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J U N E 2 0, 2 0 1 8 V O L . 2 3 I S S U E 27 SHOREWOODSENTINEL.COM

50 PLUS Seniors becoming more tech-savvy SEE PAGE 11

FORUM

Celebrating IL Ag Lab has made impact with ‘wonderful discoveries’ SEE PAGE 4

SPORTS

Player of the Year North’s Thompson leads All-Area team SEE PAGE 5

BUSINESS Dave Says New grad needs to take care of basics

SEE PAGE 8

SECTION SPOTLIGHT

#shorewoodsentinel


NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 2018 | SHOREWOODSENTINEL.COM

CALENDAR U P CO M I N G E V E N T S I N YO U R A R E A Ongoing Mondays through Aug. 27 Cruisin’ into Lockport. 6:30-9:30

p.m. in the Central Square and First Midwest Bank parking lots, 9th and Hamilton, through August 27. Come see the finest classic cars, enjoy live entertainment and shop and eat at our Food Court/Farmer’s Market open 4-8 p.m. There will be family entertainment including face painting, inflatables, free snow cones, and specialty nights.

JUNE 24 Shorewood Kite Fest 11 a.m. - 3

p.m. at Cene’s Four Seasons Park. 25520 W Seil Rd, Shorewood. Bring your kite or purchase one at the park. Professional kite flyers to demonstrate ties, large show kites and sport kites.

JUNE 27 Race Fan Rally. 5- 10 p.m. in

downtown Joliet at Chicago Street between Cass and Jefferson Streets, N Chicago Street, Joliet. Each year, members of the Will County Center for Economic Development and the Joliet City Center Partnership host a one-day fest on the streets of downtown Joliet to kick off the NASCAR race weekend at Chicagoland Speedway.

JUNE 29 2018 Rooftop Summer Music Series. 7:30 p.m. at the Joliet Area Historical Museum, 204 Ottawa St. Joliet. Righteous Hillbillies. $8/$10 815-723-5201 or jolietmuseum.org

JULY 11 Route 66 Street Market. 4-9 p.m.

in downtown Joliet, along Chicago Street between Van Buren and W. Jefferson Streets. Once again the annual market will feature vendors, downtown businesses, community

partnerships, live entertainment and featured local breweries weekly. (815)774-6066, jolietdowntown.com

JULY 13 2018 Rooftop Summer Music Series. 7:30 p.m. at the Joliet Area

Historical Museum, 204 Ottawa St. Joliet. Great Moments in Vinyl. $8/$10 815-723-5201 or jolietmuseum.org

JULY 18 Route 66 Street Market. 4-9 p.m.

in downtown Joliet, along Chicago Street between Van Buren and W. Jefferson Streets. Once again the annual market will feature vendors, downtown businesses, community partnerships, live entertainment and featured local breweries weekly. (815)774-6066, jolietdowntown.com

JULY 25 Route 66 Street Market. 4-9 p.m.

in downtown Joliet, along Chicago Street between Van Buren and W. Jefferson Streets. Once again the annual market will feature vendors, downtown businesses, community partnerships, live entertainment and featured local breweries weekly. (815)774-6066, jolietdowntown.com


INSTAGRAM: Readers, attending a game in your area? Take a photo and tag @buglenewspapers for a chance to be featured!

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

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COMMUNITY

Amazon delivers $10K for Joliet food bank center

South Suburban Center: $1 donation translate to $8 in groceries BY MARNEY SIMON Enterprise Staff @PlainfieldNews news@enterprisepublications.com

The newest distribution center for the Northern Illinois Food Bank has some additional cash to help its mission of feeding the hungry. On June 12, volunteers from Amazon’s Joliet fulfillment center visited the new South Suburban Center in Joliet, organizing product and offering up a $10,000 donation to help feed the area hungry. The donation was part of what Amazon refers to as a Community Kaizen – a Japanese term for “change for the better.” Amazon representatives took a tour with food bank workers of the new 18,000 square-foot facility, offering up information on how to better streamline activity inside the warehouse.

