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COIN

COIN NEWS November 2011

Where

money

B A N K N O T E

talks

N E W S

NEWS

I N C O R P O R A T I N G

NOVEMBER 2011 £3.85

A NEW LOOK FOR THE SOVEREIGN • THE MINT IN VIENNA • PERTH BANKNOTES

New Sovereign design unveiled

IN THIS ISSUE

Vol. 48 No. 11

THE MINT IN VIENNA Founded by an English King What’s it worth?

PERTH Continuing our look at the provincial banks

This month we focus on crowns, double florins and Clydesdale Banks notes


At Coincraft we try and treat our collectors right, this is what one saidâ&#x20AC;¦ 'HDU&RLQFUDIW ,UHFHLYHGP\ODWHVWRUGHU,ZDVKRUULILHGWRVHHWKDW,KDGXQGHUSDLG\RXE\Â&#x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³IDVW EXFN´+DYLQJUHDFKHGP\VL[WLHWKELUWKGD\ODVW\HDU,FDQUHPHPEHUZKHQWKLQJVZHUHGLIIHUHQWWKDQWKH\ DUHQRZ7KDQN\RXIRU\RXUNLQGUHSO\ $KDSS\&RLQFUDIW&ROOHFWRU

Perhaps you should try dealing with Coincraft?


PUBLISHING FOR COLLECTORS SINCE 1983

Incorporating BANKNOTE NEWS

COIN

NEWS ISSN 0958-1391

November 2011 Volume 48 No. 11 Formerly Coin & Medal News incorporating Coins & Medals, Irish Numismatics, and Banknote News

70

Published monthly by Token Publishing Ltd.

The Eulenspiegel legacy

Available at your Newsagent, or by Annual Subscription Within UK £38.00 for 12 issues Europe and World surface mail £46.00 World airmail £56.00

Viewpoint 31 How high is high?

Papermoney 70 How Till Eulenspiegel took a

notebook 34 ACollector’s solution to a numismatic

Front cover: The reverse image of the newly-designed 2012 sovereign series.

Please note that Editorial, orders, subscriptions and general enquiries can ALL be contacted at the following address: Orchard House, Duchy Road, Heathpark, Honiton, Devon EX14 1YD Orders, subscriptions, etc.: Telephone: 01404 44166 Advertising enquiries: Telephone: 01404 44167 General enquiries: Telephone: 01404 46972 Fax: 01404 44788 E-mail: info@tokenpublishing.com Website: www.tokenpublishing.com Managing Editor John W. Mussell, FRGS Member, British Numismatic Society, Numismatic Literary Guild, American Numismatic Association, International Banknote Society, etc. Advertising Director Carol Hartman Marketing Director Philip Mussell, BA DipM MCIM MIDM

The rising price of precious metals and the collector

mystery Spotlight on an unusual Short Cross Penny

Advertising Manager Celia Dunsford Advertising Production Controller Klara Bodfish Book Publishing Coordinator Fiona Pyle Sales and Subscription Manager Alyson Thomas

Editor’s Comment...............................................2

Out and about 40 The mint in Vienna

Around the World ............................................ 20

Regal headgear for an emperor

Founded by an English king

Medallic miscellany 47 Bellingshausen—history recalled A great Antarctic rarity

Tokens 49 From Britain to Christchurch

Taking token issues to the Kiwis

62

Back to basics Going clubbing Joining a numismatic society

67

Banknote feature Scotland’s forgotten banks: Perth Continuing the examination of the provincial banks

Executive Assistant Janis Thatcher Production Assistant Abbey Becow Accounts Controller Jackie Taylor Editorial Consultant John Pearson Andrew Printed in England by Buxton Press for Smith-Marriott Ltd, Exeter Distributed to the Newstrade by Comag Specialist, Tavistock Works, Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex, UB7 7QX

REGULARS

Ancients 36 The crowns of Constantine

Deputy Editor Janet Webber, BA Hons Art Editor Lisa Camm-Keyte

Kiwi for an ass Dabbling in Notgeld notes

Coin News & Views .......................................... 10 View of the Bay ................................................. 18 New Issues Coin Update ............................... 22 Royal Mint Bulletin .......................................... 24 Market Scene .................................................... 26 Price Guide to CROWNS/Dbl FLORINS .... 55 Bookshelf ........................................................... 58 Coin of the Month .......................................... 60 Banknote News ................................................ 65 Price Guide to the CLYDESDALE BANKS ....... 74 New issues Banknote Update ..................... 77 Dealer Directory............................................... 85 Diary Dates ........................................................ 86 Semi-display Adverts ..................................... 90 The Web Page ................................................... 92 Classified Advertising .................................... 94

ADVERTISERS INDEX—SEE PAGE 95

COIN NEWS is © 2011 Token Publishing. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is expressly prohibited. The views expressed by advertiser and contributors in COIN NEWS are not necessarily the opinions of the publishers. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure accuracy, neither Token Publishing nor its contributors can accept liability for errors or omissions. Printed by the “Environmental Printer of the Year” For every magazine published, we plant a tree . . .

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Editor’s comment

The way forward?

E

VERY year the numismatic “season” in the UK starts at the end of September/beginning of October with a series of auctions in the big London Houses (and outside the Capital) and the British Numismatic Trade Society’s (BNTA) “Coinex” show held in central London. For the last few years Coinex has taken place in the Millennium Hotel, Grosvenor Square, Mayfair, a few hundred yards from its former home at the Marriott Hotel. In the intervening years a couple of different venues were tried: Earl’s Court in West London and the Excel Centre in East London, but neither was deemed suitable so back to Mayfair the event went. This was very much in keeping with the image the BNTA wanted for their flagship show—they weren’t looking to create just another coin fair, they wanted it to be the crème de la crème of British coin bourses with dealers and visitors from across the globe attending. They have certainly succeeded with the event as it now stands with a large number of US and European dealers and auction houses taking tables alongside their British counterparts. Some of the biggest names in worldwide numismatics now have a presence at Coinex and it certainly cannot be considered just another coin fair! Of course it isn’t just those who have a table that make a coin fair ordinary or not, but those who come through the door to buy from the dealers or indeed sell to them, and here Coinex is different too. Where most shows will either be free to get in or charge a modest few pounds entry, Coinex charges non-BNTA members a massive £50 to get in on the first day before 2.30pm (a “mere” £25 after that time)—the second day though is free for all. This is sending out a very strong message to collectors and dealers alike: you can come to our event, and come in for nothing, but if you want the pick of the best stock in the world then you have to pay for the privilege. When the pricing structure was first announced our ’phone lines, email in boxes and mail bags were full of indignant collectors horrified at the entry fee and you can understand why, £50 is a hefty chunk of cash to fork out for the privilege of parting with even more cash when you’re inside the room. They couldn’t understand why the “ordinary” collectors was seemingly being ignored in favour of the high rollers and a few stated that they wouldn’t be going at all—even on the Saturday—and indeed the Friday of the show was noticeably quieter than in previous years, at least for us launching our COIN YEARBOOK. That said, the dealers we spoke to all seemed to have had an excellent day and it appears that those who did pay their £50 did so because they had every intention of spending more. There may have been less people walking the floor but it was a case of quality over quantity with most of those who had tables agreeing that the BNTA had probably made the right decision. One of the dilemmas of coin shows has always been that it takes as long to chat to and serve someone buying a £10 coin as it does someone buying a £5,000 coin, but the rewards for the dealer are obviously vastly different. Most dealers would of course happily spend their time talking to as many people as possible who are spending £5,000 or more and, whilst none would turn away someone spending just £10, you can see why they might be keener to attract the former rather than the latter. Every dealer we know will just as happily sell his low end items as the high end ones, but ultimately they have to make a living so the more high end items they sell the better—that’s business for you and cannot be denied. So when they know they are faced with a room full of the people likely to go high-end who can blame them for being delighted? Unfortunately, not all collectors fall into the “high end” category and so, rightly or wrongly, they do feel excluded from Coinex, the free Saturday notwithstanding, and that has ruffled a few feathers in the hobby. A number of people we expected to see at the show simply weren’t there, having decided they didn’t agree with the BNTA’s pricing decision, and others have told us that they won’t attend again—they feel the event has become too exclusive and it isn’t, therefore, for them. It is a shame that collectors feel that way, although it is understandable. However, I ask this question: is it really so wrong to have an “exclusive” show once a year? Is it really a bad thing to have an event where the international dealers can spend a lot of money coming over to London in the knowledge that the people they meet, at least on the first day, will be serious buyers with serious money? There are, after all, dozens of inclusive coin shows up and down the country every year—not least the London Coin Fair in Bloomsbury—that are inclusive and open to everyone, so what harm is there in holding one that’s a little different? Coinex has always been a little different, has always wanted to be seen as the premier UK event and perhaps this pricing policy is the way forward. After all, the fact that the Saturday was free means that it isn’t being elitist, just selective on day one. Is such a selectivity the way forward for this event? The dealers we spoke to would perhaps say yes, but what, I wonder, do the collectors think? We would be delighted if you would tell us. JOHN W. MUSSELL Group Managing Editor

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News & views

New York gems WO extremely rare gold coins come under the hammer in Bonhams of New York’s Tnext auction on December 16. One of the coins offered is the finest and only secondknown example of a Chang Tso-Lin 50 yuan gold piece (L&M-1031). It has been consigned The rare Chang Tso-Lin 50 yuan gold coin.

for sale by the direct descendants of the famous Chinese leader who is portrayed on the coin. The coin is arguably the finest known and essentially a unique example of its kind. The coin features a facing portrait of Chang Tso-Lin dressed in his military uniform while the reverse has a phoenix and dragon pattern (est. $650,000-750,000). Paul Song, Director of the Rare Coins and Banknotes at Bonhams, stated “This coin is a truly historic coin, one of the highest rarity that I have ever handled. The coin’s provenance descends directly within the Chang Tso-Lin family, which adds to the exclusivity and allure of coin. Furthermore, it was probably meant as a personal presentation piece that the warlord Chang Tso-Lin kept for himself. We would not be surprised to see a new record set for the Chinese coin market at this Bonhams auction”. Of the second rarity, estimated at $200,000–250,000, Paul Song added “The second important gold rarity is an 1860 Clark, Gruber & Co. ‘Mountain Twenty’ $20 AU. Because of the rarity of this American territorial coin, I have only seen images of it in books. In the 20 years of my experience this is the first time I have handled one. Copper and gilt copper patterns of this rare issue are frequently offered in the marketplace, however, any regular-issue example is very rare, no matter the condition”. The illustrated auction catalogue for the sale will be available online in the weeks preceding the sale at www.bonhams. com/uscoins or for a printed copy write to Bonhams, 580 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10022, USA.

Second “next generation” farmyard coin

T

HE Central Bank and Financial Services Authority of Ireland issued the second coin in their ongoing “Farmyard” series on October 10. The series re-creates the iconic circulation coins depicting farmyard animals designed by artist Percy Metcalfe which appeared on Irish coinage from 1928 to the introduction of the euro in 2002. Metcalfe’s original designs are replicated and have been retooled for more vivid detail and have been joined by the young of the species depicted. The addition of the various animals’ offspring is the work of artist Emmett Mullins who has designed several collector coins for the Central Bank. The second coin in the new series features the salmon, the design which originally appeared on the two shillings, later the 10 pence, denomination. The salmon, like the first issue in this series (horse with colt), is now joined by its offspring, a smolt, symbolising the second generation in the monetary history of Ireland, as a member of the Euro-zone. The reverse design depicts Ireland’s national symbol, the harp, along with the text “EIRE” and the year of issue, 2011. The coin is denominated as 15 euro and will be struck in sterling silver to proof quality with a diameter of 38.6mm and a weight of 28 grams. With a mintage limit of just 15,000 pieces it is anticipated that there will be great demand for the coin, although the coin division of the Central Bank confirms that a very small quantity of the “horse and colt” issue, which was released in October 2010, is still available. The Irish wolfhound with pup is scheduled to be the last in the series to be issued in 2012. For more information on this and other coins issued by Ireland’s Central Bank, visit their website http://www.centralbank.ie. Michael Alexander

Rare stater OVEMBER 14 will see the sale of an exceedingly rare gold stater by N Elizabeth Cottam of Chris Rudd. The stater was found by a metal detectorist and formed part of the Westerham Treasure hoard of 1996–97. It was struck by a king of the Cantiaci tribe of Kent sometime around 50–30 BC and shows what appears to be a fishing net under a horse. Only three other specimens are known, including two in the British Museum. In 2008 one was sold for £3,100. Liz Cottam commented “I think ours will fetch twice that price”. Other great rarities in Chris Rudd’s November catalogue include gold coins of Boduoc, Comux, Agr and the first recorded Broad Flan gold stater struck in Britain. For more information contact Chris Rudd on 01263 735 007, email: liz@celticcoins. com or write to Chris Rudd, PO Box 222, Aylsham, Norfolk NR11 6TY, England.

re-united Friends ORMER B. A. Seaby Ltd employee,

F

Michael Dickinson and his wife Angela held a reunion at their home for fellow ex-Seaby colleagues on Sunday, September 11. Now a published author Michael willingly opened the doors to his home to bring together former employees of the company first founded in 1926 by Herbert (“Bert”) Seaby. When the firm finally closed in 1991, the various numismatic experts went their separate ways, however, most still meet in their professional capacity but the reunions are a welcome get together.

From left to right are Robert Sharman (now with Peter Morris), Michael Dickinson, Donna Jones (nee Hills), Stephen Mitchell (dealer), Sue van Delden (nee Hills), Gavin Manton, Paul Divo (left Seaby’s as long ago as 1962, later director of Spink Zurich), Lisa Norfolk (with Knightsbridge Coins), Jeremy Cheek (now with Morton & Eden), Stephanie Cochrane, John Rugg, Brian Reeds, June Cochrane, Caroline Purvey, Peter Clayton (author, antiquarian and Egyptologist), Laurence Brown, LVO (author) and Frank Purvey (author). For the event Sue, Donna and Frank came over from Spain, and Paul from France. David Sear, Fred Rist, Jenny and Robert Loosley, Jim Brown and Noel Warr all planned to attend but were unable to do so.

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November 2011


News & views SOCIETY NEWS “Wild” new coin EPTEMBER saw the issue by up Sthe Royal Dutch Mint of a 5 Teaming and 10 euro commemorative coin, HE Havering commissioned by the Ministry TN u m i s m have atic of Finance, with the theme “the Society

50th Anniversary of the World Wide Fund for Nature”. The international World Wide Fund for Nature was founded on September 11, 1961; the Dutch branch was founded one year later. In addition to the circulation coin, the Royal Dutch Mint will also be releasing silver and gold proof coins for collectors. The coins are available from premier new issue dealers or direct from the Mint at www.knm.nl.

RAM looks forward T

HE Royal Australian Mint (RAM) have released details of the entire range of collectors’ coins it proposes to strike in 2012. For RAM this was a most innovative step as, while some overseas mints have been doing this on a regular basis for a number of years, it was a first for Australia. The announcement took place in Melbourne on September 6 at a well attended event. Among items collectors can look forward to from September 2011 to August 2012 are: BU year set with hyper-metallic-printed 50c; Silver proof and cupro-nickel BU Diamond Jubilee of Her Majesty 50 cents; Six BU cupro-nickel 150th Anniversary of Melbourne Zoo pad printed dollars; Cupro-nickel Australia Remembers—Merchant Navy—20c; Albronze Inspirational Australians—Sir Douglas Mawson $1; Silver proof Southern Skies curved $5. The ground-breaking hyper-metallic-printed 50 cents coin and the concave domed Southern Skies $5 are sure to attract interest. And those Melbourne Zoo centenary dollars will bear images of foreign endangered animals, the first time non-Aussie critters have appeared in number on Australia’s coins. At the launch the CEO of the RAM, Ross MacDiarmid, observed, “To keep coin collecting interesting and exciting, we have worked hard to create innovative and unique products. … The curved coin is obviously something that won’t make its way into circulation anytime soon but it’s definitely a conversation starter”. Order forms covering the entire 2012 range are now available from the RAM website: www.ramint.gov.au. These allow collectors to select the items they want, pay the total cost immediately and then receive each coin as it is released. In the meantime the RAM are being inundated with orders for their latest coin for 2011: an incredibly iconic piece commemorating the first time that Remembrance Day has fallen on the 11th day of the 11th month of the 11th year! The entire reverse of this beautiful $5 coin is taken up with an image of the red poppy—the enduring symbol of remembrance Dr K. A. Rodgers RAM’s iconic Poppy coin remembering 11.11.11.

teamed up with Havering Museum to showcase coinage and its history. Two exhibitions have already taken place and the latest, entitled Curious Coins: Use and Misuse, is currently underway. It explores how coinage has been adapted for other uses through the ages to make items such as jewellery, souvenirs and love tokens. Located at the Havering Museum, 19–21 High Street, Romford, the exhibition runs until December 17. To find out more about the Museum and its opening times visit www.haveringmuseum. org.uk or telephone 01708 766 571. To find about more about the Society visit www.havering-ns.org.uk.

Talking coins

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IKING coinage in Ireland was the subject of the talk given by Andrew Woods of the Fitzwilliam Museum to the Essex Numismatic Society on September 23. His talk covered the period of the Viking occupation of the British Isles. The November meeting will be held at Chelmsford Museum at 7.30 on the 25th when Laura McClean, the local Small Finds Liaison Officer will be giving the talk. To find out more about the Society visit www.essexcoins.org.uk or call Bob Thomas on 01277 656627.

CHRISTOPHER EIMER P.O. Box 352, London NW11 7RF Tel: 020 8458 9933 art@christophereimer.co.uk www.christophereimer.co.uk %5,7,6+ &200(025$7,9(0('$/6 $1'7+(,59$/8(6

%\&KULVWRSKHU(LPHU 2nd Edition, 2010: Price: £75.00. 2200 entries / 2000+ images in colour. (UK postage, please add £8) November 2011

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News & views Heritage hits new heights

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HE Heritage Auctions SignatureÂŽ World and Ancient Coins Auction at the Long Beach Coin, Stamps & Collectibles Expo, September 8-9, set new records for the company when it realised more than $20.5 millionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a record total for a single auction since the categoryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inception at Heritage 11 years ago. The star performers of the sale were led by coins from the Norman Jacobs Collection, top of which was the $1.39+ million 1909 Korean Gold Coin set, and $546,250 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ides of Marchâ&#x20AC;? denarius. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This auction was just tremendous for all of us here at Heritage,â&#x20AC;? said Cristiano Bierrenbach, Executive VP of International Numismatics at Heritage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Putting together a $20+ million world and ancient coin auction is a privilege very few ďŹ rms have ever experienced, and I can assure you we had a lot of fun assembling it. Just when we thought the world coin market canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get any better, this auction came along and happily proved us wrong. Our prices realised were 40 per cent higher than our most optimistic projectionsâ&#x20AC;?. For more details on this sale and to view images visit HA.com. Top lot in the 1909 set of Korean gold coins was the Yung Hi gold 20 won Year 3 (1909) (KM1144, J&V AD3, MS64 NGC) which realised $690,000. The entire set achieved more than $1.39 million

Bunny bars

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EAR of the Rabbit silver bullion bars are the latest issue in the Chinese Lunar Calendar commemorations. Issued by PandaAmerica the new 1, 10 and 100 oz pure silver bars look set to sell out as the previous yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s silver bars marking the Year of the Tiger did in 2010. The new ProoďŹ&#x201A;ike BU bars feature a running rabbit, weight and ďŹ neness and make a change from the more traditional coin issues. The bars are available from PandaAmerica, 3460 Torrance Blvd., Suite No. 100, Torrance, California 90503-5812, USA or email info@pandaamerica.com. Information courtesy of coinsweekly.com

Postal success HE postal auction of British and Foreign tokens, tickets and passes held recently by Simmons Gallery was a T great success with interest in the series drawing collectors from all over the world. Perhaps surprisingly, given the current economic climate, the most popular section was the Irish with a large number of rare and unusual 19th century tokens on offer at prices from under ÂŁ5 to around ÂŁ100. However, the top price in the sale was paid for a scarce pewter Communion token of the 4th Association Church in New York dated 1799. Simmonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; next postal auction will take place in December and will be devoted to numismatic weights and scales, followed by an exciting postal sale of historical medals later in the new year. Entries for these two sales are being invitedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for further information contact Simmons, telephone 020 8989 8097 or via email at info@ simmonsgallery.co.uk.

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International Association of Professional Numismatists IAPN 12

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November 2011

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News & views

IN BRIEF CELTIC specialist Chris Rudd’s latest list, 119, not only offers coins for sale but also includes informative articles. To find out more visit www.celticcoins.com or telephone 01263 735007. SWISS sale room, Rapp Auctions, will be offering an exceptional range of gold and precious metal coins plus named collections in their next sale on November 21– 25. The catalogue is available on -line at www.rapp-auktionen.ch or telephone 0041 71 923 7744 to order a printed catalogue. THE American Numismatic Association (ANA) has terminated the contract of Larry Shepherd as Executive Director. Shepherd will join the US coin dealers Harlan J. Berk Ltd. SHIPWRECK experts, Odyssey Marine Exploration, has continued with its operation on the shipwreck they have called Black Swan. So far they have recovered more than 500,000 silver coins—believed to be the largest haul ever recovered from a shipwreck. PAPERS for the next biennial Symposium in Early Medieval Coinage are being

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invited. The Symposium will be held at the Fitzwilliam Museum on March 31. Email Tony Abramson for more details: t.abramson@ntlworld.com. AT the Stacks, Bowers and Ponterio sale at the August ANA auction, a GB 1880 Sovereign in NGC PROOF-64 Ultra Cameo, realised: $21,240 (13579.70). GREMLINS have been at work in the recently published COIN YEARBOOK 2012. The Advertisers’ Index lists COINOTE SERVICES on page 32 when in fact their advertisement appears on page 42—our apologies for the error. THE Royal Canadian Mint have announced pre-tax profits of $46.5 million following their annual report of 2010.Coins were the best performing sector of the business. THE US Mint has approved the latest designs in the next four coins in the Presidential coin programme. Due for release in 2013, the coins will feature William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft and Woodrow Wilson.

Jersey past in post

S

IX iron age coins grace the new stamps from Jersey Post. Three Armorican and three British—from a hoard found at Le Catillon, Jersey, in 1957. Created by Andrew Robinson, the six stamps are the second issue in Jersey Post’s archaeology series, originated by philatelic researcher Melanie Gouzinis with the help of Olga Finch, curator of archaeology for Jersey Heritage. Jersey has proved to be a veritable treasure island for Celtic coins. It has been estimated that over the past 225 years maybe as many as 20,000 late iron age coins have been discovered on the island. This is an amazing number of finds, none of which were located with the aid of a metal detector, for an island of only 45 square miles (80 per cent of the 50,000 iron age coins recorded by the Celtic Coin Index at Oxford have been found by metal detectorists). Chris Rudd

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News & views OBITUARY

I

T is with great sadness that we report on the death of Dr Mark Blackburn who peacefully passed away at his home on September 1, 2011. A highly respected and knowledgeable numismatist, he will be greatly missed by his family, colleagues, many friends and the numismatic world at large. Mark Blackburn grew up in Tunbridge Wells, Kent, and attended the Skinners’ School there before reading Jurisprudence at St Edmund Hall, Oxford, graduating in 1975. The following year he entered pupillage at Middle Temple, where he went on to practise as a barrister from 1976 until 1978. By this stage Mark had already become an authority on Anglo-Saxon and related coinages, publishing his first article while still an undergraduate in 1973. When the leading scholar of early medieval numismatics of the day, Professor Philip Grierson, sought a research assistant in 1982, he persuaded Mark to leave his promising career in the City and pursue numismatics full-time. This move began an association with the Fitzwilliam and Cambridge that was to last almost 30 years, 20 of them as Keeper of Coins and Medals a post Mark took up in 1991, making the Fitzwilliam coin room both a world leader in research and a most congenial environment for research and teaching. In addition to his duties within the Fitzwilliam, he devoted much time to associated projects and societies. He served as editor of both the British Numismatic Journal and the Numismatic Chronicle, and of course as President of the BNS from 2004 until 2008. He also acted as general editor and secretary for the British Academy’s Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles project from 1980, overseeing the publication of over 35 volumes. Mark will perhaps be best remembered for his research that focused on the British Isles and Scandinavia in the period from the 5th to the 12th centuries. He wrote or edited over 200 publications on the subject, becoming the leading authority in the field and a household name to historians, archaeologists and of course numismatists. Areas of particular interest to him included the influence of the Vikings on money in Britain and the analysis of coin-finds, especially those discovered by amateur metal-detectorists since the 1980s. It is no understatement to say that through his research he revolutionised views on the monetary economy of the early Middle Ages, and his impact on the field has been recognised with many major awards and medals— among them the British Numismatic Society’s Sanford Saltus Medal (2008), the Royal Numismatic Society Medal (2008), the British Academy’s Derek Allen Prize (2011) and a LittD from the University of Cambridge (2011). Mark was married to Fiona, and took great pride in his three children—Molly, Will and Hal— and their achievements. His death at the height of his career is a tragic and untimely loss for his family and all who had the pleasure to know or work with him, as well as to numismatic scholarship. My thanks go to Mark’s colleagues at the Fitzwilliam Museum’s Department of Coins and Medals for their help with this tribute to a great numismatist. John Andrew Mark Blackburn pictured last year (courtesy Elina Screen).

PAUL DAVIES – WE STILL NEED TO BUY – WORLD GOLD COINS MODERN BRITISH GOLD AND SILVER PROOF COINS WORLD GOLD AND SILVER PROOF SETS PLEASE CONTACT US IF YOU HAVE ANYTHING TO SELL

PAUL DAVIES

PO BOX 17, ILKLEY, WEST YORKSHIRE LS29 8TZ, ENGLAND PHONE: 01943 603116 OUR FAX NUMBER IS: 01943 816326

LIFE MEMBER

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Regular Exhibitor at U.K Coin Fairs www.tokenpublishing.com

November 2011


These are a few of the items appearing in

Auction No. 20 on Friday November 18th at the Cavendish Hotel, 81 Jermyn Street St. James’s, London SW1Y 6JF

For enquiries and catalogues please contact: St James’s Auctions (Knightsbridge Coins-Stephen Fenton) 43 Duke Street, St James’s, London SW1Y 6DD Tel: 020 7930 7597 / 7888 / 8215 Fax: 020 7930 8214 E-mail: info@stjauctions.com Website: www.stjauctions.com

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A VIEW OF THE BAY

Here we take a look at some of the numerous numismatic items offered over the auction website eBay. This is just a small selection which have caught our eye. Read on and see if you agree with our reviewer (comments in italics) . . . Unless stated otherwise the descriptions are as the eBay listing written by the seller. Charles II crown 1663 no reverse stops. Rated as Good F (usual wear on hair) with VF reverse but judge yourself from the pictures. Hint of obverse edge knock, delightful specimen.—£390. This coin had a pink tone to it but it was explained by the seller as being down to bad photography under artificial light and it was not pink. This was a nice coin and a good buy as Coin Yearbook 2011 (CYB) has it at £225 in Fine and £750 in Very Fine. The buyer is happy with the coin and they have left positive feedback for the seller. USA Ext. Rare 1793 large cent, nice grade, only 63,353 [minted].—£5,120. This coin was started at 99p the seller being confident that it would do well, if the under bidder had not bid with one second left it would have sold for £170 less. My 2009 edition of The Red Book values an example in G-4 at $2,150 (£1,350), in VG-8 at $2,800 (£1,750) and in F-12 at $4,500 (£2,800). This was not a high grade example as it was worn and corroded. An example graded by PCGS as VF40, which would be graded less than Fine in the UK, and is inferior to this one, is for sale on a dealer’s web site at $11,750 (£7,400). If this coin was to be sent to the USA and “slabbed” using the USA grading system it could end up as a “high grade” example and be sold at a profit. This is a stunning and beautiful and rare especially in this condition, size 47mm

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British bronze Commonwealth medal Dutch in design dated 1658 of Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell. This medal commemorates the death of Cromwell in 1658. The tree, village and flock of sheep is there to represent the tranquillity and prosperity of Britain after his death on September 3, 1658, the shepherd under the tree is said to represent Richard Cromwell, his son and successor.—£209. This large and interesting medal was not in the best of condition, it was around VF and it looked like a crusty tone had been removed from the fields on both sides with traces remaining in the legends. Perhaps without these flaws it is a very expensive medal and bidders took the chance to acquire an “economical” example. 1934-B British Trade Dollar UK China Britain PCGS MS65.—£4,965. Another seller with the confidence to have a low start on a valuable coin, 99 cents as the seller was in the USA, it attracted 32 bids from 18 bidders. It was a lovely coin with just some peripheral toning. This auction is for a William and Mary Guinea Year: 1689 variety Elephant and Castle mintmark. Material 22 carat gold. Weight 8.5g. Diameter: 25mm. Quality: High grade.—£1,455. Although this coin was described as “high grade” is was in less than Fine condition, the one penny start attracted 23 bids from 12 bidders. Two bids placed in the last six

seconds pushed the price up by £185. This was a great result for the seller as in Fine condition CYB values it at £550. The Union Bank of Scotland Ltd. £5 note. Dated 2nd April 1954, excellent condition possibly never been circulated? No marks or creases.—£310.01. As this is the last ever date for Union Bank £5 notes and with a print run of just 100,000 it is popular with collectors. It may look like a bargain as a dealer has one on offer in uncirculated condition for £900 but these notes do not exist in uncirculated condition. If uncirculated it is accepted as being, “as it came off the printing press”. Scottish notes of this vintage were folded prior to being issued to the public to allow them to fit into the teller’s drawers of the time, so notes of this size that have genuinely seen no circulation will have two vertical folds present. If they are not there then the note has been pressed, there is a very small chance that a very high grade note will have lost its folds after long term storage in an album but this is a bit of a long shot. Cyprus coin 1/4 Piastre 1882H XF Extremely Rare. Not cleaned/no hits/no scratches/low mintage of 36,000, rarely seen in such exquisite condition.—£200. The seller was in Cyprus and it was listed on eBay.com with starting price of 99 cents. It was more a USA XF than a UK EF but it attracted 12 bids from eight bidders.

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November 2011


These are a few of the items appearing in

Auction No. 20 on Friday November 18th at the Cavendish Hotel, 81 Jermyn Street St. James’s, London SW1Y 6JF

For enquiries and catalogues please contact: St James’s Auctions (Knightsbridge Coins-Stephen Fenton) 43 Duke Street, St James’s, London SW1Y 6DD Tel: 020 7930 7597 / 7888 / 8215 Fax: 020 7930 8214 E-mail: info@stjauctions.com Website: www.stjauctions.com

November 2011

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Around the world

Note & coins mark centenary of

Revolución Mexicana

Face and back of Banco de México 100 pesos issued in 2010 to commemorate the centenary of the Mexican Revolution. (Image courtesy Panda America.)

DR KERRY RODGERS catches-up on some Central American history . . .

T

HE Mexican Revolution, not to be confused with the Mexican War of Independence of 1810–21, commenced in 1910. Postindependence the country had been governed by a succession of autocrats including Archduke Ferdinand Maximilian and, importantly, Porfirio Díaz. Díaz had been one of the generals responsible for overthrowing the French-imposed, Maximillian Second Mexican Empire and restoring the Republic. He became President in 1876 and continued to rule to 1880 and then from 1884–1911 including five consecutive re-elections despite a strict “No Re-election” policy being the order of the day. His rule is remembered for the modernization of Mexico, particularly its industry, but this occurred at the expense of human rights and liberal reforms. Economic achievements and investments in arts and sciences were matched by economic inequality and repression. Wealth, power and access to education were concentrated among a handful of families of European descent who controlled the large estates. It all came to a head in 1910 when Diaz’s fifth re-election resulted from major electoral fraud. A full-blooded revolution erupted. Initially it was led by Francisco Madero but its roots lay in a broad mix of Mexican socialist, liberal, anarchist, populist, and agrarianism movements. Other senior figures included Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata. Madero gained the support of sufficient Indian peasants to form an army able to take on the federal troops. Gradually the revolutionaries gained the upper hand and in 1911Díaz abdicated. Madero called a new election that he won overwhelmingly. His moves to establish a liberal democracy received applause from US and the support of the other revolutionary leaders but his relatively weak leadership saw a disintegration of his government and outbreak of civil war. A coup d’état in 1913 resulted in both Madero and his vice president being assassinated.

