. In 1987, Central Bank of Houston purchased the larger Houston-based Liberty Bank, which was located at the corner of Montrose and Richmond. Central Bank became the bank’s new shortened name in 1989 when “of Houston” was officially dropped.

Since inception in 1956, Central Bank always had its headquarters near the geographic center of Houston, and in 2001 it built its new corporate headquarters and bank branch in west Houston. The bank includes four branch locations – including the Timbergrove branch at 1550 W. 18th St. ––and its wholly owned subsidiary, Advantage Business Capital. Since the beginning, the bank has always focused its efforts on being a strong, independent bank that serves individuals and small businesses.

A grand old venue in historic Galveston The Grand 1894 Opera House in Galveston has, for more than a century, welcomed a cast of performers and productions ranging from internationally renowned stars to local tots in tap shoes. Young and old, professional and amateur, on-stage and off, thousands have played both major and supporting roles in its colorful history. Surviving fire, flood, hurricanes, changing public taste and neglect throughout the years, this historic landmark theatre

has continued to play a vital role in the cultural fabric of Galveston Island. Following both the 1900 Storm and Hurricane Ike in 2008, The Grand was a pivotal piece in the recovery of Galveston and its business community; and served as a key venue for residents to gather, console and recover together. Today an integral feature of Galveston’s Downtown Cultural Arts District, the theatre presents a year-round schedule of live performing arts including stars of

stage and screen, music, dance, comedy and more; while remaining a historic treasure. Designated the “official Opera House of the State of Texas” by the 73rd legislature, The Grand continues to shine for thousands of visitors and residents alike each year. For more information on The Grand, or a complete performance schedule, visit www.thegrand.com or call 800-821-1894.

Eclectic Home and CODA - For discerning, affordable buyers

Eclectic Home, Houston’s source for affordable home furnishings and accessories, is located in Houston’s most unique shopping district at 345 W. 19th St. Owners Dale Johnson and Colby Weems have pulled together a look that can only be described as “eclectic”. Eclectic Home is open 7 days a week, Monday thru Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Eclectic Home has been in business for 11 years and has grown by leaps and bounds by having merchandise that goes with the trend of our customer’s needs. They have become one of the main destinations for affordable home furnishings and those special pieces to accessorize. Dale and his talented staff are there to assist in helping the customer select and solve their design needs. There is something that will fit whatever taste you have from eclectic to traditional to contemporary. Whether it is an individual home owner, professional decorator, or someone looking for a special gift, we are the place to shop. CODA was opened in 2009 for home décor and gifts and is managed by Frank Yunc who has made the shop a hit with shoppers. With the demographic changes in the Heights and surrounding communities, Dale and Colby saw the need for a store that could handle gifts and accessories from Newlyweds to empty nesters returning to city dwelling and all the in-betweens. The markets were showing an array of products that were a perfect fit for CODA and complimented Eclectic. CODA is at 355 W. 19th St. right

Unique home furnishings found at Eclectic Home . (Submitted photo)

next door to Eclectic. The designer talent, unusual decorator items and great customer service makes either of these stores a destination that

will end your shopper’s satisfaction quest. For more information on Eclectic Home, call 713-869-1414 and CODA, call 713-864-4411.

For Darlene’s, tradition and vision see success bloom

Adolf Hoepfl: historic garage and tradition of family service Since 1946, Adolf Hoepfl Garage has been in the peace of mind business, whether it is to take care of a simple oil change, brake repair, air-conditioning issue, or pesky check engine light. When you become a customer of this historic garage on North Shepherd, you and your vehicle become part of the Adolf Hoepfl family that has been taking care of families for generations. Nine years ago when Sybren and Kathryn van der Pol bought the business from the Hoepfl family, one of their first customers gave them this advice: “Take care of your customers and the business will take care of itself.” How true! We want to be your reliable friendly shop of integrity. We have been here for more than 60 years and have grown and modernized, but never lost sight of our commitment to excellent Hoepfl customer service. To show our appreciation for all our existing customers as well as introduce our auto repair shop to potential new families, we are hosting a “Have a Pepper on us Day!” We’ll be serving Kathryn’s favorite drink in honor of her birthday from 4-6

Susan Tate and Judy Bankhead of Darlene’s and D’Boutique(Submitted photo)

Kathryn and Sybren van der Pol, owners of Adolf Hoepfl. (Submitted photo) p.m. on Monday, July 29. Have a Pepper on us, and if you’re on time, enjoy some Dr. Pepper homemade ice cream and cake! This is a free event and a great chance to learn more about how we can help

you take care of your car needs, meet our awesome staff and customers. Be sure to spread the word to your co-workers, neighbors, and family and bring everyone for a good time.