“We are very proud at Amazon to make change for the better, and we take a certain process and look at it from a visual standpoint, an efficiency standpoint, and speed, time and quality standpoints,” said Govind Singh, Site Leader for Amazon. “Then we look to break it into parts and improve that. We hope to contribute to the food bank and make the process more efficient so that we can feed more people.” For every dollar the Northern Illinois Food Bank receives, it can distribute $8 worth of groceries. That means that Amazon’s donation represents $80,000 worth of food provided by the food bank. Amazon has been donating product to the Northern Illinois Food Bank since 2016. Those donations have totaled 2-million pounds of food, and includes produce, dairy, and shelf stable foods. “We are using that product, par-

ticularly the produce, to go out and help provide the nutrition that many of our families need, particularly those who are involved in some of our health programs,” said Julie Yurko, president and CEO of the Northern Illinois Food Bank. “These are folks that suffer from diabetes, high blood pressure, other medical complications, and they need really nutritious foods.”

Yurko added the most important message for everyone is that regardless of a recovering economy and decreasing unemployment, there are still 40 million Americans who are living in poverty and who are suffering food insecurity. “What we have found is that with this recovery, those who are living in poverty or below are not recovering like the rest. And I don’t know if everybody understands

that, I don’t know if people know that their neighbors are still out there struggling and are literally going to bed hungry.” Yurko said with donations like what Amazon’s, there is enough food to go around. It’s just a matter of the community coming together. “Amazon is giving their time. They’re making a financial investment, they’re giving us food, they’re giving us their expertise. It is like the trifecta of fabulous,” Yurko said. “What you should know about the food bank is that we need you, that there’s a role for you here, you will be welcomed, and that together we will make sure that everybody has full bellies every day. It is a solvable issue.” The Northern Illinois Food Bank covers about 800 feeding sites in 13 counties, reaching about 70,000 people weekly. The bank operates out of a main distribution center in Geneva, and three additional branches, including the new South Suburban Center.

COMMUNITY

Shorewood Village Board OKs purchase of 18 acres

Vacant land at Route 52 and Wynstone Drive is for future police station BY MARNEY SIMON Enterprise Staff @PlainfieldNews news@enterprisepublications.com

The village of Shorewood is looking at some long-term planning for its police protection, starting with a land purchase. In May, the board approved a purchase of approximately 18 acres of land along in the southwest corner of Route 52 and Wynstone Drive, at a total purchase price of

$1.17 million. Trustee Anthony Luciano gave an explanation of the sale to the members of the Citizens Advisory Committee. “The reason for the purchase is for a future site for a police station,” Luciano said. “That doesn’t mean we’re going to be putting a police station in there within the near future, but we will have the land for when that project comes about. The acreage is [18] acres, from the studies that we’re look-

ing at, it’s only going to take about [eight] acres for the police station. So, the plan is for the future that the rest of the area there could be developed into businesses or something else.” Luciano said there had been talk of putting apartments on that stretch of vacant land for some time. But, he said, that type of development is ultimately not in the plans for that corner. The Shorewood Police Department currently operates out of their station at 903 W. Jefferson St. The new location would replace the current police station. But, Lu-

ciano reiterated, it’s a long-term project, not expected to see movement for several years. “This isn’t going to happen in the near future, maybe five years or ten years,” Luciano said. “There’s not too much detail, it’s a simple land sale.” Luciano said the sale was a jumping off point for some long-

term planning for that part of Shorewood’s Route 52 corridor. “The nice thing about it there’s something planned for the area, and maybe when things start growing, some other things will start going as well,” Luciano said. “I know we’re doing quite a bit of planning in the village for this area around the town center.”


FORUM

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POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to P.O. Box 892, Plainfield, IL 60544. OFFICE HOURS : Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Published every Thursday at 23856 W. Andrew Rd., Plainfield, IL 60585. Enterprise Subscription Rates: $25 per year within Will County and 60540, 60564, 60565, 60566 zip codes; $30 within Illinois; $50 per year elsewhere. Single copy 75 cents. Periodical postage paid at Plainfield, Illinois 60544 and additional mailing offices. No part of The Enterprise, Bugle & Sentinel, including advertisements, stories, photos or captions, may be reproduced without written permission from The Enterprise. Send requests to: The Enterprise P.O. Box 892 Plainfield, IL 60544 © 2018 Enterprise Newspapers, Inc.

BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM facebook.com/thebuglenewspapers twitter.com/buglenewspapers instagram.com/buglenewspapers EDITOR’S NOTE: The opinions expressed in guest columns, editorial cartoons and letters to the editor belong to the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the The Bugle or its staff.

We want to hear from you! Send us your feedback at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

GUEST COLUMN

Peoria’s Ag Lab has made impact with ‘wonderful discoveries’ BY SCOTT HILYARD OF THE PEORIA JOURNAL STAR PEORIA — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, formerly named the Northern Regional Research Laboratory, has been headquartered in Peoria for 78 years. Wait, the what? Well, it’s best known as The Ag Lab, the federal scientific research operation that is the work home of 80 Ph.D. scientists and 120 support staff. Wrapped in post-9/11 wrought iron security, the building has been a solid, if vaguely mysterious, presence at the corner of Nebraska Avenue and University Street since 1940. Created under the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, The Ag Lab was one of four regional research centers built. Each center cost about $1 million each to build, equip and staff. Then, the United States was emerging from the Depression and World War II was on the horizon. “All across this country there were large stockpiles of excess agricultural commodities,” former Ag Lab director Paul Sebesta said in 2015. “The chore was to take those excess commodities and create value-added products out of them to support the rural economy. The four centers were located in Peoria, close to the Great Lakes, in Philadelphia, one was located in New Orleans and one was located out on the West Coast, in the Bay Area. Each still exists and all four were constructed exactly the same. “They were all in the shape of a ‘U,’ where they had two science wings. And perpendicular to the two science wings was the administration wing. We received additional money in the 1960s to add a third (science) wing onto our building. So we are the largest of the four regional research centers, both in terms of square footage, in terms of human capital and in terms of budget.” Why Peoria? The two commodities the Peoria center was to work on were corn and wheat. The reason was because of the Hiram Walker Distilleries, Peoria was the whiskey capital of the world, so the first research initiatives were to im-

prove fermentation technologies. “It was because of the industry that was here and because of the agriculture commodities that were here and because of its close proximity to the Great Lakes. This was in the heart of agriculture territory,” Sebesta said. The Peoria Ag Lab earned it’s first fame from penicillin. Alexander Fleming had discovered penicillin in Britain. England was fighting the Germans before the United States joined World War II and was being bombed regularly and couldn’t build the laboratory to produce the penicillin. Britain contacted the USDA, and USDA knew of Peoria’s fermentation technologies. The British knew the value of penicillin and so they brought scientists and the penicillin strain to Peoria. They started doing research. “The original penicillin strain could not be cultured in large amounts,” Sebesta said. “They had to do a worldwide search for penicillin cultures, so Army Air Corps pilots were instructed that anywhere they landed, anywhere in the world on a dirt field, they were to scoop up a sample of dirt and send it to Peoria. And we evaluated all those samples for penicillin trying to find samples of penicillin that would grow rapidly because we knew that we needed huge doses of it, and it was hard to grow in the standard culture. It was purely by luck that a lady brought in a cantaloupe to the lab and there was a strain on there that could be rapidly cultured. The townspeople knew about the search (for penicillin cultures) and this woman, whose name was lost to history, got a moldy cantaloupe out of a Peoria grocery store.” What did the scientists do with the moldy cantaloupe? That’s where scientist Andrew Moyer gets involved. They mutated the strain so it would grow faster and then developed the tanks and the medium onto which it would grow, and that happened to be corn steep liquor from the fermentation production of ethanol. By June 1944, in times for the D-Day invasion, there was suitable quantities of penicillin to support the Normandy Invasion. The Ag Lab touches the world in countless ways; Huggies diapers and Depends garments, for instance. The super-absorbent starch material that is in those diapers and those types of

products that absorb liquid were developed in Peoria. It’s also used in operating rooms, anywhere you need to soak up large amounts of fluid because it can soak up to 1,000 times its weight in moisture. Add Sebesta, “Another product that was developed is something that you eat every day if you have a salad, but don’t know it. The product that is in every salad dressing is xantham gum and that came from this lab as well. There’s another product that came from this lab that supported the Korean War effort and that’s called dextran, a plasma extender that adds volume to plasma.” The Ag Lab also has one of the largest publicly available collections of microbes in the world. That’s about 90,000 different microbes — yeasts, bacteria, fungi, etc. — that started from the penicillin work. “If you want a microbe to do something specific you can access this culture collection to screen the microbes in there to find microbes that will make products for you in the fermentation. We make these microbes available free of charge to any scientific organization or scientist around the world,” said Sebesta. What does the future look like for the Ag Lab? “We’re not going to run out of people’s problems to solve so we better have very good solutions to those problems,” Sebesta said in 2015. “One of the things I like to say is that when you are a scientist you have a career of discovery. All of the scientists and support staff in this building are dedicated and working hard to improve the lives of Americans. Every day when I come into this building and come up the front steps I put my hand on that door and I think, ‘I wonder what wonderful discoveries are we going to make here today.’ Because that’s what we do. Think about what a wonderful career that is, to work every day of your life trying to discover something.” Portions of this article appeared in the Journal Star in 2015. Scott Hilyard can be reached at shilyard@pjstar.com. Follow @ scotthilyard on Twitter. Editor’s note: The weekly Illinois Bicentennial series is brought to you by the Illinois Associated Press Media Editors and Illinois Press Association. More than 20 newspapers are creating stories about the state’s history, places and key moments in advance of the Bicentennial on Dec. 3, 2018. Stories published up to this date can be found at 200illinois.com.


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

SOFTBALL ALL-AREA

THOMPSON

TOPS ALL Plainfield North’s Greta Thompson is the 2018 Voyager Media Softball Player of the Year BY MARK GREGORY Sports Reporter @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com

Before the season started, Plainfield North senior Greta Thompson knew the season would be a good one – she just didn’t know how good. The University of WisconsinGreen Bay recruit, all Thompson was post a 23-3 record and pitch the Tigers to second-place in Class 4A, claiming the first-ever girls team trophy in school history. Thompson pitched 159.2 innings, allowing only 40 earned runs and striking out 152 batters. She allowed 130 hits and walked only 75 all season. Thompson was a nominee for the 2018 Gatorade Player of the Year and was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 3A All-State second team. For her efforts, Thompson was also named the 2018 Voyager Media Softball Player of the Year. “It is such an honor and I am so blessed to have these accomplishments and be nominated for everything,” Thompson said of her postseason accolades. “I am just blessed. I don’t think you can predict something like this. This is so much better than anything I could have asked for. My team has backed me all year and has come through and I couldn’t have done any of this without them. “I have played with a lot of these girls since I was little and there are a lot of seniors on this team and we

knew going into this year that we were going to have a great season.” Averaging less than one strikeout per inning, Thompson works the strike zone, keep the hitters off balance and force a batter to make a bad swing on a good pitch. As that only works with solid defense. “It is such a game changer because you don’t have to be perfect, it just takes all the pressure off,” Thompson said. “You have to trust the hard work that you put in during the offseason will come through for you.” No matter how Thompson gets batters out – it’s the fact that she does that kept North coach Kelly Ash putting her in the circle. “There is nobody that I trust more,” Ash said. “She battles. She gives it everything she has. I just can’t say enough of her. She is not over powering, she pitches to contact and hits her spots and she stuck to her game plan all year and it worked. She is one of the best. She is a great kids and I am going to miss her a lot.” Thompson will continue to play in the Midwest, heading to Green Bay next season. “I really felt comfortable and at home there, which is something you don’t always feel when visiting a school,” Thompson said. “And I don’t mind playing in the cold.” The rest of the All-Area team is: HANNAH ANTZOULATOS JOLIET CATHOLIC Batted .452 for the Angels with 53 runs scored, while driving in

PHOTO BY MARK GREGORY

Plainfield North’s Greta Thompson is the 2018 Voyager Media Softball Player of the Year. 34. She posted 12 doubles and six home runs on the season. Was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 3A AllState third team. KELSEY BERNHARD DOWNERS GROVE NORTH Sophomore catcher starred on defense, while hitting .464 with 16 RBI, nine doubles, 30 runs scored and only two strikeouts all season. NATALIE BOND BOLINGBROOK Junior first baseman was AllConference in SWSC Blue hitting a .500 in conference and a .407 for the season.

She posted a pair of home runs and 22 RBI for the Raiders. Tallied a .945 fielding percentage. ALLISON BUGAJSKI MINOOKA The sophomore shortstop batted .349 with three home runs, 22 runs scored and 14 stolen bases on the season. As a lead-off hitter, she led the Indians in hits, runs scored, and stolen bases. JOANNA CIRRINCIONE RESURRECTION Senior shortstop batted .487 with a .594 on base percentage, a .750 slugging percentage and a

1.344 on base percentage – all leading the team. She also posted the team in runs (40), triples (3) and stolen bases (31). The four-time GCAC Red Division all-conference selection will play at Grand Valley State next year. ESTELLE CZECH DOWNERS GROVE NORTH Sophomore first baseman became one of the team’s top pitchers. At the plate, she batted .443 BA, with four home runs, 28 RBI, 22 runs scored. SEE ALL-AREA PAGE 6


TWITTER: For up -to-the-minute coverage of upcoming local sport events going on in your area, follow @VoyagerSport

6 SPORTS ALL-AREA FROM PAGE 5

KELSEY DOMAGALA PLAINFIELD SOUTH Senior left fielder, she batted .429 with 33 RBI, seven doubles, three triples and a pair of home runs. ASHLEY EIERMANN WESTMONT Senior was a four-year starter for the Sentinels as a catcher, shortstop and centerfielder – taking on pitching duties this year. This season, she batted .459 with 41 RBI. GINA FOLLOWELL PLAINFIELD EAST A three-year varsity starter has been a jack of all trades for the Bengals. Has played outfield and first base, but this season was the go-to pitcher. She threw in all of the big games, posting 13 wins on the season. She tossed 139 innings with a 2.36 ERA, striking out 137 and allowing 122 hits. Was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 4A All-State third team. TAYLOR GATZ MAINE SOUTH Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 4A All-State third team member batted .444 on the season, scoring 10 runs for the Hawks.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM SARAH GERSCH JOLIET WEST Senior shortstop batted .380 for the Tigers scoring 36 runs, and stealing 26 bases. Was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 4A All-State third team. MAGGIE GRECO DOWNERS GROVE SOUTH Batted .513 on the season with 17 RBI and 21 stolen bases. HALLIE HALL BOLINGBROOK Senior batted .492 for the season with 30 RBI. This season, she split time at third base and behind the plate posting a .978 fielding percentage. Hall will continue her softball career at James Madison University next year. SARAH HERBERT RESURRECTION A junior third baseman, she batted .417 with a slugging percentage of .684 and an on base plus slugging of 1.120. She paced the team in RBI (36), doubles (11), home runs (3) and was tied for triples (3). TAYLOR HERSCHBACH LOCKPORT Scored 43 runs and drove in 36 runs for Lockport, while batting .458 with 17 doubles and four home runs. Was named to the Illinois

Coaches Association Softball Class 4A All-State second team. LAUREN JOHNSON LOCKPORT Batted .500 on the season with 30 RBI, 50 hits and 28 runs scored. JEN KRIZKA JOLIET CATHOLIC Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 3A All-State second team member batted .452 with 17 doubles, eight home runs, 45 RBI and 24 runs scored this season. SAM MALINDER PLAINFIELD NORTH Batted .400 on the season, totaling 50 hits on the year, including 11 doubles, three triples and four home runs. She drove in 34 runs and scored 22. The NIU commit was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 4A AllState second team. MELISSA MANZO DOWNERS GROVE NORTH Junior infielder batted .462 on the year with six doubles, two home runs and 33 RBI. Only struck out twice on the year. TARA MCELLIGOT LOCKPORT Batted .400 with 15 home runs and 44 RBI for the Porters, scoring 41 runs and posting a .930 slugging percentage. Was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 4A All-State first team.

RANDI MCKAY DOWNERS GROVE SOUTH Batted .506 on the season with 27 RBI, while striking out only three times. LARISSA ORTIZ ROMEOVILLE Freshman utility player batted .391 with a .931 slugging percentage and 12 home runs. She posted a .942 fielding percentage. BRITNEY RICHARDSON MAINE SOUTH The senior centerfielder batted .408, recording 29 hits in 71 at bats, with a slugging percentage of .873 and an on base percentage of .468. Was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 4A All-State second team. AMBERLY RODRIGUEZ PLAINFIELD EAST A four-year varsity starter was the leadoff hitter and centerfielder for the Bengals. She batted .439 with 35 runs scored in 32 games. She posted six doubles, three triples and one home run. Stole 16 bases. She was a four-time SPC AllConference Player and will play next season at Northern Illinois University. Was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 4A All-State second team. COURTNEY SCHOOLCRAFT LOCKPORT

Batted .387 with 36 RBI, 28 runs scored and seven home runs. She was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 4A AllState third team. TAYLOR SHINGLER LOCKPORT Hit .528 with 56 hits, 17 RBI and 38 runs scored for the Porters. Was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 4A AllState second team. RYAN SHAUGHNESSY PLAINFIELD NORTH Batted .414 with seven doubles and three home runs for the Class 4A runners-up. She scored 40 runs and drove in 25. Will play at Ohio University next season. Was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 4A AllState third team. LEXI SIWEK PLAINFIELD NORTH Hit .373 for the Tigers, posting 25 RBI, seven doubles, two triples and two home runs and scoring 37 runs. Was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 4A All-State second team. MADISON SZYMANSKI JOLIET CATHOLIC Batted .482 for JCA with 18 doubles. She drove in 45 runs and scored 39. Was named to the Illinois Coaches Association Softball Class 3A All-State second team.


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2018

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live entertainment Purchase your tickets today! The 2018 Taste of Joliet is a general admission festival. Ticket purchase options are listed on www.tasteofjoliet.com. Hurry! Limited number of tickets available.

Friday, June 22 3:45 PM

HOT MESS 4:45 PM

ANTHEM

hits “Stoplight”, “Better This Way” and “Sing”. Also known for the famous “30 Songs in 30 Minutes” medley of songs from the 70’s and 80’s, 7th heaven has been an entertainment staple for 30 years.

Anthem / Classic Rock & Beyond is an all-live musical experience to see and hear, covering all-time favorites like Styx, Bon Jovi, Journey, REO, Boston, Whitesnake, Led Zeppelin, Kansas, Queen, Aerosmith, Van Halen, Rush, Foreigner, Alice in Chains, Triumph, and more! This lineup of experienced artists have performed at major venues and festivals throughout the Midwest for the past two decades.

Dennis DeYoung is an American singersongwriter, musician and producer best known for being a founding member of the rock band Styx as the primary lead vocalist and keyboardist, a tenure that lasted from 1970 until June 1999.

6:00 PM

9:30 PM

7TH HEAVEN

7th heaven is an experience you just have to see and hear! 7th heaven has charted #1 on the Midwest Billboard Charts three times in the past three years. The band has been heard on over 7 radio stations in Chicagoland with their

7:45 PM

DENNIS DEYOUNG AND THE MUSIC OF STYX

RICK SPRINGFIELD

The Snake King is the brand new album from Rick Springfield and finds Rick traveling down a dusty dirt road exploring the blues. Released on January 28, The Snake King is available from your favorite retailer.

Saturday, June 23 3:15 PM

RAELYN NELSON

As an emerging female country artist in Nashville, history suggests that the quickest path to success is somehow aligning oneself with one of the major publishers, producers, songwriters, labels, or managers that are the heart of Music Row. So what do you do if you are an emerging female country artist in Nashville, and also happen to be the granddaughter of musical icon, Willie Nelson?

4:15 PM

STEPHEN NEAL 6:00 PM

CHRIS LANE

Chris Lane is an American country music singer and songwriter. He has released one album as frontman of the Chris Lane Band and a second album, Girl Problems, via Big Loud Records.

7:30 PM

CHASE RICE

Chase Rice is an American country music singer, songwriter, and reality television personality. He co-wrote the single “Cruise” performed by Florida Georgia Line.

9:00 PM

BROTHERS OSBORNE

Brothers Osborne is an American country music duo consisting of brothers T.J. Osborne and John Osborne.

Sunday, June 24 noon

SCHOOL OF ROCK 1:00 PM

THE MILLENIALS

and also his slide guitar ability, makes him an artist unlike any other. The 6’10” 300 + lb man owns every stage he walks on and his personality is as large as his stature.

3:00 PM

The Millennials bring a fresh style to Rockn-Roll classics. Formed by a group of friends with a common love of music.

DJ EVENTS PRO

2:00 PM

GRUPO LA OBRA

BIG DOG MERCER

For close to two decades, Marty “Big Dog” Mercer’s heartfelt, southpaw Blues and soulful voice have growled through the Midwest music scene & abroad. