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INSIDE

NEWS Westmont Park District director awarded

SPORTS Baseball looks to right ship

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Our Village, Our News

APRIL 4, 2012

Vol. 1 No. 30

Let The

Hunts Begin!

Local Easter Egg Hunts set for this weekend By Debbie Lively Staff Reporter

Almost every town has an annual Easter egg hunt. Here are some local holiday celebrations to attend. The Woodridge Lions Club will hold the 44th annual Lion Jerry Pech Memorial Easter Egg Hunt at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 7 at Jefferson Junior High School, located at 7200 Janes Ave., in Woodridge. “They’re out there like crazy,” President of the Woodridge Lions See EASTER, page 2


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News

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

Westmont Park District director receives award By Debbie Lively Staff Reporter

Longevity and community involvement netted Ron Gunter, director of the Westmont Park District the 2012 Honored Professional Award from the Illinois Association of Park Districts. Gunter, a longtime resident of Westmont with over 35 years of working with the park district, received the award earlier this year.Recipients of the award must have demonstrated remarkable talents in encouraging local board members to excel as citizen advocates in advancing the field of parks and recreation, as well as being someone who has gone above and beyond the call of duty to promote their park district. “They like to recognize someone that promotes parks and recreation in the community,” said Gunter “That’s one of the things I’ve done, is that I’ve gotten involved in the community. I try to stay active,” he added. Gunter is affiliated with the Rotary Club, Lions Club, Knight of Columbus, and the Westmont Chamber, most of which he’s been a part of for over 30 years. In his spare time, he has coached boys basketball at the local high school. “I still enjoy it. I love the community, and I’m still having fun doing it,” he added. Gunter raised both is children in Westmont,and his wife teaches at Manning Elementary School.

Submitted Photo

Ron Gunter

“It’s a great honor to be recognized by my peers. It’s something that I chose [to work as park director] to do with my life and career. It’s a nice recognition to be honored.” dlively@buglenewspapers.com

EASTER Continued from page 1 Club Sherri Holquist said. “If you’re there at 11:02 a.m. you’ll miss it. For our club it’s a matter of what we can give back to the community. We look forward to it as much as the people who participate.” Area boy scouts helped fill the 7,000 plastic eggs with candy and prizes that will be placed on the field. The event will include separate areas for five different age groups.The egg hunt is open to children up to 10 years old, including a separate area for children two years and under. Participants are encouraged to arrive at least 15 minutes before the event to secure a position on the field. They are also asked to bring a basket or bag. The event is free and open to the public. However, food donations for the Woodridge Food Pantry will be accepted. For more information, e-mail president@woodridgelions.org.

Downers Grove The First Presbyterian Church of Downers Grove, located at Fourth Street and

We look forward to it as much as the people who participate.” Sherri Holquist, president of Woodridge Lions Club Fairview Avenue, is expected to hold their Easter egg hunt come rain or shine from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., Saturday, April 7. “We try to do it every year,” Pastor Henry Kim said. “Last year we had to do it inside because of the rain.” Participants should bring their own Easter basket to hunt for eggs on the church’s south lawn. When the children aren’t working on crafts or chasing eggs, they are invited to help put together disaster relief kits that the church donates to Church World Services. The kits are used in cases of disasters such as Tsunami’s or flood relief, Kim said. The egg hunt is free and also open to the public.

Westmont Over in Westmont, children will get a visit from the Easter Bunny and participate in an Easter egg hunt. The celebration will take place from1 to 3 p.m., Saturday, April 7, at the West Hills Community Church, located 213 E. 55th St. “We’ve heard comments where people say that their kids actually get eggs (at West Hills egg hunt). That’s not always the case at some of the other egg hunts,” Cindy La Born, the church’s children’s ministry director, said. Other festivities at this year’s event include a moon jump, a coloring contest with prizes, arts and crafts, and sidewalk chalk activities. Over 3,000 eggs filled with candy and toys will be up for grabs at the hunt. The church will also provide baskets for children who don’t have them. “All they have to do is show up, and we will give them the rest,” she added. This is the fifth year for the event, which is free and open to the public. Formoreinformation,visitwww. westhillscommunitychurch.org


THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

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Proposed Walgreens store removed from Downers Grove village agenda By Debbie Lively Staff Reporter

The Downers Grove Village Board was expected to take action on whether to allow Walgreens to build a new store on the south side of the village. However, the drugstore chain asked the village to move the issue off of its upcoming agenda. “It was pulled at the request of the petitioner,” Doug Kozlowski, a spokesman for the village, said.

“I think it had something to do with working with the county on changes to the proposal.” Walgreens had met considerable opposition to the plan from local residents who were not in favor of a store being built in their community. Residents cited increased traffic to the residential area as the source of their opposition. The proposal would have place the store near Woodward Avenue and 63rd Street. Draper and Kramer, a property

“It was pulled at the request of the petitioner. I think it had something to do with working with the county on changes to the proposal.” Doug Kozlowski, village spokesman and financial services company, is responsible for finding new locations for the drugstore. They made the request with the village to remove the item. Draper and Kramer did not respond to calls

regarding the matter. Kozlowski said that it was unclear if this was a temporary removal or a permanent action, but said that the village would give residents two weeks

advance notice in the event that the item is placed back on the village board agenda. The issue was initially placed before the board in late February, but was removed at that time by Walgreens, citing the company’s need for more time to respond to questions from the council and community. Representatives from Walgreens also failed to respond to calls regarding this story. dlively@buglnewspapers.com

Reward offered for info on Woodridge park fires By Debbie Lively Staff Reporter

Authorities in Woodridge are offering a reward for information leading to an arrest in connection with several fires set last week at Castaldo Park. The two fires occurred in one of the village’s most heavily used parks, Castaldo Park, 3024 71st St. Now park officials are offering a $500 reward, and the DuPage County Crime Stoppers are offering a $1,000 reward for information that leads to an arrest in the case. On March 26 at about 4:30 a.m., portable toilets in the park were set on fire. The blaze resulted in the loss of several toilets, a wooden enclosure and a concrete pad underneath the toilets. On March 28 at about 3:30 p.m., two trash receptacles were set ablaze.

“[Arson incidents] typically start to happen when the weather gets warmer,” Mike Adams, park district executive director

“[These fires are] very haphazard,” Park District Executive Director Mike Adams said. “We might get a couple of them a year. The key is that we need our neighbors to help us keep an eye on the park, and if they see something to call 911

immediately.” Authorities did not locate an accelerant in the first incident, and the assailant is believed to have used toilet paper to set the fire. The blaze resulted in about $11,000 in damages, Adams said. The second fire happened in the middle of the day, when there were likely people nearby. However, no one reported seeing anything, Adams said. Someone could have thrown a cigarette in one of the cans, but the likelihood of that starting fires in both of the cans is unlikely, he added. It will cost the park district about $600 to replace each receptacle, which are made with concrete and

recycled plastic. “[Arson incidents] typically start to happen when the weather gets warmer,” Adams said. “And they’re usually youth that are doing it.” Park officials see about two or three accounts a year, he said.

Anyone with information about the fires should contact the Woodridge Park District at 630-353-3300 or the DuPage County Crime Stoppers at 1-800222-TIPS. dlively@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

Downers Grove Police issue citations over St. Patrick’s Day holiday By Debbie Lively Staff Reporter

During the St. Patrick’s Day holiday, Downers Grove Police issued over 100 driving citations and arrested five people for driving under the influence. The concentrated driving sting was part of an initiative with the Illinois Department of Transportation. IDOT has provided the Downers Grove police with a $33,000 traffic grant to conduct saturated

patrol operations during various holidays throughout the year. “Depending on certain holidays, we will do special enforcement, typically where DUI arrests would spike in conjunction with the holiday,” Sgt. Harry Andler, a spokesman with the Downers Grove Police Department, said. During the holiday Downers Grove police made five arrests for impaired driving, issued 43 seat belt citations and issued 101 speeding citations. The

“Depending on certain holidays, we will do special enforcement, typically where DUI arrests would spike in conjunction with the holiday,” Sgt. Harry Andler, DGPD operation was held March 14 through March 17. Additionally, local police are informing the public that April is Distracted Driving Month. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration defines

distracted driving as any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving, according to police. Typical distractions include activities such as texting,

talking on a cell phone, eating and drinking, grooming, reading maps, and adjusting the car radio. Authorities said that teen drivers are more likely than any other age group to be involved in a fatal crash because of a distraction. It is reported that 40 percent of all American teens say they have been in a car when the driver was using a cell phone in a way that put people in danger, according authorities. dlively@buglenewspapers.com

Noah’s Hope hosts 5K Downers run/walk to raise funds for Grove Police awarded CALEA Downers Grove children accreditation By Debbie Lively Staff Reporter

The Downers Grove Police Department was recently awarded accredited status by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies. The commission’s overall purpose is to improve the delivery of law enforcement services by developing nationally accepted standards of excellence in law enforcement. Downers Grove met the standard with 100 percent compliance. Downers Grove underwent an on-site audit, which measured department personnel, quality of service provided to the community and the condition of its policy files against the commission’s standards. “There are different police departments throughout the country that acquire this status,” Downers Grove Police Sgt. Harry Andler said. “What they do is review your policy to make sure that it’s at the level that they set.” The commission has about 450 standards that it uses to evaluate law enforcement