Two new faces at Smart Financial Smart Financial Credit Union, a Houston-based, full-service financial services provider, recently announced the hiring of Greg Stirman as its new community development officer and Preston Price as assistant vice president of commercial services. In his new role, Stirman’s primary responsibility will be to represent Smart Financial in the other communities it serves and develop new growth opportunities, particularly in the areas of real estate and commercial lending. The credit union will also benefit from his experience and leadership on legislative and regulatory issues. Stirman has been president and CEO of Gas Producers Liquids, Inc. and started Enertex, LLC. He also held a director position with Sterling Bank prior to becoming one of the founding shareholders for Royal Oaks, a successful startup community bank. He currently serves as chairman for a committee overseeing the development of a 740-acre project along U.S. 59 adjacent to the University of Houston Sugar Land campus that is projected to add 25,000 residents and $1.5 billion in value to the city of Sugar Land. Stirman graduated Summa Cum Laude from Abilene Christian University, where he earned his BBA in Economics and Finance. He is married with three children and one grandchild.

Darlene’s Flower & Gift Shop began as a vision of H. T. “Pat” and Velma Patterson. The shop was opened in Woodland Heights in 1969 as an extension of their wedding catering business, Diane’s Catering Service. Working in the business since its inception, their daughters, Susan Tate and Judy Bankhead, took over the daily running of the shop in 1982 after the death of their Mother. At the time the girls had to decide whether to continue the business with a vision that they had of growth and expansion or to close this chapter and move on. Raised by parents that had firmly instilled in them the importance of working hard and the sense of obligation to valued customers that had built their business, there was only one answer. With their roots and hearts firmly planted in the Heights, Susan and Judy purchased the shop from their Dad for the astronomical price of $1 and made the scary decision to move just outside the 610 Loop to a location on Mangum Road. After a short stay in this location they expanded yet again and moved to the present location on Northwest Freeway.

Susan and Judy’s love of the floral industry has prompted the continued growth of the shop. After 44 years in business, the shop still has many of the original customers, their children and now even their grandchildren as continuing patrons. The owners both feel that it is an honor and a privilege to be given the job of expressing someone’s feeling through what they create. They also enjoy the challenge of keeping their store up-to-date and filled with the newest merchandise. Many changes in the floral industry, as well as the demographics in this area, have led to additions in the inventory at Darlene’s over the last few years. The sisters pride themselves on still being a full-service, family-owned-and-operated flower and gift shop that puts a new “twist” on the traditional fair. Along with things customary, such as beautiful flowers, plants and balloons, they also offer candles and potpourri, gift and gourmet baskets, art, home décor and many inspirational gifts. With the addition in 2010 of D Boutique …A Dazzling Division of Darlene’s, they also offer an eclectic array of clothing, jewelry, handbags and many other ac-

cessories as well as wonderful bath and body products. With the expansion and construction on 290, Judy and Susan have had many people inquire as to whether they would close or be moving. Make no mistake: Darlene’s Flower & Gift Shop has no plans to go anywhere. That’s not to say their vision excludes something new, but when all the dust from the road construction clears you will still find them firmly planted at 10570 Northwest Freeway which enables them to continue to conveniently serve all of their friends in the Heights as well as our their many friends in the Oak Forest, Garden Oaks, Shepherd Park Plaza and Memorial areas. Darlene’s is proud to claim the only shop in the area with an AIFD Designer on staff. Susan was inducted into the American Institute of Floral Design in 1978. She is past president of Allied Florist of Houston and a past board member for the Lone Star Unit of Teleflora, Inc. Darlene’s is a member of the Heights Chamber of Commerce and are proud supporters of both the Heights Association and Garden Oaks Home Tours.

Lutheran High North: a history of developing leaders

Stirman

Price

Price is responsible for overseeing our credit union’s growing member business lending department. He’s a seasoned professional with more than 12 years of commercial lending experience. Before joining Smart Financial, Price managed a $1.6 billion portfolio of commercial loans, including commercial real estate and construction loans along with secured and unsecured lines of credit. Smart Financial Credit Union, established in 1934, is a Houston-based, full-service financial services provider

with more than $540 million in assets. It serves a diverse field of more than 77,000 members, including Houston-area educators, medical professionals, employees of more than 300 private companies, and residents of Fort Bend, Harris and Montgomery Counties. The 79-year-old institution delivers financial service to its members through 16 office locations, including its branch at 2510 North Loop West, 713-850-1600.