A multi-sided civil war now swept the country. Despite it, or perhaps because of it, in 1917 a new socialist constitution was hammered out. It addressed foreign ownership of resources, an organized labour code, the role of the Catholic Church in education, and land reform. Nonetheless the civil unrest continued to plague the country through until the 1920s before a democratic Mexico was able to emerge into the modern world. Banco de México has marked this important centenary with the issue of a three piece set that includes a commemorative 100 pesos banknote and two proof 10 peso, 2oz silver coins. The front of the 100 peso note shows one of the locomotives used to transport the revolutionary troops. On the reverse side is a segment of the vast mural Del Porfirismo a la Revolución painted by David Siqueiros in 1957. One of the silver 10 pesos shows Mexican Revolutionaries taking over a locomotive at Cuernavaca, Morelos. The design comes from a photograph c. 1910-20. The second coin also uses a design also from a contemporary photo that shows women on a train. This same image appears in the underprint of the note’s face above the large “100”. Women were an integral part of the revolution. They not only cooked and cared for the wounded but many fought alongside their men. One of the more famous was Zapatista soldier, Margarita Neri, who rose to become a battle commander. Many of these women soldiers continued to wear men’s clothing and carry pistols long after the Revolution ended. If your favourite coin ’n note dealer cannot supply the centenary issues, try www.PandaAmerica.com.

Silver 10 pesos struck for the anniversary of the revolution and the photos of revolutionary women and a high-jacked train from which the designs for the coins were taken. (Images courtesy PandaAmerica.)

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Latest issues AUSTRALIA

Theme: World Heritage Seriesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Macquarie Island Mint: Perth Mint Metal: Aluminium bronze Denomination: $1 Diameter: 30.6mm Mintage: Unlimited Contact: Perth Mint, www.perthmint.com.au

CANADA

Theme: 2012â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Year of The Dragon Mint: Royal Canadian Mint Metal: Silver Denomination: $15 Diameter: 38mm Mintage: 48,888 Contact: Royal Canadian Mint, www.mint.ca

THE COOK ISLANDS

Theme: The Muonionalusta Meteorite Mint: B. H. Meyer Metal: Silver Denomination: $5 Diameter: 38.6mm Mintage: 2,500 Contact: C.I.T.V., www.coin-invest.li, or your favourite new issue dealer.

LATVIA

Theme: Rundale Palace Mint: Bank of Latvia Metal: Silver Denomination: 1 Lats Diameter: 38.6mm Mintage: 5,000 Contact: Bank of Latvia, www.bank.lv, or your favourite new issue dealer.

NEW ZEALAND

Theme: 2012 Celebration of Maori Art Mint: Royal Dutch Mint Metal: Silver, gold Denomination: $1, $10 Diameter: 38.6mm (both coins) Mintage: 3,000 ($1), 250 ($10) Contact: The New Zealand Post, www.nzcoins.co.nz, or your favourite new issue dealer.

TUVALU

Theme: Heroes and Villains Mint: Perth Mint Metal: Silver Denomination: $1 Diameter: 40.6mm Mintage: 1,500 sets Contact: Perth Mint, www.perthmint.com.au

To have your new coin issues featured on this page, please email the details to abbey@tokenpublishing.com

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News & views

Bulletin

The latest news from The Royal Mint

As well as The Royal Mint’s world-class production facilities, the Llantrisant plant in South Wales also houses The Royal Mint Museum. It represents one of the most impressive numismatic collections in the world, featuring outstanding rarities alongside the currency we use everyday—serving as a true reflection of the history of the coinage in the United Kingdom and of many other countries. COIN NEWS has teamed up with the Museum to bring you an item from the collection every month.

Trial pieces for Victoria Coronation medals A

MEDAL or a coin struck in high relief can be very attractive. It provides the artist with more freedom to explore the form of a portrait or can offer a more satisfying solution to a figurative composition. When working in high relief, however, certain technical problems arise, one of the most important being how much metal there is to play with across the obverse and reverse. As was evident on coins of George V, if a piece is too thin for the extent of the relief, metal can be drawn up and result in a hollowed out effect, or ghosting, on one side. The trial pieces illustrated here, for a commemorative medal by Benedetto Pistrucci to mark the coronation of Victoria, appear to be the result of an experiment into how thick the medal would have to be in order to avoid ghosting. Several blanks of metal were placed in the press and struck together to gauge the point at which a sufficient amount of metal would be available to make the medal. The pieces are a recent acquisition to the Royal Mint Museum collection because of the interesting technical questions they raise about the consequences of high-relief designs. The Royal Mint offers limited edition, gold, silver and base metal collector coins along with a range of precious art medals and exclusive diamond jewellery. Below are a few carefully selected items from the current range.

Celebrating all together

A

S only the second monarch in British history to celebrate a Diamond Jubilee, there is much to commemorate this milestone in our history. To mark the occasion, the Royal Mint has issued an historic coin collection that celebrates the Diamond Jubilee with coins that chart the events, ceremonies and landmarks from HM the Queen’s 60-year reign. The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Collection honours Her Majesty’s role as Head of the Commonwealth and brings together 24 silver Proof coins from around the Commonwealth including the Armed Forces Silver Proof £5 coin, featuring the British Armed Forces Tri-Service insignia as well as others that help trace the key technological and cultural changes that have occurred during her reign. This truly international collection features coins issued by the Royal Mint on behalf of 15 Commonwealth countries. Further details are available from the mint at the address below or by logging onto www.royalmint. com.

New design for an old favourite H

OT off the press is news that the 2012 gold sovereign has had a make-over. Keeping with the popular, traditional, theme of St George and the Dragon, the new coin bears a striking and original design with an almost art-deco feel to it. The obverse retains the Ian Rank-Broadley effigy of Her Majesty the Queen although a new reverse portrait of the Queen is in hand to mark her Diamond Jubilee next year. For more information on these, or any other Royal Mint products please, contact The Royal Mint, Freepost NAT23496, PO Box 500, Llantrisant, Pontyclun CF72 8YT, United Kingdom | Telephone: 0845 60 88 300 | www.royalmint.com

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Market scene JOHN ANDREW

Out of town action I

NTERESTINGLY, I think this is the first Market Report that does not include the results from a central London auction house. While there were some stunning prices, there was a feeling that some pieces could have done a little better, or should have sold when they did not. However, what the sales do demonstrate is the power of the worldwide web. Obscure overseas coins that years ago could well have just slipped through the net to have been bought cheaply by a single dealer, were now being previewed by an international audience and fiercely contested, selling not only for many times the auction houses’ conservative estimate, but also selling for a multiple of the value given in Krause’s Standard Catalog of World Coins.

London Coins Auction—General Sale—September 3 and 4, 2011

A pattern farthing in silver dated 1713 sold on estimate for £1,170.

£1,872 was paid for the pattern 1848 florin with the adopted head of Queen Victoria.

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Coin news

Prior to the event, the team of London Coins Auction (LCA) thought that this was a routine sale. However, with the buoyant market, when they analysed the results they realised the sale total was the company’s second highest to date. To say that some prices were astounding is no exaggeration. When a 2011 Maundy set in a red case of issue was offered, auctioneer Stephen Lockett thought that a dealer who purely traded in Maundy money was going to have a seizure. Five years ago Spink sold a 1981 Maundy set in its original case for £85, while sets relating to that year (2006) were being offered retail by the company at £120. Traditionally sets in the year that they were issued have always commanded a premium. The reason for this year’s anomaly is simple: the recipients treasured the money with which they were presented and the only people prepared to sell were those who received sets for officiating at the service. In 2006 1,942 Maundy sets comprising the four silver coins from the fourpence (groat) to the penny were struck. Of these 662, a staggering 34 per cent, were given to those who officiated. When I noted last year that no London dealers had been offered a single Maundy set, I contacted the Office of the Royal Almonry of the Privy Purse and Treasurer’s Office at Buckingham Palace. Its spokesman would not talk about current mintage figures for 2010. When I asked how many officials receive sets, the response was along the lines of there had been an audit and “things were much different than they once were”. However, the Royal Mint revealed that in around 1,600 sets had been struck for that year. At some point after 2006, there was a severe cutback in Maundy freebies to officials. In 2009 Baldwin was offered no sets issued that year and was only aware of two 2008 sets being offered in the market in 2008 and one in 2009. Newcomers to the world of Maundy money are totally confused that Victorian and Edwardian sets are relatively inexpensive. This is because there are plenty around as the public could buy them. Edward VII stopped the practice from 1909 to protect the value of Maundy to recipients.

Recently the Royal Household appears to have reduced the order for Maundy coins as an economy measure. As the number required for recipients is determined by a formula cast in stone, the only place to makes cuts is in the number given to those officiating. Last year I predicted, “The fact that sets are now more exclusive means that not only are they unlikely to appear on the market, but, when they eventually do, the price will be high.” So what happened when a 2011 set in its original red leather case appeared at this sale? The 2012 Coin Yearbook lists a 2010 Maundy set at £450 (which is retail), LCA estimated its 2011 set at a not unreasonable £225—around £263 with the Premium. At this event the 2011 set was fiercely fought over. The hammer fell at £800—which is a cool £936 with the Premium. The nation’s octogenarians and those who are even older will be clamouring to be Maundy recipients! Even a 2002 set that the Coin Yearbook lists at a mere £185 sold for £468. The auctioneer was pleased to see a couple of clients who had not been active in the market since 2005 at the viewing. Coincidentally, both were interested in the general bulk lots. While these were once the Cinderellas of the auction world, they have become popular of late and are possibly purchased by people who sell the coins individually on eBay. The two potential bidders were shocked at the prices realised and did not raise their hands once to bid. Both declared that they would bring “their entire holding” to be auctioned at the next sale. Top price was for three albums containing 95 George III to Victoria coins ranging from crowns to farthings in mixed grades. It sold for double expectation at £2,808. Top price for a lot was not surprisingly in the gold section when 35 sovereigns were offered in mixed grades to UNC. Interestingly it was described as a “35-coin set”, which would have been fine had there been some kind of order to it. However, it just appeared to be a motley collection thrown together without thought. Its contents ranged from an 1869 example with the die number 58 to a 2006 example. It sold for £9,477. www.tokenpublishing.com

November 2011


Market scene Interestingly, the two highest prices for lots estimated at £750–1,250. It sold for a healthy comprising just a single item were in the banknote £1,872. The market always reacts well to section. London Coins Auction has been building material that is fresh as opposed to that this side of their business over the last few years which “has done the rounds”. The highest price for a British coin and at this event over 1,000 lots of papermoney were offered. The highest price was paid for was paid for what, in my opinion, is a Kentfield £50 bearing the serial number E01 one of the most boring 20th century 000001, which is the first of this issue and in the coins: a 1934 crown. These were the words of the cataloger “excessively rare thus, and country’s first issue of crowns since offers an almost unique opportunity to acquire a 1902. The issue was intended for first issue note”. Graham Kentfield was the Bank collectors and as presentation pieces—a of England’s Chief Cashier from 1991 to 1998 and good idea, but not only is the reverse type the note is in uncirculated condition. However, unimaginative; it never altered for any of the what price for such a rarity? The cataloguer nine years it was minted. The mintage in any gave it a wide estimate of £5,000–15,000. It sold one year never exceeded 10,000 and of course the for the lower end of this range—a hammer price lowest year of striking was 1934 when only 932 of £5,200, which is £6,084 with the Premium. were struck. In EF state, it sold for £3,978. The highlight of the English section, a Possibly at some future date collectors will think that they missed an opportunity to acquire a Henry VIII third coinage sovereign struck at the Southwark mint offered with an estimate of great rarity at a reasonable price. A Nairne £1 “gold note” sold for a little less. £15,000–25,000 did not sell, however, a rather When World War I broke out in the summer of scruffy James I second coinage rose ryal which 1914, it became increasingly clear that Britain apart from two crease marks is in fine/nearly very acquired a smaller note than £5 (the then smallest fine state sold for £3,042. A Charles I Pontefract denomination) to replace the gold sovereign that 1648 shilling which is holed, but otherwise in a sharp and pleasing circulated freely in very fine condition, the country. Before it nevertheless sold for had been established £2,574. Had it not been who should issue holed, it would have such a denomination, sold for £6,000–8,000. the Bank of England Nevertheless the vendor started preparations should be delighted. for the note. This was The surprise for the somewhat premature sale was in the world for the government of section. A Chinese Huthe day decided that the Peh Province 1 tael of Treasury should issue 1904 was offered in GVF. the denomination, The Krause Standard together with its Catalog of World Coins fractions. The unissued 2011 lists this at US$900 proof form of the Bank of England’s 1914 £1 (say £600) in VF and is a sought after rarity US$1,750 (say £1,200) in the English series— in EF. London Coins only 15 examples have Auction estimated the piece conservatively come to light. Despite The Huh-Peh province 1 tael surprised everyone at £225–350, possibly the small number, by selling for an unexpected total of £5,616. hoping for £800–900 there are two versions: on a good day. Well, one with the prefix it was not a good A/1 prefix to the 00000 serial number and one without. It was the “one day; it was an absolutely fantastic day for this with” version that was offered here. In GEF state, coin. The coin generated considerable interest its estimate was £5,000–7,000 but at the sale it and there was a right battle royal to secure it. sold for £5,850, which again is not a particularly The hammer eventually fell at £4,800—making it high price. £5,616 with the Premium. The coin was not even Although a general sale, there was some illustrated in the catalogue—though it was interesting material, including some patterns on the web. Thanks to Stephen Lockett, that had pre-decimal price tickets indicating that we bring readers an image of the piece. they had not been on the market for at least 40 If you have one tucked away, it may years. One of these was a 1713 pattern farthing in be worth far more than you think. A silver, its reverse featuring the figure of Britannia person in the room who is believed to in a portico (Peck 747). Apart from a few minor have links to Hong Kong bought it. There were other surprises too in hairlines on the obverse the condition was given as UNC/nFDC with the cataloguer stating that the world section. An Indian Bengal it is “a most pleasing example that compares Presidency copper dump token coinage favourably with the example in the Cooke 1 anna of 1774 was offered. Krause refers collection”. With a wide estimate of £500–1,000, to the “Dump token coinage”, whereas it sold exactly on the upper figure, making it Pridmore describes them as “postal tickets”, £1,170 with the Premium. However, there was which in reality was their use. They were competition for a pattern 1848 florin bearing issued in April 1774 by the Patna Postmaster the adopted Gothic head of Queen Victoria. Its at the inception of the General Post Office in obverse bears ONE FLORIN within a wreath Bengal. They were sold in quantity to individuals with ONE TENTH OF A POUND below (ESC who made frequent use of the “Dawk”, as the 904). The piece, which is near FDC state, was postal system was then known. There were two November 2011

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Despite its rather imperfect appearance the rose ryal of James I realised £3,042.

The 1934 Crown took the top price in the English section at £3,978.

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Market scene denominations—the 2 annas and 1 anna. The tickets were used to ensure that servants dealing with post on behalf of their masters did not have to handle money! A single letter was charged 2 annas for each 100 miles, while letters by sea or from foreign settlements were charged 1 anna

on delivery. The auction house graded the piece as having some surface porosity, but otherwise being good fine. It was estimated at £120–150, which seems reasonable and realistic. However, it sold for £1,287. The sale totalled £701,069.

Croydon Coin Auctions—General Sale—September 13, 2011

The 1825 sovereign considered by some to be an impaired proof sold for £1,313.

Elizabeth I angel with sword mintmark realised £1,680.

Traditionally the sales at Croydon begin with mixed lots: anything from “a shoebox of world and GB coins (room bids only)” to an “album containing misc mainly modern coins, over £40 face value”. The highlight of the offering on this occasion were 15 Whitman folders, “some with coins inc 1/2ds 1944–67 many Unc lustre, 1/4ds 1902–36 (no 04), many around VF, (room bids only)”. For younger readers who do not know what a Whitman folder is, I had better explain. They were heavyduty cardboard folders, dark blue in colour, that were designed for various UK pre-decimal denominations. There were certainly folders for pennies, halfpennies and farthings, threepences and sixpenny pieces and possibly more. They were divided into periods such as halfpennies 1902–36, 1937 to 1967, etcetera. Launched in the early 1960s when people began collecting runs of pre-decimal coins from their change, they were very popular. The interiors featured apertures for each date the denomination was issued, with the date the coin was issued below. Headings indicated the various monarchs on the throne, when the coins were issued such as Edward VII, George V, George VI and Elizabeth II. People collected coins from their change with the objective of filling each aperture in the folder. Not unreasonably, Croydon placed an estimate of £20 on the lot but it sold for £147. I gave my Whitman folders away a few years ago—if you have yours, consider consigning them to Croydon Coin Auctions! Most of the copper and bronze coins that followed mainly sold around estimate, though there were a few passes. A collection of sixpences

that had been formed over the last 40 years certainly attracted attention. One determined bidder virtually bought the whole collection at prices averaging twice the estimate. A small collection of tokens sold at well above estimate, but banknotes found it harder to find a new home. Highlights of individual coins included: a 1703 VIGO halfcrown in about EF/EF grade sold for £945; a 1717 halfcrown in similar condition realised £2,100; a 1704 “plumes” halfcrown sold for £1,050 and a very fine 1658 Oliver Cromwell crown found a new home at £1,995. The English hammered section was somewhat patchy. Some coins were sought, such as the Elizabeth I fifth issue angel with the sword mintmark for 1582. In fine condition, it was estimated at £1,100, but sold for £1,680. However, generally the lower grade hammered coins struggled to reach their estimate. Milled sovereigns of numismatic interest as opposed to being bullion sold well. An 1825 example in good extremely fine+ state described as being “very prooflike”, may be considered by some to be an impaired proof. However, auctioneer Graeme Monk’s view is that it is probably not. It sold exactly on estimate at £1,313. An 1847 sovereign, which apart from the Irish shield being softly struck, is in good extremely fine condition found a new home at £683. The surprise of the auction was when a 1946 1/4–rupee from Mauritius was offered in uncirculated state. Given a somewhat conservative estimate of £30, it sold for a staggering £483. The lot that followed also soared. It comprised nine generally uncirculated 1/4-rupees dating from 1936 through to 1975 and six rupees in the same condition dating from 1951 through to 1978. These were given a tease estimate of a mere £50. The lot sold for £420.

Lockdales—Coins and Collectables—September 18 and 19, 2011

A nice example of the “elephant below” crown of Charles II sold for £1,876.

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Named sales are more common at London auctions than those in the provinces, so it was good to see “The Martin Shaw Collection of English Milled Crowns” being offered at this sale. Mr Shaw explained how he became a crown collector in the introduction to his part of the proceedings. His maternal grandmother ran a pub on the Isle of Dogs and one day an affluent customer paid for a round of drinks with an 1893 crown. She kept it and 50 years later gave it to Martin. Twenty years after that he started to collect. His initial intention was to collect an example of each regnal year for Victoria’s Old Head issue, but he soon found himself buying across the board. “My favourite coins among my collection”, he revealed, “are the Gothic Crowns (a beautiful design) and those of Charles II (imagine holding

a coin that was was in use during the Fire of London!).” Several Charles II crowns were offered, including two dated 1666. The highlight here was the example with an elephant below the monarch’s bust. This has the regnal year XVIII on the edge (counted from the death of his father as opposed to the restoration of the Monarchy) and is of the RE.X (instead of REX) variety, of which there are only perhaps 11–20 known. Apart from a flan adjustment mark on the French shield, the piece is in GF/nVF grade. Quite reasonably estimated at £700–900, it was contested to £1,876. A couple of Gothic Crowns were offered. The better of the two is the 1853 proof. Apart from a tiny edge nick (which certainly does not detract from the coin) it is in EF/GEF condition and is enhanced by and blue and grey tone. It sold www.tokenpublishing.com

November 2011


Market scene exactly on its top estimate, ÂŁ8,208. However, the coin that stood out for me was the 1839 plain edge proof. Described by the cataloguer as â&#x20AC;&#x153;iridescent toned FDC, a very nice exampleâ&#x20AC;?, one could not help but feel that this did not do the piece justice. However, to wax lyrical about its alluring beauty would have appeared to be stooping to hype. There was an image and as the Chinese say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;a picture says a thousand wordsâ&#x20AC;?. The ďŹ&#x201A;an is darkly toned and the Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head has the tone of iridescent gold. It is simply mouthwatering in all its glory. The estimate of ÂŁ4,500â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5,000 was a tease and it certainly got the punters biting at their bits. The piece was run up to an eyewatering ÂŁ9,966, which ÂŁ8,208 was paid for the is more or less a third 1853 Gothic Crown. above the Coin Yearbook price and the top price in the Shaw Collection. There were some superb realisations in the Shaw Collection but there were elsewhere as well. A 1926 penny with the modiďŹ ed efďŹ gy was offered in GEF with some lustre. This coin is rare in such a high grade. The Coin Yearbook price for an EF specimen is ÂŁ800 (ÂŁ2,500 for UNC) and this was reďŹ&#x201A;ected in Lockdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top estimate. The coin sold above its top expectation, at ÂŁ1,759, which undoubtedly pleased the consignor. No Lockdalesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sale would be complete

without a Celtic or medieval rarity. At this event a silver unit of the Trinovantes/ Catuvellauni took the spotlight. Issued by Cunobelin (AD 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;40) its obverse features two coiled ram-headed serpents and the reverse a galloping horse with a ring enclosing a pellet below and the same above except that the pellet is enclosed in a ring of pellets as opposed to being solid. The piece is a slight variant as the O of CVNO appears above the horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tail as opposed to below it. Clearly a recent ďŹ nd, it is â&#x20AC;&#x153;still full of dirtâ&#x20AC;? but in very ďŹ ne condition. The cataloguer described it as â&#x20AC;&#x153;excessively rareâ&#x20AC;? and placed the estimate at ÂŁ200â&#x20AC;&#x201C;300. It sold for ÂŁ820. I am beginning to feel that no sale is normal unless there are Chinese surprises. At this event an Anhwei Province silver dollar of year 24 (tall 4) (1898) was offered. Apart from a chopmark and a small ďŹ le test mark at 12 oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock, this scarce coin is otherwise in very ďŹ ne condition. Estimated at ÂŁ150â&#x20AC;&#x201C;200, the piece sold for ÂŁ997. However, what I found surprising was that a good extremely ďŹ ne Yunnan Fu-Tien Bank $10 note, which is very rare in this condition, only sold for a hammer price of ÂŁ1,150 (ÂŁ1,348 with Premium) against an estimate of ÂŁ600â&#x20AC;&#x201C;800. We want ďŹ reworks not a damp Chinese cracker! The sale, which of course was not purely numismatic, totalled ÂŁ358,478.

The outstanding 1839 plain edge proof was eventually bid up to ÂŁ9,966.

IMPORTANT NOTE Unless otherwise stated, the above prices are inclusive of the Buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Premium. In other words, it is the hammer price plus 17 per cent at London Coins Auction, 17.25 per cent at Lockdales and 5 per cent at Croydon Coin Auctions. In all cases, this includes Value Added Tax at 20 per cent.

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ZZZFDPEULGJHVKLUHFRLQVFRP LQIR#FDPEULGJHVKLUHFRLQVFRP November 2011

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Thomson Roddick & Medcalf

COIN, MEDAL & MILITARIA AUCTIONS

Carlisle - Thursday 17th November at 1.00pm Sale by auction of coins, banknotes, tokens, medallions & numismatic miscellanea Our sale of medals, decorations, militaria & arms will be on the following day, Friday 18th November at 11.00am Catalogues at www.thomsonroddick.com or on request. Viewing Wednesday 16th, 10am to 5pm & auction day from 9am. Thomson, Roddick & Medcalf, Coleridge House, Shaddongate, Carlisle CA2 5TU. 01228 528939 or auctions@thomsonroddick.com

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November 2011


Viewpoint MICHAEL ALEXANDER

How high is high? W

ITH silver at over US$40 per ounce, the skyrocketing price of precious metals is rising faster than collectors can keep up with. Could this usher in the practise of the ever-shrinking silver coin or . . . could it mean the end of the silver collector coin altogether? MICHAEL ALEXANDER of the London banknote and Monetary Research Centre asks the question: “Is it time to decrease the silver content in collector coins?”

It was one of those typical British summer days, rainy, grey and thundering with a few instances of blustering wind thrown in for kicks—an inhospitable Saturday afternoon where the only thing which comes to mind is “there goes the picnic and barbeque” and “I’m just glad I’m not out in that”. It was also one of those days when you decide to cut your losses and catch up with some quality coin collecting—gathering up your purchases and acquisitions from over the past couple months in order to amalgamate them into your wider collection. The process of cataloguing and recording, upgrading and arranging everything in chronological order is one of those tasks which either relaxes you or drives you to drink but, it has to be done, and there’s no way around it. I decided to tackle the task with some recently-acquired American dollars which my coin-collecting cousin had brought me on his visit to London. The new coins were a 2011 silver dollar marking the founding of the United States Army in 1775, highlighting the Army Historical Foundation fund-raising programme, and another 2011 silver dollar issued to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the United States Medal of Honor—two very well-designed coins and sought-after additions. Reviewing the section of coins where these were to be added, I had the chance to look back to the modern issues of US commemorative dollars and I spotted my Bicentennial dollar minted in 1976. Bright, lustrous, with rays of light shimmering on its surface, I thought to myself “it still holds up”. The design is simple, it’s to the point with its depiction of the Liberty Bell in front of the moon symbolising the US triumph of landing a man on the lunar surface and bringing him back safely to earth as John Kennedy had prophesied in his speech to Rice University on September 12, 1962. But one other aspect of this coin had me thinking, in these uncertain days of austerity and costsaving measures: this piece was struck in 40 per cent silver! Placed alongside its 90 per cent silver counterparts, both the proof and uncirculated strikes are virtually indistinguishable and just as iridescent, bold and bright white. The bill authorising these coins for the 1976 national celebrations was a hold-over from the law passed in 1965 which November 2011

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altered the silver composition of US coinage for half dollars from 90 per cent silver to the lesser fineness. The measure was adopted as an answer to the rising cost of silver in the mid 1960s and as a result, many countries who still had circulating silver coins either removed the precious metal content entirely or reduced the fineness. The United States issued silver-clad coinage, only in the form of half dollars, from 1965 until 1970. The clad material, which consists of a sandwich-type process containing a surface layer of 80 per cent silver/20 per cent copper mix, with a core of 21 per cent silver/79 per cent copper, results in a coin with an overall silver content of 40 per cent. Meant only as a temporary measure until the price and shortage of silver was stabilised, the clad product was continued when the mintage of new Dwight Eisenhower dollar coins were authorised in 1970. Consequently there was a call for the removal of all silver from the half dollar denomination. However, when the idea for a set of commemorative coinage to mark America’s Bicentennial of Independence was discussed as early as 1973, the US Mint was still obliged to strike these silver issues to the same clad specifications as set out by law. It wasn’t until 1982, on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of the birth of George Washington, when the United States again issued a silver half dollar coin to the standard and familiar 90 per cent fineness. Subsequently a revised bill has enabled all commemorative dollars to be struck to 90 per cent fineness. Fast forward 45-odd years and the conditions for the need to reduce the silver content seem to be upon us once more. However, this time it is not necessarily due to a shortage—the precious metal’s price is simply increasing (as an answer to an alternative option of investment) to levels which make it impractical to continue the issue of even commemorative coins at a reasonable price to the collector. In the last year collector dollars have risen an extra US$20 per coin and if you don’t catch the pre-order prices, you will now end up paying upwards of US$60 direct. I know from having had conversations with commercial directors of several National Mints during the past year, that the price of precious metals is rising faster than collectors can keep up with. The choice for future issues means

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Viewpoint

either: (a) decreasing the weight of the coins (i.e. diameter and thickness, which would mean the loss of the crown-sized coin, a cornerstone of many coin collections); (b) switching to just non-precious metals (many mints already strike the same designs in both cupro-nickel and silver); (c) simply passing on the increase in price to the collector. These options have been debated around the boardroom tables with a less than enthusiastic approach. It’s a choice many mints do not welcome but dare not run the risk of being on the losing side of this commodities-related conundrum. In 2008 Denmark increased the face value of their collector’s silver crown from 200 kroner (£20) to 500 kroner, due to the anticipated increase in the cost of the one ounce of pure silver used to strike these 38mm diameter coins. This meant that the coin, now with a face value of just over £50, has a silver content of just £24 at today’s (August 2011) spot price of US$40 . . . too much on the other side of the extreme in my opinion and way out of balance between the face value and precious metal content. With this combination, the spot price of silver would have to rise to an eye-watering $90 per ounce for this equation to make sense. In their case, it might have been better to reduce the silver content back to 80 per cent—a fineness which Denmark utilised for earlier circulation and commemorative coins up to 1990—and return the face value to a more sustainable and acceptable 200 kroner. During a recent interview with one Mint Director I had raised the question of reducing the silver content instead of decreasing the weight of crown-sized coins or alternatively having to raise the costs through the roof, which would only drive many collectors out of the market. I brought up as examples, the US and their silver-clad issues, the United Kingdom and their 50 per cent silver coinage after World War I, the silver coinage from Germany with its current 62.5 per cent content and the Dutch circulation and commemorative coins with their longtime fineness of 72 per cent. Many of these coins, with their acceptable but reduced silver content worked—they fulfilled their purpose and more importantly they looked the part and maintained the confidence of the public, unlike Mexico with their embarrassingly shoddy 10 per cent silver peso coins of the 1960s. The current situation shouldn’t affect the silver bullion coinage issued by the mints, as these coins are struck specifically for investment. However, the luxury of high grade silver

coins for commemorative or collector purposes may become a thing of the past. Few collectors buy commemorative coins specifically for the silver content as many of these coins have a premium way over the silver content anyway. I do agree that collector coins do look much better as silver issues, but under the present economic situation, with the rising cost of living, inflation, the increasing prices of all metals on the commodities exchange and the shrinking budgets of many collectors, I for one would be satisfied if the world’s mints were to reduce the silver content without decreasing the diameters or weights of the coins . . . as long as these cost-saving measures are passed to the collector and the prices maintained at today’s levels. To increase the prices and still reduce the silver content would be a double slap in the face. Already the cost of silver has increased substantially faster than salaries and the budgets of dedicated collectors have been stretched to their limits. As for my 1976 Bicentennial dollar, it keeps on shimmering, bright and flawless as the day it was struck. My 1928 Wreath crown is as impressive a coin as it ever was, with its subtle tones of red and blue around the edges, and my Dutch 1933 deep hair lines 222 gulden crown continues to effortlessly show off its distinct differences from its ordinary counter-part strike—all examples of a lesser fineness of silver, all coins which have stood the test of time in collector appeal. It is a bonus to have collector’s coins struck in 90 per cent or sterling silver or even the purest .999 fineness of the glacier-white glistening metal, but I don’t think it’s a requisite any longer. As an investment and as a measure of stock-piling my own silver hoard, I’ll buy the more than satisfactory, abundant and plentiful choices of bullionrelated coins. I don’t restrict myself from buying commemorative or special issues by asking the underlying question of “is it struck in a high grade of silver?” My interests lie purely in whether the coin is aesthetically pleasing; is it part of a long term or continuing series that I have committed myself to obtain? or is it a subject I have any interest in? Under these exceptional conditions, I would accept a lesser fineness of silver if the cost-saving measure is passed on to the collector accordingly. If not, then leave things as they are.