“There are different police departments throughout the country that acquire this status,” Sgt. Harry Andler, DGPD

agencies. Andler said Downers Grove met all of the standards based on a department of its size and the population it serves. Downers Grove has 74 sworn police officer and 30 civilian staff employees. The local police department can maintain the accredited status for three-years. CALEA was established in 1979 through the combined efforts of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives, the National Sheriff’s Association and the Police Executive Research Forum. dlively@buglenewspapers.com

Noah’s Hope is putting on “Run for Hope” to help find a cure for children with late infantile NCL-Batten disease, a fatal and rare genetic disease. The 5K race, “Run for Hope: Curing Batten Disease One Step at a Time,” is open to the public for registration and will be held at 8:30 a.m. on May 20 in Downers Grove. The race will start and end near the Downers Grove Swim and Racquet Club. “We are so grateful to the volunteers, village of Downers Grove, the Downers Grove Swim and Racquet Club, the community, and so many others for making this race possible and helping us build awareness about Batten disease,” said Jennifer VanHoutan, mother or Noah and Laine. “Our entire family will be there, cheering

on all the runners and walkers and thanking them for their support.” Noah’s Hope was established by Downers Grove parents, Jennifer and Tracy VanHoutan, whose children Noah and Laine were diagnosed with the fatal disease in 2009 Runners and walkers can register at www.signmeup. com/81924 or by visiting www. NoahsHope.com. Registration costs $30 online and $35 on the day of the race One hundred percent of the proceeds from the race will go towards finding a cure for this fatal disease. A complete map of the course is available at www.signmeup. com/81924. The race will be officially timed and t-shirts, goodie bags and refreshments will be provided. Race packets

can be picked up the morning of the race at 7 a.m. Participants will also have the opportunity to meet Noah Coughlan, who ran across the United States to build awareness for Batten disease. For more information, please visit: www.signmeup. com/81924. In addition to the Run For Hope 5K, “Noah’s Hope – Fun In the Sun” will be held on the same day at the Downers Grove Swim and Racquet Club. Fun In the Sun will feature the Jesse White Tumblers, magicians, balloon artists, train rides, a bouncy house, a petting zoo, face painting, swimming, a Downers Grove fire truck, and more. The event begins at 11a.m. The cost for Fun In the Sun will be $10 per person, and children under 2 are admitted for free.


Calendar ONGOING B & B Ladies Golf League. Join us for golf and fun every Friday morning. Season runs May 4-Sept. 28. 9 holes at Village Greens of Woodridge. For information call 630-985-3610. Knights of Columbus Council Fish Fry. Knights of Columbus Council 3738 will hold a fish fry from 5 to 8 p.m. each Friday of Lent through April 6 at the council hall, 25 N. Cass Ave., Westmont. Selections include jumbo shrimp, crab cakes, and all-you-can-eat white fish and Atlantic cod. Salad bar, carry-out, and a children’s menu, including fish sticks and chicken nuggets, also available. Contact Rick Vath or Cliff Grammich, 1-630-9693738 for more information. Garage sale sign-up. Tables are available for the St. Scholastica Council of Catholic Women annual Garage Sale of Hidden Treasures: Spring Cleanup on March 24. Tables are $17 each, or two tables for $30. For more information call Natalie Meyers at 630-985-9289. Great Decisions Foreign Policy Discussion Group. 9:30-11:30 a.m. every Monday at the Downers Grove Library. Topics for 2012 include: Middle East realignment, promoting democracy, Mexico, cybersecurity,exit forAfghanistan and Iraq, state of the oceans, Indonesia,and energy geopolitics. Registration is not required. Call Nancy Peraino at 630-968-8706 for more information. Birth after cesarean. 12-2 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. meetings

the first Monday of the month in Romeoville. Come for encouragement, supports, and information on planning for your next birth. Babes-in-arms are always welcome. Call Melanie in Romeoville at 253-861-5897 for more information, or e-mail VBACesarean@aol.com. Do you want to stop drinking? Contact Alcoholics Anonymous at 630-887-8671 to get help, or go online to www.aania.org to find a local meeting. Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings daily at the West Suburban Alano Club, 17 W. Quincy St., Westmont. Open speaker meetings at 7 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. Sundays, other meetings listed by day and hour on www.wsacaa. org. Memberships available: inquire at the Club. Baby andToddler Storytime. 10:15-10:45 a.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays at the Westmont Library. Get ready for stories, songs, and interactive play.Young children and a caregiver can enjoy this weekly time together while nurturing a love of reading. For ages 0-3. Toddler & Me Playgroup. 10:45-11:30 a.m. Thursdays at the Westmont Library. Bring your young children to a special morning playtime in the library’s meeting room. Interact with other moms and caregivers while the kids play and eat snacks. Saturday morning storytime. 9:30-10 a.m. at the Downers Grove Library. Join in every Saturday morning for

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

storytime filled with stories, songs, and fingerplays. This program is for children of all ages and their caregivers. Adult participation is an important part of this storytime.

fourth Annual Community High School District 99 Student Art Show will open with a reception and award ceremony.The exhibit is available for viewing during normal Library hours.

Breastfeeding support group. Led by a certified Lactation Counselor, meets on the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of the month from 11:30–noon at Edward Hospital. Join other breastfeeding moms for support and to have any questions answered. For information and location, please call (630) 5273957.

Hemingway of the Heartland. 7-8:30 p.m. at the Westmont Library. Redd Griffin, founding director of the Ernest Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park, will speak about Hemingway’s experiences and writing in the Midwest. He will discuss the prosaic, poetic, and spiritual aspects of Hemingway’s work, from his Illinois beginnings to his peak years on four continents. For ages 16 and up. Sign up for this program at westmontlibrary.org.

Job club. Mondays from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Woodridge Library, 3 Plaza Drive,Woodridge. Job Club members learn to write résumés and cover letters,develop interviewing skills and find job leads. No sign-up, no fee, just drop in. For further information call 630-964-7899, email askus@ woodridgelibrary.org, or visit www.woodridgelibrary.org.

APRIL 4 Are utility bills making you sick? 6 p.m. at the Woodridge Library. Get tips and information from the Citizens Utility Board on how to lower your gas, electric, and phone bills. Sign up at the library, on woodridgelibrary.org, or call 630-964-7899. Art Gallery Showing - April - District 99 Student Art Show: Mixed Media. 6 p.m. at the Woodridge Library. The

APRIL 5 Discovery Club: Jellybeans and more. 4-4:45 p.m. at the Downers Grove Library. Jellybeans come in all colors and flavors. Discover the joy of jellybeans and other sweet treats through stories, crafts, and games. For grades K-3. Registration required at www. downersgrovelibrary.org. Clash of the Cupcakes. 7-8 p.m. at the Westmont Library. Put your creative skills to work at this contest for the next cupcake boss. Register as a contestant for the chance to win a prize, and bring your friends to cheer you on. All materials provided. For ages 12 and up. Sign up for this program at westmontlibrary.org.

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Big Read discussion. 7 p.m. at the Woodridge Library. Discussion of “The Sun Also Rises” by Ernest Hemingway. Copies of the book are available one month before the discussion at the Adult/Young Adult Department Reference Desk. Fiction book discussion group. 7:30-8:45 p.m. at the Downers Grove Library. This discussion features The Big Read’s book selection,“The Paris Wife” by Paula McLain.

APRIL 6 Let’s Learn Spanish Storytime. 11-11:30 a.m. at the Downers Grove Library. Young children are uniquely suited to learn a second language. An instructor from Language Stars presents a storytime introducing the Spanish language. The program is geared to preschoolers and attending children must be supervised by an adult. Become a manga illustrator. 6-7:45 p.m. at the Downers Grove Library. Learn how to draw anime and manga characters with the help of well-known professional illustrator Addie Afable. Registration required at www.downersgrovelibrary.org.

APRIL 7 Easter Egg Hunt. 10:30 a.m. at the Westmont Community Center. Kids, grab your basket and scoop up some colorful eggs See CALENDAR, page 6


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Police Blotter

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Downers Grove, Woodridge, and Westmont Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

Downers Grove William Kenneth Choice, 40, 113 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, was arrested at 4:57 p.m. on March 26 at 55th and Park for driving under the influence, failure to yield emergency vehicle and expired registration. Richard Hall, 56, 2201 Prentiss, Downers Grove, was arrested at 5:34 p.m. on March 27 at 6400 Woodward for driving without a license. James Fuchsen, 27, 116 W. Division St., Wood Dale, was arrested at 11:43 a.m. on March 28 at the police station for attempted disorderly conduct. Kevin Bozeman, 41, 2148 Prentiss Drive, Downers Grove, was arrested at 4:24 p.m. on March 28 at 2148 Prentiss on a warrant. Coree Thomas, 21, 419 Belmont Drive, Romeoville, was arrested at 12:22 a.m. on March 29 on 63rd and Janes Avenue for driving without a license.

CALENDAR Continued from page 5 full of treats and candy. Children will be divided into 2-3, 4-5, 6-7, and 8-9 year age groups. Special needs and 2-3 year old children must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call 630-969-8080 or visit www. wpd4fun.org. Teen Decoration Days. Noon to 2 p.m. at the Westmont Library. Have you noticed the seasonal decorations and painted windows on the second floor of the library? Become a part of TeenTeam and join in on the decorating fun.