It was in the late 1940s in Houston when visionary leaders purchased land at the end of an incomplete Gulf Freeway to build the first Lutheran High School in Houston. By the 1950s it was determined that another location would someday be needed as Houston grew. Land was purchased on the north side of town for when that day would arrive. On Dec. 2, 1979, Rev.Hobart Meyer conducted the groundbreaking ceremony for Lutheran High North. With a staff of 11 dedicated to Lutheran education on the secondary level, the school grew opened in 1980 and grew. Two of the original 11 remain. Many graduates have achieved high levels of success attending colleges like MIT, Columbia University, Texas A&M, The University of Texas, and the Air Force,

Naval and West Point Academies. Lutheran High North still offers what once was a great part of the ideals that made our country’s educational system great. Many of our students are involved in sports, musicals, bands and choirs. Three and four letter athletes who sing in choir are not hard to find at LHN. Opportunities to lead can be found in many areas and are encouraged. Our fully integrated 1-to-1 iPad program allows teachers and students to reach heights not possible in standard classrooms. Students at LHN learn the valuable skills of creativity, collaboration, and communication. They then apply those skills within our ever evolving digital world. Through digital classes, dual credit courses taught by university professors, and Advanced Placement

classes, our students are able to earn up to 18 college credits. These credits challenge our students while helping families get a head start on college. As a Christian school we must take seriously the values we are pouring into our students’ lives. Preparing for the future while cherishing its past, applauding the achievements of today and embracing our commitment to developing future Christian leaders of tomorrow’s world, Lutheran High North stands strong in its tradition of providing excellent academics and meaningful ministry to students. To learn more about Lutheran High North, please visit our website at www.lutheranhighnorth.org or call Melissa King, Director of Admissions at 832-778-4130.


Page 13A • The Leader • July 27, 2013 • @heightsleader

Real estate is family tradition for Janet Schmidt My parents opened a real estate office in 1972, Hartman Realty, which later became Century 21 in 1975. I chose to follow in their footsteps and joined their team in 1977, at the age of 19. I specialized in the Timbergrove Manor and Lazybrook areas, where I was the top producer for many years. I continued working for them until the year 2000. In 2001, I started working with Prudential Premier Properties for Stacey Matthews. I enjoy working there and am still currently employed

with them. In 2011, my husband, Cecil, joined up, and we currently work together. Now you get two-for-one in your real estate needs; my experience and his attention to detail make us a great team. If you are interested in selling or buying a home, give us a call. We look forward to serving you in all your real estate needs. Janet (Hartman) Schmidt & Cecil Schmidt Prudential Premier Properties 1803 W. 43rd St. • 713-419-7918

Neighborhood Service

Bill, Aileen, & Janet Hartman (1977)

Artists have a gallery in their corner at Avenue Houston’s vibrant art scene gained additional momentum with the grand opening of Avenue Gallery in Woodland Heights, catering both to artists and art collectors as well as fundraising causes. Featuring turnkey gallery promotion and marketing services for artists as well as events, workshops and classes for the community, Avenue Gallery is designed to give artists a boost for their business while giving collectors exciting channels for accessing art, including first-hand learning from the creators. Avenue Gallery founder Taylor Clendennen explains: “At Avenue Gallery, we’re here for the artists first and foremost. As an artist, I understand the business challenges of gaining exposure and working with galleries. We want to give artists more time and freedom to do what they do best: create art.” Avenue Gallery, 3219 Houston Ave., is open from Wednesday through Sunday and will stage at least two art shows a month, presenting multiple mediums to solo artist exhibits to fundraisers. Artwork exhibited in the gallery will serve as the artist’s storefront, and the gallery’s website [www.avegallery.com] will feature all

artwork online for purchase. Avenue Gallery also provides an informal brokering service to help match art collectors to their aesthetic preferences and find the perfect pieces, thanks to an extensive database. Avenue Gallery leases space to artists on a month-to-month basis. Artists receive 100% of their sales, and the gallery handles all expenses and promotions. “My ultimate goal is not only to sell their art but get the artists as much recognition and exposure as possible,” Clendennen says. A Houston native, Clendennen acknowledges that art runs extensively through her family tree. She discovered her own inclination for all things creative during early school years, later studying for a BFA in Studio Art Photography with a minor in Art History at Baylor. She then completed her education at the University of Houston Downtown where she studied the business side of art, gaining knowledge in the nuances of art gallery operations. “I became interested in opening a gallery when studying at Baylor,” Clendennen said. “Things began to come together recently, and I did extensive research on galleries to determine the features I’d like