How has the current prices of precious metals affected you and your hobby? Are you buying more coins? Fewer coins? Are you looking at your collection as an investment? Are you happy with the way new collector coins are marketed? Let us know . . . write in to the Editor with your opinion—he would be delighted to hear from you. 32

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November 2011


November 2011

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Collector’s notebook GERAINT MORGANS

SOLUTION TO A STERY? Y M C I T A M S I NUMA class 1a voided shor

T Obverse and reverse of the 1a1 clearly showing the cross pommee.

Reverse of a cut half showing a well formed cross pattee.

Obverse and reverse of a Rhuddlan coin once in the author’s collection—with the cross pommee.

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Coin news

t cross penny with cross pommee in the reverse legend

HE voided short cross series of silver pennies, struck from 1180–1247, is the first series of British coins that is widely available and usually fairly inexpensive to buy, particularly if collected as cut halves or quarters. The design is attractive (in my opinion) and the coins cover an interesting period of history—associated with such characters as Robin Hood, etc. This may be historically inaccurate, but most of us were brought up with these characters through the many films and TV series, and know a little bit about that time. The coins themselves bear the names (as moneyers) of real 12th and 13th century people, and this also makes them more interesting. A great deal of research has been done on the series by various experts, and the collection of one of these, Professor Jeffrey Mass, has been published as Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles. The J. P. Mass Collection of English Short Cross Coins 1180–1247. This collection contained about 2,200 specimens.

One of the problems in studying the coins is that they all bear the King’s name as Henricus (Henry) whether they were struck under Henry II, Richard I, John, or Henry III. This caused confusion in the early days, but now, through painstaking research, the coins have been attributed to the various monarchs and have been sorted into eight classes with many sub classes, in accordance with the order of issue. A few problems still need to be “ironed out”, but a good deal is known from contemporary records, careful consideration of hoards, and study of die linkages. Being Welsh/Cornish I am interested in coins and tokens associated with those areas. There are no known short cross coins from any Cornish mint, but there are Welsh ones (struck at Rhuddlan) and these have proved to be a law unto themselves. Although basically similar they differ from the English series in the style of the lettering, etc. and are considered to be the products of local craftsmen, probably working for a Welsh lord. In short they are an imitative coinage. Four moneyers are known for Rhuddlan— Halli, Tomas, Simon(d), and Henricus, and the dates of issue are considered to be from c. 1190– c. 1215. The earliest coins are roughly similar to the English coins of classes 1–3 and the later ones roughly similar to the English class 5. Some of the coins that roughly imitate the class 1–3 coins bear a cross pommee in the reverse legend. This is rather odd for an imitative coinage, because the English coins of class 1–3 all show a cross pattee. The Sylloge itself makes mention of “a cross pommee in advance of the time when it was introduced into the regular series”. This first occurred on some coins of class 4b (struck c. 1200–04). It is one of the diagnostics for coins of class 5a2, 8a2, 8b, 8c. A recent find may provide the answer to the Rhuddlan problem.

Almost a year ago I bought a small parcel of short cross cut halves in an internet auction. There was very little description, but the picture was good enough for me to see that one had unusual features. When the coins arrived I was not disappointed. One of them clearly had a class 1a1 obverse yet had a cross pommee in the reverse legend. It was the better half of the coin with plenty of diagnostics. The moneyer was Hugo of York, previously unrecorded for class 1a1. Being very busy at the time I did not contact the British Museum for a while, but when I eventually sent a picture with my comments they asked to see the coin, stating that it was class 1a1 (the obverse at least), was not in Mass, or otherwise recorded, and that the odd letter in the mint name was the Old English letter “Wen” (W). After examination they wished to buy it for the collection, stating that it was “interesting” and “relatively important”. However, since I have now become interested in the series as a whole, I have decided to retain it as the star of my otherwise modest collection. I have given permission for its existence to be made known to academics and other museums. I don’t know if it has been published in any academic journals, but as the ordinary collector probably does not have access to these, where better to publish it than COIN NEWS? Apart from the cross pommee, the reverse of the coin seems more like a class 1a3 to me (note double half moon ends to E), so it is probably a “mule”. It dates to 1180, well before the cross pommee Rhuddlan coins, providing a possible (even probable) explanation for their existence. Books consulted WREN, Christopher R., The Short-cross Coinage 1180-1247. MASS, Jeffrey P., Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles. The J. P. Mass collection of English Short Cross coins 1180-1247. www.tokenpublishing.com

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November 2011

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Ancients

MARVIN TAMEANKO

The crowns of

Constantine The Great

A colossal marble bust of Constantine I, the Great, located in the Museum of the Capitol in Rome.

O

NE of the most famous Roman leaders was the first Christian emperor, Constantine I, the Great, AD 307–337. He halted the terrible persecution of Christians and made Christianity the Roman national religion, replacing Jupiter with Jesus. Constantine was a brilliant ruler, a competent administrator, a great warrior, and an effective diplomat. Using a modern-day expression of praise for his many talents, we would say that he was a man who “wore many hats”. And indeed, Constantine is portrayed on his coinage wearing several different headdresses or crowns, and these proved to be emblematic of his accomplishments and the stages of his life. Roman coins were propaganda pieces used to communicate with the populace and, apparently, Constantine modified his public image on his coinage by simply changing “hats”. These crowns were associated with his victories, his new religious beliefs, his diplomatic efforts and his changing politics. Consequently, if we examine Constantine’s coins chronologically, and note the type of headdresses he wears, we can identify the major developments in the emperor’s history.

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Constantine began his imperial career as the son of the Caesar, Constantius I, in AD 293. Constantius was one of the “tetrarchs”, the four man committee ruling the Roman Empire, which consisted of two Augusti (emperors), assisted by two Caesars (princes). The empire was divided in half with the Augustus, Diocletian and the Caesar, Galerius, ruling in the East and the Augustus, Maximianus and the Caesar, Constantius, overseeing the West. In 305, Diocletian and Maximianus retired as Augusti, promoted Galerius and Constantius to be the new emperors, and appointed two new soldiers, Severus and Maximinus, as their Caesars. When the Augustus Constantius died in 306 in the city of York in Britannia, his troops proclaimed his son Flavius Valerius Constantinus, called Constantine, as the new Augustus. This was unacceptable to the other tetrarchs and a bitter conflict broke out. To prevent a full civil war, a compromise solution made Severus the Augustus of the West and with Constantine installed as his Caesar. However, a period of hostilities immediately began involving Maximianus, who came out of retirement to become an Augustus again, with his son Maxentius, a competent soldier, assisting him against the other tetrarchs. Severus, who opposed Maximianus, was defeated and killed in 307 and his Caesar, Constantine, succeeded him as Augustus. This was not approved by the other tetrarchs and Constantine was degraded to Caesar and replaced as Augustus of the West by Licinius, a comradein-arms of the Augustus, Galerius. At this same time Maxentius was declared a Caesar and this decision resulted in Licinius and Constantine in the West opposing Maximianus and Maxentius in the East. Constantine Caesar was a capable soldier and won many battles against Rome’s barbarian enemies but, despite this, he was portrayed on his coinage with a bare head, and without any noble headdresses, such as the laurel wreath, a crown associated with royalty and victory. Apparently, Constantine deliberately avoided wearing a crown on his early coins, perhaps to indicate his secondary status to the reigning Augusti but also to avoid arousing jealousy in his colleagues. One extremely rare gold medallion, valued as four aurei, struck circa 306/07 showed a bold portrait of Constantine as Caesar with a bare head. This coin was believed to have been struck by Constantine’s fellow Caesar and later enemy, Maxentius. The reverse shows Constantine as the PRINCIPI IVVENTVTI, “the Prince or Leader of the Youth”, the usual title for a Caesar preparing to become an emperor.

A very rare, four aurei medallion struck by Maxentius for Constantine circa 306/07 showing the bare head of Constantine Caesar. (Photo courtesy of Numismatica Ars Classica NAC, AG.) www.tokenpublishing.com

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Ancients After some conflicts, Maximianus and Maxentius were removed and in 308 a new tetrarchy was established consisting of Licinius as Augustus and Constantine as Caesar, in the West, and with Galerius as Augustus and a new military leader named Maximinus, as Caesar, controlling the East. In that same year Maxentius, who had been banished and declared a public enemy, returned to Italy and usurped the title of Augustus. More civil conflict resulted and in 309 the senior Augustus, Galerius, was forced to raise the Caesars, Constantine and Maximinus, to the status of Augusti. At this time, Constantine was a pagan who revered the national deity, Jupiter and the sun god, Sol, an eastern divinity adopted by the Roman armies. Sol eventually became the most popular deity in Rome almost replacing the national god, Jupiter. To show his dedication to Sol and to make himself popular with his soldiers, Constantine depicted Sol Invictus, “Sol the Invincible”, as his patron deity on his coins. These were especially minted in Treveri, Tier in modern Germany, which was Constantine’s military base and capital city in Gaul. One such coin showed Constantine’s bust, wearing the laurel wreath crown of a victor, to clearly indicate his new status as an Augustus. The reverse of this coin portrayed Sol, the sun god wearing his distinctive sun ray, (radiate), spiked crown. A painting of Constantine’s revelation on the route to the Milvian Bridge by Raphael, showing the flaming cross in the sky. From the Vatican Museum in Rome.

A bronze follis of Constantine struck at Treveri in 310–313, showing Sol the Invincible, the sun-god, and Constantine crowned as the Augustus. (See Roman Imperial Coinage, cited as RIC, Vol. VII, no. 887.)

In 311, Galerius died and Constantine, ruling over Gaul, Spain, Britain and parts of Germany, invaded Italy to attack Maxentius, who controlled the Italian peninsula as well as North Africa. They met in 312 at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge, just outside Rome, where Maxentius was defeated and died. This victory is considered the most important event in Constantine’s life because the historian Eusebius, the Bishop of Caesarea and the biographer of the emperor, in his book, Vita Constantini, the “Life of Constantine”, said that the emperor converted to Christianity just before this battle. Eusebius reported that on the road to the Milvian Bridge, Constantine saw a flaming cross in the sky with the message, IN HOC SIGNO VINCES, translated as “In this sign, (thou shalt) Conquer”. The flaming cross supposedly appeared in the shape of the Chi-Rho monogram, called a Christogram, made up of the overlapping Greek letters Chi (X) and Rho (P), the initials of the title “Christ”. Church historians claimed that Constantine had his soldiers paint this monogram on their shields and helmets, and this talisman led them to victory in the battle. Later, the three letters IHS (IHC in Greek), the abbreviations for “In Hoc Signo” and also the initials three letters of the Greek name Jesus, were made into a second Christogram. The Chi-Rho and IHS monograms, became a part of the Church’s iconography and were placed on coins, crucifixes, paintings and priests’ vestments as an emblem of Christ. Some historians are skeptical about Constantine’s vision in the sky and his conversion to Christianity in 312. They claim that the Chi-Rho monogram was really only an old, dynastic symbol used by Constantine’s family and not a symbol for Christ. Other scholars argue that Constantine probably saw a sun burst through the clouds in the sky and interpreted it as a sign from his protective deity, Sol, foretelling hat he would be victorious. This debate will probably never be resolved but historical literature recorded that Constantine formally converted to Christianity only on his deathbed in 337 and not in 312, before the battle of the Milvian Bridge. In addition to November 2011

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this fact, Constantine struck gold medallions at Treveri in 313, immediately after this battle, showing himself wearing the radiate crown of Sol, an indication that Constantine associated himself with this pagan god and attributed his victory to him. Furthermore, the reverse of this medal depicted Constantine in the guise of Sol, wearing the radiate crown, and with the goddess Securitas on the right, handing him a victory statue. This is a direct allusion to the battle at the Milvian Bridge and the reverse inscription SECURITAS REIPUBLICAE, meaning the Security of the Republic, reinforces the reference. Many authorities cite this medallion as proof that, contrary to the Church historians, such as Eusebius and Lactantius, the emperor did not become a Christian and remained a devotee to the cult of Sol. Also, the two lions shown on the reverse of this coin are believed to be the animals that Constantine employed in the circus at Treveri to kill his prisoners of war after the battle at the Milvian Bridge. This would have been a form of execution repugnant to Christians, whose martyrs suffered the same fate under earlier emperors, but relished as a spectacle by pagans.

A gold medallion valued at 12 solidi, struck for Constantine in Treveri in 313–315, showing the emperor wearing the radiate crown of Sol and Sol or Securitas on the reverse. (RIC Vol. VII, 2.) (Photo courtesy Numismatica Ars Classica NAC AG.)

As early as 312, Constantine faced severe opposition from his enemies and ruled under a constant threat of war. This required a new military image for Constantine as a propaganda on his coins, to convince his people that he would prevail over his opponents. So, the emperor donned the helmet of the war god Mars on his coins to inform the public that he was ready and able to engage in warfare. As well, on several reverses of the coinage, the emperor appeared as a warrior, wearing

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Ancients armour and carrying a spear and a shield. The obverses of one of these coins, struck in Rome, showed Constantine wearing a spectacular war bonnet and this became the model for all the later helmet-crowns on his coins. The reverse of this coin exhibited two victories placing an inscribed shield on an altar. The coin’s inscription was VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINCIP PERP, meaning the “Joyful Victories of the Leader (Prince) Forever”.

A solidus of Constantine struck in Rome in 315 showing the prototypical helmet of Mars used on subsequent coins. (RIC VI, page 688.) At that time, Constantine controlled several western cities, including Rome, London, Treveri, Ticinum and Siscia, and their mints issued numerous propaganda coins showing the emperor wearing a war crown helmet. The actual designs of these helmets varied from city to city in order to illustrate the familiar styles of headgear worn by the local garrisons in the districts of Italy, Gaul, Britannia and Thrace. Some helmets on the coins are plumed, some crested, some embellished with images, some bejeweled and some with chin straps and visors. These designs may have been based on the actual war headdress worn by Constantine, the commander-in-chief of the army or by his delegated general in the region. To raise the moral of the soldiers, some of the decorations on the helmet referred to the local deities or myths. A typical example of a regional style of helmet can be seen on coins struck in Londonium (mint mark PLN), in the province of Britannia. These coins showed an armoured bust of the emperor wearing a visored, plumed helmet decorated with pagan symbols. The reverse of the coin illustrated Securitas leaning on a column, with the inscription of SECURITAS AVGG, the Security of the Co-emperors (the double G in AVGG makes it plural), meaning Constantine and Licinius I.

A bronze follis struck for Constantine I in London in 312–313, showing a regional style, visored helmet, perhaps the general’s own headgear worn on campaigns in Britannia. (RIC VI, Londinium 278.)

In 313, during their joint reign, Constantine and Licinius issued the famous Edict of Milan granting complete religious tolerance to all the citizens of the Empire. This was intended to end the persecutions of the Christians but the eastern Empire was still ruled by Maximinus, a zealous persecutor of the new religion, and even Licinius was fiercely anti-Christian. At any rate, Constantine and Licinius ruled as associates for a further decade and defeated the other tetrarchs in the East, but they could not resolve their differences and war broke out between them. In 324 Constantine vanquished Licinius I at Chrysopolis in Anatolia and became the sole Augustus of a then unified

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Empire, with his son, Crispus, acting as his Caesar. Also at that time Constantine began to convert the old, Greek city of Byzantium into Constantinople, his new capital city to replace Rome as the “Navel of the World”. This reconstruction took five years and during that time, in 326, tragedy devastated the life of the emperor. His wife Fausta, jealous of the Caesar Crispus, Constantine’s son born from his first wife Minerva, falsely accused her stepson of treason. Based on fabricated evidence and false witnesses, Crispus was convicted and executed. When Constantine discovered the truth, he killed Fausta by throwing her into a vat of boiling water, and executed many of her supporters in the royal court. Despite Constantine’s indifferent attitude to Christian principles, in 326 he issued some coins that depicted a helmet on his head with a tiny Chi-Rho at the top. Many scholars claim this was simply the emperor’s personal emblem used as a decoration but to many numismatists, who believed the emperor was a staunch Christian, this symbol confirmed his dedication to his religion. The best example of the Christogram on his helmet appeared on coins struck in Siscia, in ancient Thrace, but because the tiny symbol was engraved in a very small area it often looks like a simple cross form.

A bronze follis struck for Constantine in Siscia in 318-319 showing the supposedly Chi-Rho symbol on top front of the helmet. The monogram is enlarged at the upper left. (RIC VII, 55.)

In 324, Constantine assembled the Council of Nicaea to resolve the divisive theological issues presented by the Arian Controversy. This Council’s final unanimous statement on the doctrines of faith are still accepted by mainline churches today. At that time church historians embraced Constantine as the paradigm of a new Christian emperor and, in 327, he did issue one coin that clearly showed the Chi-Rho monogram. This coin is contentious because it uses Christian and pagan symbols and conveys a mixed message. The Christogram on the coin is combined with a pagan military standard (labarum), which pierces a writhing serpent below. However, some numismatists state that these coins are Constantine’s only explicitly Christian types and that the composition showed the triumph of Christianity (Good) in the Empire, represented by the Chi-Rho standard, over paganism (Evil), impersonated by the serpent. Other scholars disagreed and claim that these coins have more to do with the emperor’s remorse over the deaths of his son Crispus and wife Fausta. They believed the coin was his attempt to promote the future of his dynasty by showing his family’s dynastic emblem, the Christogram, and a military standard with three pellets, representing his three surviving sons, who will rule the empire and destroy their future enemies, represented by the serpent. The reverse legend is SPES PVBLICA, the “Hope of the Public”, a slogan with a clear reference to the pagan divinity Spes. As well, the coin’s obverse shows the emperor wearing the traditional Roman laurel leaf, the crown of a pagan Augustus. The mint mark on the coin is CONS indicating the coin was issued in the new city of Constantinople, even though it had not yet been completed. www.tokenpublishing.com

November 2011


Ancients

An extremely rare bronze coin, 18 millimetres in diameter, struck for Constantine in Constantinople in 327-28, with the Chi-Rho on a military standard piercing the serpent. (RIC VII, 19.)

A rare solidus struck for Constantine in Antioch in 335-336, showing the emperor as an eastern monarch and Victoria on the reverse. (RIC VII, 96.) (Photo courtesy Numismatica Ars Classica NAC AG.)

By 327, the emperor’s effigy on coins took on a distinct, oriental appearance, perhaps because he was shifting the Roman capital city to Constantinople in the East, and also because of his apparent preference for Christianity, a religion originating in the East. Many coins showed the bust of the emperor wearing a simple Greek diadem or filleted headband, the usual crown of Greek or eastern monarchs. This was interpreted as the emperor moving away from Roman, pagan imperial crowns to more Christian, sovereign headdresses. However, the emperor also combined his portrait on these coins with a traditional pagan reverse design possibly to appease his pagan subjects. In addition, many of Constantine’s coins were struck with an “anepigraphic” obverse, that is without the inscription of his imperial titles, showing the bust of emperor wearing the Greek diadem and with his eyes raised to heaven, supposedly indicating Christian prayer to God. But this pose is also seen by some as a pagan icon showing the emperor pleading with Jupiter, the sky god in the heavens. As well, the reverses of these coins displayed pagan themes such as the ubiquitous goddess Victoria. Obviously, Constantine walked a tight rope between his Christian and pagan subjects and he cleverly issued ambiguous messages and images so that they could be interpreted differently by the audiences. Similarly, it was reported that the emperor commissioned paintings in Constantinople that showed his portrait surmounted by a cross but also ordered a statue for the Great Forum, the main public space, showing himself dressed as the pagan sun-god Apollo.

Although the Church declared Constantine a true convert and a Christian hero as early as 312, and granted him the status of “isapostolos”, that is equal to the Apostles, he probably remained a semi-pagan to the end of his life. Fearing for his salvation, he was baptized on his deathbed in 337. He may have believed in the new religion but he cynically used it to unify his empire and to advance his own political interests. During his reign he refused the bishop’s demands that he cease being the Pontifex Maximus, the pagan High Priest of Rome, and he continued his policy of tolerance for the existing pagan cults. It was only 50 years later, in 387, that the emperor Gratian gave up the Pontifex title and it remained for the emperor Theodosius I in 392 to ban all pagan cults in the Empire. After Constantine died, the Eastern Orthodox Church awarded him and his mother Helena sainthood but his sons, Constantine II, Constans and Constantius II, disregarded this honour and deified him, making him a pagan god, as was normal for a deceased Roman emperor. His sons portrayed him on his posthumous commemorative coinage wearing the veil of the Pontifex Maximus, which was also the traditional headdress of a deified emperor. The obverse inscription on these coins is DN CONSTANTINUS PT AVGG, the abbreviations for Divus Constantine Pater Augustorum, meaning “The Deified Constantine, Father of the Augusti.” This deification was a traditional, pagan Roman honour but anathema to Christians. The reverse legend VN–MR is the abbreviation for “Venerable Memoriae.”

An anepigraphic solidus struck for Constantine in 324-325 in Ticinum showing the diademed portrait of the emperor with an upward gaze and a seated Victoria on the reverse. (RIC VII, 179.)

A commemorative coin, a 15 millimetre bronze, struck in Cyzicus by Constantine’s sons in 347–348, showing the veiled bust of a deified Constantine. (RIC VIII, 493.)

In only a few years, Constantine’s diadem crown evolved into a more intricate jeweled headdress, with a large gem at the forehead. This was a typical eastern crown, perhaps indicating that the emperor was turning toward his eastern population for the future success of the Empire. A fine example of a coin showing the fully jeweled crown replacing the simple Greek diadem, is a rare piece struck in Antioch in Syria. This coin depicted the emperor as an eastern or Byzantine Christian monarch, wearing a bejeweled crown and gown. However, the reverse displayed Victoria, a pagan deity.

And so, the last “hat” Constantine wore, his posthumous headdress, was the pagan veil of a high priest and a deified emperor, and this final “crown” enabled him to depart his life as he started it, as an unapologetic pagan Roman.

November 2011

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Unless stated otherwise coin photos are courtesy of The Classical Numismatic Group, CNG, www.cngcoins.com.

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Out & about KERRY TATTERSALL From May 7 to 9, 2012, the Austrian Mint will host the XXVII Mint Directors’ Conference in Vienna. The mint ranks today among the leading modern mints of the world and at the same time can look back on over eight centuries of history. It is the oldest still functioning factory in Austria with an unbroken record of coining for 818 years.

An English King founded the

Mint in Vienna C

OINS had been produced in the territories of the Duchy of Austria in several towns before they were ever struck in Vienna, the best known being the silver pennies from the town of Krems on the Danube (Kremser Pfennige). Once the Babenberg dukes chose the old Roman town of Vindobona as their principal residence and administrative centre, however, it was only a question of time before a mint was established in Vienna.

Top: the Austrian Mint’s top-selling gold bullion “Philharmonic” coin and (below) the ever-popular Maria Theresa silver thaler.

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In 1189 the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa led an army down the Danube in the direction of the Balkans and Constantinople to cross into Asia Minor on the Third Crusade. In Vienna he stopped to enlist Duke Leopold V in the crusade, and the Babenberg Duke swore to follow his liege lord the following year by sea. Two other monarchs were pledged to the Crusade, King Philip Augustus of France and King Richard the Lionheart of England, Normandy and Aquitaine. The Emperor met with an untimely death, drowning in the waters of the River Saleph in Asia Minor. His son Conrad led the imperial troops to join the crusaders besieging the city of Acre, where he died apparently from malaria in January 1191. Duke Leopold had also arrived in January before the walls of Acre. As the senior knight he took over command of the imperial contingent. King Philip arrived in April, followed by King Richard at the beginning of June. Acre surrendered to the crusaders on July 12. The banners of the victors were raised above the city’s walls—that of the King of Jerusalem, the King of France, the lions of England and the flag of the Duke of Austria. Tradition has it that Richard was angered to see a mere ducal banner beside those of the kings and ordered it torn down and thrown into the ditch. This was not only a mortal insult to Duke Leopold and the imperial knights, but also was a denial of their share as victors in the spoils of the city. Leopold and the German crusaders broke off and left for home. Philip of France soon followed. In October, 1192, Richard himself left with a handful of followers to return to Europe. He slipped away secretly, well knowing that Europe bristled with his enemies waiting to intercept him. Richard planned to cross Hungarian

Territory to his brother-in-law, Henry the Lion of Saxony. He was shipwrecked in the north Adriatic Sea and found himself constrained to pass through the Duchy of Austria. Although disguised as a common pilgrim, Richard’s stature, red hair and kingly bearing soon caused rumours to abound. One knew the English king was on his way back, even if no one knew exactly where he was. (Could this be the origins of the Blondel legend?) Richard was recognized and arrested at an inn in Erdberg, at that time just outside Vienna. Legend states that he tried to hide as a kitchen help, but was quickly detected. Leopold had his royal prisoner held in the castle of Dürnstein, high on a crag overlooking the River Danube, while he negotiated the surrender of Richard to the Emperor Henry IV. A ransom of 100,000 Cologne marks of silver was demanded (almost 23 tons, or double the then income of the English Crown). Duke Leopold was to receive half. The English silver began to arrive in Vienna towards the end of 1193. Leopold, who had been excommunicated by the Pope for laying hands on a returning crusader, established a mint near his Court in Vienna to coin the ransom silver into Viennese pennies (Wiener Pfennige). The Vienna mint, therefore, reckons 1194 at the latest (or perhaps 1193) as the year of its foundation. Leopold spent the money on strengthening the defences of the towns of Vienna, Enns and Hainburg, as well as founding the new settlement of Wiener Neustadt to the south. A riding accident just after Christmas of 1194 brought the Duke’s rule to an unexpected end. On his deathbed he was absolved from excommunication on condition that he release all remaining hostages and pay back the ransom he had received. It seems probable that not all www.tokenpublishing.com

November 2011


Out & about of the 50,000 marks had been paid at that time (hence the hostages). Certainly only 4,000 marks of silver were remaining. It is doubtful whether his son was able or willing to honour his father’s dying commitment of returning the monies spent. The Babenberg dukes died out in 1246. The mint was still producing silver pennies in the same location when Rudolf of Habsburg, the Holy Roman Emperor Elect, defeated the Bohemian, Ottokar II, in 1278 and then later settled the territories of the Duchy of Austria on his own sons (1282–83). Vienna was to become the residence and the power base of the House of Habsburg and was to remain so for the next 600 years. As the Habsburgs rose in European importance, so did their capital on the Danube, and although they struck coins throughout their dominions, the Vienna mint was well positioned to become the premier mint of the Habsburg lands. In 1386 the mint was moved to a new site near the cathedral of St Stephen. The mediaeval mint master was assisted by the so-called Hausgenossen, a consortium of merchants who were responsible for the acquisition of supplies of silver. The position of mint master was not always a safe one. He would be called to account for any deficiency in the coinage and sometimes he became embroiled in political troubles that would cost him his head. At this time princes often resorted to suspending the legal tender status of coins and calling them up against new issues at either a surcharge or more frequently for coins with less silver content. The greatest innovation came in 1486 in Tyrol. The scarcity of gold led to the production of a large silver piece, the Guldiner. Its popularity spread. Spain started producing the eightreal silver coin (popularly known as “pieces of eight”) after 1497. In 1520 the great silver coin was struck in Joachimsthal in Bohemia. The Joachimsthaler gave the coin the name that stuck: the Taler. Through Scandinavian daler and Dutch daalder it gave us then the dollar. Of course, the mint in Vienna struck talers too. Eventually, one would become the most famous silver coin in the world with the longest minting history, the Maria Theresa Taler of 1780. In 1679 plague struck Vienna. The workers at the mint and their families moved into the mint building and walled up the doors and windows, isolating themselves from the stricken city. After nine months they were able to emerge

again. They had suffered not a single death nor indeed a case of illness. In gratitude they vowed an annual pilgrimage to the Church of the Holy Trinity outside Vienna. Their successors in the mint continue to fulfill their vow. It is the only pilgrimage from the plague year that has been kept unbroken down to the present day. In 1752 the Empress Maria Theresa moved the mint from its mediaeval building into the town palace built by the great soldier, Prince Eugene of Savoy, ally of the Duke of Marlborough. The introduction of a copper coin called the Kreuzer, required work night and day, and caused one of the empress’s ministers, who also had quarters in the palace, to complain that the noise prevented him from sleeping! The mint in Vienna was now clearly established as the leading mint of the Habsburg Empire. By the end of the 19th century only Vienna and Kremnitz (now in Slovakia, but then in the Kingdom of Hungary) remained active. The destruction of the Dual Monarchy at the end of World War I meant that the Imperial and Royal Mint of Vienna now became the State Mint of the new Republic of Austria. After Hitler took over Austria in 1938, the mint ceded pre-eminence to Berlin, but with the end of the war in 1945 it was once more free to strike the Austrian Schillings. In 1988 the Austrian Treasury, seeking monies for the budget as all treasuries do, sold the state mint and the seigniorage rights to the Austrian National Bank, the issuing authority for banknotes and circulation coins. As a 100 per cent subsidiary of the central bank in the form of a joint-stock company, the Austrian Mint acquired a flexibility that now allowed them to enter the numismatic world on a commercial basis. The new director-general and mint master, Paul Berger, initiated an on-going programme of modernization and innovation. A marketing department was established. Coin design was taken into the hands of the mint. New collector programmes were generated, with innovations such as designing both obverse and reverse to the one theme. The quality of production was brought up to the highest international standards.

A Wiener pfennig of Rudolph I with the word WIN for Vienna between the heads.

Right: the Mint’s impressive building in Vienna. Below: a contemporary depiction of the capture of King Richard.

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Out & about A magazine for collectors (in German) was launched with informative background articles on the mint and its programmes. The mint also became a regular exhibitor at international coin shows, especially in Germany, their biggest â&#x20AC;&#x153;foreignâ&#x20AC;? market. Bergerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success may be judged by the fact that just three years after its â&#x20AC;&#x153;privatizationâ&#x20AC;? the Austrian Mint was invited to participate as one of the ďŹ ve countries in the International Olympic Committee Centenary Programme (1992â&#x20AC;&#x201C;96) alongside Canada, Australia, France and Greece. The innovation, however, that catapulted the Austrian Mint onto the international scene was the decision in 1989 to produce a gold bullion coin, known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vienna Philharmonicâ&#x20AC;?. The impulse came from the home market. Austrians were not allowed to purchase foreign, tax-free gold coins, although visitors to Austria could do so. A one ounce and a quarter ounce gold coin A typical Tyrolean guldiner c. 1486. were produced, denominated in Schillings and thus available tax-free to the domestic investors. The bullion programme was ďŹ rst launched in Vienna, then in Japan, Germany and New York. In the two and a half months till December 31, 1989, the mint sold 419,000oz. The new programme was a resounding success so itwas not long before a one tenth and a half ounce coin were added. In the following years the Philharmonic repeatedly topped in the statistic of world sales (1992, 1995, 1996, 2000), always when the European market was dominant. It achieved top position in Japan in the 1990s, a position it has retained up to the present and its sales in Europe generally represent 40â&#x20AC;&#x201C;60 per cent of the market.

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In collector issues the mint was the ďŹ rst to strike coins using titanium and later they pioneered the use of niobium in varying colours in collector coins. In business-to-business the Austrian Mint is a major supplier of gold and silver blanks to minting facilities around the world. They are also involved in technical consulting and were the general planners for the construction of a new mint in Kiev in the Ukraine. Of course, the mint was active in all the committees preparing for the introduction of the Euro. This was probably the most remarkable event in numismatic history. Fifteen sovereign nations agreed to jettison their national currencies on the same day and to adopt a single European currency. The logistics were worked out in minute detail, with the result that the change-over to a common currency went through in all countries without a hitch. The mint has been fortunate to have had a great degree of stability in its management. Paul Berger was mint master for the ďŹ rst ten years, followed by Dietmar Spranz for the next ten. Kerry Tattersall was the marketing and sales director for over 21 years. The new mint master is Gerhard Starsich, who will be the host for the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mint masters and associated industries at the XXVII Mint Directorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Conference 2012 in May next year. The Mintâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motto? Tradition meets Innovation . . . And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all thanks to the Angevin temperament of King Richard the Lionheart . . . well, the beginning anyway.

GB gold coins

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M. J. Hughes PO Box 1515 Kingston Upon Thames KT1 9UE Tel: 07917160308 E-mail: mjhughes87@aol.com Website: www.GBgoldcoins.co.uk Buyers and sellers of British & World coins. Specialising in Sovereigns and Krugerrands. Always interested in buying any coins Extremely competitive prices paid! Please get in touch for a no obligation quote, or if you need a little advice.

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November 2011


Medallic miscellany

DR KERRY RODGERS

Rare Bellingshausen Antarctic Silver Medal

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MONG several historically important medals in the August 20 sale of Status International was a great Antarctic rarity: an 1819 Bellingshausen Antarctic Exploration Medal in silver. The obverse carries a portrait of Czar Alexander I. The reverse shows the names of two ships: Vostok and Mirnyi, the vessels of Russia’s first Antarctic exploring expedition. Antarctica had been largely ignored by the European nations after Captain Cook’s initial reports of frozen lands in the south. In 1819 Tsar Alexander I of Russia decided a closer examination was warranted. The man chosen to command the venture was Faddej Faddejewitsch Bellingshausen who had participated in Russia’s first circumnavigation of the globe in 1803. The 900 ton Vostok [East] and 530 ton support vessel Mirnyi [Peaceful] first called in to Portsmouth where Sir Joseph Banks supplied them with charts and books from his and Cook’s travels Down Under. The ships finally sailed south on September 15, 1819 to cross the Antarctic Circle on January 26, 1820, the first Europeans to do so since Cook. They eventually reached 69º 21’ 28” S, 2º 14’ 50” W, some 20 or so miles from the Antarctic mainland. A modern analysis of Bellingshausen’s log books indicates that this was the first confirmed sighting of the long sought-for Terra Australis. It beat the Royal Navy’s Edward Bransfield who arrived on January 30, 1820 and America’s Nathaniel Palmer who set foot on Antarctic Peninsula on November 17, 1820. Bellingshausen was driven out of the southern ocean by a savage storm. He retreated to Sydney to re-supply, arriving there in April 1820, to be welcomed and entertained by Governor Lachlan Macquarie—under instructions from the Colonial Office. With Macquarie’s blessing Bellingshausen’s scientists undertook numerous studies in and around Sydney and he used the colony as a base for a four month exploration in the South Pacific. In November 1820 he once again sailed for the Antarctic. On his departure Macquarie presented him with a number of Holey Dollars one of which Bellingshausen gifted to the Viceroy of Peru. Between December 24 and January 16 he again crossed the Antarctic Circle six times, sighting solid land, as opposed to ice, at least twice, but on each occasion his ships were driven back by storms. Bellingshausen returned to Mother Russia on August 4, 1821 after a voyage of two years and 21 days. He found few interested in his discoveries. It would be ten years before his reports were published. Most remain untranslated today. For 120 years Russia ignored Terra Australis—until they began sending whaling fleets south post-World War II. November 2011

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Today the explorer’s achievements are fully acknowledged. Several places on our planet bear his name: Bellingshausen Sea in the Great Southern Ocean, Bellingshausen Island in the Aral Sea, Bellingshausen Island in the South Sandwich Islands, Bellingshausen Station on Antarctica’s King George Island, Bellingshausen Plate—one of the Earth’s ancient tectonic plates, and Bellingshausen a.k.a. Motu One in the Society Islands. Beyond Planet Earth lie Bellingsauzen, a crater on the far side of the Moon and minor planet 3659 Bellingshausen discovered in 1969. The 42mm Bellingshausen Antarctic Exploration Medal (illustrated above courtesy of Status International) of 1819 in silver by Sculptor L. Shilov was struck by the St Petersburg Mint to commemorate the departure of the expedition to Antarctica. Quantities of these medals were carried aboard the ships as presentation pieces. The medal is well known in bronze but is extremely rare in silver. It is probably the rarest in the Antarctic medal series and is even a rarity in Russia. The example above is crudely holed for suspension. Nick Kamper of Bundena, NSW, acquired the item in the middle of the last century from a Persian seaman dying in a Sydney Hospital. The seaman stated that he picked it up in the “South Sea Islands”. Bellingshausen has appeared on numerous stamps and one test banknote, with at least one coin struck in his honour by the Bank of Russia.

Captain Faddej Faddejewitsch Bellingshausen.

Bellingshausen and his officers being entertained on a Pacific island.

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Tokens

VAUGHN HUMBERSTONE

From Britain to Christchurch

The Story of Christchurch’s token issuers

T

HE PROVINCE OF CANTERBURY, New Zealand, was founded by the Canterbury Association in 1850 as a Church of England settlement. It was originally intended that the port town of Lyttelton would be the main township, but the Port Hills between Lyttelton and the Canterbury Plains proved too great a barrier and it wasn’t long before Christchurch took over as the principle town. The first four ships of immigrants from England arrived in December 1850 and, like the rest of the colony, it was soon found that there was an acute shortage of lower-denomination coinage. This was because not enough coinage was struck to supply all the colonies of the vast British Empire. What was struck was often immediately absorbed within Britain. Migrants coming to New Zealand tended not to bring much of the heavy and cumbersome copper coins with them, and because imports had to be paid for in hard cash, any coinage that made it into circulation often went straight back out of the colony. Any coinage that remained was often hoarded. Colonial governments did not have the authority to strike their own coinage, and the officials in London did not consider the provision of such coinage to be a very high priority. 46 firms issued their own tokens as a substitute for Imperial coinage throughout New Zealand from 1857–81. 14 of these firms were from Christchurch. Four of them were partnerships, so the actual number of Christchurch token issuers is 18. Of the 14 issuers with a known place of birth, ten were from England, two from Scotland, one from Ireland and one from Norway. This article gives condensed biographical information relating to Christchurch’s token issuers.

Henry J. Hall: Henry Joseph Hall was born in 1837 in Belfast, Ireland. In 1859 he arrived in Auckland with his wife Eleanor. Soon after he moved to Christchurch and in 1860 he established a grocery store in Cashel Street. Undated halfpenny and penny tokens depicting wording only were struck by both W. J. Taylor of London and T. Stokes of Melbourne. In response to the Coinage Offences Act of 1867, H. J. Hall began to refuse to accept his own tokens. Action was taken against him at the Resident Magistrate’s Court. It was ruled that he was not only permitted to but also compelled to redeem tokens of his own issue at full value. At one stage he had £200 worth in circulation. In 1865 H. J. Hall relocated his grocery business to High Street and he sold out to Charles Louisson in 1867. Both H. J. Hall and fellow token-issuer G. L. Beath owned substantial homesteads in Riccarton Road, which were renowned for their extensive gardens, orchids and paddocks. In 1873 Henry J. Hall decided to focus on farming and land acquisition. In 1881 he purchased the 20,400 acre Motunau station in North Canterbury, and by the following year his land holdings were valued at £78,320, making him a rich man. He died suddenly from a paralytic seizure on May 10, 1897, aged 60. He was buried at the Linwood Cemetery and he left behind a widow, four sons and five daughters. Eleanor Hall died on February 11, 1907, aged 73. J. Caro & Co: Jacob Caro was born in 1824. With the opening of the Victorian goldfields in Australia, he arrived in Victoria aboard the Jas Carson in October 1852. While Jacob Caro remained in Melbourne, he formed a number of business partnerships that established general stores in the Victorian towns of Sandhurst, Little River and

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Yachandanda. In 1859 J. Caro established an ironmongery business in Melbourne. The following year he went into partnership with Hermann Cohn, under the style of J. Caro & Co, ironmongers, in Christchurch. Hermann Cohn ran the store in High Street, Christchurch, while Jacob Caro remained in Melbourne. Undated one-penny tokens depicting an agricultural ploughman were struck by T. Stokes of Melbourne. The partnership between Caro and Cohn was dissolved in 1864 and J. Caro & Co was sold out to Solomon Nashelski. Jocob Caro remained in business in Melbourne as an ironmonger. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge of Victoria, and in 1879 his ironmongery business expanded to include the wholesale and retail trade, with a store opening in Little Collins Street East in addition to the main store in Elizabeth Street. Jacob Caro retired from business in 1883, aged 59. T. W. Gourlay & Co: Thomas William Gourlay was born on April 8, 1840 at North Leith, Scotland, the son of David Gourlay, a shipmaster, and Jemina (nee Crawford). In 1852–3 the Gourlay family immigrated to Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. In 1862 Thomas W. Gourlay opened an ironmongery store, Economy House, in High Street, Christchurch. He was in partnership with Joseph Moir, who had issued his own tokens in Hobart. Undated one-penny tokens depicting tools of the trade were struck by an unknown maker between 1864 and 1868. On January 15, 1868 Thomas W. Gourlay, aged 28, married Sarah Jane Watkins, aged 18. In 1870 Gourlay relinquished his ironmongery business and returned to Hobart. Five sons and four daughters were born between 1871 and 1891. Thomas W. Gourlay remained in business as an ironmonger, trading from 132 Liverpool Street. Sarah Jane Gourlay died in 1897, aged 47. Thomas W. then moved to the town of Zeehan in Tasmania, where he went into partnership with one of his sons. In 1902 he retired from business and returned to Hobart, where he resided in Lansdowne Crescent. Thomas William Gourlay died at the Hobart General Hospital on September 9, 1917, aged 77, and he was buried at the Cornelian Bay Cemetery, Hobart. The Alliance Tea Company: Thomas Richard Fisher had been engaged in a commercial business in England, as well as serving in the Methodist ministry, when poor health forced him into early retirement. Hoping that a change in climate would improve his health, the 50-year-old arrived in Wellington aboard the Myrtle

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Tokens

on January 20, 1857 and immediately set out for Christchurch. In April 1857 he secured the lease on a site at the junction of High Street and Hereford Street. Later in 1857 he established a tea and grocery store at this site, which traded as Thomas R. Fisher & Co. The grocery store was renamed the Alliance Tea Company some time after July 1863. One-penny tokens depicting wording only were struck by T. Stokes of Melbourne in 1866. The tokens state that the store, opposite the Bank of New Zealand, was under the management of Robert Thompson. Soon after, management reverted back to Fisher & Co. In 1872 Thomas R. Fisher retired from business. In 1880 he erected Fisher’s Building at this site, and although the family grocery business was wound up in 1884, the historic Fisher’s Building is still standing today.

B. M. Petersen: Benjamin Martin Petersen was born in Bergen, Norway, in 1837. After completing an apprenticeship as a watchmaker, he left Copenhagen, Scandinavia, and immigrated to Adelaide in South Australia. The climate did not suit him, so in 1863 he sailed to Christchurch. B. M. Petersen opened a watchmakers and jewellers business in High Street in December 1863, and he also worked as an engraver. In August 1864 Petersen was naturalized as a British subject and in 1868 he was appointed the Swedish and Norwegian Consul General for New Zealand. Undated one-penny tokens depicting a clock, prize cup and watch face were struck by T. Stokes of Melbourne. In 1871 B. M. Petersen sold out his business to Solomon Nashelski and moved to London. In London, Petersen was engaged in the timber and shipping business with Norway, as well as establishing a merchant’s business with his old business acquaintances in Adelaide and Christchurch. B. M. Petersen was married in Bergen in 1872 and his only child, a son, was born in 1876. His wife died from a stroke in 1915. Benjamin Martin Petersen died at Anerley, London, in 1916 from pneumonia, aged 79. In 1939 Petersens Jewellers Ltd moved premises to New Regent Street. Petersens Jewellers is still trading in Christchurch today, and is New Zealand’s oldest jewellery retailer. William Pratt: William Pratt was born in 1823 at Barking, Essex, England. By 1842 Pratt had completed his drapery apprenticeship. He arrived in Nelson with the first lot of settlers aboard the

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indus on February 5, 1843. He became in turn a boat builder, road worker and a farmer. In 1848 he moved to Wellington and worked as a bookkeeper, but soon after an earthquake destroyed the store. In December 1849 he moved to Lyttelton, where he opened Canterbury’s first general store. In July 1851 William Pratt, aged 28, married Sarah Fowler, aged 23. The couple had a total of four sons and five daughters. In 1852 Pratt moved back to Riwaka in Nelson and returned to farming. In 1863 he returned to Canterbury, settling in Christchurch. In January 1864 he purchased a drapery store named Dunstable House in Cashel Street from David Clarkson. Undated one-penny tokens depicting wording only were struck by W. J. Taylor of London. In May 1868 William Pratt sold out to John Ballantyne, while retaining the freehold of the store. He died on October 15, 1905, aged 82. Sarah Pratt died on May 22, 1911, aged 83. Ballantynes department store is still trading in Christchurch today.

Edward Reece: Edward Reece was born in 1834 in Shropshire, northern England. After remaining on his father’s farm, he went to Birmingham where he trained in the hardware business. He arrived in Lyttelton aboard the Caroline Agnes on August 17, 1855. At the age of 21 he married Isabella Asher, aged 23, on January 1, 1856. Four sons and a daughter were born to the couple. Edward Reece opened an ironmongery store in Colombo Street, Christchurch, in 1856. Undated halfpenny and penny tokens, depicting a bundle of wheat and a shearer, were struck by T. Stokes of Melbourne. Edward Reece also became an astute land owner. He owned land in Fiji which he planted with cotton. In 1879 he relinquished management of his ironmongery business to his eldest son. He established a number of farms about Christchurch, and in 1883 he purchased the 8,600 acre Montserrat station in North Canterbury from fellow token-issuer H. J. Hall for £26,000. Edward Reece died on September 12, 1885, aged 51, and was buried at the Addington Cemetery. Two of his sons took over the ironmongery business while his other surviving son purchased Montserrat. Isabella Reece died in London on February 20, 1890, aged 56. E. Reece Ltd traded until 1977. www.tokenpublishing.com

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Tokens His partner, Daniel Jobberns, was born at King’s Bromley, Staffordshire, England, in 1845. In 1867, aged 22, he immigrated to Invercargill. By 1873 he had moved to Christchurch when he went into partnership with Henry S. Hobday. On August 14, 1874, Daniel Jobberns, aged 29, married Angus Elizabeth Dash. The couple had at least six children, including three sons. The partnership with H. S. Hobday was dissolved in July 1875 due to Daniel Jobberns’ continued ill health. He then moved to Wellington, where he worked as a commercial traveller. In 1889 Daniel Jobberns moved to Palmerston North, where he purchased a drapery business but in September 1890 he was declared bankrupt. The creditors of his estate could not get a single satisfactory answer out of him, and his business records were found to be a complete shambles. While in New Zealand, Daniel Jobberns also raced thoroughbred horses. In 1893 the Jobberns family moved to Sydney in Australia, where Daniel Jobberns continued to work as a commercial traveller. In April 1897 his eldest daughter died in San Francisco, aged 22. His wife died in 1918. Daniel Jobberns died on August 21, 1923 at a private hospital in Burwood, Sydney, aged 78.

G.L. Beath & Co Ltd: George Low Beath was born on December 13, 1827 in Leslie, Fifeshire, Scotland, the son of James Beath and Christian (nee Low). He served his drapery apprenticeship in Dunfermline. In 1865 he immigrated to Melbourne to join his brother David in business. The following year he moved to Christchurch and went into partnership with Oscar Kirby, who had established a drapery business in Cashel Street in 1860. In 1868 Beath became sole proprietor. On February 6, 1867, aged 39, he married Marie Malcolm, aged 20. One son and four daughters were born between 1868 and 1883. Beath was instrumental in persuading Marie’s family to also migrate. Marie’s sister, Catherine, went on to become the famous suffragette, Kate Sheppard, who was largely responsible for New Zealand becoming the first country in the world to grant women the right to vote, in 1893. Kate Sheppard has featured on New Zealand’s ten dollar notes since 1993. Undated one-penny tokens depicting the coat of arms of the Duke of Argyll were struck by T. Stokes of Melbourne. George Low Beath died on August 4, 1914, aged 86. His widow Marie died in 1930, aged 84. Beath & Co Ltd traded until 1979. The Union Bakery Company: The Union Bakery Company is the one token issue that has defied all attempts to locate information on either the firm itself or anyone connected with the firm. Undated one-penny tokens depicting a bushel of wheat were struck by Stokes & Martin of Melbourne between 1870 and 1875. The tokens state that the Union Bakery traded as “wholesale and retail bakers, confectioners and grocers”.

Hobday & Jobberns: Henry Smart Hobday was born in 1835 at Woolwich, London, the son of Stephen Hobday and Caroline (nee Davis). In 1856, aged 21, he married Priscilla Margaret Nash in London. A son, Henry Smart Edgar Hobday, was born in 1858, followed by seven daughters between 1861 and 1875. The Hobday family landed in Otago in 1863 and moved to Christchurch in the early 1870s. In 1873 Henry S. Hobday went into partnership with Daniel Jobberns, with the firm of Hobday & Jobberns trading from the corner of Cashel and Colombo Streets. Undated one-penny tokens depicting the Christchurch shield of arms were struck by Stokes & Martin of Melbourne. The partnership was dissolved in July 1875, with Hobday continuing as sole proprietor. In October 1885 Henry S. E. Hobday married Nelly Maude Reece, who was the only daughter of fellow token-issuer Edward Reece. Hobday’s Cooperative drapery store burnt down in 1888 and was wound up. In 1898 H. S. Hobday moved to Dalmorton, NSW, Australia, where he worked as an accountant. In 1906 he moved to Manly in Sydney, and later that year his wife died. Henry Smart Hobday died of heart disease on September 9, 1914 at Manly, aged 79.

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Mason, Struthers & Co: Frederick Mason was born in 1825 at Norfolk, England, the son of William Mason. In 1847, aged 22, he married Susannah Couldon in London. Three sons and a daughter were born to the couple. In 1874 the Mason family immigrated to Christchurch. Later that year Frederick Mason went into partnership with Robert Struthers as ironmongers. The firm initially traded from Pratt’s buildings in Colombo Street. Undated one-penny tokens depicting an Australian Aboriginal were struck by Stokes & Martin of Melbourne. In 1876 the firm moved to their new warehouse at the corner of Colombo and Lichfield Streets. The partnership was dissolved on September 30, 1885, with Frederick Mason taking over the Australian interests of the firm. The Mason family moved to Sydney, where by May 1886 Frederick was in business as a grain and produce merchant. In 1891 Frederick Mason went into business as an importer of agricultural implements. He also had business interests in Melbourne and Adelaide. Frederick Mason died of general paralysis at his residence in Paddington, Sydney, on March 25, 1894, aged 69. He was predeceased by two sons and was buried at the Church of England Cemetery in Waverley, Sydney. His partner Robert Struthers was born in 1843, the son of Thomas Struthers, a farmer, and Mary (nee Stevenson). He spent most of his youth in Yorkshire, England, before immigrating to Melbourne and then coming out to New Zealand. Upon arrival in Dunedin, he engaged in farming before managing station properties in North Canterbury. He was a storekeeper and produce dealer in the town of Dunsandel until August 1873, before moving to Christchurch. After going into partnership with Frederick Mason in 1874, Mason & Struthers then took Henry Harris Hill and Francis James Hartridge, who were merchants in London and Birmingham, into partnership. This partnership was dissolved on December 31, 1899, with Robert Struthers continuing as sole proprietor until selling out in 1904. Janet Struthers, first wife of Robert Struthers, died on August 24, 1895, aged 57. Robert Struthers married for a second time on April 27, 1897, at the age of 54, to Jane Maria (nee Thompson), who was a 37-year-old widow. Robert Struthers died

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Tokens at his residence on March 20, 1906, aged 63. He had no children and left behind his wife, a brother in the North Island and several brothers in Yorkshire. Mason Struthers Ltd traded until 1977. S. Clarkson: Samuel Clarkson was born in 1835 at Greenwich, London, England, the son of Joseph and Matilda Clarkson. When Samuel was 14 his entire family decided to immigrate to New Zealand. Samuel Clarkson arrived in Lyttelton with his father aboard the Castle Eden on February 7, 1851. In 1853 the Clarkson’s moved to Christchurch where young Samuel served an apprenticeship as a builder. On August 1, 1857 Samuel, aged 21, married Sarah Ellen Lodge, aged 17 (born in March 1840, Sarah Ellen had been the second white child born in Wellington). Six sons and three daughters were born between 1860 and 1880. Samuel Clarkson erected some of the more prominent buildings in the city. He traded from Cashel Street, where Clarkson Avenue is now situated. One-penny tokens depicting Justice & Trade seated were struck by W. J. Taylor of London in 1875. In 1875 Samuel Clarkson went into business as an importer. In 1880 he commenced to sell on a commission basis, before retiring in the late 1880s. Samuel Clarkson died of heart disease on July 29, 1895 at his residence, Canal Reserve, Linwood, Christchurch, aged 59. He was buried two days later at the Linwood Cemetery. Sarah Ellen Clarkson died on February 17, 1925, aged 85. Gaisford & Edmonds: William Gaisford was born in London in 1840. He arrived in New Zealand in 1865 and later that year, at the age of 25, he married Janet Turvey, aged 30, in Christchurch. William Gaisford went into partnership with George Edmonds as butchers, and in April 1874 Gaisford & Edmonds moved into one of the new shops at Pratt’s buildings in Colombo Street. One-penny tokens were struck by W. J. Taylor using the same reverse die used to strike the tokens of S. Clarkson. The partnership was dissolved some time soon after 1875. William Gaisford continued in business as a butcher, first under the style of Gaisford & Gregg, and then Gaisford & Co, before moving his business out of Colombo Street in 1882. William Gaisford continued as a butcher until at least the early 1900s. His wife, Janet, died on July 12, 1906, aged 71. Soon after, William Gaisford moved to Glentunnel, a town 57 kilometers inland from Christchurch, where he remained for the rest of his life. He died on March 23, 1932, aged 92. He had no surviving children and was buried at the Addington Cemetery, Christchurch. George Edmonds also went into partnership with George Bull, under the style of Bull & Co, butchers. This partnership was dissolved in September 1881. George Edmonds was declared bankrupt in January 1886. The following month he was the manager of W. Hobb’s family butcher’s shop on the East Town Belt. In 1887 he was a butcher back in Colombo Street. Milner & Thompson: John Joseph Milner was born in 1844 at Brixton, London, and was educated at the Grammar School there. He arrived in Canterbury in 1868 and he worked as a teacher at the school of the Reverend Alabaster, which was connected with St. Michael’s Church. On March 31, 1869 he married Mary Elizabeth Bowley. The couple had four sons and a daughter. By November 1869 J. J. Milner was working at John Lewis’ piano business, which Select bibliography Amodeo, Colin, The Summer Ships, The Caxton Press, Christchurch, 2000. Devaliant, Judith, Kate Sheppard, the fight for women’s votes in NZ, the life of the woman who led the struggle, Penguin Books, Auckland, 1992. Macdonald, George Ranald, G. R. Macdonald Dictionary of Canterbury Biographies, Unpublished, presented to the Canterbury Museum in 1964. Ogilvie, Gordon,Ballantynes, The Story of Dunstable House 1854–2004, J. Ballantyne & Co Ltd, Christchurch, 2004. A Return of the Freeholders of New Zealand, 1882. Property Tax Department, by authority of George Didsbury, Govt. printer, Wellington, 1884. The Cyclopedia of New Zealand, vol. 3, Canterbury, Cyclopedia Company Ltd, Christchurch, 1903. The New South Wales Pioneers Index 1788–1918, Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages, NSW, CD-ROM, 1993. Tasmanian Pioneer Index 1803–1899, Archives Office of Tasmania, CD-ROM, 1993. Immigration to Victoria 1852–79, Public Records Office, Victoria, CDROM, 1999. Parish Records of Britain, Jesus Christ Church of Latter-Day Saints, USA, 1988.

52

Coin News

was located at the Crystal Palace building in Colombo Street, facing onto Market Square. In 1871 he became manager. In 1874 he went into partnership with Robert Thompson, and Milner & Thompson took over the business from John Lewis and transferred to High Street. The partnership was dissolved in 1879. From 1880 to 1881 J. J. Milner was proprietor of the Auckland Music Warehouse before retiring from business, although his services continued to be sought from R. Thompson. John J. Milner was an accomplished musician and for many years he was the organist for the Holy Trinity Church at Avonside, Christchurch, a position he held until the turn of the new century. He died on June 16, 1904, aged 60, his widow, Mary Elizabeth, died on December 28, 1912. His partner Robert Thompson was born at Roxeth, near Harrow, Middlesex, England, on April 6, 1835. He arrived in Lyttelton aboard the Sir Edward Paget in July 1856, and worked in Christchurch as a wine and provisions merchant. He then returned to England, where he married Emma Goodchild at Greenwich, London. In 1861 he migrated to Melbourne, where he worked for Levy Bros., a fancy goods firm (Levy Bros. issued their own tokens in 1855). Robert Thompson returned to Christchurch in 1865, where he went into the flax industry. After the retirement of J. J. Milner in 1879, Robert Thompson continued as sole proprietor, still trading under the style of Milner & Thompson. One-penny tokens depicting native Maoris and local scenery were struck by Stokes & Martin of Melbourne in 1881. These tokens saw a limited circulation that was confined to the Christchurch area. Robert Thompson retired in 1912 and the firm was continued by three of his sons. Robert Thompson was an accomplished musician who played the flute solo. His wife died on August 1, 1912. Robert Thompson died of heart disease on April 24, 1915, aged 80. He left behind four sons and three daughters. The Thompson brothers sold out to Chas Begg in 1920. Begg’s Musical Centre is still trading in Christchurch today. While copper coins were demonetized in Britain on December 31, 1869, they continued to circulate in New Zealand due to shortages. In 1874 it was estimated that there was £4,000 worth of copper and bronze currency circulating in New Zealand, of which half consisted of tokens. Copper coins were finally demonetized on January 31, 1876, but only after the New Zealand government had secured a shipment of £6,000 worth of Imperial bronze coinage from Britain. This eliminated the need for any further issues of tokens, and their circulation died out soon after. They did, however, enjoy a brief resurgence of popularity in Christchurch in the early 1880s, in conjunction with the Christchurch Industrial Exhibition of 1882. This article follows on from articles previously published in Coin News featuring the Auckland issuers (Vol. 45, No. 12, December 2008, pp 52–54), the Dunedin issuers (Vol. 47, No. 3, March 2010, pp 51–54), and the Wellington issuers (Vol. 48, No. 3, March 2011, pp 47–50). All of the information in this article is taken from an unpublished manuscript by the author, entitled Merchants Making Money, 2011. Church Register Index and Cemetery Records, Christchurch Public Library; NZ Cemetery Records, Alexander Turnbull Library. Christchurch, Riccarton, Selwyn & Sydenham Electoral Rolls. Auckland Star, The (Melbourne) Argus, Brisbane Courier, Christchurch Times, The (Hobart) Courier, Evening Post, Lyttelton Times, Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW), The (Hobart) Mercury, Otago Witness, The Press, Southland Times, The Star, The Sun, Sydney Morning Herald, Timaru Herald, Weekly Press, Wellington Independent. (newspapers) Canterbury Provincial Business & Trade Directory, Christchurch Suburban Directory, Sands & McDougall Melbourne Directory, Sands Sydney & NSW Directory, Southern Provinces Almanac, Stevens & Bartholomew’s NZ Directory, Tasmanian Post Office Directory, Wises NZ Directory. London Gazette, New Zealand Gazette. http://canterburyheritage.blogspot.com. Retrieved May 29, 2010. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com. Retrieved June 11, 2011. http://www.petersensjewellers.co.nz. Retrieved February 7, 2011. The official website of Petersens Jewellers. http://portal.archives.tas.gov.au. Retrieved September 1, 2009. Colonial Tasmanian Family http://search.ancestry.co.uk. Retrieved March 9, 2010. England census records, 1861.

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November 2011


November 2011

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Coin News

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?-):-)4?)A;3--6 <78=:+0);-+071+- +716;-;8-+1)44A" *ZQ\Q[P=;))][\ZITQIV We will purchase single items or complete collections and can travel anywhere to view at short notice. If you have coins, medallions or banknotes you wish to sell, please contact us at the address below. Knightsbridge Coins (S. Fenton) 43 Duke Street, St Jamesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, London, SW1Y 6DD, UK Telephone: 020 7930 7597/8215/7888 Fax: 020 7930 8214 info@knightsbridgecoins.com

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November 2011


Coin price guide

Price guide to: Crowns & Double Florins 2012 EDITION AVAILABLE NOW

Date

OLIVER CROMWELL

The Price Guide is intended as a supplement to the highly acclaimed COIN YEARBOOK and we hope the prices quoted will provide a true reflection of the market. The grading used in this price guide is strictly as the recognised English system. In the listing “—” indicates either: Metal or bullion value only; not usually found in this grade; or not collected in this condition.

Coming next month: Illustrated Price Guide to Half Sovereigns

Mintage

F

VF

EF

UNC

Date

F

1681 — Elephant & Castle below bust.................... £3000 1682/1 — ................................................................. £160 1682 — edge error QVRRTO for QVARTO .............. £400 1683 — .................................................................... £400 1684 — .................................................................... £400

CROWNS

VF

EF

UNC

£7500 — £650 £3250 — — £1000 £4000 £1300 —

— — — — —

JAMES II (1685–88)

1658 8 over 7 (always) ............................................. £1800 £3500 £6000 — 1658 Dutch Copy .................................................... Extremely rare 1658 Patterns. In Various Metals............................. Extremely rare CHARLES II (1660–85) James II first bust 1686 First bust ........................................................ 1686 — No stops on obv ........................................ 1687 Second bust ................................................... 1688/7 — 8 over 7 ................................................... 1688 — ....................................................................

James II second bust £275 £800 £3800 £350 £1400 — £260 £600 £3400 £270 £800 — £260 £800 £3400

— — — — —

WILLIAM AND MARY (1688–94)

Charles II first bust 1662 First bust, rose (2 varieties) ............................ 1662 — no rose (2 varieties) .................................... 1663 — ....................................................................

Charles II second bust £250 £800 £4500 £250 £800 £4500 £240 £800 £4000

— — —

Charles fourth bust 1691 ........................................................................ £500 £1400 £4250 1692 ........................................................................ £500 £1400 £4500 1692 2 over upside down 2 ..................................... £500 £1400 £4250

— — —

WILLIAM III (1694–1702)

Charles II third bust 1664 Second bust ................................................... £200 1665 — .................................................................... £1350 1666 — .................................................................... £225 1666 — error RE.X for REX ..................................... 1666 — Elephant below bust .................................. £600 1667 — ................................................................... £160 1668/7 — 8 over 7 ................................................... £150 1668 — .................................................................... £150 1669/8 — 9 over 8 ................................................... £350 1669 — .................................................................... £300 1670/69 — 70 over 69 ............................................. £175 1670 — .................................................................... £160 1671......................................................................... £150 1671 Third bust ....................................................... £150 1672 — ................................................................... £150 1673 — .................................................................... £150 1674 — ................................................................... 1675 — .................................................................... £700 1675/3 — ................................................................. £700 1676 — .................................................................... £150 1677 — ................................................................... £140 1677/6 — 7 over 6 ................................................... £175 1678/7 — ................................................................ £175 1678/7 — 8 over 7 ................................................... £260 1679 — .................................................................... £150 1679 Fourth bust ..................................................... £150 1680 Third bust ....................................................... £150 1680/79 — 80 over 79 ............................................. £175 1680 Fourth bust ..................................................... £160 1680/79 — 80 over 79 ............................................. £190 1681 — .................................................................... £160 November 2011 www.tokenpublishing.com

£800 £4000 — — — — £900 £4000 — Extremely rare £2000£12500 — £500 £3000 — £550 — — £550 £3500 — £800 — — £1000 £4500 — £1000 — — £600 £3500 — £600 £3000 — £600 £3000 — £500 £3000 — £500 £3000 — Extremely rare £2000 — — £2200 — — £550 £3000 — £550 £3000 — £900 — — £900 — — — — — £600 £3000 — £600 £3000 — £800 £3500 — £800 — — £700 £3500 — £1000 — — £600 £3000 —

William III first bust

William III third bust William III second bust 1695 First bust ........................................................ £100 £300 £1800 — 1696 — .................................................................... £90 £275 £1600 — 1696 — no stops on obv. ........................................ £225 £400 — — 1996 — no stops obv./rev. ...................................... £250 £400 — — 1696 — GEI for DEI ................................................. £600 £1500 — — 1696 Second bust ................................................... Unique 1696 Third bust ....................................................... £90 £275 £1600 — 1697 — ................................................................... £1200 £4000 £7500 — 1700 Third bust variety edge year DUODECIMO .... £140 £550 £1750 — 1700 — edge year DUODECIMO TERTIO............... £140 £550 £1750 —

Coin news

55


Coin price guide Date

Mintage

F

VF

EF

UNC

Date

Mintage

1818 LIX .................................................................. 1819 LIX .................................................................. 1819 LIX 9 over 8 ................................................... 1819 LIX no stops on edge ..................................... 1819 LX ................................................................... 1820 LX ................................................................... 1820 LX 20 over 19 ................................................

ANNE (1702–14)

F

VF

EF £250 £250 £400 £400 £325 £300 £500

UNC

£40 £40 £45 £60 £40 £35 £35

£100 £100 £150 £150 £100 £100 £200

£750 £750 — £950 £850 £750 —

£40 £40 £40 £40 £40

£180 £700 £1500 £180 — £4000 £180 — £4000 £180 £700 £1500 £180 £700 £1500 Extremely rare

Anne first bust 1703 First bust, VIGO .............................................. 1705 — Plumes in angles on rev. ............................ 1706 — Roses & Plumes in angles on rev .............. 1707 — — ...............................................................

£300 £500 £160 £160

£900 £1500 £600 £600

£3500 £5500 £2200 £2200

— — — — George III dollar GEORGE IV (1820–30)

Anne third bust, roses and plumes reverse Anne second bust 1707 Second bust, E below .................................... £160 £500 £1800 — 1707 — Plain ........................................................... £160 £500 £1800 — 1708 — E below ...................................................... £160 £500 £1800 — 1708/7 — 8 over 7 ................................................... £160 £800 — — 1708 — Plain ........................................................... £160 £600 £1800 — 1708 — — error BR for BRI ..................................... Extremely rare 1708 — Plumes in angles on rev. ........................... £180 £700 £2500 — 1713 Third bust, Roses & Plumes in angles on rev.£180£700£2200 — GEORGE I (1714–27)

George IV first bust 1821 First bust, St George rev. SECUNDO on edge ................................ 437,976 1821 — — Proof .....................................Incl. above 1821 — — Proof TERTIO (error edge) .....Incl above 1822 — — SECUNDO ................................ 124,929 1822 — — TERTIO ..................................Incl above 1823 — — Proof only .............................................

George IV second bust, shield reverse 1716......................................................................... 1718 8 over 6........................................................... 1720 20 over 18....................................................... 1723 SSC in angles on rev. (South Sea Co.) ........... 1726 ........................................................................

£525 £525 £525 £525 £525

£1500 £1500 £1500 £1500 £1500

£6000 £5000 £5000 £5000 £5250

— — — — —

1826 Second bust, shield rev, SEPTIMO

Proof only

—£2000

— — —

— — —

£6000

WILLIAM IV (1830–37)

GEORGE II (1727–60)

1831 Proof only W.W. on truncation ........................ 1831 Proof only W. WYON on truncation ................ 1834 Proof only ....................................................... George II young head 1732 Young head, Plain, Proof ............................... 1732 — Roses & Plumes in angles on rev .............. 1734 — — ............................................................... 1735 — — ............................................................... 1736 — — ............................................................... 1739 — Roses in angles on rev............................... 1741 — — ............................................................... 1743 Old head, Roses in angles on rev................... 1746 — — LIMA below bust ................................... 1746 — Plain, Proof ................................................ 1750 — — ............................................................... 1751 — — ...............................................................

George II old head — — £6000 £200 £700 £2300 £200 £700 £2300 £200 £700 £2300 £220 £700 £2300 £210 £600 £2300 £210 £600 £2300 £200 £600 £2000 £200 £600 £2000 — — £4500 £350 £1000 £3000 £450 £1200 £3300

GEORGE III (1760–1820) Dollar with oval counterstamp................................. £125 £400 Dollar with octagonal counterstamp ....................... £175 £500 1804 Bank of England Dollar, Britannia rev. ............ £100 £225 1818 LVIII ................................................................. £40 £100

56

Coin news

£12500 £14500 — £21000

VICTORIA (1837–1901) — — — — — — — — — — —

£750 — £800 — £500 — £250 £750

Victoria young head

Victoria gothic head www.tokenpublishing.com

November 2011


Coin price guide Date

Mintage

YOUNG HEAD ISSUES 1839 Proof only ....................................................— 1844 Star stops on edge .............................. 94,248 1844 Cinquefoil stops on edge ..............incl. above 1845 Star stops on edge ............................ 159,192 1845 Cinquefoil stops on edge ..............incl. above 1847............................................................ 140,976

F

— £50 £50 £50 £50 £60

VF

— £260 £260 £260 £260 £275

EF

— £1200 £1200 £1200 £1200 £1300

UNC

£6500 £3000 £3000 £3000 £3000 £3500

GOTHIC HEAD ISSUES (Proof only) 1847 mdcccxlvii UNDECIMO on edge ........... 8,000 £500 £900 £1750 £3000 1847 — Plain edge ...............................................— — — — £3500 1853 mdcccliii SEPTIMO on edge..................... 460 — — — £8000 1853 — Plain edge ...............................................— — — — £11000

Date

Mintage

F

VF

EF

UNC

1933................................................................ 7,132 £110 £160 £300 £525 1934................................................................... 932 £800 £1600 £3500 £5000 1935 Jubilee issue. Incuse edge inscription714,769 £15 £20 £30 £45 1935 — — error edge inscription ...........incl. above — — — £1500 1935 — Specimen in box .......................incl. above — — — £60 1935 — Proof .........................................incl. above — — — £175 1935 — Proof. Raised edge inscription.......... 2,500 — — £175 £300 1935 — — fine lettering..........................incl. above — — — £1000 1935 — — error edge inscription ...........incl. above — — — £1500 1935 — Gold proof .............................................. 30 — — Extremely rare 1936................................................................ 2,473 £170 £325 £600 £1000 GEORGE VI (1936–52)

George VI coronation issue Victoria jubilee head JUBILEE HEAD ISSUES 1887 .......................................................... 173,581 1887 Proof ...................................................... 1,084 1888 Narrow date ....................................... 131,899 1888 Wide date .......................................incl above 1889......................................................... 1,807,224 1890............................................................ 997,862 1891............................................................ 556,394 1892............................................................ 451,334

Victoria old head £20 — £20 £25 £20 £20 £20 £20

£30 £60 — — £35 £90 £60 £300 £30 £60 £30 £70 £30 £70 £30 £80

OLD HEAD ISSUES (Regnal date on edge in Roman numerals) 1893 LVI ...................................................... 497,845 £20 £45 1893 LVII .................................................incl. above £20 £45 1893 Proof ...................................................... 1,312 — — 1894 LVII ..................................................... 144,906 £20 £45 1894 LVIII ................................................incl. above £20 £45 1895 LVIII ................................................... 252,862 £20 £45 1895 LIX .................................................incl. above £20 £45 1896 LIX ..................................................... 317,599 £20 £45 1896 LX ..................................................incl. above £20 £45 1897 LX ...................................................... 262,118 £20 £45 1897 LXI .................................................incl. above £20 £45 1898 LXI ..................................................... 166,150 £20 £45 1898 LXII ................................................incl. above £20 £45 1899 LXII .................................................... 166,300 £20 £45 1899 LXIII................................................incl. above £20 £45 1900 LXIII.................................................... 353,356 £20 £45 1900 LXIV ...............................................incl. above £20 £45

£150 £200 — £175 £175 £175 £175 £175 £175 £175 £175 £175 £175 £175 £175 £175 £175

£150 £700 £240 — £150 £200 £200 £250 £375 £425 £600 £400 £400 £400 £400 £450 £400 £400 £450 £500 £400 £400 £400 £400 £400

1937 Coronation ......................................... 418,699 1937 Proof .................................................... 26,402

£18 —

£24 —

£38 —

£55 £60

£4

£7

— — — — —

— — — — —

£3 — £3 — —

£6 £20 £6 £9 £1

£15 — £15 — £15 £22 £18 £25 £15

£28 — £28 — £40 £45 £28 £45 £40

£50 — £50 — £80 £90 £45 £90 £60

£100 £400 £100 £400 £130 £340 £130 £340 £130

George VI Festival of Britain issue 1951 Festival of Britain, Proof-like .......... 1,983,540 ELIZABETH II (1952–

)

EDWARD VII (1901–10)

Pre-Decimal issues (Five Shillings) 1953 ........................................................ 5,962,621 1953 Proof .................................................... 40,000 1960......................................................... 1,024,038 1960 Polished dies ....................................... 70,000 1965 Churchill ....................................... 19,640,000 Later issues are listed in the Decimal section. 1902............................................................ 256,020 1902 “Matt Proof” ........................................ 15,123

£55 £110 £175 — — —

£250 £235

DOUBLE FLORINS VICTORIA (1837–1901)

GEORGE V (1910–36)

Victoria double florin Roman I

Crown reverse 1927 Proof only ........................................... 15,030 1928................................................................ 9,034 1929................................................................ 4,994 1930................................................................ 4,847 1931................................................................ 4,056 1932................................................................ 2,395 November 2011 www.tokenpublishing.com

Jubilee issue reverse — £100 £170 £260 £110 £160 £300 £500 £110 £160 £300 £500 £110 £160 £300 £500 £110 £160 £300 £500 £200 £400 £800 £1250

1887 Roman I ............................................. 483,347 1887 Roman I Proof ...............................incl. above 1887 Arabic 1 .........................................incl. above 1887 Arabic 1 Proof................................incl. above 1888............................................................ 243,340 1888 Second I in VICTORIA an inverted 1 incl. above 1889......................................................... 1,185,111 1889 inverted 1.......................................incl. above 1890............................................................ 782,146

Patterns were also produced in 1911, 1914 and 1950 and are all extremely rare.

Coin news

57


Bookshelf

An essential reference book “ . . . Volume eight of the Norweb Token Sylloge brings to a close the monumental task of cataloguing a collection of over 13,000 pieces . . . ” Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles. 62. The Norweb Collection, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A. Tokens of the British Isles 1575–1750. Part VIII. Middlesex and Uncertain Pieces. R. H. Thompson and M. J. Dickinson. Spink & Son, 2011. cxv, 449pp, 68 b/w pls, folded map frontis. Hardback, £35. The publication of volume eight of the Norweb Token Sylloge brings to a close the monumental task of cataloguing a collection of over 13,000 pieces that began with volume one in 1984, although Robert Thompson had already spent nine years on the project. Michael Dickinson joined Robert in this Herculean task with volume three in 1992. The volumes have varied in size as they follow an alphabetical sequence through the English counties, some being more prolific token issuers than others. The immediate companion to the present volume is number seven, which listed the tokens of the City of London (2007, Sylloge no. 59). Mrs Emery May Norweb had been interested in coins since about 1905 and had a remarkable collection but it was the 17th century tokens that became a joint focus with her husband, The Honorable R. Henry Norweb. Together they acquired whole token collections with names that numismatically resonate: Ralph Nott, H. W. Taffs, William Longman, etc., as well actively adding pieces from the London auction rooms. What had begun life as a possible check list against Williamson’s Trade Tokens issued in the Seventeenth Century (2 vols, 1889–91), took on a new life in 1979 when the late Christopher Blunt suggested formal publication as volumes in the British Academy’s Sylloge series—the rest, as they say, is history and eight splendid volumes later prove it. To produce a Sylloge volume that included the City of London and the wider, what is nowadays Greater London, area would have been unwieldy, impossible and also very delaying. The present volume acts as a compact and useful complementary companion which thus covers south of the Thames, the Surrey shore as well as the greater area to the north of Middlesex (which although often cited, actually is no longer a “county” division). The arrangement follows the usual format for the series with extensive introductory matter that includes notes on the arrangement with a valuable Concordance between Williamson or Dickinson’s later revision listing to Norweb numbers by county sequence (some reattributed pieces) and London and Middlesex, and adds over 270 types not in Williamson. There is a Classified Index of types, Abbreviations with three subdivisions: General, Collectors and Dealers cited, and a full Bibliography. The Preface and the Introduction is followed by an essay by Robert Thompson, “At the Sign of the Plat: Andrew Welch, Draper, Chart-maker, and Token-issuer”. This just shows the benefit of research and investigation as all the earlier writers had described the obverse type on the token as a breastplate, and identified Welch as an armourer. Nothing could be further from the truth. Welch, it turns out, was a cartographer in Shadwell, the word “plat” in the 17th and 18th centuries actually referred to a sea-chest in which maps, or “plats” would be kept. Pepys mentions a Nicholas Comberford (on July 22, 1663), “at the Sign of the Platt in Redcliffe”. There were apparently some 37 individuals concerned with a school of chart makers and who were members of the Drapers’ Company (and Nelson was a Draper). The essay is a masterpiece of detective work worthy of Hercule Poirot. The fold-out frontispiece map of Chelsea by James Hamilton, surveyed in 1664 and continued to 1717, but not published until 1810, incorporates the obverse of Thomas Munden’s 1666 halfpenny (no. 9104), and is probably the earliest representation of a tradesman’s token on a map. The arrangement of this catalogue cannot follow the norm of places A-Z within counties as in previous volumes so here the sequence is under metropolitan boroughs and parishes in inner Middlesex, and then alphabetically by the most specific locality relating to the token. The structure of the token entries are numbered in sequence from Volume VII, followed by weight, die axis, issuer’s name, date (or nd), denomination, type, references, and provenance. Many of the entries have extensive and valuable notes relating to the issuer, citations to various sources such as baptismal records, freedom entries, wills, etc., which fill out dimensions far beyond these small pieces of metal. Of the trades and professions recorded on the tokens, some are most strange where one would not have thought the trade merited a token issuer; they include oddities such as a Baconman, a Letter receiver, a Tripeman, and many others. The trade of some, such as Andrew Welch in the Introduction, have only been teased out by careful research. A section is devoted to Uncertain Pieces where perhaps a locality has not been identified, or there is an unnamed locality with only a personal name on the piece, or simply initials. A short section deals with Later Forgeries and Fantasy Pieces that have slipped into the collection, and an Addenda notes a few additional pieces to be added to the listing in earlier volumes. Following on from the catalogue itself and the plates are a series of indexes to Finds, Places of Issue, Trades and Other Descriptions, Issuers, and to Letters in Obverse and Reverse Types. These are the essential keys to the book and its use. The detail in the book is quite incredible and it is the crowning volume to a remarkable series of eight focused catalogues that will be a standard reference and forever known simply as “Norweb”. Peter A. Clayton

58

Coin news

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November 2011


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We cover the World Quality English & World coins, tokens & medallions bought & sold See our extensive stock on our website Saltford Coins, Harcourt Bath Road, Saltford, Bristol BS31 3DQ

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Coin News

59


Richard Plant

H T N O M E H COIN OF T

The exciting exploits of Henry of navarre (before and after death)

I would definitely not have liked to have been a King of France around 1600. Henry III was assassinated in 1589, though I’ve no sympathy for him! For one thing, he was one of the leaders behind the St Bartholomew’s Day massacre of thousands of Protestants in Paris and throughout France in 1572. In fact he could be described him as a very bad king who deserved his assassination. His coins are not uncommon; but I do not like the man and refuse to give him place as a “Coin of the Month”. But his successor, Henry IV—Henri Quatre—just about the best king the French ever had, was also assassinated—in 1610; and I do like him and his coins. So the illustration this month is of a silver halffranc from the Toulouse mint (mintmark “M”), dated 1597. The obverse shows Henry IV’s head, which personal feature will have its own prominent place in the later part of this article. Henry gained the French throne by marrying the right young lady, Margaret de Valois, daughter of King Henry II; but had to overcome the (in those days) almost insuperable barrier caused by his being of the “wrong” religion—France was a mainly Catholic country, and he was a Protestant. However, as he supposedly said, Paris veut bien une messe, “Paris is worth a Mass”. He became a Catholic; though his real desire was for religious tolerance throughout France, and in 1594 he formulated the Edict of Nantes, which allowed freedom of religious choice to all; and contributed greatly towards the internal peace Henry brought to a previously very divided nation. His political agenda was one any of our political parties could take up and be proud of today. As he told Colonel Schomberg before the Battle of Arques in 1589, where he fought against, and defeated, the army of the Catholic League to gain his throne, “I want there to be no peasant in my kingdom so poor that he cannot have a chicken in his pot every Sunday”. On May 14, 1610 Henry IV, aged only 57, was stabbed to death by a man called Francis Ravaillac. His body was treated with great honour. It was mummified, and his tomb placed amongst the royal tombs in the Basilica of St Denis, near Paris. End of story? Yes, for any normal person—but not for Henry IV. There were yet new adventures awaiting our intrepid hero! The strange thing about this next bit is that I found out the story completely unexpectedly whilst glancing at an on-line newspaper dated June 28, 2011, the day I was gathering material for this article. Henry’s head had been lost in 1793, when Revolutionaries had ransacked the royal tombs in St Denis. His body had been broken up, and in the chaos of the day one of the rioters had made off with Henry’s head! It remained lost until one day in 1919 when an antiques dealer saw it for sale at an insignificant auction-house in Paris for the princely sum of 3 francs. Where it went for the following 90 years I am not sure; but by 2011 it had reached the hands of experts in such matters who noted three things—one of the ears was pierced: there was a lesion on his face near his nose, and he had a healed facial wound (from a previous assassination attempt). Though the head had been through too many unknown hands to provide distinctive DNA, his facial peculiarities fitted the known portraits of the King, and his personal history so exactly that the experts declared that this was definitely the head of King Henry IV.

&DWKHGUDO&RXUW0HGDOV MEDAL MOUNTING & FRAMING COIN AND MEDAL SALES Miniature Medals • Replacement Full Size Medals Cap Badges / Titles • Military Research • Write-up of Service • Medal Cleaning Ribbons supplied • Framing Service A good selection of British coins; Tokens; Foreign, Ancient and Roman coins in stock. For coin and medal sales at our Ripon office, please phone or email us to make an appointment. Don’t forget your “wants list”—we always honour appointments, so please don’t let us down.

First Floor Office, 30A Market Place West Ripon, North Yorkshire HG4 1BN Telephone: 01765 601400 Mobile: 07720 714563 Email: parsonscathedralcourt@btinternet.com

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November 2011


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Please visit us at the London Coin Fair on November 19 /DQGPDUN+RXVH +DQRYHU6TXDUH 0D\IDLU /RQGRQ:6+8

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ABC Coins and Tokens We stock a large selection of Scottish coins, tokens and communion tokens and also offer a wide range of hammered and milled British and World coins, tokens and numismatic books. Alnwick British and Colonial Coins and Tokens P. O. Box 52, Alnwick, Northumberland NE66 1YE, United Kingdom Website: www.abccoinsandtokens.com E-mail: d-stuart@d-stuart.demon.co.uk Telephone David at: 01665 603851 November 2011

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Coin News

61


Going Clubbing

Dr Kerry Rodgers gets sociable—in a prudently cautious way . . .

O

ne issue all collectors need to consider, be they new or established, is whether or not to join a numismatic collectors’ organisation. This might be a local club, a national society or an international association. There are good reasons for doing so, not the least being the wealth of experience a collector can tap into.

Many moons ago I had cause to look up the word “wisdom” in the OED. It is defined as having three aspects: knowledge, experience, and the ability to capitalize on these. Knowledge I can get from books but not so experience. Early in my collecting I had few experiences of my own to draw-on. I needed to cash-in on those of others—as I still do. One source lay in members of the local club. I gained much of value—and quite a few coins— from picking their brains. Token’s 2012 Coin Yearbook lists 69 numismatic societies on pp. 323–325. The list is not comprehensive. Also try the website of the British Association of Numismatic Societies www.coinclubs. freeserve.co.uk It lists 39 affiliated societies but also invites you to contact the BANS Secretary to get details of your nearest numismatic society. And, of course, each month Coin News provides a “Societies’ Diary” as on page 88 of this issue. Local clubs can offer guidance, publications, coin exchange, auctions, talks, exhibitions, or even just social interaction. They can provide useful contacts with local museums, dealers, archaeologists, and metal detectorists. Of course, clubs vary from the highly active to the somewhat laid back. If a local club fails to meet your needs, consider national or international organizations such as British Numismatic Society or the International Bank Note Society. These are excellent bodies. They provide much of value for the experienced collector as for the newcomer. Their publications alone are well worth the annual fee. Check out their websites: www.britnumsoc.org, www.theibns.org, www.ibnslondon.org.uk Belonging to any formal groups will cost a subscription but I have never regretted any of these payments. I have got back far more than the few pounds it has cost me over the years. And for those who have cause to travel around the country (or even overseas) try to organize your time to ensure you can visit on club night away from home base. The advent of the internet has changed the dynamics of

club and society involvement, not the least for those of us living in the boondocks. Sometimes it seems you can do it all without leaving home. For starters, many groups now sport a website. Increasingly national, international and even regional organizations are posting newsletters, publications and shops on-line. Examples of on-line informal weekly e-newsletters include e-Sylum from the Numismatic Bibliomania Society (www. coinbooks.org), and MPC Gram posted by the military paper boys and girls. These provide social contact and numismatic interchange for those of us in splendid isolation—and are free. But one thing these sites don’t provide is one-on-one experience. It is as difficult to learn the subtleties of grading on-line, as it is from a book. There is also a proliferation of web blogs devoted to numismatic topics. They can be useful. They offer much of the social interaction and information exchange found in clubs and, of course, are free. But I confess I have become a little leery of many. They are just too undisciplined. All collectors need to be aware of the security issues their growing collections present for them and their families. Dealing with these matters requires a restraint that does not exist in blogland. As a dedicated collector’s hoard grows from a worth of a few tens of pounds to a few hundred or more, so do security issues. In my own case I am coy about letting people know what is in my collection or where I live. I am aware security concerns have caused some to avoid joining or to leave clubs. I can but suggest that prudence becomes the watchword of all collectors and particularly so when joining a club or becoming involved in a blog. However, so long as you are canny about what info you give out and to whom, you need have few reservations. And always respect the information others impart to you, whether about their collections or where they live. Think twice about passing this on to any third party and then don’t do it.

Many thanks to the above organisations for the use of their logos.

62

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Coin News

63


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IAN GRADON WORLD NOTES Quality banknotes bought & sold

P.O. Box 359, Durham, DH7 6WZ Tel: 0191 3719700 Mobile: 07929 602933 E-mail: igradon960@aol.com

Website: www.worldnotes.co.uk IBNS Member 7516 www.tokenpublishing.com

November 2011


BANKNOTE News

THE SPECIALIST BANKNOTE SECTION INCLUDED FREE WITH COIN NEWS

Issue date of the Boulton & Watt £50 banknote revealed

T

HE Bank of England will introduce a new-style £50 banknote into circulation on November 2, 2011. The note will feature the renowned 18th century business partnership of entrepreneur Matthew Boulton and engineer James Watt. A range of new and enhanced security features have been incorporated into the design. Full details of these will be revealed when the new banknote is introduced into circulation, accompanied by a publicity and education campaign. The Boulton and Watt £50 banknote marks the first time two portraits have appeared together on the back of a Bank of England banknote. It will also be the first banknote in circulation to be signed by Chris Salmon, who was appointed as the Bank’s Executive Director, Banking Services and Chief Cashier in April 2011. As new-design banknotes are introduced so the notes they replace are withdrawn—although they can always be exchanged with the Bank of England for their face value. The Boulton and Watt £50 banknote will initially circulate in tandem with the current £50 banknote featuring Sir John Houblon, the first Governor of the Bank of England, which was introduced in 1994. The BoE will make an announcement regarding the withdrawal date of the Houblon £50 banknote in the near future. The design includes separate portraits of Boulton and Watt, developed from images held by the Bank of England. In addition there are two images: the Whitbread Steam Engine which comes from the Timmins Collection, Boulton and Watt, Vol. 2, 456024 an is reproduced with the permission of Birmingham Libraries & Archives; and Matthew Boulton’s Soho Manufactory which comes from The Phillp Album and is reproduced with the permission of Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery. The Boulton and Watt £50 banknote is the second in the Series F (the first being the Adam Smith £20 in 2007). The Houblon Series E £50 note was introduced in 1994. The previous £50 banknote design was the Wren banknote, introduced in 1981 and withdrawn from circulation in 1996. Prior to this there was THE Standard Guide to Small-Size US a white £50 in issue Paper Money 1928–to date is available between 1725 and from Krause Publications. With more 1943. than 300 colour photographs, complete serial data and current market values, the book is invaluable to the collector of these notes. To find out more visit shopnumismaster.com.

BANKNOTE NEWSROUND

THE new General Secretary of the IBNS has been announced as Roger Urce. Roger had held the post of membershiip N important collection of Indian Banknotes will be auctioned by Noble Secretary for America. Meanwhile, Numismatics in their November 22–24 sale in Sydney, Australia. The collection the IBNS will also need to elect a covers the period 1830s up to recent Republic issues and was mostly assembled in the new President next year when 1960s and 1970s. The earliest note is a Bank of Hindostan unissued 16 Sicca Rupees Peter Symes has to stand down c.1830s. Government of India one sided (uniface) notes include 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and following the maximum 1,000 rupees, ranging from 5 rupees of 1872 to 1,000 rupees of 1918. They include issues allowed two elections to from Allahabad, Bombay, Calcutta, Lahore and Madras, plus specimen 5 rupees of 1915 from that post. Bombay and Lahore, a total of 45 one sided (uniface) notes. The George V section contains most types and signatures up to the 1,000 rupees. One of the major highlights of the collection is the George V, 10 rupee specimen note (illustrated) that was given to visitors, invited to the inauguration of the India Security Press on April 14, 1928. This distinct type has a larger portrait of George V and was never issued into circulation and comes with a special inauguration souvenir folder with special certificates and photos of the works. The George VI section is fairly complete. The collection of Indian notes since independence is quite extensive, mostly up to the late 1990s. The collection also contains Boer War issues of eight annas and one rupee internment camp notes used at the POW camp of Trichinopoly in Southern India, these are both very rare. World War II POW Camps notes are also well represented. For further details write to Nobles, Ground Floor, 169 Macquarie Street, Sydney, Australia (www.noble.com.au). (

Important Indian notes

A

November 2011

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65


A Great Deal for Banknote Collectors • Every month I produce a large list of some 30 pages offering thousands of different, world wide banknotes. • I also issue a quarterly, specialised listing of English, Scottish, Irish, Isle of Man and Channel Island notes. • My price lists, as well as many special offers can now be accessed on the internet.

WORLD BANKNOTES Dealers write for wholesale list World’s largest stock ★ ★ ★ EDUCATIONAL COIN COMPANY Box 892 HIGHLAND, NEW YORK 12528, USA Tel: 845-691-6100 Fax: 845-691-4974

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BARRY BOSWELL

24 Townsend Lane, Upper Boddington, Daventry, Northants. NN11 6DR Telephone: 01327 261877 Fax: 01327 261391

e-mail: Barry.Boswell@btinternet.com

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Banknote feature All Perth Union notes are rare.

JONATHAN CALLAWAY

scotland’s forgotten banks: the early provincial banks and their notes

PART 4—PERTH T

HIS article takes a further look at some of the quieter corners of Scottish banking history, this time to those banks which made their home in the “Fair City” of Perth. Perth is a former Royal Burgh and its 45,000 residents are currently conducting a lively campaign to regain formally the town’s status as a city. Indeed, road signs already direct the motorist to the “City Centre”.

Evidence suggests the earliest inhabitants arrived over 8,000 years ago. They were followed much later by the Picts who gave the town its name which is derived from the Pictish word for wood or copse. The Romans also came and built a fort, calling their settlement Bertha. But it was the arrival in the 9th century of the first King of both Picts and Scots, Kenneth Mac Alpin, which established Perth as a place of some importance (even though the royal court was set up in nearby Scone). Strategically located on the River Tay at the point at which it becomes tidal, Perth has suffered from periodic flooding throughout its history. Nevertheless it developed into an

Perth Bank £1 proof—A lovely Lizars creation for the Perth Banking Company.

Central £1 proof— Another Lizars effort for the Central Bank.

November 2011

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important and prosperous port and attracted visitations from the armies of both Edward I and Oliver Cromwell. Perth’s central role in Scottish history did not last, in part quite possibly due to the assassination there of King James I in 1437. He was the last Scottish king to reside in Perth and with his successor moving to Edinburgh any chance of Perth being made the country’s capital was lost. The 18th century saw the first stirrings of the Industrial Revolution with linen, leather and bleaching manufactories opening up. The railways came to Perth in 1848 and helped the town develop into an important transport hub. It became clear from the mid 18th century onwards that there was a need for new sources of capital to build factories, finance the growing merchant classes and support the growth of agriculture. The first banks, if that is the right word for the businesses that appeared at that time, were very small. The earliest seems to have been the Perth Banking Company of John Stewart & Co, in 1763. He was joined by five other small banking firms which all apparently issued small denomination notes with the then prevalent option clause allowing payment to be delayed for a fixed period (usually six months) at the option of the issuer. None of these notes has survived although a note for 1 Shilling Scots issued by another early banker, Douglass Robertson Jr. & Co, has been seen. The Scots Pound had been abolished in 1707 but continued in everyday use for many years thereafter. The exchange rate was £12 Scots to £1 Sterling making this 1 Shilling note worth just 1 Penny Sterling. These “banks” were really very small indeed, probably with a single partner and a couple of clerks, and may well have been just local traders issuing small notes for the convenience of their customers. In any event, when the 1765 Bank Act was passed prohibiting the issue both of small notes and of notes with the option clause, six of these small firms merged to form the Perth United Company.

Coin news

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Banknote feature Central £10 proof Lizars—Perhaps Lizars’ finest work for any of the Perth-based banks.

Perth Bkg 5s—A 5 Shillings note issued by the Perth Banking Company at a time when small change was at a premium.

Central £1 proof, detail—A superb depiction of Victorian Perth from across the River Tay.

This co-partnery (i.e. a partnership with multiple partners) began business in 1766 with capital of £8,000, not a huge sum even in those days. One of the original partners was George Dempster who was also the founding partner of the Dundee Banking Company in 1763 and played an important role in the early days of banking. Agencies were set up in the main cities but the partnership contract was for a fixed period of 21 years, a frequent feature of business undertakings in those days. Consequently voluntary liquidation took place in 1787. Few notes of the Perth United Company have survived as nearly all were redeemed when the firm was liquidated. Circulation seems to have reached £83,200 by 1787 but few notes were still unaccounted for by 1793. As the firm had been successful a new bank, the Perth Banking Company, was formed to take over the business in its entirety. The new undertaking was organised as a joint stock company (i.e. one where the partner’s shares could be traded) with initial capital of £34,000 and began trading on May 7, 1787. There were 99 shareholders at the outset. The bank was as successful as its predecessor and when its 21 year term expired in 1808 it was renewed for a further 21 years, and again in 1829. The final incarnation of the bank this time included a clause in the partnership contract empowering the directors to extend the new 21 year term, which they did in 1850. However, the bank was approached by the Union Bank of Scotland in 1857 with an attractive all-share offer to acquire the bank, which the directors were quick to accept. They realised that the days of the smaller provincial banks, even those which had operated profitably and prudently, were numbered. Issued notes of the Perth Banking Company have survived in very small numbers. Initially notes for 1 Guinea and £5 were issued but for a brief period from 1798 to 1804 they, like several other banks across the UK, issued small denomination notes of 5 Shillings given the shortage of coinage at that time. Forgeries troubled the bank from time to time and prompted them to look to ways to combat the forger’s efforts. Once again, it was the renowned engraver William Home Lizars who provided an answer. His designs prepared in 1850 are amongst his finest work for Scottish banks, rivalled perhaps only by those he also prepared for Perth’s other joint stock bank, the Central Bank of Scotland. Proofs have survived to enable modern collectors to enjoy these beautiful works of art. The early Perth Banking Company notes all featured the town’s Seal, a double-headed eagle and shield with the motto “PRO LEGE, LEGE ET GREGE” (for the King, Law and People).

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Coin news

The Central Bank of Scotland, named in reference to Perth’s location rather any grandiose attempt to claim preferred status (government-owned central banks were a rarity in those days), opened for business in 1834 with capital of £78,125 subscribed by 405 shareholders. The directors’ intentions were evidently to provide the Perth Banking Company with some local competition but there seems to have been enough business to go around because it survived until 1868 when it was absorbed by the Bank of Scotland. It was thus the last independent bank in Perth and perhaps its most lasting legacy is its fine Grade 1 listed head office building in the city centre (now a restaurant). Its record was not unblemished, however, and despite financial support from the Bank of Scotland it endured a crisis in 1864 which required that bank to come to its rescue by acquiring several of its branches in Perthshire. The Bank of Scotland assumed full control in 1868 but some shareholders declined to sell their interest and retained nominal independence until 1880 when they were finally bought out. The bank’s debts had totalled £51,525 in 1868 and these directors had managed to reduce this by half in the ensuing twelve years. From the outset the Central Bank’s notes were designed and engraved by Lizars and the acquirers of his engraving firm after his death in 1859, Messrs W & A K Johnston. These notes are once again beautiful and artistic creations which would grace any collection. Issued notes are however rare although proofs are more easily obtainable. Finally, we should mention a less well-known bank which operated in Perth from 1810 to 1836. The Perth Union Bank had 70 partners but seems never to have played an important role even locally. There are reports of a problem with one of its agents speculating unwisely in agricultural products but the bank evidently failed to make much headway. However, it never lost money and met its end when it was acquired by the National Bank of Scotland. Very few of its notes have survived and the first one to come on to the market in nearly 30 years was offered in auction in 2010. References DOUGLAS, James, Scottish Banknotes (London 1975) MUNN, Charles, The Scottish Provincial Banking Companies 1747–1864 (Edinburgh 1980) RAIT, Robert, The History of the Union Bank of Scotland (Glasgow 1930) CHECKLAND, Prof S. G., Scottish Banking: A History 1695– 1973 (Glasgow & London 1973) www.tokenpublishing.com

November 2011


75(925:,/.,1%$1.127(6

Pick up a copy at London Coin Fair November 19th

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69


Papermoney

How Till Eulenspiegel took a Kiwi for an Ass

DR KERRY RODGERS confesses he once dabbled in Notgeld

I

T is truly amazing what assorted Australian and British dealers have managed to foist upon an innocent Kiwi collector abroad. At a London bourse some ten years ago, one of those dinky-di Aussies saw me coming. He lined me up in his sights and, before I was aware, had me done like a dog’s dinner. And it is not as if I’d ever considered collecting notgeld!

Sure, I find the folksy themes and bright colours of many notgeld quite charming. But long ago I decided the subject is too vast and life too short, to get involved. I lay my momentary lapse entirely at Till Eulenspiegel’s door. Somewhere in a previous incarnation I had come across this miscreant, this degenerate folk hero, whose medieval antics make Bart Simpson resemble a born-again angel. Possibly some distant memory stirred my jet-lagged synapses as I wandered that fateful London bourse. In the event I acquired a near complete set of Kneitlingen notgeld tracing the birth, life and death of this ultimate ne’er-do-well. They led me to learn about the man himself. People’s hero or mindless lout? Till Eulenspiegel, or Tyll Ulenspiegel, lived in and around Lower Saxony in the 14th century. His social role was that of a trickster, the practical joker, given over to merrye jestes, so-called adventures, played out at the expense of his fellow citizens— even his long-suffering mother. His father, wisely, died young. Many societies have their anti-hero, one who tests the patience of a society’s elders. Think Bart Simpson or Bugs Bunny. For many Till was the archetypal people’s champion, a carefree vagabond pricking the self-importance of the middle-class nouveau riche. But just as one man’s freedom fighter is another man’s terrorist, others regard him as a petty, mindless thug, a particularly nasty and vindictive cretin, with a penchant for malicious, brutal and offensive practical jokes. It is hard to understand Till’s enormous staying power. His notoriety has survived 650 years. He figures in the folklore

of Belgium, Germany, France and Poland. Books relating to his many merrye jestes have been published century upon century. They have been translated into some 70 languages. The French even coined the word espiegle to describe mischief making. Rembrandt collected Eulenspiegel ephemera. Breughel depicted one of his merrye jests in a painting. Richard Strauss enshrined Till in a tone poem. At least one ballet, two movies and several plays commemorate his life. A dozen European restaurants and hotels use his name. Many, many web sites are devoted are to him. Till has his own magazine and radio station. You can buy a Till Eulenspiegel teddy bear. The year 2000 was International Eulenspiegel Year with a major festival held at Schöppenstedt commemorating his 700th birthday and the 650th anniversary of his death. And in the 1920s three German communities and one state bank claimed him as their own and celebrated him in notgeld. Today Till holds value for the tourist dollar. A number of European towns regard him as their own. Many authorities agree he is buried at Möllen. There is a tombstone there dated 1350, carved with an effigy of man clad as a jester and carrying an owl in his right hand and a mirror in his left. Spoilsports claim it to be the grave of Tilodictus Ulenspiegel, a unrelated fourteenth century knight. Certainly, Belgians claim Till’s grave is really at Damme. And, depending on which learned, non-Belgian, authority you consult, Till’s dad was Claus Eulenspiegel and his mum Anna. The family name is Saxon. In English Eulen is owl and spiegel, mirror or (looking-)glass giving Till’s English name as Owlglass. Owls and glasses figure large in accounts of Till’s life. The stories A published version of Till’s life first appeared in 1486, or maybe 1500. One early account was penned by Dr Thomas

Frontispiece from Copland’s Black Letter Howleglass,1528 and a happy family replete with owls and mirrors on a Kneitlingen 50pf notgeld.

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November 2011


Papermoney

Eulenspiegel’s life and his stories are depicted on the notgeld from Kneitlingen.

Murner, a Franciscan monk. Among other matters, Murner wrote a book attacking Luther and supporting King Henry VIII’s defence of the seven sacraments. While King Hal gave Murner £100, in Germany he got a knife in the back. Till would have approved the irony. Murner’s version tells of Till from his birth, through numerous adventures and travels in and around Saxony, to his becoming a monk, and finally his death and burial. Some tales are long, some short. Each is a complete chapter that recounts some merrye jeste. The humour is very basic. There is nothing subtle. The merry jestes are earthy, ribald and usually senseless, the stuff of school boy humour—very young schoolboys—admixed with antiestablishment, anti-papist, anti-clerical and anti-semetic content. Most tales would be over the heads of today’s children; their social context is long lost. Free translations of Till surfaced in England. In 1528 William Copeland produced an unexpurgated edition known as the Black Letter Howleglass. The gross vulgarity of some of the tales led to this version being (a) widely read and plagiarised, and (b) placed on the restricted shelves in Victorian libraries. Most 19th and 20th century versions come heavily bowdlerized. Even so, many of the tales are not for those of delicate disposition or with a soft spot for animals. By any 21st century standard Till was not a nice person. Nonetheless, in the 16th and 17th centuries the crude humour appealed to the emerging literate English middle class. Mr Howleglass became well known in England with Ben Johnson making several bawdy references to Howleglass in his plays that November 2011

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would have been readily understood—and appreciated—by his public. Chapter titles in sanitized versions are pretty boring. For example: How Tyll Owlglass was born, and in one day three times christened How Owlglass did deceive a baker at Strasfurt, and gat bread for his mother How Owlglass did eat the roasted chicken from off the spit How that Owlglass did at Brunswick hire him a baker, and did there bake owls and monkeys How Owlglass sold a live cat How that Owlglass painted the forebears of the Landgrave of Hessen, and told them that if they were ignobly born he might not behold his painting How that in his latter days Owlglass became a pious monk, and what became thereof Not exactly the gripping stuff of prime time television, but it has survived for 650 years. One wonders if stories from Coronation Street or The Simpsons will be commemorated on in notgeld in the 27th or 28th century. Regrettably, some of the more eyebrow-raising and explicit titles in Copeland’s translation are inappropriate for a family magazine, but any reader, with an overactive imagination will probably get the drift. Just think scatological and Rabelaisian. Of course, Till’s reported life is probably a composite of several individuals. In 650 years much myth has been woven into the tales. Nowadays, it is hard to separate fact from fiction. To accomplish the 119 jestes with which he is credited in an

Coin news

71


Papermoney

The Till series offers a colourful and intriguing challenge to the notgeld collector.

1890 gentile translation by Kenneth MacKenzie he would have had to have been a very busy boy indeed. But then again, MacKenzie confesses he made some tales up, including Till’s canonization! By comparison, the Black Letter version records only 48 merrye jests. The Kneitlingen notgeld The Eulenspiegel notgeld illustrated were issued by the commune of Kneitlingen. There are at least two series that between them summarise Till’s life. They provide a few high lights—if that is the appropriate term—along with an ample sufficiency of owls and glasses. The series starts with Till’s birth and christening. On the way home his inebriated godparents fall into a ditch along with their godchild. He is duly washed clean and thereby christened three times in one day. So endeth the first adventure with much thigh-slapping hilarity. As the lad grows up he plays merrye jestes upon his elders. Pushing a straw up their noses while they nap proves a favourite. Hearty chortles all round. By his early teens he has learned to walk a tightrope. He persuades the local worthies he can do so carrying 200 pairs of shoes which they duly supply. He succeeds only to throw all the footwear in a heap which leads to much pushing, shoving, hair-pulling and general fisticuffs as each individual tries to reclaim their property. Till heaps scorn upon the townsfolk from his perch but is forced to beat a hasty retreat to mum’s house when the locals come seeking vengeance. Many delighted guffaws. In Brunswick he takes up an apprenticeship with a baker. In a fit of impudence, he bakes all of next day’s dough into a mess of owls and monkeys. The angry baker throws him out but not before extracting the full value of the ingredients from Till’s purse. Till then sells the owls and monkeys at considerable profit and absconds with the money. Copious mirth. There is a forerunner of the Emperor’s New

Clothes. Till is paid 400 marks to produce a non-existent painting for the Landgrave, the senior alderman, of Marburg. He tells the Landgrave, his family, and the servants that if they are of ignoble birth as defined by the laws of the Church, i.e. illegitimate, they will be unable to see his painting. None can but all keep their mouths shut. Side-splitting laughter. In fleeing one hanging, Till successfully moons the good citizens, in best Bart Simpson fashion, before making for Leipzig. Here he sells the local furriers a live cat which he has sewn into a hare’s skin. When the hare is used by the furriers to bait their dogs, they were rendered speechless when it runs up the nearest tree. Further delighted jocularity. Till finally repents and he becomes a monk. However, he finds himself unable to resist more merrye jestes. He removes the steps from the stairwell of the priory and causes the elderly and unworldly abbot to fall down and injure himself, along with other members of the order. Unbridled glee. He dies soon after. A German chronicle dated 1486 records the Black Death ravaging Braunschweig. It notes that, “thereof dies Ulenspeygel at Möllen, among the Gheyseler brothers”. At his burial two of the ropes suspending his coffin break and it falls into the grave end-on such that Till Eulenspiegel is buried standing up. A 1519 edition records his epitaph: This stone dare none to overthrow, For Owlglass upright stands below. For the paper money collector, the Till series offers a colourful and intriguing challenge, particularly for anyone seeking to fillip a jaded palate. I have readily purchased Till notgeld at fairs in both Sydney and London. They were modestly priced in high grades but some items of the series are less readily come-by and will test a collector’s hunting skills. At least 22 paper notgeld are known related to Till’s life. They were issued by the Brunswick State Bank and three communes, Kneitlingen (Till’s alleged birthplace), Möllen (where he died and was buried), and Osterwieck (where he once lived). There may well be others out there. Good hunting and good collecting.

Eulenspiegel’s tombstone at Möllen.

72

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November 2011


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DORSET COIN CO LTD 193 ASHLEY ROAD PARKSTONE POOLE - DORSET BH14 9DL

Tel: (01202) 739606 Fax: (01202) 739230 Website: www.dorsetcoincompany.co.uk E-Mail: sales@dorsetcoincompany.co.uk

We issue regular sales lists of:

â&#x20AC;¢ British Coins â&#x20AC;¢ Gold Coins â&#x20AC;¢ Foreign Coins â&#x20AC;¢ Banknotes PLEASE TELEPHONE OR WRITE FOR A COPY November 2011

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Banknote prices

Price guide to:

New 7th Edition now available

The Cydesdale Bank Limited, The Clydesdale & North of Scotland Bank Limited and Clydesdale Bank PLC The Price Guide is intended as a supplement to the highly acclaimed BANKNOTE YEARBOOK and we hope the prices quoted will provide a true reflection of the market. The grading used in this price guide is strictly as the recognised English system. In the listing “—” indicates either: not usually found in this grade; or not collected in this condition. F

VF

VF

THE CLYDESDALE BANK LIMITED ONE POUND SC301 Signatories: D. Dewar (Accountant) and handsigned p. General Manager From 4.7.1882 to 30.10.1912 without prefix letter ....... from £480 £850 Prefix A dated 8.10.1913 to prefix A dated 9.2.1921. ................£300 £550 SC302a Signatories: A. Swanson (Cashier) and J. D. Dewar (Accountant) Prefix A dated 4.1.1922 and 14.6.1922 ........................................£260 £450 SC302b Signatories: A. Swanson (Cashier) and R. Young (Accountant) Prefix A dated 14.3.1923 to prefix A dated 27.10.1926 .............£260 £450 SC303a Signatories: A. Swanson (Cashier) and R. Young (Accountant) Prefix A dated 3.1.1927 to prefix A dated 7.10.1931 ...................£95 £180 SC303b Signatories: A. Mitchell (General Manager) and R. Young (Accountant & Cashier) Prefix A dated 2.3.1932 to prefix B dated 24.10.1945 .................£65 £100 SC303c Signatories: A. Mitchell (General Manager) and J. W. Pairmain (Accountant & Cashier) Prefix C dated 1.5.1946. ...............................................................£110 £200 SC303d Signatories: J. J. Campbell (General Manager) and J. W. Pairmain (Accountant & Cashier) Prefix C dated 20.11.1946 to prefix C dated 3.9.1947 .................£60 £100 SC303e Signatories: J. J. Campbell (General Manager) and R. R. Houston (Accountant & Cashier) Prefix C dated 7.4.1948 to prefix C dated 14.12.1949 .................£60 £100 FIVE POUNDS SC304 Signatories: D. Dewar (Accountant) and handsigned p. General Manager From 4.7.1882 (prefix unknown) to prefix Q2/B dated 9.2.1921.Rare SC305a Signatories: A. Swanson (Cashier) and J. D. Dewar (Accountant) Prefix Q2/C dated 15.2.1922 to prefix R2/J dated 14.6.1922 .......... Rare SC305b Signatories: A. Swanson (Cashier) and R. Young (Accountant) Prefix R2/K dated 31.1.1923 to prefix U2/O dated 9.12.1931 .£280 £450

VF

EF

SC305c Signatories: A. Mitchell (General Manager) and R. Young (Accountant & Cashier) Prefix U2/P dated 16.11.1932 to prefix W2/H dated 27.10.1937£380 £600 then printers imprint is removed from the bottom left of the note, and SC305d Prefix W2/J dated 25.5.1938 to prefix D3/A dated 24.10.1945 £300 £500 SC305e Signatories: J. J. Campbell (General Manager) and J. W. Pairmain (Accountant & Cashier) Prefix D2/B to prefix D3/R dated 10.7.1946 ..............................£350 £550 SC306a Signatories: J. J. Campbell (General Manager) and J. W. Pairmain (Accountant & Cashier) Prefix AA to prefix AQ dated 3.3.1948. £340 £650 SC306b Signatories: J. J. Campbell (General Manager) and R. R. Houston (Accountant & Cashier) Prefix AR to prefix BG dated 12.1.1949. ....................................£340 £650

F

VF

TWENTY POUNDS SC307 Signatories: D.Dewar (Accountant) and handsigned p. General Manager From 4.7.1882 (prefix unknown) to prefix P/B dated 9.6.1920 ...... Rare SC308a Signatories: A. Swanson (Cashier) and J. D. Dewar (Accountant) Prefix P/C dated 15.2.1922 to prefix Q/A dated 31.1.1923 ............ Rare SC308b Signatories: A. Swanson (Cashier) and R. Young (Accountant) Prefix Q/B dated 2.5.1923 to prefix Q/Z dated 3.6.1931...from £450 £900

VF

EF

SC308c Signatories: A. Mitchell (General Manager) and R. Young (Accountant &Cashier) Prefix R/A dated 16.11.1932 to prefix U/A dated 15.11.1944£ 750 £1250 SC308d Signatories: J. J. Campbell (General Manager) and J. W. Pairmain (Accountant & Cashier) Prefix U/B to prefix U/J dated 4.6.1947....................................£750 £1150

ONE HUNDRED POUNDS SC309 Signatories: D. Dewar (Accountant) and handsigned p.General Manager Final prefix E/V dated 5.8.1914.......................................................... Rare SC310a Signatories: A. Swanson (Cashier) and J. D. Dewar (Accountant) Prefix E/W to prefix F/A dated 15.2.1922 ........................................ Rare SC310b Signatories: A. Swanson (Cashier) and R. Young (Accountant) Prefix F/B dated 16.12.1925 to prefix F/L dated 3.6.1931 .............. Rare SC310c Signatories: A. Mitchell (General Manager) and R. Young (Accountant & Cashier) Prefix F/M dated 19.6.1935 to prefix G/D dated 3.2.1943 ............. Rare SC310d Signatories: J. J. Campbell (General Manager) and J. W. Pairmain (Accountant & Cashier) Prefix G/E to prefix G/H dated 26.3.1947 ........................................ Rare

74

Coin News

EF

THE CLYDESDALE & NORTH OF SCOTLAND BANK LIMITED

ONE POUND SC311a Signatory: J. J. Campbell (General Manager) Prefix A dated 1.11.1950 to prefix M dated 1.6.1955, and ...... £35 Prefix A/N to prefix A/Q dated 1.11.1956 .............................. £35 SC311b Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix A/R dated 1.5.1958 to prefix A/U dated 1.11.1960 ..... £35 SC312

£70 £70 £70

EF UNC

Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix B/A dated 1.3.1961 to prefix B/H dated 1.2.196 ......... £35

£55

VF

EF

FIVE POUNDS SC313a Signatory: J. J. Campbell (General Manager) Prefix A dated 2.5.1951 to prefix P dated 1.6.1955, and ......... £60 Prefix A/Q dated 1.11.1956 to prefix A/X dated 1.2.1958 ..... £60 SC313b Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix A/Y, A/Z, A/A and A/B dated 1.3.1960...................... £70 SC314 Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix B/A dated 20.9.1961 to prefix B/M dated 1.2.1963 ..... £45 TWENTY POUNDS SC315a Signatory: J. J. Campbell (General Manager) Prefix A dated 2.5.1951 to prefix B dated 1.2.1958 ................ £120 SC315b Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix C dated 1.12.1960 to prefix E dated 1.8.1962 .............. £120

£120 £120 £130 £85

£250 £250

ONE HUNDRED POUNDS SC316a Signatory: J. J. Campbell (General Manager) Prefix A dated 2.5.1951. ............................................................ £700 £1200 SC316b Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix A dated 1.12.1960 ........................................................... £850 £1300

CLYDESDALE BANK LIMITED

EF UNC

ONE POUND SC317a Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix C/A dated 2.9.1963 to prefix C/K dated 3.4.1967 ....... £30 SC317b Sorting symbols added to reverse of the notes Prefix C/L dated 3.4.1967 to prefix C/U dated 1.9.1969 ....... £30 SC318a Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix D/A to prefix D/F dated 1.3.1971 ................................. £25 SC318b Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (General Manager) Prefix D/G dated 1.5.1972 to prefix D/Q dated 1.8.1973 ...... £20 SC318c Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/R dated 1.3.1974 to prefix D/BT dated 27.2.1981... £12 FIVE POUNDS SC319a Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix C/A dated 2.9.1963 to prefix C/R dated 1.5.1967 ....... £55 SC319b Sorting symbols added to reverse of the notes Prefix C/S dated 1.5.1967 to prefix C/GG dated 1.9.1969 .... £55 SC320a Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix D/A to prefix D/K dated 1.3.1971 ................................ £55 SC320b Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (General Manager) Prefix D/L dated 1.5.1972 to prefix D/AA dated 1.8.1973 .... £55 SC320c Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/AB dated 1.3.1974 to prefix D/DX dated 27.2.1981 £45 TEN POUNDS SC321 Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix C/A dated 20.4.1964 to prefix C/D dated 1.12.1967 . £240 SC322a Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (General Manager) Prefix D/A dated 1.3.1972 to prefix D/F dated 1.8.1973 ..... £160 SC322b Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/G dated 1.3.1974 to prefix D/DZ dated 27.2.1981 £140

£50 £50 £35 £30 £18

£85 £85 £85 £85 £65

£350 £250 £200

TWENTY POUNDS SC323 Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix C/A dated 19.11.1964 to prefix C/H dated 1.12.1967.£250 SC324aSignatory: A. R. MacMillan (General Manager) Prefix D/A to prefix D/J dated 1.3.1972 ................................ £300 SC324b Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/K dated 2.2.1976 to prefix D/AV dated 27.2.1981 £200

£300

FIFTY POUNDS SC325 Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/A to prefix D/Q dated 1.9.1981 .............................. £280

£400

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£320 £450

November 2011


Banknote prices VF

EF

EF UNC

ONE HUNDRED POUNDS SC326 Signatory: R. D. Fairbairn (General Manager) Prefix C/A dated 1.2.1964 to prefix C/B dated 1.2.1968.......£1050 £1950

TWENTY POUNDS SC351a Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/BH to prefix D/BR dated 29.3.1982...........................£170 £300 SC351b Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/BS dated 5.1.1983 to prefix D/ED dated 8.4.1985................................................................................£140 £220 SC351c Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief Executive) Prefix D/EE dated 18.9.1987 to prefix D/FV dated 2.8.1990................................................................................£120 £200 SC352a Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief Executive) Prefix E/AA dated 30.11.1990 to prefix E/NM dated 3.9.1992..................................................................................£65 £100 Replacement note—prefix E/ZZ........................................................ Rare SC352b Signatory: C. Love (Chief Executive) Prefix E/NN to prefix E/SR dated 5.1.1993 ...............................£90 £180 Replacement note—prefix E/ZZ........................................................ Rare SC353a Signatory: F. Ciccutto (Chief Executive) .............................................. Prefix E/SS to prefix F/AX dated 1.9.1994 .................................£50 £85 Replacement note—prefix E/ZZ........................................................ Rare SC353b Signatory: F. Goodwin (Chief Executive) Prefix F/AY to prefix F/BC dated 2.12.1996...............................£45 £65 Replacement note—prefix E/ZZ........................................................ Rare SC354 Signatory: F. Goodwin (Chief Executive) Prefix F/BD to F/BF, and prefix C/HG dated 30.9.1997 ..........£50 £85 SC355a Signatory: F. Goodwin (Chief Executive) Prefix A/AA to prefix A/AQ (split at 950,000) dated 1.11.1997. ...............................................................................£35 £60 Replacement note—prefix E/ZZ........................................................ Rare SC355b Signatory: J. Wright (Chief Executive) Prefix A/AQ to prefix A/BL (split at 450,000) dated 12.10.1999.£35 £55 NB—Prefix A/AQ starts at A/AQ 950001 and is scarce SC355c Signatory: G. Savage (Chief Executive) Prefix A/BL to prefix A/BP dated 19.6.2002 ................................— £55 SC355d Signatory: S. Targett (Chief Executive) Prefix A/BQ to prefix A/BW (split at 450,000) dated 26.1.2003 — £45 SC355e Signatory: R. Pinney (Chief Executive) Prefix A/BW to prefix A/CS (split at 450,000) dated 25.4.2003.— £45 SC355f Signatory: D. Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix A/CS to prefix AD/K dated 21.11.2004 .............................— £40 SC356 Signatory: J. Wright (Chief Executive) Prefix A/AL to A/AQ, 950,000 and G/AD dated 9.4.1999. .....£45 £85 SC357 Signatory: J. Wright (Chief Executive) Prefix MM dated 1.1.2000. .............................................................£40 £6 SC358 Signatory: D. Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix A/DK 950001 to prefix A/EJ 450000 dated 6.5.2005 ......£35 £50 SC359 Signatory: D. Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix RB/1 to prefix RB/5 dated 25.3.2005 ...............................£40 £60 SC360 Signatory: D. Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix A/EJ (from 450001) dated 24.6.2006 and ongoing ...........— £40 SC360A Signatory: D. Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix W/HS dated 11.7.2009..........................................................— £36 Prefix E/ZZ—replacement note......................................................... £55

EF UNC

SC327a Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (General Manager) Prefix D/A dated 1.3.1972 to prefix D/E dated 6.1.1975 ........£850 £1400 SC327b Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/E and D/F dated 1.2.1976 ...........................................£850 £1400

CLYDESDALE BANK PLC ONE POUND SC328a Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/BU to prefix D/CD dated 29.3.1982. ...........................£10 SC328b Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/CE to prefix D/CR dated 5.1.1983.................................£8 SC328c Sorting symbols removed from reverse of the notes Prefix D/CS dated 8.4.1985 to prefix D/DK dated 25.11.1985...£8 Replacement note—prefix D/ZZ .................................................£28 SC328d Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief Executive) Prefix D/DL dated 18.9.1987 to prefix D/DW dated 9.11.1988. £5 Replacement note—prefix D/ZZ .................................................£28

£16 £13 £12 £40 £9 £45

FIVE POUNDS SC329a Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/DY to prefix D/FP dated 29.3.1982. ............................£40 £60 SC329b Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/FQ to prefix D/HP dated 5.1.1983. .............................£40 £60 SC329c Sorting symbols removed from reverse of the notes Prefix D/HQ to prefix D/JG dated 18.9.1986.............................£25 £45 SC329d Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief Executive) Prefix D/JH dated 18.9.1987 to prefix D/LU dated 28.6.1989 .£22 £35 SC330a Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief Executive) Prefix E/AA to prefix E/CM dated 2.4.1990. .............................£18 £30 SC330b Signatory: F. Cicutto (Chief Executive) Prefix E/CN to prefix E/DN dated 1.9.1994 ..............................£12 £18 Replacement note—prefix D/ZZ ....................................................... Rare SC330c Signatory: F. Goodwin (Chief Executive) Prefix E/DP dated 21.7.1966 to prefix E/DY dated 1.12.1997 ..£9 £14 SC330d Signatory: G. Savage (Chief Executive) Prefix E/DZ to Prefix E/EB dated 19.6.2002 ................................— £10 SC331 Signatory: F. Goodwin (Chief Executive) Prefix RB dated 21.7.1996. Set of four notes with matched numbers ......................................— £90 Prefix RB dated 21.7.1996. Single note...........................................— £20 TEN POUNDS SC341a Signatory: A. R. MacMillan (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/EA to prefix D/GW dated 29.3.1982 ........................£130 (prefix D/GW splits at or below 030000) SC341b Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/GW dated 5.1.1983 to prefix D/PZ dated 18.9.1986£100 Replacement note—prefix D/ZZ ....................................................... SC341c Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief Executive) Prefix D/QA to prefix D/SW dated 18.9.1987. ..........................£90 SC342 Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief Executive) Prefix D/SW dated 7.5.1988 to prefix E/GR dated 3.9.1990 ....£45 Replacement note—prefix D/ZZ ....................................................... SC343a Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief Executive) Prefix E/GR to prefix E/QZ dated 3.9.1992. ..............................£40 Replacement note—prefix E/ZZ........................................................ SC343b Signatory: C. Love (Chief Executive) Prefix E/QZ to prefix E/VC dated 5.1.1993 ...............................£35 Replacement note—prefix E/ZZ........................................................ SC343c Signatory: F. Goodwin (Chief Executive) Prefix E/VD dated 22.3.1996 to prefix E/WZ dated 27.2.1997 £22 Replacement note—prefix E/ZZ........................................................ SC344a Signatory: F. Goodwin (Chief Executive) Prefix A/AA to prefix A/AK dated 1.5.1997..............................£24 Replacement note—prefix E/ZZ........................................................ SC344b Prefix NAB dated 1.5.1997 ............................................................£65 Notes with prefix NAB were encapsulated in a block of acrylic and issued to ...members of the Bank’s staff to commemorate 10 years of ownership of the National Australia Bank. Surplus, un-encapsulated notes were subsequently issued due to a shortage of new notes, and a few have found their way onto the collectors market. SC344c Signatory: J. Wright (Chief Executive) Prefix A/AK dated 5.11.1998 to prefix A/CA dated 12.10.1999 — SC344d Signatory: S. Targett (Chief Executive) Prefix A/CA to prefix A/CL 800000 dated 26.1.2003 ................— SC344e Signatory: R. Pinney (Chief Executive) Prefix A/CL to prefix A/CZ (split at 300,000) dated 25.4.2003 — Prefix E/ZZ—replacement note......................................................... SC344f Signatory: D. Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix A/CZ 300,001 to prefix A/DS (split at 800,000) dated 21.11.2004.. ..............................................................................— SC345 Signatory: J. Wright (Chief Executive) Prefix MM dated 1.1.2000 ..............................................................£20 SC346 Signatory: D. Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer). Prefix CG/1 to CG/5 dated 15.3.2006 ...........................................— SC347 Signatory: D.Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix A/DS 800001 to prefix A/FP 800000 dated 14.3.2006 ......— SC347 Signatory: D.Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix A/DS 800001 to prefix A/FP 800000 dated 14.3.2006 ......—

November 2011

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£200 £160 Rare £150 £75 Rare £65 Rare £60 Rare £40 Rare £40 Rare £90

£25 £25 £25 £65 £20 £45 £35 £20 £20

FIFTY POUNDS SC361 Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief Executive) Prefix D/R dated 3.9.1989 to prefix D/AV dated 20.4.1992 ...£200 SC362a Signatory: F. Goodwin (Chief Executive) Prefix A/AA to A/CB dated 22.3.1996 ......................................£110 SC362b Signatory: R. Pinney (Chief Executive) Prefix A/CC dated 25.4.2003 ......................................................£100 SC363 Signatory: S. Grimshaw (Chief Executive) Prefix GU dated 6.1.2001 (100,000 notes issued) ......................£125 SC364 Signatory: D. Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix A/CC dated 9.1.2006 Series ends at AC/CC 750000 .......— SC365 Signatory: D. Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix W/HS dated 16.8.2009 .........................................................— Prefix E/ZZ—Replacement note....................................................— ONE HUNDRED POUNDS SC365 Signatory: D. Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix W/HS dated 16.8.2009 .........................................................— Prefix E/ZZ—Replacement note....................................................— SC371a Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief General Manager) Prefix D/G to prefix D/L dated 8.4.1985 ..................................£500 SC371b Signatory: A. R. Cole Hamilton (Chief Executive) Prefix D/M to prefix D/R dated 9.11.1991 ...............................£400 SC372 Signatory: F. Goodwin (Chief Executive) Prefix A/AA to prefix A/BA dated 2.10.1996 .............................— SC373 Signatory: S. Grimshaw (Chief Executive) Prefix GU dated 6.1.2001 (100,000 notes issued) ......................£160 SC374 Signatory: D. Thorburn (Chief Operating Officer) Prefix W/HS dated 7.6.2009 and ongoing ....................................— Prefix E/ZZ ...........................................................................................

£350 £180 £170 £200 £10 £90 £150

£90 £150 £1000 £800 £240 £350 £185 £260

Coming next month— Price guide to: The Commercial Bank of Scotland Limited The Banknote Yearbook contains a comprehensive price guide to the banknotes of the British Isles. To order a copy call 01404 44166 or visit www.tokenpublishing.com

Coin News

75


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Coin news


LATEST ISSUES By our banknote correspondent, TREVOR WILKIN

GIBRALTAR

Twelve months ago I wrote of the new £10 and £50 paper notes issued by the Government of Gibraltar (GoG). This month I write of the £5, £20 and for the first time a £100 which completed the series with their appearance on May 12, 2011. As for the £10 and £50, a modern portrait of Queen Elizabeth II appears on the front. However, it is a very unusual depiction of Her Majesty being an airbrushed partial portrait presenting a considerably younger image which is interrupted by other design elements. Accompanying her on the front are the Gibraltar coat of arms, broad diagonal patterns which intrude onto the portrait and a stylised and embossed “G” in a field of raised squares which doubles as a security feature called MASK. When held to the light the denomination numeral appears within this feature on all notes except the £5. According to the GoG, these broad diagonal patterns reflect Gibraltar’s strategic location being where the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea meet. Back designs represent a continuation of the History and Heritage series which was introduced in 1995. Whilst Gibraltar has a long and varied history, in reality it is a pin prick dominated by the Rock and there are limited scenes to portray. For the traditionally green £5, the Moorish Castle (nestling on the slopes of the Rock) with its prominent Tower of Homage features on its back as it did on the 1995 but without the portrait of Moorish Governor Tariq Ibn Zayed. Tariq was the Governor of Tangiers who led an invasion across the Straits settling Gibraltar in AD 711 and after whom Gibraltar is named—the Moors called the Rock, Jabel Tariq or Mountain of Tariq which was later anglicised to Gibraltar. Using Gibraltar as an initial anchor point, their influence progressively spread across the Iberian Peninsula lasting some 600 years. The Moorish Castle, whose upper sections are depicted became a crucial element of their fortifications, dates back to the 11th century. What is now Casemates Square which appeared on the £10 from 2002 until 2006, is built on the lower level of the Castle and was a highly defended position by the Moors, Spanish and British alike. As for the £20 before it, the new orange one shows a crippled HMS Victory being towed to Gibraltar after the Battle of Trafalgar of 1805. History tells us Admiral Nelson’s body is aboard. As for the £5, the portrait on the back of the 1995 series (in this case Nelson’s) is dropped perhaps with the objective of having a less cluttered presentation. For the new mauve hybrid £100 using De La Rue’s Optiks technology we have the King’s Bastion on the back—this denomination, the hybrid technology and the scene are a first for Gibraltar. Originally a strategic fortification as the name implies, it was built off a mediaeval seawall in 1773 by Major General Robert Boyd securing the western defences. Typically of an arrow head design, it was heavily gunned, housed many troops in its casemates and was the defensive headquarters during the Great Siege of 1779–83 by the French and Spanish. The Siege is illustrated on the current £10. From time to time the Bastion underwent modifications but retaining a primary military purpose until the 1960s when a power station was built on the site. Decommissioned in the mid 1990s, it gave way to the extensive King’s Bastion Leisure Centre, architecturally a mix of the old and new, which was opened in 2008. One unusual feature of this series is the amount of white on the note. Up to 25 per cent is the natural colour of the paper, within which space is the watermark and as such is a throwback to design practices of the past. A more contemporary Her Majesty wearing a tiara (which is not the case in her printed portrait) forms the watermark to the right which is accompanied by an electrotype of the denomination numeral with the Pound sign. For the £5 an interrupted metallic security thread contains the inscription “GIBRALTAR 5” whereas the £20 contains a rope or chain like design without further inscription and of course the £100 has the Optiks feature incorporating a castle tower. A crenulated tower forms a perfect registration on each value and embossed cornerstones provided added security and strength at each corner. These three new notes are dated January 1, 2011 in contrast to those earlier in the series with January 1, 2010. Notes are signed by the Commissioner of Currency and are printed by the historical printer of choice, De La Rue.

Trevor Wilkin can be contacted at: PO Box 182 | Cammeray | NSW 2062 | Australia | Telephone/Fax ++61-2-9438-5040. Email: trevorsnotes@bigpond.com | website www.polymernotes.com

November 2011

www.tokenpublishing.com

Please see Trevor Wilkin’s advert on page 69

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77


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November 2011


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79


R I C H A R D W. J E F F E R Y The name in coins and banknotes for over 40 years

~OFFERS FOR SALE~

SOVEREIGNS 1817 GEORGE 111 AUNC 1817 GEORGE 111 GVF

£1,575 £975

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£450 £975 £445 £875 £525 £685 £675 £475 £675 £475 £565 £545 £595 £575 £725 £575 £695 £675 £575 £845 £875 £975 £575 £575 £725 £575 £725 £475 £495 £745 £495 £495 £495 £425 £745 £375 £385 £395 £385 £725 £485 £375 £375 £585 £585 £325 £375 £375 £375 £375 £375 £375 £375 £375 £375 £375 £325 £375 £375 £375 £395 £365 £375 £345 £345 £345 £345 £345 £345 £345 £345 £385 £375

WANTED FOR CLIENTSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;TOP PRICES PAID SOVEREIGNS EF TO UNC CANADA 1909â&#x20AC;&#x201D;1913, 1914 SYDNEY 1921â&#x20AC;&#x201D;1924 MELBOURNE 1928â&#x20AC;&#x201D;1929

SOVEREIGNS SHIELD VF TO EF LONDON 1838â&#x20AC;&#x201D;1839 EF TO UNC LONDON 1842 TO 50

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ATS Bullion Ltd

Dealers in Bullion & Modern Coins Suppliers of Gold Coins & Bars for Investment 2 Savoy Court, STRAND, London WC2R 0EZ Tel: 020 7240 4040

Fax: 020 7240 4042

e-mail: bullion@atslimited.fsnet.co.uk Website: www.atsbullion.com

TREBEHOR, PORTHCURNO, PENZANCE, CORNWALL TR19 6LX â&#x20AC;¢ Tel: 01736 871263 â&#x20AC;¢

Contact us for friendly advice whether you are buying or selling.

Please note that all stock is in the bank which may cause a slight delay in sending.

Website: www.atsbullion.com

Coins sent on 7-day approval against payment. P&P £1 buyers risk. Reg Post £5 ~ Up-to-date computer quotes available for coins and banknotes ~

80

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November 2011


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GOULBORN COLLECTION Ltd â&#x20AC;¢ PO Box 122, Rhyl LL18 3XR â&#x20AC;¢ Tel: (01745) 338112 eve (01745) 344856 a&RLQ 0HGDOOLRQV/LVWVGD\VDSSURYDO³2UGLQDU\SRVWSDQG5HFRUGHG'HOLYHU\Â&#x2026;\RXUULVN5HJLVWHUHGSRVWÂ&#x2026;P\ULVNa

November 2011

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November 2011


Letters to the Editor Write in and tell us your views on numismatically-related topics

Mint problems

Dear Editor Some months ago you intimated that you were looking into the various anomalies that occur with our circulating coinage. Typical was the one penny coin with a blob underneath Her Majestyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nose that made it look as though she was sporting a moustache. There are also numerous other imperfections in the striking of our current coins. I have noticed that it is the 2p coin which seems to be the most regularly affectedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I started collecting the ones that I spotted with the idea of forming a collection of all the different types but after putting together a representative selection I counted over 400 pieces! Consequently I have decided to give up on my initial idea and I now only keep the ones with really obvious ďŹ&#x201A;aws. My feeling is simply that the environment at the Mint is dusty and therefore particles are getting lodged between the steel blanks and their copper plating long before the coin is struckâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which is more or less what you said initially. Amongst my ďŹ nds has been a number of 2ps of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Armorialâ&#x20AC;? type where it appears obvious that the Royal Mint are experiencing other difficulties with the productionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the reverse shield on many of them can almost be seen on the obverse side, thus marring the otherwise clear portrait of Her Majesty. I have a number of collector friends who have all observed the same thing which is reminiscent of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;ghostingâ&#x20AC;? on

Whilst we endeavour to reply as quickly as possible this can take some time. Please send your letters to: Token Publishing Ltd., Orchard House, Duchy Road, Heathpark, Honiton, Devon, EX14 1YD, or to info@tokenpublishing.com If a reply is required, please enclose an SAE. Here we publish a selection from the postbag.

Hopefully we will be looking into this question very soonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;my apologies for the unseemly delay but these things always take longer than anticipated. In the meantime it would be useful to hear from other readers on the subject.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;ED.

Your countermarks are commonly known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;chop marksâ&#x20AC;? and are often found on coins from the Orientâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they are test marks and marks added by merchants who would verify the fineness of the silver in the coin. Interestingly, at one time these marks automatically consigned a coin to the scrap pot, but today there is a growing interest in them and collectors look upon the marks as provenance for a piece. However, the coin is defaced and, like all grading, it is purely subjective: one collector seeing a heavily defaced or marked coin as down-graded but another considering it a historic itemâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to you!â&#x20AC;&#x201D;ED.

Defaced coin

Growing readership

much of the bronze coinage of Edward VII and George V. Having said all that is there any likelihood that we can look forward to the promised article on the subject as it would be nice to hear the official view as well as the findings of other interested collectors. Michael Heath

Dear Editor I have recently purchased an interesting coin: a British Trade Dollar dated 1907. It is certainly an attractive piece with its depiction of Standing Britannia on the obverse and the Chinese design on the reverse. I understand why they were produced and how they changed hands throughout the Far East. However, my coin has a number of countermarks, some of which are obviously oriental. Can you explain what these are and reassure me that they do not detract from the value of the coin. J. R. Latimer

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Dear Editor My dog Rob loves your publication!

Paul Nepstad

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DEALERS LISTS

EACH month a bewildering selection of lists are offered by dealers featuring all aspects of the hobby. To help collectors decide which lists are of interest to them and to save valuable time and frustration on the part of the dealer, we give a brief review of the lists seen (and the inland price where applicable). When sending for lists a large S.A.E. is always appreciated. Dealers: we are happy to include lists received from advertisers, free of charge—a nominal charge of £5 per issue is requested from non-advertisers. AIREDALE COINS, O Box 7, Bingley, West Yorkshire BD16 1XU. Modern coins. ANCIENT & GOTHIC, PO Box 5390, Bournemouth, BH7 6XR. July/August list No. 268—Coins and antiquities. A. H. BALDWIN & SONS LTD., 11, Adelphi Terrace, London WC2N 6BJ. Fixed pice coin list. ARGHANS, Unit 9, Callington Business Park, Tinners Way, Moss Side, Callington, Cornwall PL17 7SH. April list of world banknotes. STEPHEN J. BETTS, 4, Victoria Street, Narborough, Leicester LE19 2DP. List T&M 26 world coins. BARRY BOSWELL, 24 Townsend Lane, Upper Boddington, Daventry, N o r t h a n t s N N 1 1 6 D R . Wo r l d banknotes. JAMES & C. BRETT, 17 Dale Road, Lewes, Sussex BN7 1 LH UK. 26pp of world coins. STEVE BURKINSHAW, 19 Oak Lodge Road, High Green, Sheffield S35 4QA. Hammered and milled . CAMBRIDGESHIRE COINS, 355 Newmarket Road, Cambridge CB5 8JG. Coins and accessories. NIGEL CLARK, 28 Ulundi Road, Blackheath, London SE3 7UG. List of 17th c. tokens. COINCRAFT, 45 Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3JL. “The Phoenix”. Large newspaper-style list containing coins, banknotes, books, etc. COINS HISTORIC, PO Box 5043, Lower Quinton, Stratford upon Avon CV37 8WH. Email: sales@coinshistoric. co.uk. Catalogue No. 1 of ancient coins CO L I N CO O K E, P O B ox 6 0 2 , Altrincham, WA14 5UN. Hammered/ milled coinage. CNG, 14 Old Bond Street, London W1S 4PP. 11pp list of numismatic books. DAVID CRADDOCK, PO Box 3785 Camp Hill, Birmingham B11 2NF. List of British coins for sale. IAN DAVISON, PO Box 256, Durham DH1 2GW. 18pp list available— hammered and milled coins dating from 1066–1910. D E I G R AT I A , P O B o x 3 5 6 8 , Buckingham, Bucks MK18 4ZS. Coins and antiquities.

CLIVE DENNETT, 66 Benedicts Street, Norwich NR2 4AR. Shop open 9.30am to 4.30pm. Closed Thurs & Sun. List of banknotes. DORSET COIN CO. LTD, 193 Ashley Road, Parkstone, Dorset BH14 9DL. Lists of British coins, world banknotes and gold coins. JEAN ELSEN, Avenue de Tervueren, 65, Brussels, 1040 Belgium. List 256—ancient, medieval, modern and oriental coins. GK COINS LTD, 17 Hanover Square, London, W1S 1HU. List No. 5. List of British and world coins. GALATA, The Old White Lion, Market Street, Llanfyllin, Powys SY22 5BX. 130 pp of books. B. GOULBORN, PO Box 122, Rhyl LL18 3XR. Lists of English coins and notes. IAN GRADON, PO Box 359, Durham DH7 6WZ. Internet list—world paper money. ANTHONY HALSE, PO Box 1856, Newport, S. Wales NP18 2WA. Autumn List—12 pp of English, foreign coins and tokens. MUNTHANDEL.G.HENZEN, Postbus 42, NL-3958 ZT Amerongen. Tel: +31 (0) 343-430564. Email: info@henzen. org. List 227 , world coins. List 216, Dutch coins. ALVIN HOUSE, 4 Carpenters’ Terrace, Martock, Somerset, TA12 6HF. British coins. IRISH BANKNOTES, PO Box 99, Kells, Co. Meath, Ireland. 16 Page list containing Irish banknotes. www. irishpapermoney.com. R. INGRAM, 206 Honeysuckle Road, Bassett SO16 3BU. List 91: Hammered, milled and modern. D M I T R I K H A R I TO N O V , G e n . Janouska 900, 19800 Praha 9, Czech Republic. Email: kharitonov@volny. cz. Russian banknotes. K. B. COINS, 50 Lingfield Road, Martins Wood, Stevenage, Herts SG1 5SL. 105 pp of English coins. K & M COINS P O B ox 3 6 6 2 , Wolverhampton WV10 6ZW, or 07971 950246. British and World coins and tokens. Please email: for details: mickbagguley@hotmail.co.uk.

KLEEFORD COINS, 42b Shop Lane, Nether Heage, Belper, Derbyshire DE56 2AR. List available, email: kleeford@btinternet.com. FRITZ RUDOLF KüNKER, Münzenhandlung Gutenbergstrasse 23, 49076 Osnabrück. List No. 195. World coins, ancient to modern. LIGHTHOUSE (Duncannon Partnership), 4 Beaufort Road, Reigate, Surrey RH2 9DJ. 24pp catalogue of coin accessories. LINDNER, 3a Hayle Industrial Park, Hayle, TR27 5JR. 60pp. catalogue of accessories. MANNIN COLLECTIONS LIMITED, 5 Castle Street, Peel, Isle of Man IM5 1AN. September colour list of Isle of Man banknotes. GIUSEPPE MICELI, 204 Bants Lane, Duston, Northampton NN5 6AH. British/foreign coins. TIMOTHY MILLETT LTD. PO Box 20851, London SE22 0YN. www. historicmedals.com. Historical medals (£10, refundable on purchase). PETER MORRIS, PO Box 223, Bromley BR1 4EQ. List No. 13 Banknotes; No. 8 Foreign coins, world coins, books; No. 56 British coins; No. 37 medals. COLIN NARBETH & SON LTD, 20 Cecil Court, Leicester Square, London, WC2N 4HE. 28pp list of world banknotes available. NOTABILITY BANKNOTES, Email: info@notability-banknotes.com. List of world notes. GLENN S. OGDEN, 53 Chestnut Cresc, Culver Green, Chudleigh TQ13 0PT. List No. 50. 18pp 19th/20th c. English coins. ROGER OUTING, PO Box 123, Clayton West, Huddersfield HD8 9WY. List 18—Cheques, banknotes, banking memorabilia. PETERCOINS, PO Box 46743, London SW17 0YF. Regular lists of low cost British Coins. MARK RASMUSSEN, PO Box 42, Betchworth RH3 7YR. List 21— English/world coins. RODERICK RICHARDSON, The Old Granary Antique Centre, King’s Staithe Lane, King’s Lynne PE30 1LZ. 18pp. Hammered & milled.

F. J. RIST, PO Box 4, Ibstock, LE67 6ZJ. 2011 Summer list of ancient & early English coins. CHRIS RUDD, PO Box 222, Aylsham NR11 6TY. September list 119: 20pp of Celtic coins. Liz’s List No. 55 : Celtic coins—all under £200. SALTFORD COINS, Harcourt, Bath Road, Saltford BS31 3DQ.. 6 lists per year of coins, tokens & medallions. Postal only. STUDIO COINS, 16 Kilham Lane, Winchester, Hampshire S022 5PT. Numismatic list no 84. THE COLLECTOR’S BAY, 18 Ross Road, Wallington, Surrey SM6 8QB Tel: 0775 925 3127. List of coin accessories. THE LONDON COIN COMPANY LTD, PO Box 57635, London NW7 0DS. British & world coins. www. thelondoncoincompany.com. MICHAEL TRENERRY, PO Box 55, Truro TR1 2YQ. (October) Ancient/ hammered. JOHN WELSH, PO Box 150, Burton on Trent, Staffs DE13 7LB. 16pp list of British coins. D. S. WELTON, 13 Monmouth Road, Harlington, Dunstable, Beds LU5 6NE. List 21—8pp of British coins. PAM WEST, PO Box 257, Sutton, Surrey SM3 9WW. 20pp list Irish notes. JOHN WHITMORE, Teynham Lodge, Chase Road, Upper Colwall, Malvern, Worcs WR13 6DJ. Coins, tokens, etc. TIM WILKES, PO Box 150, Battle TN33 0FA. List No. 13, medieval/ Islamic coins. WORLD TREASURE BOOKS, PO Box 5, Newport, IOW PO30 2JG. List 24. D. YAPP, PO Box 4718, Shrewsbury Mail Centre SY1 9EA. 11pp list of banknotes of the world.

DEALERS—

Please send your current list to Token Publishing Ltd, Orchard House, Duchy Road, Heathpark, Honiton, Devon EX14 1YD

/ĂŵĂĐŽůůĞĐƚŽƌĂŶĚ/ůŽŽŬ ĨŽƌsŝĐƚŽƌŝĂƉƌŽŽĨƐŝŶ& ͲWƌŽŽĨƌŽǁŶϭϴϯϵ͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘ άϭϲ͕ϬϬϬ ͲDĂƚĐŚĞĚWƌŽŽĨƌŽǁŶ͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘ ĂŶĚ,ĂůĨƌŽǁŶϭϴϯϵ͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘ άϮϬ͕ϬϬϬ ͲϭϴϯϵWƌŽŽĨƐĞƚ͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘ άϴϬ͕ϬϬϬ ͲϭϴϴϳWƌŽŽĨƐĞƚ͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘ άϭϴ͕ϬϬϬ ͲϭϴϵϯWƌŽŽĨƐĞƚ͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘ άϮϱ͕ϬϬϬ ũĞƚŵĂũΛŚŽƚŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ ϬϬͲϱϴͲϮϵϯͲϰϱϭ͘Ϯϰ͘ϰϬĂŌĞƌϮƉŵ ϬϬͲϯϯͲϰϭϯ͘ϲϯ͘ϳϳ͘ϰϬ November 2011

www.tokenpublishing.com

Tel: 01430 879740 / 07905 467650 e-mail: sales@weightoncoin.co.uk We specialise in British & Colonial Gold & Silver coins & sets of the modern age. Sovereigns of different Monarchs, dates & Mint Marks also available. Always in stock are: • Gold Proof Coins & Sets • Silver Proof Coins & Sets • Gold & Silver Bullion Coins • Royal Mint Collectors Pieces • Gold Sovereigns Visit our e-shop and order on line at

www.weightoncoin.co.uk 18 High Street, Market Weighton, York, YO43 3AH We also buy single coins or whole collections.

Coin news

85


Diary dates FAIRS/EVENTS

DATE

EVENT

VENUE

Charing Cross Marketâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Coins, Stamps and Collectables

1 Embankment Place, London (opposite Embankment Tube Station)

( 01483 281 771

Nov 2

Coin and Collectables Fair

Stowmarket Football Club, Bury Road, Stowmarket

CLICKCOLLECT ( 01485 578118 (David James)

Nov 6

Collectors Fair

Cresta Court Hotel, Church Street, Altrincham

NATIONWIDE COLLECTORS FAIRS ( 01484 866777 ( 07971 950246

Wolverhampton Coin Fair

Social Club, Church Road, Bradmoor, Wolverhampton

Nov 9

Cheltenham Fair

St Andrews United Reform Church, Montpelier Street, Cheltenham

( 0117 962 3203

Nov 12

Coin and Collectables Fair

Large Parish Hall, De La Warr Road, East Grinstead

( 01342 326317

Nov 13

Midland Coin Fair

National Motorcycle Museum, Bickenhill, Birmingham

( 01694 731781 (Mike Veissid)

Nov 16

Coins and Collectables Fair

Stanway Football Club, New Farm Road, Ely

CLICKCOLLECT ( 01485 578118 (David James)

Nov 17

Plymouth Fair

The Guidhall, Plymouth

( 01749 813324

Nov 19

London Coin Fair

Bloomsbury Hotel, 16-22 Great Russell Street, London

( 01694 731781 : www.coinfairs.co.uk

Collectors Fair

America Hall, Pinhoe, Exeter

MICHAEL HALE COLLECTORS FAIRS ( 01761 414304

Little Clacton Coin & Stamp Fair

Youth & Community Centre, Parish Fields, Plough Corner, Harwich Road, Clacton

( 01255 862087

Nov 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20

Numismata Frankfurt 2011

Forum der Messe, Frankfurt

( +49 (0)89 268359 : www.numismata.de

Nov 20

Britannia Medal Fair

Carisbrooke Hall, The Victory Services Club, 63/79 Seymour Street, London

( 01404 46972 : www.tokenpublishing.com

Collectors Fair

Cresta Court Hotel, Church Street, Altrincham

NATIONWIDE COLLECTORS FAIRS ( 01484 866777

Collectors Fair

Victoria Methodist Church Hall, Station Road, Weston Super Mare

MICHAEL HALE COLLECTORS FAIRS ( 01761 414304

Nov 26 Nov 27

Collectors Fair

The Cedars Hotel, Barnstaple

( 01805 622794

Wakefield Coin, Medal and Banknote Fair

Cedar Court Hotel, Denby Dale Road, Calder Grove, Wakefield

( 01522 684681 (Eddie Smith)

Collectors Fair

Royal Clifton Hotel, The Promenade, Southport

NATIONWIDE COLLECTORS FAIRS ( 01484 866777

DATE

AUCTIONS

CONTACT

November (every Saturday)

AUCTION

LOCATION

CONTACT

Nov 12

84th Numismatic Auction

Newcastle Upon Tyne

B. FRANK & SON ( 0191 413749 :www.b-frank-and-son.co.uk

Nov 17

Coins, Banknotes, Tokens, Medallions etc

Carlisle

THOMSON, RODDICK & MEDCALF ( 01228 528939 :www.thomsonroddick.com

British and World Coins

London

DNW ( 020 7016 1700 :www.dnw.co.uk

Nov 18

Auction 20: British and World Coins

London

ST JAMESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ( 020 7930 7997 : www.the-saleroom.com

Nov 19

The Autumn Argentum Auction

London

BALDWINS (020 7930 9808 www.baldwin.co.uk

Auction IIIâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Choice world coins

Dublin

INTERNATIONAL COIN EXCHANGE ( +353 (0) 86 849 33 55 : auctionice@gmail.com

Nov 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20

Classical Coins, World Coins, Medals, Paper Moneyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Italian Mint and Savoia Kingdom

Valdragone, Italy

INASTA ( +378 0549 970146 :www.inasta.com

Nov 20

British, World and Ancient Coins

London

LOCKDALES ( 020 7493 5344 :www.lockdales.com

Nov 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;25

Coins, Banknotes and Medals

Wil, Switzerland

RAPP AUCTIONS ( +00 41 71 9237744 :www.rapp-auktionen.ch

Nov 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;24

Sale 98: Important Australian & World Coins, Medals & Banknotes

Sydney

NOBLE NUMISMATICS ( + 61 (0)2 9223 4578 :www.noble.com.au

Nov 23

Coins, Banknotes, Medals and Militaria etc.

Stockport

A. F. BROCK ( 0161 456 5050 :www.afbrock.co.uk

Nov 29â&#x20AC;&#x201C;30

Ancient Islamic, British and World Coins

London

MORTON & EDEN ( 020 7493 5344 : www.mortonandeden.com

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(PDLOJUDHPH#FUR\GRQFRLQDXFWLRQVFRXN 86

Coin News

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November 2011


Britannia

Medal

Fre Ne e en ws try Sub to C scr oin ibe rs!

Fair

From the publishers of Coin News and Medal News...

The next Britannia Medal Fair, Europeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest, independent medal bourse takes place on November 20thâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;make a note in your diary and be a part of this most successful, much talked about event.

The next Britannia Medal fair will be held on

Sunday November 20th at the Carisbrooke Hall, The Victory Services Club, 63/79 Seymour Street, London W2 2HF 9.30am to 2.00pm

Entry is FREE to all COIN NEWS subscribersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;so make sure you put this date in your diary if you are at all interesting in medals, military or family history. For further details tel: 01404 46972 or visit www.tokenpublishing.com BRITANNIA MEDAL FAIR

BRITANNIA MEDAL FAIR

Open EVERY Saturday at 1 Embankment Place, London Opposite Embankment Tube Station.

&+$5,1* WAKEFIELD FAIR

&5266 0$5.(7

Est 1974

In addition to the Coin Dealers present, there are also stamps and postcards on show. Open 07:30 to 14:30.

Enquiries 01483 281771 E-Mail: rodney@rodneybolwell.wanadoo.co.uk

./(()25' &2,1 $8&7,216

5HJXODUPRQWKO\VDOHVRI&RLQV0HGDOV1RWHVHWF

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ZZZNOHHIRUGFRLQVZHEVFRP )RUDIUHH$XFWLRQ&DWDORJXHSOHDVHFDOORQ RU(PDLONOHHIRUG#EWLQWHUQHWFRP $OVRDFFHSWLQJORWVIRUIXWXUHDXFWLRQV3OHDVHFDOOIRUGHWDLOV November 2011

www.tokenpublishing.com

COINS, MEDALS, BANKNOTES AND MILITARIA Come and see us at our superb venue, Cedar Court Hotel Denby Dale Road Calder Grove, Wakefield WF4 3QZ At Junction 39 off the M1

3XWWKHVH GDWHVLQ \RXUGLDU\ QRZ

&XWRXWWKHVHGDWHVDQGSXWWKHPLQ\RXUGLDU\ TO BE HELD ON THE LAST SUNDAY OF EACH MONTH

November 27th No Fair in December Approximately 35 dealers Admission: ÂŁ1 Adults Children under 14 free Free car parking (Park in the main car park at reception) 9.30-14.30

WE ARE NOW IN THE CEDAR SUITE ENQUIRIES: Eddie Smith 01522 684681 Coin News

87


SOCIETIES

Diary dates DATE Nov 1

Nov 3 Nov 7

VENUE Swarthmore College, Woodhouse Square, Leeds Fairkytes Arts Centre, Billet Lane, Hornchurch The Edward Wright Room, Beaufort Community Centre, Beaufort Road, Southbourne, Bournemouth The Eagle & Child, Maltkiln Lane, Bispham Green, Ormskirk

The Albert Hotel, Victoria Lane, Huddersfield St Martin’s Church Hall, Erith Road, Barnehurst, Bexleyheath, Kent

Nov 9 Nov 10

Nov 14

The Cecil Roberts Room, Central Library, Angel Row, Nottingham Crewe Memorial Hall, Church Lane, Wistaston, Crewe RAF Assoc. Eric Nelson House, 16 Bewick Road, Gateshead

CONTACT

Council Meeting and Annual General Meeting Members Competition

HAVERING NS ( 07910 124549

Numismatic Quiz

Wessex NS ( 020 7731 1702

The Fourth Fielding Lecture

ORMSKIRK & WEST LANCS NS ( 01704 531266

Nursery Inn, 258 Green Lane, Heaton Norris, “Two Welsh Victoria Cross Holders” Stockport by Alan Cox Please call for venue details “Local Banks” by Geoff Sutcliffe Please call for details

Nov 8

SUBJECT/EVENT

“Numismatic History of Cyprus” by T. Everson “Desert Island Collectors—Four Items that would be essential on the Island” “Currency of the Ostmen—An Introduction to the Coinage of Viking Age Ireland” by Andrew Woods “Coins of the Knights of Malta” by Tony Holmes “Myths and Monsters on Coins” by Keith Sugden Society Meeting

Fry Social Club, Keynsham

“The 960 Reis Coinage of Brazil” by Mike Shaw Please call for venue details Monthly Meeting Wallace Humphrey Room, Shelthorpe Joint Meeting with the Philatelic Community Centre, Loughborough Society. Illustrated talks including: “Thematic Areas of Philatelic Interest”, and “Scottish Gold Coinage from Robert III to Wiliam III (1390–1694) Nursery Inn, 258 Green Lane, Heaton Norris, “Myths and Monsters on Coins” by Stockport Keith Sugden

YORKSHIRE NS ( 01977 682263

South Manchester NS ( 0161 432 2044 South Wales & Monmouthshire NS ( 02920 561564 Reading Coin Club ( 01753 516390 : www.readingcoinclub.co.uk HUDDERSFIELD NS ( 01484 866814 BEXLEY COIN CLUB ( 020 8303 0510 NS OF NOTTINGHAMSHIRE ( 0115 9257674 Crewe & District Coin & Medal Society ( 01270 569836 TYNESIDE NS ( 01661 825824 : www.tynesidecoinclub.info Bath and Bristol NS ( 07793 905035 Bedfordshire NS ( 01234 870645 LOUGHBOROUGH COIN & SEARCH SOCIETY ( 01509 261352 : www.norwichcoinandmedalsociety.co.uk South Manchester NS ( 0161 432 2044

The Scout Building, off Walton Road, “Canteen Tokens” by Rex Edwards Wealdstone, Harrow

Harrow Coin Club ( 020 8952 8765

The St James Centre, Stadium Way, Pinhoe, Exeter

“Euros” by Mike Crew

Devon & Exeter NS ( 01395 5688830

C. A. B., 19 Tower Street, Ipswich

“King Radwald—Saxon Suffolk” by Steve Pollington

Ipswich NS ( 01473 728653

St Paul’s Centre, Chapel Road, Worthing

“The Roman Provincial Coinage Worthing & District NS Website” by Dr Volker Heuchert ( 01634 260114

Surbiton Library (Small Hall), Ewell Road, Surbiton

“Religion on Roman Coins” by Jonathan Williams

KINGSTON NS ( 020 8397 6944

Nov 18

Ely House, Ely Place, Dublin 2

“Why Collect Coins” by Michael E. Kenny and Annual General Meeting

NS OF IRELAND : derekkerins@msn.com

Nov 21

The Raven Inn, Poulshot, near Devizes, Annual General Meeting Wiltshire

Nov 16

Nov 17

Wiltshire NS ( 01380 828453

The White Horse, Trowse

Nov 22 Nov 24 Nov 25 Nov 26 Nov 28

“Beautiful Greeks”—talk by a member NORWICH COINS & MEDALS SOCIETY ( 01603 617127 : www.norwichcoinandmedalsociety.co.uk The Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, “What is the Point of Numismatics” by British NS ( 020 7563 4045 London, WC1H 0AB Dr Robin Eaglen Room 301, Sylvia Young Theatre School, Simon Narbeth’s Quiz IBNS (London Branch) 1 Nutford Place, London ( 020 8641 3224 Chelmsford Museum, Moulsham Street, “Yet more finds from Essex” Essex NS ( 01277 656627 Chelmsford by Laura McLean Highfields Community Fire Station, Bi-monthly meeting IBNS (EAST MIDLANDS CHAPTER) Hassocks Lane, Beeston ( 0115 9280347 The Scout Building, off Walton Road, “Middlesex Tokens” by Robert Harrow Coin Club ( 020 8952 8765 Wealdstone, Harrow Thompson

Please check details with Secretaries before setting off on your journey as venues and subjects can change SECRETARIES—Please send details of your meetings to Token Publishing Ltd, Orchard House, Duchy Road, Heathpark, Honiton EX14 1YD or email to: abbey@tokenpublishing.com giving at least two months’ notice. Thank you.