APRIL 9 Downers

Grove

Artists’

Jenna Elizabeth Moudy, 26, 3960 Broadmoor Circle, Naperville, was arrested at 2 p.m. on March 29 in the 3100 block of Finley Road for driving with a suspended license and operating an uninsured motor vehicle. Matthew Mroch, 33, 508 Bunning, Downers Grove, was arrested at 5:32 p.m. on March 29 on Third and Florence for driving under the influence.

traffic stop on a vehicle in the 400 block of W. 55th Street. Efrain Rebollar, male, 23, 2213 Prentiss Drive, Downers Grove, was arrested and cited for improper lane usage, driving with a suspended license and operating an uninsured vehicle. Rebollar was released on his own recognizance.

Westmont

At approximately 6:50 p.m. on March 22, officers responded to the 1100 block of South Williams Street for a report of a domestic battery. Michael A. Jones, male, 24, 1128 Williams St. #D12, Westmont, was arrested and charged with domestic battery after he punched a family member. Jones was transported to DuPage County Jail for a bond hearing.

Sometime between 9 p.m. on March 18 and 9 a.m. on March 19, an unknown offender(s) damaged landscape lights and a basketball hoop in the 200 block of North Linden Avenue. The estimated damage is $100.

Sometime between 5:30 p.m. on March 22 and 9 a.m. on March 23 an unknown offender(s) entered a vehicle and stole a GPS unit in the 0-100 block of West 59th Street. The estimated loss is $170.

At approximately 6:20 a.m. on March 20, officers responded to reports of a suspicious person in the 200 block of East Naperville Road. Tyler S. McCartney, male, 21, 121 S. Washington St., Westmont, was arrested for possession of a controlled substance, possession of cannabis and possession of drug paraphernalia. McCartney was transported to DuPage County Jail for a bond hearing.

Sometime between 8 p.m. on March 23 and 5 a.m. on March 24, an unknown offender(s) entered an unlocked vehicle in the 1300 block of Cass Lane and stole a change purse and assorted change. The estimated loss is $10.

Erick William Yax, 29, 820 Foxworth Boulevard, Lombard, was arrested at 2900 Highland Ave. for no valid driver’s license and operating an uninsured motor vehicle.

At approximately 1 a.m. on March 21, officers conducted a

Guild.6:30-9 p.m.at the Downers Grove Library, 1050 Curtiss St, Downers Grove.The Artists’ Guild encourages artists to explore their talents by participating in a variety of presentations and demonstrations. Membership is open to all artists, and all who have a passion for fine art. For more information, visit www. downersgroveartistsguild.com.

APRIL 10 Beginning ballet. 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Westmont Library. An instructor from Expression Dance Studio will teach basic techniques and positions, along with a few songs and games to help improve basic motor skills, agility, and rhythm. For ages 3-6. Sign up for this program at westmontlibrary.org. Influential

Books.

7-8:15

Sometime between 10 a.m. on March 23 and 2 p.m. on March 25,an unknown offender(s) stole a television from a residence in the 200 block of South Cass Avenue. The estimated loss is $220.

p.m. at the Downers Grove Library. Celebrate National Library Week with Bill Haase as he presents his list of the 25 most influential books. Bring your own list to compare or pick up a few future reading suggestions. Registration required at www. downersgrovelibrary.org. Titanic: Mrs Thomas Andrews. 7 p.m. at the Woodridge Library. Commemorate the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. Denise Vanaria portrays passenger Helen (Mrs. Thomas) Andrews, sharing intimate and heartrending accounts of the tragedy. After the ship collided with an iceberg, her husband spent his final hours evacuating women and children. His body was never recovered. Denise appears in authentic Titanic-era

Woodridge

in the 3300 block of Foxboro damaging, the frame.

A residential burglary occurred at approximately 10:30 p.m. on Mach 23 in the 3100 block of Edgewood Parkway. Unknown person(s) removed approximately $4,000 from a residence.

At approximately 7:30 p.m. on March 27, Yan Zhang, 49, 4436 Ash Lane, Naperville, was charged with retail theft after she removed various clothing items from Kohl’s in the 1000 block of 75th Street.

A theft occurred at the Verizon Store in the 7400 block of Woodward Ave. Unknown person(s) removed two cell phones from the store sometime between 11 a.m. and 12 p.m. on March 24.

At approximately 10 p.m. on March 27, Cory Johnson, 20, 619 Western Ave., Aurora was charged with robbery following an incident in the 3300 block of Hightrail.

At approximately 3:45 a.m. on March 25, Stefanie Gumowski, 23, 536 Donald Ave., Arlington Heights, was charged with two counts of driving under the influence of alcohol following a traffic stop in the 7500 block of Route 53. At approximately 5:40 p.m. on March 25, a juvenile was charged with retail theft after they removed various clothing items from Target in the 2300 block 63rd Street. A criminal damage to property occurred at approximately 11:50 a.m. on March 27 in the 3300 block of Foxboro. Unknown person(s) damaged the siding of a residence with a BB gun. At approximately 11:50 a.m. on March 27, Tyria Davis, 21, 2211 Apache Lane, Woodridge, was charged with criminal damage to property after she kicked the door to a residence

attire and will bring artifacts. Sign up at the library, on woodridgelibrary.org, or call 630-964-7899.

APRIL 11 Show Us Your Library Card day. All day at the Downers Grove Public Library. A library card is your passport to adventure. Display yours at the Junior Room Desk and you’ll be rewarded. Drop-in preschool crafts. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Downers Grove Library. Stop by the library’s craft table with your preschoolers to make a simple craft. Preschoolers must be assisted by an adult. Craft will be available for the first 100 children. Google Docs. 6:30-8:30 p.m.

At approximately 1:30 a.m. on March 28, Kelly Strain, 22, 2279 Massachusetts Ave., Naperville, was charged with two counts of driving under the influence of alcohol, following a traffic stop in the 3000 block of 75th Street. An arson occurred at approximately 3:30 p.m. on March 28, at Castaldo Park in the 3000 block of 71st Street. Unknown person(s) lit a garbage can on fire. A motor vehicle theft occurred sometime between 7:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. on March 28 in the 3300 block of 83rd Street. Unknown person(s) stole a motorcycle. At approximately 1:30 p.m. on March 29, Seth Beranek, 24, N6905 Snadstrom, Mauston, Wis., was charged with retail theft and resisting an officer after removing various items from Kohl’s in the 1000 block of 75th Street.

at the Downers Grove Public Library. An overview of how to use Google documents, spreadsheets, presentations, drawings, and forms. Classes are open to Downers Grove Library cardholders only. Registration for this class is required at www. downersgrovelibrary.org. Learn to download Audiobooks. 7-8:30 p.m. at the Woodridge Public Library. Learn how to check out and download audiobooks from Media on Demand, the Library’s online audiobook and ebook service containing over 2,000 current titles. Chris Keefe, Reference Librarian, will provide a demonstration and answer any specific questions. Sign up at the library, on www,woodridgelibrary.org, or call 630-964-7899.


Forum

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Guest Columnist

From the desk of Rep. Jim Sacia The Illinois Budget. - This is an effort to simplify a very complex problem involving billions of dollars. Our annual budget this next fiscal year is approximately $58 billion - of that amount, you the taxpayers are expected to send us $33 billion 719 million in tax dollars. The difference between those two numbers is money we receive as reimbursement from the federal government and some other sources. It is predominately motor fuel tax that is specifically designated for such things as roads and bridges. It is tax money that you pay each time you pull up to the pump and put gas in your car. It is not part of what

we call GRF or General Revenue Fund. Of the $33,719,000,000 GRF that you will send us, here is the breakdown of how it will be spent. First and foremost is non discretionary spending.These are obligations that must be made. Number 1 - Our pension obligation is $5.1 billion (this is the state’s portion of the pension expense not including the employee contributions). Number 2 is statutory transfer out money equaling $2.1 billion. This is money that we have collected and we owe a percentage back to local governments such as sales tax revenues.

Write to us! You are invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. Please email your letter to Matt Honold, managing editor, at mhonold@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

Publisher & Editor Rich Masterson publisher@buglenewspapers.com Managing Editor Matt Honold mhonold@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Sherri Dauskurdas Rick Kambic Laura Katauskas Debbie Lively Jonathan Samples Sports Reporters Mark Gregory mgregory@buglenewspapers.com Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication Letters to Editor: 9 a.m. Friday sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

www.buglenewspapers.com Vice President of Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Production Manager Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Sales sales@buglenewspapers.com Voyager Media Group, Inc. P.O. Box 1613 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 3 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 3 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

Number 3 is our group insurance obligation totaling $1.2 billion. This is the state’s portion of the state workers’ insurance programs not including the employee contributions. Number 4 is our debt services or our obligation for money we have borrowed, both principle and interest, totaling approximately $2.2 billion. Number 5 is Medicaid. You the taxpayer are on the hook for $6 billion 638 million. (Our total Medicaid obligation this year is approximately $15 billion including federal reimbursements). Yes, you are right – tax payers are on the hook for all of it.