for Avenue Gallery that would appeal to artists and collectors alike.” Clendennen is a practicing jewelry artist and photographer. Her jewelry line, Knots & Leather Designs, mostly consists of fiber based jewelry with natural gemstones and wire embellishment. It has been featured in a number of boutiques and arts markets. Clendennen’s jewelry line will be available at the gallery, along with periodic exhibits of her photography. Clendennen chose the Woodland Heights location for Avenue Gallery because of her affinity for the area, and its growing reputation as an arts epicenter. Woodland Heights is easily accessible from I-45, and is minutes away from downtown and Midtown. Avenue Gallery is open Wednesday – Saturday from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Sunday 12 – 5 p.m.; and Monday and Tuesday by appointment only at 832-649-8984. Local artists teach classes and workshops focused on photography, jewelry, painting and other art mediums. The gallery’s July class schedule is available on its website at www.avegallery.com and Facebook page at https://www.facebook. com/avegallery.

1995 doesn’t seem so long ago, but I know for a fact I had Black hair and weighed 40 pounds less. It seems like yesterday, moving into our first building Johnny Bang on Pickering Street. We had one service writer and two technicians and one junk yard dog. The equipment was hand–medown from another shop and the desk was picked up from a yard sale. We had no computer and 2 phone lines. We worked hard and had a vision in our mind. It was slow going for a while. Some days we didn’t make enough to pay for the lights. And we spent more time cooking fajitas than working on cars. As time went on we stared to get a little busier, added a few more employees and moved a couple of times. I like to think we have a found a home in Garden Oaks Oak Forest area. Today we have 9 employees working full

time; most of them are long time employees. We now have 7 bays and a large air conditioned waiting room for our customers. Our goal for the looking forward is to continue to improve daily. We want to be the preferred repair shop in our area, providing great customer service in a timely manner. We want to earn your business the old fashion way by meeting your expectations. If you want to check us out just come by and ask for Peter or John, they are our service writers and will answer any question you have. I want to thank our loyal customers for sticking with us over the years. Your patronage has helped us stay afloat and keep working through these tough economic times.

NLines current staff

3030 Ella Blvd. @ Loop 610 Monday - Friday 8 am-6 pm. • Saturday 8 am-5 pm

713-862-5544

Don Jose’s owner has nearly 4 decades of history at eatery Don Jose Mexican Restaurant offers an inexpansive menu that has something for everyone’s taste in Tex-Mex. Luis Hermosillo worked his way up from waiter nearly 40 years ago to own the restaurant. He and Carlos Garcia, his general manager and his nephew are grateful for their customers’ continued patronage. They invite new diners to drop by to try their great food and atmosphere. They are located at 5305 Antoine at Pinemont. The telephone is 713-6823853. In addition to fantastic appetizers, they offer fajitas, enchiladas, tamales and American dishes, including senior and kiddie choices. The restaurant boasts of a full wine and liquor bar, and the house favorite, the 13-ounce margarita. “We are so grateful for our customers’ loyalty and are looking forward to the future,” said Garcia.

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Carlos Garcia, left, and Luis Hermosillo, team up at Don Jose Mexican Restaurant as the general manager and owner, respectively. (Submitted photo)

Montessori Children’s Cottage celebrates 43rd Montessori Children’s Cottage is celebrating its 43rd anniversary of helping neighborhood families grow and educate their children. Lee Cohen, the current owner, explains the school was started by his mother, Marilla Cohen in 1970. Mrs. Cohen has a background in child psychology and spent many years with the Spring Branch Independent School District. When Lee was old enough to start school, his mother wanted to have a very active role in his education and decided to start the school, teaching the Montessori program, and to look for some additional students. She started with a total of five students, including Lee. When her husband, Hy Cohen, retired from the University of Houston, he started helping his wife with the school.

The Montessori Children’s Cottage was designed so that the classrooms appeal to the children and are customized to facilitate a child’s independence and development. The teachers help link the children to the learning materials and helps guide them toward constructive activities. Each child works at his or her own pace, which not only helps them intellectually but helps the personality of the child to become more self-directed and self-disciplined. Since growing up in the Children’s Cottage and it being such a big part of his life, Lee’s vision for the future is to keep the school growing and to eventually pass it on to his children. With five children of his own, it may not be difficult to keep the family tradition going. The Children’s Montessori Cottage

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is located at 4009 Sherwood Lane for children 2-6 years, 713-574-6226, and the Children’s Cottage Infant Center is located at 3910 Brookwoods Drive for children 6 weeks-2 years, 713-686-5427. Visit www. montessorichildrenscottage.com for more information.

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InQuicker™ is intended for use by individuals who have non-life and non-limb threatening medical conditions. Those with life- or limb-threatening medical conditions should dial 911 or go immediately to the nearest emergency room.


Leader0727a  

July 27 Section A

Leader0727a  

July 27 Section A