88

Coin News

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November 2011


BLOOMSBURY

COIN FAIR BLOOMSBURY HOTEL 16-22 Great Russell Street London WC1 3NN

Admission £2.00 Dealers in English, Foreign, Ancient, Antiquities, Tokens, Medallions and Banknotes

December 3rd 2011

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(9.30 am - 2.00 pm)

NEXT FAIR: JANUARY 7TH 2012 Enquiries: Tel: 01694 731781

WK1RYHPEHU

)XWXUH'DWHVWK)HEWK0D\UG1RY

The Largest Monthly Coin, Medal & Banknote Fair in the Country

The Midland Coin Fair

NATIONAL MOTORCYCLE MUSEUM Bickenhill, Birmingham, B92 0EJ Opposite the NEC on the M42/A45 junction. Free parking. Refreshments

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Second Sunday of EVERY Month 10.00 am to 3.30 pm Admission £2 Running continuously for over 25 years!!

November 13th December 11th

All enquiries to Mike Veissid

Midland Coin Fair Hobsley House, Frodesley Shrewsbury, SY5 7HD Tel: 01694 731781

www.coinfairs.co.uk November 2011

www.tokenpublishing.com

Coin News

89


Semi-display advertising Raise the profile of your business with an entry in this section— generous discounts available (see page 94 for details)

COINS

Coins For Sale Roman, Celtic, English Hammered Coins, 17th Century Trade Tokens Write or telephone for a free copy of our large sales catalogue in which almost every item offered is illustrated.

Michael Trenerry

PO Box 55, Truro, Cornwall TR1 2YQ Tel: 01872 277977

Fax: 01872 225565

A Comprehensive selection of British Coins New list available now

K. B. COINS

50 LINGFIELD ROAD, MARTINS WOOD, STEVENAGE, HERTS SG1 5SL TEL: 01438 312661

FAX: 01438 311990

HUGE FREE LISTS

ON SALE NOW

English Hammered and Milled coins

W. A. Nicholls

206 Honeysuckle Road, Soton SO16 3BU

Superb selection of Roman, British, Hammered & Milled coins. Gold, Silver, Copper & Bronze. For your FREE copy of our monthly list, please apply to:-

PO Box 44, Bilston, West Midlands WV14 6YX. Tel: 01543 452476

PETER MORRIS 1 STATION CONCOURSE, BROMLEY NORTH BR STATION, KENT Open: Monday to Friday 10am–6pm Closed Wednesday Saturday 9am–2pm and other times by arrangement

023 - 8032 - 4258

GLENN S. OGDEN

English coins, send for a FREE list

MOORE ANTIQUITIES

Irish Hammered, coinage of the Great Rebellion, Irish coppers, Silver Gun Money, Free State coinage Proofs and Morbiducci Patterns, Irish Art Medals and Irish Paper Money.

Del Parker

Email: irishcoins2000@hotmail.com

1-206-232-2560, PO Box 7568, Dallas TX 75209, USA See us at: Coinex, Dublin Fair & Simmons Fair, Baltimore & NYC Inc

GLENELY COINS

British, Roman and Ancient Greek Coins Bought and Sold

www.glenelycoins.co.uk Tel: 01793 750307 07739 426194 Email: chris_kellow@hotmail.com

FORMAT

Although we specialise in foreign coins, we also buy and sell British

Format

Second Floor, Burlington Court, Lower Temple Street, Birmingham. Tel: 0121 643 2058 Fax: 0121 643 2210

53 Chestnut Crescent, Culver Green, Chudleigh TQ13 0PT Tel: 01626 859350 Mobile: 07971 709427 Email: glenn@gillianogden.wanadoo.co.uk www.glennogdencoins.com

Write for free copy of latest coin list: FREEPOST (no stamp needed) PO BOX 223, BROMLEY, KENT BR1 4EQ Telephone 020 8313 3410 Visit our web site: www.petermorris.co.uk E-mail: coins @petermorris.co.uk

I re l a n d 4 0 Pa g e N e t Pr i ce L i s t N ow Ava i l a b l e

PO Box 57635, London, NW7 0DS

R.P. COINS

COINS, BOOKS, CATALOGUES & ACCESSORIES Bought & Sold. Please visit our website -

www.rpcoins.co.uk or call Rob Pearce on 07802 713444, fax 0161 798 7428 RP Coins, PO Box 367, Prestwich, Manchester, M25 9ZH

01243 824232 07850 037091 www.mooreantiquities.com moore.antiquities@virgin.net WANTED AND FOR SALE:

Specialists in Buying and Selling Modern, Gold and Silver Coins from the UK and Around the World.

UK Freephone: 0800 085 2933/Int Tel: +44 208 343 2231 Email: sales@thelondoncoincompany.com Visit our Secure On-line Shop on www.thelondoncoincompany.com

www.coinsandtokens.com ANTHONY HALSE

A large selection of coins from budget priced date fillers to coins for the advanced collector. Send for a free list of English, Foreign and Tokens PO BOX 1856, Newport South Wales, NP18 2WA 01633 413238

Bronze Age, Celtic, Roman, Saxon, Viking, Medieval & later coins & artefacts up to 18th Century • Whole collections or single items purchased • Unit 12, Ford Lane Industrial Estate, Ford, Nr. Arundel, West Sussex BN18 0AA

– VALDA COINS –

01430 879060 / 07905 467650 Specialists in Modern Gold and Silver Proof Coins and Sets Visit our e-shop and order on line at www.weightoncoin.co.uk

Separate lists of English coins for beginners to established collectors. Send for your free copy. EVANS, 80 Aberfan Road, Aberfan, Mid Glam CF48 4QJ Tel: 01443 690452

BRITISH COINS FOR SALE Crowns to fractional farthings. Copper and bronze specialist. Some foreign. DAVID CRADDOCK PO Box 3785, Camp Hill, Birmingham B11 2NF Tel/Fax: 0121 773 2259 Send for free list

DORSET COIN COMPANY LTD Dealing in British Coins, Sets, Proofs, Foreign Coins and Banknotes. Send for latest list

193, Ashley Road, Parkstone, Poole, Dorset BH14 9DL. Tel: 01202 739606

ANDREW’S COINS

NOVEMBER LIST NOW AVAILABLE Over 1,000 GB & World coins, proofs, sets, tokens and medallions. Priced from 50p. Free UK Postage and half cost World Postage Tel: 01253 311090 Email:andrews-coins@hotmail.co.uk

Never miss an issue of COIN NEWS. Take out your subscription today and save over £8 per year! Tel: 01404 44166

Log on to our website at www.tokenpublishing.com for all the latest news, views, events, books, accessories and much more . . . 90

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November 2011


Semi-display advertising MEMORABILIA

We stock all types of Manx memorabilia including banknotes, coins, postcards etc. Shop open 10-4 Mon–Sat 21 ST PAULS SQUARE, RAMSEY, ISLE OF MAN

Email:tonyhar@manx.net Tel: 01624 818303/07624 492484

Buying and selling English hammered coins, British milled coins and British tokens. Meet me at the fairs. Large ebay stock. Email: sales@johnnewmancoins.com Tel: 01903 239867. Mobile: 07814 793312 www.johnnewmancoins.com

F. J. RIST For a comprehensive catalogue of Ancient Greek, Roman, Judaean, Parthian, Sasanian, Byzantine, Early British, European and Crusader Coins, please write or telephone for a free copy F. J. Rist, Po Box 4, Ibstock, Leics LE67 6ZJ Tel: 01530 264278

LONDON COINS AUCTION

Colin Narbeth & Son Ltd 20 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE Paper Money Dealers Visit our Web site at: http://www.colin-narbeth.com A wide range of notes on offer

Next Auction: Keep a look out for details! • Viewing arrangements now include Saturday & Sunday • NEW Catalogue format available • Call us or check out our new website for more information

LONDON COINS

4 - 6 Upper Street South • New Ash Green • Kent • DA3 8JJ Tel: 01474 871464 • Email: info@londoncoins.co.uk • Website:www.londoncoins.co.uk

BRITISH BANKNOTES

Probably the biggest selection in the UK, mostly high grades. BRADBURY to LOWTHER Free up to date computer listing. Tel: 01736 871263 Trebehor, Porthcorno, Penzance, Cornwall TR19 6LX A Free list of World and British banknotes is available from

D. YAPP PO Box 4718, SHREWSBURY, SY1 9EA Tel: 01743 232557

A list of forthcoming auctions can be found on page 86 Medallions

www.david-yapp.com

CHARLES RILEY

Arghans

African banknotes – sensible prices

List from Arghans, Unit 9, Callington Business Park, Tinners Way, Moss Side, CALLINGTON PL17 7SH. Tel: 01579-382405 e-mail: keithp44@waitrose.com

COINS & MEDALS

Professional Numismatist since 1990 Coins and medallions bought and sold PO Box 733, Aylesbury HP22 9AX Tel: 01296 747598 email: charles.riley@virgin.net

www.charlesriley.co.uk

IAN GRADON WORLD NOTES

Coins Wanted

UNIVERSAL CURRENCY COIN EXCHANGE

Buying Swiss 80%, Can 80% and Ireland 80% Contact: Universal Currency Coin Exchange, UCCE, PO Box 57648, Mill Hill, NW7 0FE Tel: 07831 662594 E-mail: uccedcp@aol.com. www.coinsonline.co.uk

Banknotes bought and sold. Bulk lots, collections and single items wanted. Tel: 0191 3719 700 email: igradon960@aol.com website: www.worldnotes.co.uk

Roger Outing

An invitation to view our website

www.pdmedallions.co.uk • • • •

Buy historical medals on line. British, European, World medals available. Browse through our current stock. Regular up-dating of items for sale.

We buy single or collections of medals.

PO Box 123 Huddersfield HD8 9WY Tel: 01484 860415 rogerandliz@banknotes4u.co.uk www.banknotes4u.co.uk

TIMOTHY MILLETT LTD

catalogue of historical medals now available

Specialising in British banking history: cheques, books, banknotes and all banking memorabilia

Ye Olde Banknote Shoppe

We stock a huge range of Banknotes and Coins from UK and around the World, also Tokens and Medals, Roman & Celtic and a host of other collectables. View our current catalogue online at

www.oldbanknoteshop.co.uk

To receive your copy please send £15 (Refundable on purchase) to:

s lat end est fo lis r t

PO Box 20851, London SE22 OYN Tel: 020 8693 1111 Fax: 020 8299 3733 Email: tim@historicmedals.com NEW WEBSITE: www.historicmedals.com

Accessories

Contact email: jim@oldbanknoteshop.co.uk Crowns, halfcrowns wanted, G, VF ++ Charles to George II, lists of what you have to Twyford Antiques Centre, Evesham. Tel: 446923

Coin Shops www.cambridgeshirecoins.com

Buying and selling for over 20 years

Coins Wanted. Gold-Silver-Copper-Collections. Over 5,000 Coins for sale on-line. Coin Trays – Capsules – Albums – Books. 01223 503073

info@cambridgeshirecoins.com

Banknotes

British Notes Buying/Selling

Quality British Notes

Pam West, PO Box 257, Sutton, Surrey. SM3 9WW Tel/Fax: 0208 641 3224 Email: pamwestbritnotes@aol.com www.britishnotes.co.uk November 2011

www.tokenpublishing.com

Auctions/Fairs/Societies MATT HOOD MEMORIAL COIN AUCTION Postal auction with monthly catalogues

UK, Foreign & Ancient Coins Tokens, Medals, Banknotes, etc

For a free catalogue contact: Tim Barna, PO Box 335, Lyndhurst, Hants SO40 0DA. Tel: 07833-692956 mhmca@hotmail.co.uk

A wide range of Numismatic accessories are available online from

www.tokenpublishing.com Coin news

91


Web directory Increase the traffic to your site with an entry in this section. All entries are hot-linked in the digital issue so new collectors are just a click away! See page 95 for details.

www.HistoryInCoins.com ŠHammered to Milled: English, Irish & Scottish ŠCatering for beginners right through to serious collectors ŠEstablished February 2001. Fresh additions EVERY Tuesday Š3,000+ ITEMS FOR SALE (all with obverse & reverse images)

,ULVK&KDUOHVVW³2UPRQGH´)XOO6LOYHU&URZQ,VVXHRI$QHPHUJHQF\LVVXH VWUXFNGXULQJWKH*UHDW5HEHOOLRQXQGHUWKH(DUORI2UPRQGH([6SLQN/LVWHGDW…

Mention this advert and buy the coin for £860. Tel: 07944 374600

Coins

www.coincraft.com British coins, World coins, British banknotes, World banknotes, Roman coins, Greek coins, antiquities, medallions, supplies, Edward VIII bought and sold.

foreigncoin.com Over 4,000 certified coins

www.coinsofbritain.com

Lloyd Bennett. A good selection of British coins from Saxon times to the present day. English hammered coinage, occasionally Celtic, Roman and Anitquities. All items illustrated and updated weekly.

www.davidseamancoins.co.uk

www.tokenpublishing.com The one stop shop for all your collecting needs plus latest news and much, much more. Log on now to www.tokenpublishing.com.

www.chards.co.uk

View our stock on-line. Vast selection from Roman to modern. Exclusive gold site and many collector items. Proofs and bullion. Many special offers. Links to all other Chard websites

www.gilliscoins.com Ancient coins, Greek, Celtic, Roman, Byzantine, Saxon, Viking, English, Irish, Scottish, Tokens. Antiques as before including Bronze-age, Iron-age, Dark-age, Medieval pottery, glass etc.

For everything you need to know about Petition Crowns log on to:

www.petitioncrown.com

www.ringramcoins.com

Simple to use. Screen sized photographs of each piece. Mainly British milled with a selection of hammered and good selection of maundy sets and odds.

The Biggest selection of English coins on the Web. An extensive selection of Hammered including Gold as well as a vast range of Milled from 1656 to date. 023 80324258

www.saltfordcoins.com

argentumandcoins.co.uk/

Try the rest Then try the best

www.saltfordcoins.com Irish Coins and Notes Ancient Greek & Roman Del Parker

irishcoins.com

Specialising in British milled coinage from 1662 to date All coins pictured on the website Secure on-line payment

www.cngcoins.com Classical Numismatic Group offers continuous on-line auctions of Greek, Celtic, Roman, Byzantine, Medieval British and World coins.

www.pennycrowncoins.co.uk An extensive catalogue mostly comprised of English and United Kingdom milled issues each coin illustrated using high-quality photographs

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November 2011


Web directory www.tonyharmer.org Coins and banknotes, postcards,stamps and Collectables

www.weightoncoin.co.uk Specialists in Modern Gold and Silver Proof Coins and Sets Sovereigns of different dates and Mint marks always available.

www.clickcollect-coins.co.uk

www.yorkcoins.com

We buy and sell British and Foreign coins of all ages and reigns in our easy to use website

Roman, Ancient British, English, Scottish & Irish Hammerd Coins ~Professional Numismatist~

www.johnnewmancoins.com Buying and selling English hammered coins, British milled coins and British tokens.

Buyers and sellers of World and British Gold Coins—Fair prices paid for Sovereigns and Krugerrands

Coins Wanted

Free valuations without obligation on specialist collections and single coins, old accumulations, dealers’ stock, hoards and even unpopular and obscure material

www.croydoncoinauctions.co.uk Bi-monthly sales of English, Foreign and Ancient Coins, Medallions, Tokens and Banknotes. See our website for free on-line catalogue.

Auctions taking place this month are listed on the diary page on page 84

www.downies.com

Australia’s largest coin dealer, specialising in Australian coins and banknotes, world coinage, stamps, medals and quality numismatic material. Visit our website for online shopping and free catalogue

www.cambridgeshirecoins.com

www.warwickandwarwick.com

www.gbgoldcoins.com

www.spink.com COINS, BANKNOTES, MEDALS, STAMPS AND BOOKS – THE COMPLETE ONLINE SERVICE FOR THE COLLECTOR.

Auctions

Simon Chester Coins.com

Antiquities

www.antiquities.co.uk Quality Ancient Coins and Antiquities

Dealing in British Milled Coins

www.simonchestercoins.com

Buying and selling for over 20 years Over 5,000 coins online

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www.celticcoins.com Chris Rudd sells more Celtic than anyone else worldwide. For a free catalogue phone

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www.denofantiquity.co.uk Buying & Selling Ancient Coins & Antiquities

Tel: 01223 863002 Email: thedenofantiquity@yahoo.co.uk

www.petercoins.com Your local coin shop on the net!

www.petercoins.com www.jecoinsandnotes.com British Coins, Tokens and Banknotes

Banknotes

www.David-yapp.com British and World Banknotes

www.coincabinets.com Peter Nichols, Cabinet Makers Full range of coin cabinets available. Tel: 01424 436682. Email: orders@coincabinets.com

www.David-yapp.com Books www.douglassaville.com Out of Print, Secondhand and Rare Books on Coins, Tokens, Medallions, Orders, Decorations and Medals. Easy to use Website listing books for sale. All areas of the subject.

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Classifieds Use the classified section to locate a rare coin, sell unwanted items, or simply exchange correspondence with other collectors— Advertising is FREE for non-trade COIN NEWS subscribers, so why not take out your subscription today! Coins for sale W W W C O I N S O N A B U D G E T. CO.UK A great site for new collectors, also for filling in those elusive gaps. Great prices: new items being added all the time. Wants lists welcomed—a fast friendly service. Contact me on the above website. (12/11/03T) ENGLISH AND UK COINS. Please ask for list— G. Ogden, 53 Chestnut Crescent, Culver Green, Chudleigh TQ13 0PT Tel: 01626 859350. (12/11/12A ANCIENT AND HAMMERED COINS PLUS CLASSICAL ANTIQUITIES for sale. Large display at The Ginnel Antiques Centre, Harrogate. Odyssey PO Box 61, Southport, PR9 0PZ. Tel: 01704 232494. (02/12/06T) ROMAN, CELTIC, ENGLISH HAMMERED AND BRITISH COINS BEFORE 1895 for sale and wanted—ring anytime or write for mail order sales catalogue, or visit our stall at antiques fairs in the South. Ancient & Gothic, PO Box 5390, Bournemouth, BH7 6XR. Telephone: 01202 431721. Est. 1977. (01/12/12T) FREE ENGLISH—FOREIGN LISTS. Crowns to farthing fractions. Proof—BU sets. Maundy odds. Banknotes. Telephone: 01709 526697. (10/12/24T) CLOUD “9” COINS AND BANKNOTES. Down to earth coins and notes at down to earth prices. Twentieth century circulated coins bought and sold. CLOUD “9”, 4 Queen’s Row, Cheddar Gorge. 01934 741358. (04/12T) FREE CATALOGUE! FREE COINS! FREE BANKNOTES! Extensive range of coins, ancient to modern, tokens, banknotes, antiquities and related items. Low to medium grades our speciality! (UK only) Contact: Dei Gratia, PO Box 3568, Buckingham, Bucks., MK18 4ZS (stamp appreciated). Tel: 01280 848000. Email: daves@dgcoins. freeserve.co.uk. Go to website at: www.dgcoins.freeserve.co.uk www.dgcoins.freeserve.co.uk. (02/12/06T) MERLINS OF GODALMING, Bridge Street, Godalming, Surrey. Celtic, Roman, hammered, milled. 01483 426155. Sorry no lists. (05/12/12T) ELIZABETH II Royal Mint proof sets 1971–2005. Offers. Telephone: 01234 306580 (Bedford). (12/12) PETERCOINS—your local coin shop on the net! Selling a wide range of British coins. www.petercoins. com. SAE for list to: PO Box 46743, London, SW17 0YF. (11/11/12T) MAUNDY SETS 1904, 1905, 1914, 1915 UNC toned in red dated boxes. Ex. condition. 01473 414646. (04/12) PRESTIGE NUMISMATICS the place for all types of premium World coins. Customer satisfaction is our priority. www.prestigenumismatics. com. (11/11/03T)

WORLD AND BRITISH COINS. Please send for a free list. James & C. Brett, 17, Dale Road, Lewes, Sussex BN7 1LH. Web list available from jc.brett@btinternet.com. (12/11/06T) ONE GOLD ROMAN COIN for sale, good condition. Tel: 07790 914877. (12/11) WORLD COINS: Medieval and modern. Tokens, Countermarks, Jettons, medallions etc. Please send an SAE for latest list to: Stephen Betts, 4 Victoria Street, Narborough, Leicester LE19 2DP. (12/11/06T) SP ASIMI, selling BRITISH MILLED coins 1662–1946. Visit our cabinet at: THE EMPORIUM, 112 High Street, HUNGERFORD, Berkshire RG17 0NB, 01488 686959. (01/12/12T) ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN COINS. Free catalogue. Great for beginners and budget minded collectors. For more information contact T. Barna, PO Box 335, Lyndhurst, SO40 0DA. Email: tbarna_andsonuk@hotmail.com (03/12/06T) BRITISH COINS FREE LIST of inexpensive coins plus details of free gift. Des Welton, 13 Monmouth Road, Harlington, Dunstable, Beds, LU5 6NE, or email: des.welton@ ntlworld.com. (12/11/06T) EARLY ENGLISH MILLED: The most extensive date range available anywhere. 1658–1967 Farthings— Gold virtually every date. Free list tel: 023 80324258, write to 206 Honeysuckle Rd, Southampton SO16 3BU, please email: info@ ringramcoins.com. www. ringramcoins.com. (10/11/12/A) ringramcoins.com

Coins Wanted

SELECTED BRITISH COINS for all tastes. Fast, friendly and efficient service. British coins bought and sold. View coins online in the shop. Contact Barry Kemp on 01706 344520. (11/11/06A) 1/10TH, or 1/20TH gold angel, sentimental reasons. Chris 01359 250012. (11/11) A BEGINNER looking to fill gaps with lower grade coins. English and USA. Please contact with list. details, Email andy@trott89.fslife. co.uk. (11/11) SPANISH COINS IN GOLD AND SILVER,, especially “COBS”. (Portuguese and Dutch coins also wanted). Please contact: Beachcomber Trading Company (BTC) PO Box 8, Newport, Isle of Wight, P030 5JW. Tel: 01983-740712, or fax: 01983 740800. (04/12/12T) BRITANNIA AS OF HADRIAN (BMC 1174) wanted in high grade (GVF or above). Any reasonable price considered. C/O Lawrence Chard 521 Lytham Road Blackpool. 01253 342081. (RTC) SHIPWRECK COINS, any wreck, any quantity. Also shipwreck auction catalogues. BTC, PO Box 8, Newport, Isle of Wight, PO30 5JW. 01983 740712. Fax: 01983 740800. (04/12/12T)

BUYING PRE-47 SILVER AT 24x face; Call/write for latest price. Buying obsolete but redeemable banknotes/coins of Switzerland, Ireland, Germany & most other countries. Collectable coins/tokens wanted. Please contact: Taylor, 4 Sherwood Avenue, Ruislip, Middlesex HA4 7XL. Telephone: 01895 638885. (11/11/06T) BUYING PRE-47 SILVER 24x FACE, PRE-20 40x FACE. USA Pre-1965 10 cents to 1$ £8 per $. CANADA Pre-1965 £6 per $. Wanted REDEEMABLE NOTES of Cyprus, Greece, Italy, Malta, France, Belgium, Portugal. COINS/NOTES of Spain, Germany, Ireland, Austria, Switzerland. Taylor, 4 Sherwood Avenue, Ruislip, Middx. HA4 7XL. Tel 01895 638885. (12/11/06T) AUSTRALIAN PRE-1966 SILVER AND COPPER COINS WANTED. tel: 0794191 9686, email: mc@ guanomondo.com. (03/12/06T) WA N T E D D O N AT I O N S OF BRITISH or foreign coins, banknotes. Please send to to Dogs for the Disabled, The Frances Hay Centre, Blacklocks Hill, Banbury, Oxen OX17 2BS. Charity No: 1092960 (05/12/12C) BRITISH COINS wanted nted by collector. Almost anything considered. Phone Chris on 01793 750307/07739 426194. (06/12/12T) PRE-47 & PRE-20 silver wanted. Also modern 925 silver crowns or ingots. Top prices paid. Contact: 01935 824878. (12/11/12A) DANZIG WANTED. High grade coins 1923 onwards. Top prices paid. Please emails details to: wmg.1923@ tiscali.co.uk. (12/12) BLACK CAT COINS. Buying English Milled coins. Gold, silver, copper, bronze, proof sets, Maundy money. We are located in the Oxfordshire area and can arrange a home visit to you at your convenience. Tel: 01844 279832 or email: blackcatcoins@live.co.uk. (12/11/12T) REGISTERED CHILDRENS CHARITY 295732. Require donations of coins, tokens, banknotes, anything saleable. Please send to W. E. Cornish, 70 Downham Gardens, Tamerton Folit, Plymouth PL5 4QF. (02/12/12C) WORLD AND BRITISH gold coins wanted. Fair prices paid. Tel: 07917 160308. (01/12/06A) PRE-1947 silver coins wanted. Pre1920 also. There are probably many adverts in this column wanting these coins so if you phone around PLEASE PHONE US LAST for the best possible offer you will get! Est. 1966. 07879 865 118 or email: info@ uk-mint.com Web: www.uk-mint. com. (11/11/12T) PRIVATE COLLECTOR SEEKS BULLION SOVEREIGNS. I am a private collector looking to buy small quantities of bullion sovereigns as a hedge against coming bad times. I will pay the spot price for gold. Email: davidgoldstone@btinternet. com (12/11)

HALFPENNIES—1865, 1915, 1922. Farthings—1865, 1874 & 1875, 1915. High grade only. Peter, 01489 577121. (04/12 ) WE BUY SOVEREIGNS—best prices paid. Please telephone Paul on 07779 461929. (12/11/06A) 1863 GB FLORIN needed urgently. Minimum fine condition. £500+paid Please send details by email to: wmg.1923@tiscali.co.uk. (11/11) RING MOUNT to hold 1/20th gold angel. Tel: 01359 250012. (01/12)

Banknotes

WORLDWIDE BANKNOTES AND COINS at great prices. Please visit: www.collectorscurrency.com or email: bruce.tupholme@gmail. com. (04/12/12T) QUALITY BANKNOTES from the British Isles & Commonwealth. www.notability-banknotes.com,, or www.notability-banknotes.com email: info@notability-banknotes. com. (03/12/06A)

Cheques & Ephemera

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN COLLECTING Old Cheques, other Financial Instruments or Banking Ephemera? Then why not join the British Banking History Society. Tel: Keith for info: 020 83605665. (11/11)

Miscellaneous

NZ AND AUSTRALIAN postcards wanted to buy. Tel: 0794 1919686. (03/12/06T) COUNTERFEIT COIN CLUB. New members welcomed. Details: CCC, 8 Kings Road, Biggin Hill, Kent, TN16 3XU. Tel: 01959 573 686, or email: kenvoyhotmail.co.uk. (11/11) EXCHANGE ALL kinds of collectables. References available. Free numismatic literature to numismatic students. Details to Antonis Filippou, 24 Tsalduhidi Str., 54248 Thessaloniki, Greece. (11/11) TYNESIDE NUMISMATIC SOCIETY: Meeting second Wednesday every month. New members welcome. . If you collect coins, banknotes, cheques etc., telephone: 0191 2582042, or 01661 825824 . (01/12) COLLECT@HOME, Copy of Collect@home, mine is damaged and cannot install on new computer, please help. Tel: Terry, 01264 400493. (12/11) COIN MAGS FOR SALE—Vol. 1, No.1–Vol. 48. 545 in total. All in binders. Don’t wish to break up but will if need be. Offers? Buyer collects. Mr J. Price, 60 Gerraint Road, Downham, Bromley, BR15 5DX. (01/12)

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Directory section Advertisers Index ABC Coins and Tokens.................................... 61 Airedale................................................................ 33 Argentum............................................................ 80 ATS Bullion Ltd................................................... 80 Allgold Coins ..................................................... 53 Baldwins Auctions........................................9, 14 R. P. & P. J. Beckett............................................. 60 Birchin Lane Gold Coin Company.............. 63 Bloomsbury Coin Fair...................................... 89 Yves Blot............................................................... 85 BNTA...................................................................... 84 Bonhams.............................................................IBC Barry Boswell...................................................... 66 Britannia Medal Fair......................................... 87 A. F. Brock............................................................. 33 Cambridge Coins & Jewellery...................... 42 Cambridgeshire Coins.................................... 29 Cathedral Court Medals................................. 60 Chards................................................................... 23 Charing Cross Market...................................... 87 CNG........................................................................ 80 Coincraft.........................................IFC, 35, 45, 73 Colin Cooke............................................................5

Croydon Coin Auctions.................................. 86 Paul Davies Ltd.................................................. 16 Paul Davis Birmingham Ltd........................... 61 Clive Dennett..................................................... 69 DNW................................................................... 7, 43 Dorset Coins....................................................... 73 Roger Dudley..................................................... 83 The Duncannon Partnership........................ 46 Educational Coin Company.......................... 66 Christopher Eimer.............................................11 Format................................................................... 33 B. Frank & Son..................................................... 46 GB Gold Coins.................................................... 42 G K Coins.............................................................. 61 Goulborn.............................................................. 81 Ian Gradon........................................................... 64 A. D. Hamilton.................................................... 73 History in coins.................................................. 92 IAPN.........................................................................12 R. Ingram Coins........................................... 78, 79 International Coin Exchange..........................4 Richard Jeffery................................................... 80 K. B. Coins............................................................. 48

Kate’s Paper Money......................................... 64 Kleeford Coins.................................................... 87 Knightsbridge Coins........................................ 54 Lindner/Prinz Publications........................... 53 Lockdales............................................................. 46 The London Coin Company................... 18, 92 The London Coin Fair...................................... 89 Midland Coin Fair.............................................. 89 Morton & Eden......................................................8 Peter Morris......................................................... 48 Colin Narbeth & Son Ltd................................ 64 NGC.........................................................................15 Peter Nichols....................................................... 45 Noble Numismatics......................................... 69 Notability............................................................. 66 Numismatica Ars Classica.............................. 63 Orpington Coins & Medals............................ 48 David Pratchett.................................................. 83 Rapp Auctions.....................................................13 Mark Rasmussen Numismatist.................... 53 Roderick Richardson....................................... 45 Royal Australian Mint...................................... 21 Royal Mint................................................. 25, OBC

Chris Rudd..............................................................2 Saltford Coins..................................................... 59 Douglas Saville ................................................. 59 Scoin Shop........................................................... 61 Stack’s, Bowers & Ponterio............................ 87 Stamp & Coin Mart........................................... 64 St James’s Auctions.................................... 17, 19 Thomson, Roddick & Medcalf...................... 29 Treasure Hunting.............................................. 66 Timeline Originals...............................................3 Michael Trenerry Ltd....................................... 59 Wakefield Fair..................................................... 87 Warwick & Warwick...................................30, 44 Weighton Coin Wonders............................... 85 John Welsh.............................................................6 Pam West............................................................. 69 West Essex Coin Investments...................... 76 Tim Wilkes............................................................ 63 Trevor Wilkin....................................................... 69 York Coins............................................................ 60

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