The above five “must be made” expenditures total approximately $17.2 billion. There is another $219 million in non-discretionary expenditures bringing the total to $17.419 billion. If you do the math that leaves $16,300,000,000 for the five appropriations committees to divide which is close to $1 billion less than available funds last year. If your eyes haven’t yet glazed over here is how it allocates out. Elementary and Secondary Education Appropriations receive 39.8 % of funding totaling $6 billion 491 million, a cut of $363 million.Higher Education receives 12.1% totaling $1.978 billion,a cut of $110 million. General Services

Illustrated Opinions

receives 7.1% or $1 billion 165 million dollars, a cut of 65 million. Human Services appropriations (Medicaid removed) receives 31.2% of funding totaling $5 billion 87 million, a cut of 284 million dollars. Public Safety appropriations receives 9.7% of funding or $1 billion 576 million, a cut of $88 million. There will not be a happy agency in Illinois government but this is where the rubber meets the road. As always, you can reach me, Sally or Barb at 815/232-0774 or e-mail us at jimsacia@aeroinc.net. You can also visit my website at www.jimsacia.com. It’s always a pleasure to hear from you.


8

jokes in stride. In the week ahead, you will find that your business aspirations get a boost and the work you’ve done to improve your public image begins to pay off.

You can enjoy sentiments without drowning in sentimentality. In the upcoming week, you can keep your head above water and maintain harmony - as long as you don’t fall prey to a bid for your sympathy.

The April Fools’ joke is not on you. Someone might try to persuade you to accept poor advice or a bad situation in the week to come. The joke will be on that person when you don’t fall for it.

Live to fight another day. You may fight through a few bad days to get to the good ones in the week ahead. Your perception of what is right and wrong may be challenged by others.

Horns can turn into halos. Your loved ones might escape your understanding off and on during the week to come. Your dedication and passion, however, will highlight and augment your essential harmony.

Sometimes honesty as the best policy is just too honest. It may be wise to play your cards close to your vest. In the coming week, you may feel pressured to keep your head in the midst of family crisis.

Push on past the pitfalls. Some people are never more righteous than when they are in the wrong. By sticking to your guns in the week ahead, you will be able to overcome adverse situations.

In some instances, a pawn is more powerful than a king. Don’t let the little things that cause aggravation take control of your emotions in the week to come. Remain vigilante; money can slip away.

Make a fresh start each day. In the week ahead, make sure you never go to bed with unresolved arguments brewing in the background. Someone might hide their anger or pretend to accept your views.

Schools

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

Junior Woman’s Club Briefs Outstanding Teacher Across awards presented

He said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” In the week to come, you might be called upon to tackle problems in unique ways.

Art contest awards givenDown

35 Swelled head 1 Burn badly 36 “For Me and 1 Nintendo __” 38 T-bone with a Downers Grove Junior Ascompetitor part of the Junior My Woman’s 6The The lightning 37 Gives the nod 2 Start up the warm, red center bolt on Harry Woman’s Club honored Downers Club’s mission to support 39 Postal sackful mountain 42 Colorful card Potter’s Grove teachers with Outstanding educational as well as personal 40 Layered haircut 3 Italian violin game forehead, e.g. Teacher awards during the growth thebus 41 Crosstown makerin the community, 43 Lends a hand to 10 Squirrel away 4 Chaney of horror Club’s annual education awards organization sponsors alternative a Junior 44 Lecture rooms 14 “__ World”: Auto open finish 5 “Spring ahead” ceremony 20th. Art Contest each45year, Abel’s 

The assassin Highhrs. ticklish March 45 protection awards are open to47teachers to 6allWitch seventh and eighth grade Jazzy hornat Muppet’s 46 Height: Pref. trials town 48 Lass awed by students all public and private schools in bird Downers Grove. “Sesame Street” 47 Chilly powder? 7 Whooping 48 What the nose the bigThis city, 8 Entirely segment within Downers Grove. First and second place awards knows 9 Kanga’s kid maybe 15 Woody year’s winners were Whittier were given for each grade as 49 “Circle of 10 Vain walks 54 Bright son 5th Guthrie’s grade teacher Cheryl Lyons, well two honorable mentions. Friends” writer 11 as In the loop 55 Sis’s sib 16 Candy that Pierce Downer 4th grade Winners received gift cards Binchy 12 Anglican parish 56 IM offerer comes in twos 50 Newspaper priest to the Elmhurst teacher Randi Streng, O’Neil and passes Art bye 58and He “runs 17 Winter lines? 13 Flames that Middle School bandthrough teacher Museum. All artwork 51will be on the Olympics Seize (from) have cooled? town ... was in his display David Balika. Cheryl Lyons the Downers Groveas event with gates 52 Gathered, 18 Box at for practice nightgown” 20 Invoice fig. fallenplace leaves 19 Horse’s hairin April. First nominated by Zoe Strauch. Lyons Public Library 63 Thomas __ 21 Place for inks or 53 Orleans’s river 24 Spice Girl has been teaching at Whittier for for eighth grade was awarded to 54 Exchange Halliwell Edison oinks six years, and prior to that taught Sophie Baillargeon from Avery 57 Ogle 64 Tater __: Ore-Ida 25 Ashram 22 Subtle vibes for five years at LaGrange Park. Coonley School for her pen and 59 India Inc.? authority product 23 One stalking Gehrig who Store posting Randi bynameink26drawing “Home in60the Forest.” 65 Big tractor lionsStreng or tigerswas nominated played with Ruth 27 Craving Eva Bednard. has been 66 Movie house Second place for eighth grade 28 It.’s continent Streng 61 Credit card 30 Sch. in Big D suffix for 29 Raw rocks teaching at Pierce Downer was31awarded to Sarah Hodshire users may be Commandment 67that Allergy trigger, from 30 “Octopus’s two years,and prior to taught for asked for them, countSt. Joseph’s School often David Garden” briefly Hubbub at Belle Airesinger for three years. her32 photograph entitled “Muir 68 Passover dinner 33 Painting Ringo 62 Society page Balika was nominated by Bridget Woods.” First place for seventh word reproduction 33 Talk show Moroney, Brian Moroney, Billy grade was awarded to Joelle Chiu 34 Schoolboy ©2012 TRIBUNE MEDIA guest’s blatant Moroney, and Ashly Pirl. from Avery fish Coonley SERVICES, SchoolINC. for 35 Slippery promotion

SUDOKU

her chalk pastel entitled “Settling

P r e v i o u s p uin z zthe l e ’leaves.” s a n sSecond w e r s place for

College scholarships presented

The Downers Grove Junior Woman’s Club presented four college scholarships to local students during the Club’s annual education awards ceremony March 20th. Scholarships were awarded based on the applicant’s academic excellence, work ethic, community service endeavors, and personal goals. The scholarships were awarded to Shane Companey and Cory Mosiman of Downers Grove South High School, and Colleen Gorecki and Andrea Vetrone of Downers Grove North High School.

seventh grade was awarded to Mary Fleming from St. Joseph’s School for her watercolor and marker work entitled “Be Yourself.” Receiving honorable mentions were Caroline Fry of Avery Coonley School for her photograph entitled “Autumn,” and Nicole Simos of Avery Coonley School for her pencil sketch entitled “The Stalion.”The entries were judged by Roger and Susan Schillerstrom. Roger has been the cartoonist for Chicago’s Crain Magazine for more than 25 years, while Susan is an artist currently working with glass tile. This year’s contest was organized by Carrie Schneider, Ana O’Neil, and Suzan Campbell.

TOP POP ALBUMS March 18 through March 24 TITLE

Up All Night 21 Greatest Hits Wrecking Ball Passion: White Flag Whitney: The Greatest Hits Take Care Now 41:That’s What I Call Music

Making Mirrors Some Nights

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Jumbles: • HOUSE • TROTH • BEAVER • SINGLE

Answer:

When the siblings opened the shoe repair shop, they became -- “SOLE” BROTHERS

TOP DVD RENTALS March 18 through March 24

TOP COUNTRY ALBUMS March 18 through March 24 ARTIST

One Direction Adele Guns n’ Roses Bruce Springsteen Passion Whitney Houston Drake Various artists Gotye Fun.

TITLE

Tailgates & Tanlines My Kinda Party Own the Night Chief The Band Perry Footloose Halfway to Heaven Four the Record Spring Break 4... Suntan City

Family Man

ARTIST

Luke Bryan Jason Aldean Lady Antebellum Eric Church the Band Perry Soundtrack Brantley Gilbert Miranda Lambert Luke Bryan Shooter Jennings

TITLE

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Tower Heist Jack and Jill The Muppets The Adventures of Tintin Footloose Young Adult Happy Feet 2 The Three Musketeers In Time

LABEL

Columbia Pictures Universal Pictures Columbia Tristar Walt Disney Pictures Paramount Pictures Paramount Pictures Paramount Pictures Warner Bros. Summit Entertainment 20th Century Fox


Take 5

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

H o ro s c o p e s

Across

1 Burn badly 6 The lightning bolt on Harry Potter’s forehead, e.g. 10 Squirrel away 14 “__ World”: ticklish Muppet’s “Sesame Street” segment 15 Woody Guthrie’s son 16 Candy that comes in twos 17 Winter Olympics event with gates 20 Invoice fig. 21 Place for inks or oinks 22 Subtle vibes 23 One stalking lions or tigers 28 It.’s continent 29 Raw rocks 30 “Octopus’s Garden” singer Ringo 33 Talk show guest’s blatant promotion

35 Swelled head 38 T-bone with a warm, red center 42 Colorful card game 43 Lends a hand to 44 Lecture rooms 45 Abel’s assassin 47 Jazzy horn 48 Lass awed by the big city, maybe 54 Bright 55 Sis’s sib 56 IM offerer 58 He “runs through the town ... in his nightgown” 63 Thomas __ Edison 64 Tater __: Ore-Ida product 65 Big tractor name 66 Movie house suffix 67 Allergy trigger, often 68 Passover dinner

Down

1 Nintendo competitor 2 Start up the mountain 3 Italian violin maker 4 Chaney of horror 5 “Spring ahead” hrs. 6 Witch trials town 7 Whooping bird 8 Entirely 9 Kanga’s kid 10 Vain walks 11 In the loop 12 Anglican parish priest 13 Flames that have cooled? 18 Box for practice 19 Horse’s hair 24 Spice Girl Halliwell 25 Ashram authority 26 Store posting 27 Craving 30 Sch. in Big D 31 Commandment count 32 Hubbub 33 Painting reproduction 34 Schoolboy 35 Slippery fish

36 “For Me and My __” 37 Gives the nod 39 Postal sackful 40 Layered haircut 41 Crosstown bus alternative 45 Auto finish protection 46 Height: Pref. 47 Chilly powder? 48 What the nose knows 49 “Circle of Friends” writer Binchy 50 Newspaper bye lines? 51 Seize (from) 52 Gathered, as fallen leaves 53 Orleans’s river 54 Exchange 57 Ogle 59 India Inc.? 60 Gehrig who played with Ruth 61 Credit card users may be asked for them, briefly 62 Society page word

You can’t just say you are free of prejudices, you must be free of them. During the first half of the week, you may be challenged by others to perform at the optimum and criticized if you aren’t politically correct.

Communication conquers discord. Information is something you can distribute, but communication is getting through. There may be days in the week ahead when you can sidestep a serious misunderstanding.

Think like Einstein. He said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” In the week to come, you might be called upon to tackle problems in unique ways.

Take April Fools’ Day jokes in stride. In the week ahead, you will find that your business aspirations get a boost and the work you’ve done to improve your public image begins to pay off.

You can enjoy sentiments without drowning in sentimentality. In the upcoming week, you can keep your head above water and maintain harmony - as long as you don’t fall prey to a bid for your sympathy.

The April Fools’ joke is not on you. Someone might try to persuade you to accept poor advice or a bad situation in the week to come. The joke will be on that person when you don’t fall for it.

Live to fight another day. You may fight through a few bad days to get to the good ones in the week ahead. Your perception of what is right and wrong may be challenged by others.

Horns can turn into halos. Your loved ones might escape your understanding off and on during the week to come. Your dedication and passion, however, will highlight and augment your essential harmony.

Sometimes honesty as the best policy is just too honest. It may be wise to play your cards close to your vest. In the coming week, you may feel pressured to keep your head in the midst of family crisis.

Push on past the pitfalls. Some people are never more righteous than when they are in the wrong. By sticking to your guns in the week ahead, you will be able to overcome adverse situations.

In some instances, a pawn is more powerful than a king. Don’t let the little things that cause aggravation take control of your emotions in the week to come. Remain vigilante; money can slip away.

Make a fresh start each day. In the week ahead, make sure you never go to bed with unresolved arguments brewing in the background. Someone might hide their anger or pretend to accept your views.

SUDOKU

©2012 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • HOUSE • TROTH • BEAVER • SINGLE

Answer:

When the siblings opened the shoe repair shop, they became -- “SOLE” BROTHERS

9


10

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Downers North soccer dealing with tough schedule, page 12; Downers South soccer has three D-I recruits, page 13

www.downersgrovebugle.com

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

11

Benet beats Downers S. in extras By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

As the season opened, Benet had been winning games by blowing out its opponents with high-scoring games. While it was nice to see the bats come alive early, Benet coach Jerry Schilf felt like last Thursday’s 5-2 extra-inning win over Downers Grove South was the first real test for the Redwings,

SOFTBALL “This was our first really big challenge and we came through,” Schilf said.“This is the first time this year we can leave the field feeling good.The other games we were able to pad the stats, but that was all we were doing. We took advantage when we had opportunities. The kids have confidence this year. We came off a big third-place finish last year and the kids didn’t really know what to expect this year.” The game was a scoreless pitchers dual between Benet’s Molly Moran and South’s Aleisha Bozek until the Mustangs pushed a run across in the fifth when Kristina Airdo scored on a misplayed fly ball, only to have the game tied on a Benet run in the sixth when Maeve McGuire doubled and scored on Julianne Rurka single. The Redwings broke the game open with four runs in the eighth to seal the win. In the eighth, Benet’s No. 9 hitter Ali Michalik beat out an infield single to get things rolling. After a McGuire single, sacrafice bunt and a Kendall Duffy sacrifice fly, Benet took the lead for the first time in the game. Rurka then notched her

second RBI of the game, followed by a two-run home run from freshman Stephanie Abello. “She was a little quicker than I have seen this year, so my approach was to sit back and not swing at any balls,” Rurka said. “I was looking for a base hit to keep the rally going. This was our funnest game. Scoring a lot is good mentally, but this was a good game. We buckled down and played well against a good team.” “Julianne was clutch twice,” Schilf said. “Our freshman belting a two-run homer was huge because it gave us confidence and we knew we should be able to hold on.” Downers Grove South (13) three straight hits in the bottom of the eighth, with Katy LaCivita scoring Danielle Trezzo to cut the lead, but the Mustangs could not get any closer. It was the sixth win this year for Moran “Molly has four shutouts in six games this year, so that’s pretty darn good,” Schilf said. “She’s not only proved to her teammates, and think she’s proved to herself that I belong here and I can help this team win. As long as we play defense and give our bats a chance, we will win a lot of games this year.” Although she earned the loss, Downers Grove South coach Ron Havelka was happy how Bozek pitched, holding Benet down most of the game, when they had come in averaging nearly 12 runs per game. “This team has been scoring double digits and run ruling everyone they play,” Havelka siad. “There is no consolation, because we didn’t come here Mark Gregory/Bugle staff

See BENET, page 13

Molly Moran throws a pitch in Benet’s win over Downers South.


12

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

Sports

Young Trojans open with tough schedule By Scott Taylor Sports Reporter

With a young team and a new coach, Downers Grove North’s schedule has done it few favors. The Trojans have had to open their season against two of the top teams in the area in Benet and Plainfield North.

GIRLS SOCCER Plainfield North got the best of them 7-0 last Monday in Plainfield. “The quality of their team speaks for itself,” Downers North coach John CoumbeLilley said of the Tigers. “Their girls are well coached. I wasn’t disappointed in the way we played. I knew coming in the girls were going to be up against it. They have some girls who are highly regarded in Illinois. Whether they scored a couple of extra goals is no big deal to us, the thing was that we were able to pressure their goalkeeper and created some opportunities, which I was happy with.” While this year’s squad struggled with the speed of the Tigers, Coumbe-Lilley feels it will be a different story next time they travel to Plainfield. “Our varsity team averages 15 and a half years of age,” Coumbe-Lilley said. “We will be back here in two years with a team full of seniors, 36 more games under our belt and the girls will be used to the physicality.” With the young team (including freshman goalie Izzy Greenblatt), CoumbeLilley wishes his team could ease into the season instead of

playing some of the best teams in the state right away. The Trojans lost the following day to Lockport 3-0. “I would say that the schedule I was given was absolutely lousy,” Coumbe-Lilley said. “There’s no way we should be playing this team this early in the season. I’m very disappointed coming in as a new head coach, the schedule was given to our team. The girls didn’t ask for it, I didn’t ask for it. We weren’t prepared to play that quality (of a team). Given the age of our team, I’m delighted with how we played, but I’m (not happy) with playing Plainfield North the second game of the year after playing Benet. I know that my school had nothing really to do with it. The girls deserve better and that’s what we’re going to do. We want to play Plainfield North when we can challenge them and give them a good game.” The biggest thing for the 2012 season is to get the young girls some experience for the future. “We started six freshmen today and we have (four seniors, Frannie Jones, Biana Romay, Carrie Smith and Lily Stanicek),” Coumbe-Lilley said. “We want to get as close to .500 as possible. I want them to learn as much as they can about what the requirements are to play varsity soccer. We have a lot of work to do and us as coaches have to do a better job of preparing them and giving them the tools to do well.” When it is all said and done, Coumbe-Lilley hopes that the girls on this team will turn the program around over the next couple years. “I think we have to give the

Scott Taylor/Bugle staff

Sophomore Gianna Marconi heads a ball for Downers North in a 7-0 loss to Plainfield North.

school a program worthy of being talked about,” CoumbeLilley stated. “I think for a long time the program has been looked at as being second class and second rate. Everybody deserves better and that’s what we’re going to be working towards. We’re going to do our very best to compete and wins some games.” staylor@buglenewspapers.com


sPorts

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

13

Three D-I recruits lead Mustangs By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

BASEBALL 1. Downers South 2. Plainfield North 3. Niles West 4. Minooka 5. Joliet Catholic 6. Maine South 7. Plainfield Central

SOFTBALL 1. Benet 2. Downers North 3. Plainfield Central 4. Lockport 5. Minooka 6. Plainfield East 7. Plainfield South

GIRLS SOCCER 1. Downers South 2. Plainfield North 3. Plainfield Central 4. Lockport 5. Maine South 6. Plainfield South 7. Bolingbrook

BOYS VOLLEYBALL 1. Downers North 2. Benet 3. Minooka 4. Downers South 5. Plainfield North 6. Maine South 7. Bolingbrook

BOYS TRACK 1. Plainfield South 2. Minooka 3. Maine South 4. Niles West 5. Plainfield North 6. Joliet West 7. Benet

GIRLS TRACK 1. Plainfield North 2. Downers South 3. Downers North 4. Bolingbrook 5. Lockport 6. Niles West 7. Westmont Rankings are compiled by Mark Gregory and Scott Taylor.

Goals “kind of came easy at times” last season for the Downers South girls soccer team, noted veteran coach Barry Jacobson.

GIRLS SOCCER That’s because the Mustangs had two reliable goal-scorers in Stephanie Zurales and Keri Kujawa. Zurales led the Mustangs with 18 goals as a freshman in 2011, and Kurjawa netted 24 two years ago. But the duo has since moved on. Zurales is playing club soccer exclusively this year,and Kurjawa, who graduated last spring, is now at Illinois State. Nonetheless, the Mustangs— led by Division I recruits Sarrah Ludwig, Jessica Bronke and Flo Beshiri, all seniors—should be able to dent the back of the net

BENET Continued from page 11 to play them close, we played them to win the game. I thought she pitched well today. She changed pitch speed and she needs ti do that. She was throwing the ball a lot better and using her legs a lot better than she was against

enough this season to build on a team that went 18-4-1 last year. Ludwig, who committed to Valparaiso last year,has been doing her part to pick up the scoring slack thus far. She’s tallied five goals in the Mustangs’ first four contests, including a goal against non-conference foe Lockport last Thursday that led to a 2-0 victory. Sophomore forward Emily Wauer scored the Mustangs’ other goal later in the first half off a crossing pass from Tess Grannan, who’s also a sophomore. “We don’t have 20- or 30-goal scorers out on the field, but we have people who can put the ball in the net when we need to,” Ludwig said. But she pointed out that the Mustangs’ offense feeds off their defense, which is as stingy as they come.The Mustangs recorded 14 shutouts last season, and have two in their first four games of 2012. “I think our defense is what

runs the game,” Ludwig said. “If we don’t have a good defense, we don’t have anyone connecting. They protect our goalie; they get the ball to the midfielders, who get it to the forwards who score.” Seniors Amanda Meyers and Cassidy Herrmann—who’s playing her first season of soccer—have been splitting duties in goal. They combined for a shutout in DGS’ 5-0 victory over Lincoln-Way East to open the season. Herrmann went the entire 80 minutes en route to blanking Lockport. “Cassidy, she’s a volleyball player,” said Jacobson, an Illinois Soccer Coaches Hall of Famer who is in his 29th season at DGS and has over 470 career victories. “She’s worked really hard with (assistant) coach (Bob) Topor, and in these conditions she did a great job.” The Mustangs and Porters played through a steady

Lockport on Tuesday. I thought she pitched pretty well today and she changed up speed every once in a while. You have to with Benet. Havelka knows with losses to Benet, Elgin and Lockport, the Mustangs cannot be frustrated with their early record. “I was proud of the girls,” Havelka said. “If we play (how we did against Benet) we will win a lot of games. I told the

girls, we are only four games in. We still have 31 more plus the regional, so we have to build on this thing. Games like these help us in the end. Sometimes you get a false security when you play someone else. We want to play good teams early. If there are things to work on, which there are, they kind of show up in games against good teams.” mark@buglenewspapers.com

downpour most of the evening. But competing on Downers South’s new all-weather turf made it much easier to maneuver. “It’s wonderful,” Jacobson said of the new surface. “It changes everything for us. A game like this, in this weather, would have been slop (playing on grass).” Beshiri, who’s verbally committed to Creighton, has been alternating between midfield and defense early this season. Bronke, a Miami of Ohio recruit who was an all-stater last year as a junior, has a goal and three assists through the Mustangs’ first four games. “Flo, she’s a great player and has had a really nice start this year. She expects so much of herself,” Jacobson said. “Jess is solid. She does her job and she’s a workhorse out there.” Senior defender Jessica Pikul joins Bronke and Ludwig as cocaptains of this year’s squad. mikes@buglenewspapers.com


14

Sports

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

Westmont, new coach hoping to right ship By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

No doubt, Westmont’s baseball team will reap the benefits of firstyear coach D.J. Cocks’ impressive resume and familiarity with the Interstate Eight Conference.

BASEBALL

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle staff

Jean Pietrzak has had two strong outings for Westmont on the mound.

Cocks coached Plano, a crossconference foe, for five seasons (2007-2011). His teams won 20-or-more games each year. “I’ve got a lot of experience in the I-8, knowing all the teams, so it’ll definitely help,” he said. “And these guys (referring to the Sentinels) are going to come along. I think we’re going to be OK.” Currently, the Sentinels are in the midst of a slow start. Westmont has dropped seven of its first eight games, including losses to Fenton (10-1 and 6-5 in a doubleheader) on Saturday and 2-0 to Elmwood Park at home March 29.

The only solace Cocks takes from these defeats is that they were to Class 3A schools (Westmont is in 2A). “These teams that we’re playing at the beginning of the year are 3A and 4A schools,” Cocks said.“That’s not an excuse by any means because we want to win every game, but what I’m saying is it’s preparing us for conference play. There’s not one team on our schedule that’s an easy team to play, but hopefully we start coming around and start getting some W’s on the board soon.” On March 29, the Sentinels ran into Joe Uvelli, a freshman power pitcher whose fastball tops out in the high 80s. Uvelli mowed through Westmont’s lineup, striking out 17 while giving up only two hits. Uvelli, ranked third among freshman players throughout the state by Prep Baseball Report— Westmont shortstop Charlie Donovan is ranked fourth— struck out the side in four of the

seven innings he pitched. He fanned 11 of 12 batters he faced from the first through the fourth innings—including seven in a row at one point. Donovan, in fact, was the only Sentinel to get a hit off his Elmwood Park freshman counterpart during the first three innings—a single to lead off the game. Third baseman Zach Hill had Westmont’s only other hit. “He was tough,” Cocks said. “You’ve got to hand it to him. The kid’s a good pitcher. The thing that’s frustrating, though, I understand we’re going to strike out, but we had eight backwards Ks.That doesn’t settle well, especially with runners in scoring position.You’re watching the third one go by, knowing that he’s not throwing any curve balls.” Most of Westmont’s roster will be adjusting to varsity play as well as to a new coach. Hill and catcher Brian Albaugh, both See WESTMONT, page 15


Sports

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

15

O’Brien coaches in All-Star game By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

January turned out to be quite a memorable month personally for Ellen O’Brien. In late January, the longtime Downers South girls head basketball coach, now in her third decade of coaching at the school, was one of four individuals inducted into the Downers Grove South Athletic Hall of Fame.

GIRLS BASKETBALL A couple of weeks earlier, O’Brien—the only studentathlete in school history who’s ever been named team MVP in three sports (she achieved that feat her senior year in volleyball, softball and basketball)— got a call from Zion-Benton girls basketball coach Tanya Johnson. Johnson, an IBCA Hall of Fame coach, was named to coach the West Team in the 2012 McDonald’s Girls AllAmerican game held last week at the United Center. She asked O’Brien to be one of her assistants, and O’Brien jumped at the opportunity. “I’ve known Tanya for about 20 years back when she was (coaching) at Loyola Academy and Marillac (Ill. High School),” O’Brien said. “I’ve helped her a little bit here and there.” The girls game, which preceded the 35th annual McDonald’s All-American boys

WESTMONT Continued from page 14 seniors, are the only Sentinels with varsity experience. In addition to Donovan, three sophomores were in the starting lineup against Elmwood Park: first baseman Greg Pietrzak, second baseman Zach Moran and right fielder John Kelly, who threw out an Elmwood Park baserunner trying to stretch a single into a double during the sixth inning. “A lot of these guys are playing varsity baseball for the first time,”

game, featured 24 of the best high school seniors in the nation—all of whom are going to play at NCAA Division I schools. The West squad lost a tough 79-78 contest to the East on two free throws with 0.3 seconds left, yet O’Brien relished the experience of helping to coach some of the country’s top prep players. “It was just a fantastic opportunity,” she said. “It really felt like a dream team of high scorers. To be a part of it has just been phenomenal. I’m so pleased to be a part of it.” O’Brien got to coach and interact on a daily basis with the state’s two best prep players during the 2011-12 season— two-time Ms. Basketball of Illinois award-winner Morgan Tuck of Bolingbrook and Niles West’s Jewell Loyd, this year’s Ms. Basketball runner-up. Tuck will join West Team teammate Moriah Jefferson and Breanna Stewart, who played on the East Team, at women’s basketball power Connecticut later this year. Loyd—one of only seven girls in IHSA history to score 3,000-or-more career points—is heading to Notre Dame. “All these kids are really classy kids,” O’Brien said. “The Illinois kids have been fantastic to be a part of and be around. Both of those kids are really phenomenal kids and do their community proud and their families proud.”

While the game is considered an exhibition, plenty of preparation went into it. Coaches met each morning at 7:30 in the days leading up to the matchup. “We were meeting and making sure we’re all on the same page,” O’Brien said. “From a coaching perspective, we all contributed. We keep track of this and that. Fouls, times, who’s up, who’s down, who’s the matchups, who’s doing what. “There’s certain rules throughout the whole game, such as each kid is supposed to play so many minutes, (and) here’s the suggested matchups. Some of it’s just handed to us and we’re just trying to administer it.” O’Brien said the experience of going to the Ronald McDonald House near the University of Chicago in Hyde Park—which houses the families of seriously ill children who are receiving medical treatment—to visit with the children is something she’ll never forget. “We (all the coaches and players) went to the Ronald McDonald House and it was just an incredible experience for everyone—every one of the kids and myself,” she said. “It’s just wonderful what they do for everyone.” All of the proceeds from both the girls and boys games benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities of Chicagoland.

Cocks said. “It’s an adjustment to adjust to my coaching philosophies. We’re doing fine; it’s early in the season and we’ve got a tough schedule to begin our year. We’ll get there.” Junior right-hander Jean Pietrzak has looked good in the early going, even though he suffered the loss Thursday, and endured another 2-0 defeat to Timothy Christian on March 22. Pietrzak struck out 11 against Elmwood Park and 14 vs.Timothy Christian. I feel great,” Pietrzak said. “As much as we’ve lost, we don’t give up. We’re still trying to get

the team winning every day. We come out to practice and work hard. We should eventually turn it around. This team is really resilient.” “He had 25 Ks in two games and he lost them both,”Cocks said. “But that’s just the way the game is sometimes. It’s just crazy like that. We didn’t get him any run support and that’s disappointing. We had a couple of chances there and it was frustrating to get a pitcher who pitches that well and get zero (runs) on the board. Hopefully we’ll learn and adjust and get better from this.”

mikes@buglenewspapers.com

mikes@buglenewspapers.com

VOTE ONLINE! Monay Crawford, Maine East -Voyager Media All-Star MVP

Morgan Tuck, Bolingbrook -Female hoops player of the year

Sidney Prasse, Benet -First team All-Area, 14.9 ppg

Marlon Johnson, Joliet West -Voyager Media All-Star MVP

Vicky Vodicka, Romeoville -Three goals in season-opener

Ed Presniakovas, Plainfield South -Male hoops player of the year

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for your winner for the Athlete of the Month for March online at www.buglenewspapers.com up until April 16. The winner will be announced in the April 18/19 issue.


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Travel

THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

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Changes spice up northern Europe While the countries of southern Europe struggle with financial instability, those living in northern Europe are in stronger shape, thanks to their ability to produce more while consuming less. It remains to be seen to what degree they will continue to bail out their less fiscally responsible neighbors. But one thing’s certain: Travelers to Germany, Switzerland, and Scandinavia will encounter their share of renovations, red tape, and reinvigorated neighborhoods and sights this year. Berlin remains one of Europe’s most exciting and affordable capitals. The city has been busy updating and expanding several communist sights, including the Berlin Wall Memorial, the DDR Museum, with a quirky collection of communist-era artifacts, and the new but underwhelming Stasi Museum, featuring exhibits on East Germany’s state security service. Unfortunately, visitors to the Reichstag - Germany’s inspirational parliament building - must now make an online reservation in advance to tour its impressive glass dome (www. bundestag.de). If it’s not too crowded, you may be able to get in without a reservation, though it’s unlikely. In Munich, the Lenbachhaus, featuring early Modernist art, and the Halls of the Nibelungen at the Residenz remain closed for renovation and are projected to reopen in 2013. In Wurzburg, the opulent chapel at the Residenz is undergoing restoration and should open to visitors in mid2012, while St. Kilian’s Cathedral will be closed for renovation until the end of the year. The classy horse races near BadenBaden have resumed, with three sessions happening in May,

August, and October. Several new walking tour offerings can help spice up your German adventure. In Rothenburg, the country’s best-preserved medieval walled town, you can now do a walking-tour double feature. Start by strolling the town on the Executioner’s Tour, a macabre hour with Georg Lehle costumed as a 14th-century executioner, then follow it up with the long-recommended Night Watchman’s Tour, accompanied by gritty tales of old-time Rothenburg. If you’re saddled with a long wait at Frankfurt’s airport, the Frankfurt Layover Tour offers a unique way to kill time. Offered by Frankfurt on Foot, the tour lasts at least three hours but can be tailored to your interests and time, and includes pick-up and drop-off at the airport. Changes are also afoot in Switzerland, Germany’s neighbor to the south. In the Swiss capital of Bern, the bears are back. Two years ago, Finn (a male from Finland) and Bjork (a female from Denmark) moved into Bern’s terraced Bear Park and got busy; soon afterward they welcomed female cubs Ursina and Berna. In Lausanne, the Olympic Museum will be closed for renovation until late 2013.During this time, you can still enjoy the park and see the Olympic flame. A temporary floating exhibit, moored just across the street from the park, will feature a taste of the museum’s collection. Considering how hot the Mediterranean region is in the summer, vacationing in Nordic

Submitted Photo

Copenhagen’s Kodbyen district is home to a number of trendy eateries, including BioMio, a fresh and 100-percent organic take on a traditional cafeteria, located in the old Bosch building.

Europe has become a hit in July and August. As usual, the biggest changes are taking place in the capital cities. In Denmark, Copenhagen’s Meatpacking District, Kodbyen, is one of the city’s most upand-coming destinations for restaurants and nightlife. Located behind the main train station, the neighborhood is filled with trendy galleries and eateries that mingle with surviving offices and warehouses for the local meatpacking industry. In Oslo, Norway, damaged buildings in the Grunerlokka neighborhood now bear a poignant tribute to the events of July 22, 2011 - when an antiimmigration lunatic killed eight people in the city with a car bomb before shooting and killing 69 more at a Labor Party summer camp. Permanent memorials will

eventually be built at the sites of the tragedies. In 2014, the Swedish capital of Stockholm will welcome a new commuter rail line that’s being built beneath its main train station (until then, expect lots of construction). The city is also welcoming a new breed of tourist: fans of Stieg Larsson’s punked-out computer hacker heroine, Lisbeth Salander, and jaded journalist hero, Mikael Blomkvist. Set in Stockholm and shot here, the Hollywood version of “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” is making the cityscape more recognizable. Just south of the Old Town, the Sodermalm neighborhood is the primary setting of the books. It’s here that fans will find Kvarnen, an oldstyle pub in which Lisbeth hangs out with an all-girl punk band,

and the Mellqvist cafe, where the love-struck Lisbeth sees Mikael kiss his mistress. Fans can also visit the City of Stockholm Museum, which displays Larsson artifacts,features a reconstruction of Mikael’s office at Millennium magazine, and offers Millennium walking tours in English. Despite a few hassles, northern Europe remains one of the easiest places to travel, whether it’s a spring fling to Germany, an alpine adventure in the Swiss Alps, or a summertime swing through Scandinavia. (Rick Steves (www.ricksteves.com) writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and public radio. Email him at rick@ricksteves.com and follow his blog on Facebook.)

(c)2012 RICK STEVES DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.


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THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

Business & Real Estate

The real costs of today’s health care This has been a hot business and personal finance topic lately, especially in the wake of “The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act”, better known as “Obamacare”, current Supreme Court hearings regarding the Act’s constitutionality, and this being an election year. I’d put the healthcare costs debate into four categories – medical providers, insurance companies, the legal system, and last but not least… the government.Although each could be a whole article or book, I’ll go easy on the former three here, and to paraphrase Dave Ramsey, punch the latter right in the face. Many people think medical providers are highly paid. In some cases this may be true, but as usual, I have a personal story. A few months ago I had an outpatient procedure that took two preparatory office visits, a two and a half hour surgery plus prep and recovery time, and two

follow-up visits. The highly educated and skilled surgeon billed insurance approximately $5,900. The insurance c o m p a n y disallowed over $4,700 because they can,and the medical providers take it because two-thirds of patients without insurance don’t pay. Insurance only paid $1,100 and my portion is $121 after meeting my deductible with other medical bills. For three hours of that surgeon’s time, minus paying his staff, overhead, malpractice insurance, legal fees, etc., that’s not overpaid in my opinion. I mentioned that insurance companies dictate payments to medical providers, similarly to federal Medicare and state Medicaid. Another major concern

is increasing premiums. As the insured population becomes older and sicker, costs increase. Therefore premiums also increase. Currently when someone has a personal Medicare supplemental insurance policy, which is already structured by the government, they can change companies to get into a new “pool” of policyholders and save premiums. With Medicare, which is partially funded with a mandatory payroll tax on employees and employers, coverage is required, premiums are withheld from Social Security, and the program is administered by the federal government and subsidized with federal general revenues. There is no opt-out, premiums continue to rise,and the trust funds continue to deplete. That’s how our government-run system works so far. The legal system has been scrutinized as a cause for high healthcare costs including

Is it OK to use a credit card for our monthly bills? Dear Dave, I want to keep one of our credit cards open and use the bill-pay option for utilities and other monthly bills. I want to do this so we can continue earning rewards points, and the way I look at it, we’d just be rerouting the money and paying it off every month. My husband doesn’t like this idea and thinks we should get rid of them all. Am I just asking for trouble by wanting to keep the rewards card open? Cheryl Dear Cheryl, Yes, you are. Life never works out exactly the way you think it will. You can make all the wellreasoned and best-intentioned plans you want, but sooner or later that snake is going to bite you. The only thing I’d consider in a situation like this is a debit card that has a rewards system attached. Lots of debit card programs offer the same kinds of rewards programs offered by credit card companies, with one big exception—you don’t have to go into debt!

You need to stop chasing these stupid b r o w n i e points, Cheryl. According to Consumer Reports, 78 percent of credit card airline miles are never redeemed. Studies also show that people spend more when using credit cards as opposed to cash. That extra money you spend on things you don’t need is money you could have been saving and investing. So, where’s the reward? Cut up the card and close the account, Cheryl. You don’t build wealth by using credit cards! —Dave Dear Dave, My wife and I are both active duty Marines. She’s planning to get out in a few months, but I’m staying in for the long haul. You recommend saving 15 percent for retirement, but how does that apply in my case when I’ll be getting a good pension after

20 years? James Dear James, I’d like to see you do both. Just imagine the money you guys would have for retirement with your military pension and a big pile of cash from having saved 15 percent of your income over the years. Having options is a great thing. Think about all the things you could do down the road if you save for retirement and have your pension in place.You could pay cash for a home, or even open a business when you retire from the military. And these are things you probably wouldn’t be able to do working with just your service pension. You’ve got a great future if you’ll just keep plugging along and saving, James. Let the military do its thing, and you guys keep pumping 15 percent of your income into Roth IRAs and other pre-tax retirement plans. It’s going to be pretty cool! — Dave * For more financial help please visit daveramsey.com.

malpractice insurance premiums. In 2005, law professors from Duke Law School published an article titled “Judicial Hellholes: Medical Malpractice Claims, Verdicts and the Doctor Exodus in Illinois”. More recently, in August 2010, the AMA released a study analyzing survey responses from over 5,800 physicians that 42 percent are sued at some point in their career, including 6 of 10 who practice until age 55 or older. By specialty, general surgery and obstetriciangynecology tops the list at 69 percent. Over half of OB-GYNs surveyed were sued twice or more in their careers. However, a Chicago area medical malpractice lawyer disputes the connection to healthcare costs stating that the “Congressional Budget Office reports that medical malpractice amounts to less than two percent of overall healthcare spending.” Unless something changes, the above-referenced Act is fully

effective in 2014. Businesses and individuals will be required to have health insurance or be fined by the IRS. Meanwhile, the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee warned that as many as 16,500 new IRS auditors and investigators, or a 17 percent increase in IRS workforce could be needed to administer and enforce the new health insurance rules. I don’t have the answers, but when you get behind a political candidate this year because of what he or she is going to provide for you, consider what it’s going to cost you, and your children, your children’s children, etc. God Bless America, please! Mike Reid, the self-proclaimed “Money Maverick” is a Registered CPA, a fulltime Advertising Consultant for Bugle Newspapers and Voyager Media Group, and an independent contractor with various entities in the Chicago area, Central, and Southern Illinois.


THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS 2010 CH 00835 US Bank National Association, as Trustee for the Structured Asset Investment Loan Trust, 2005-HE3 PLAINTIFF Vs. Mark Johns; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 12/16/2011, John Zaruba, the Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois will on 4/19/12 at the hour of 10:00AM at Dupage County Sheriff’s Office 501 North County Farm Road Wheaton, IL 60187, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DuPage and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 09-29-114-015 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1034 Claremont Drive Downers Grove, IL 60516 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g) (4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-09-43517. I419305 Published 3/21, 3/28, 4/4

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THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS 2010 CH 00835 US Bank National Association, as Trustee for the Structured Asset Investment Loan Trust, 2005-HE3 PLAINTIFF Vs. Mark Johns; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 12/16/2011, John Zaruba, the Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois will on 4/19/12 at the hour of 10:00AM at Dupage County Sheriff’s Office 501 North County Farm Road Wheaton, IL 60187, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DuPage and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 1034 IN ASSESSMENT PLAT NO. 2 OF HIDDEN PINES ESTATES PHASE II, BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 4 AND 5 IN HIDDEN PINES ESTATES PHASE II, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 11, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, SAID ASSESSMENT PLAT RECORDED AUGUST 24, 192 AS DOCUMENT NO. R92-160321, IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN 09-29-114-015 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1034 Claremont Drive Downers Grove, IL 60516 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twentyfour (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-09-43517.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY- WHEATON, ILLINOIS Wells Fargo Bank, NA Plaintiff, vs. Antonio E. Rome; Carolyn T. Rome; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc; CitiMortgage, Inc.; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendants. 12 CH 240 Property Address: 9541 Witham Lane, Woodridge, Illinois 60517 NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given you, Carolyn T. Rome and UNKNOWN OWNERS and NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, defendants in the above entitled cause, that suit has been commenced against you and other defendants in the Circuit Court for the Judicial Circuit by said plaintiff praying for the foreclosure of a certain mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: LOT 278 IN GALLAGHER & HENRY’S FARMINGDALE VILLAGE UNIT 25C BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 11, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 25, 2005 AS DOCUMENT R2005-084105, AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED JUNE 21, 2005, AS DOCUMENT NO. R2005-129160, AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED JULY 20, 2005, AS DOCUMENT NO. R2005-154685, IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. P.I.N.: 10-07-114-010 Said property is commonly known as: 9541 Witham Lane, Woodridge, Illinois 60517, and which said mortgage(s) was/were made by Antonio E. Rome; Carolyn T. Rome and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds as Document Number R2010-022651 and for other relief; that Summons was duly issued out of the above Court against you as provided by law and that said suit is now pending. NOW THEREFORE, unless you, the said above named defendants, file your answer to the complaint in the said suit or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Office of the Clerk of the Court at DUPAGE County on or before April 27, 2012, a default may be taken against you at any time after that date and a Judgment entered in accordance with the prayer of said complaint. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Steven C. Lindberg Attorney for Plaintiff FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60563 630-983-0770 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (fax) Attorney No. Cook 26122, DuPage 42005, Kane 031-26104, Peoria 1794, Winnebago 3802, IL 03126232 Louis Freedman- 3126104, Thomas Anselmo- 3125949, Steven Lindberg3126232,Doug Oliver - 6273607, Clay A. Mosberg- 1972316, Karl V. Meyer6220397,Bryan D. Hughes- 6300070, Ann W. Lopez- 6190037, Jonathan Nusgart- 6211908, William B. Kalbac6301771, Sarah K. Lash- 6300299, John Gerrity- 6303376, W. Brandon Rogers- 6302871, G. Stephen Caravajal, Jr. - 6284718

I419305

Published 3/28, 4/4, 4/11

Published 3/21, 3/28, 4/4

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On a Roll

Haraldsen’s Garage celebrate 60 years By Debbie Lively Staff Reporter

Anyone who has lived in Westmont,and who owns a car has likely heard the name Haraldsen. Because this year Haraldsen’s Garage celebrates 60 years in business, an accomplishment that the company says has been built on trust. Third generation owner John Haraldsen Jr. operates the company which has shops in both Westmont and Darien. Haraldsen’s Garage began as a Standard Oil station in Clarendon Hills. John’s grandfather, Toven Haraldsen started the business in 1952. In 1958, Toven, who migrated to the United States from Norway, took a gamble by selling both the gas stations that he owned at the time, and traded in his Westmont home to purchased the current Haraldsen’s Garage, located at 21 East Burlington Ave. in downtown Westmont. “For me and my family,

Because in a small community like Westmont, you wouldn’t survive if people didn’t trust you,” John Haraldsen Jr., owner celebrating 60 years means everything, because my name is over the door,” said John Jr. “It means that the community trusts us. Because in a small community like Westmont, you wouldn’t survive if people didn’t trust you,” he added. Haraldsen’s prides itself on having the top technicians in the industry. Each of the company’s eight technicians average about 27 years in experience, with about 220 years of experience put together. The company has a very low employee turnover and a strong belief in employee training. Even the previous owners, 67-year-old John

Submitted Photo

Haraldsen Sr., still works with the company part-time. John Jr. said at times customers have taken issue with the shop’s service prices, but he contends that the services are worth it. “It’s worth it to pay more,” said John Jr. “People may go some place else but they come back,” he said because Haraldsen’s is trustworthy and skilled at diagnostics. The advice he gives

customer is, “You should find a place that you feel is trustworthy. If they don’t do it (the kind of auto work that a customer is seeking), they can tell you where to take it. It’s all about the people (shop owners). Do they care? Are they trustworthy?” he said. One of the areas that Haraldsen’s is known for is its work on vintage cars, such as Chevys built between 1955 and

1957. “We work a lot on classic cars because we have so much experience.My guys were around when those cars were new,” he said. “It’s not our specialty, but it’s something that we do.” For more information about Haraldsen’s Garage, visit www. haraldsensgarage.com dlively@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE APRIL 4, 2012

Westmont Bugle 4-4-12  

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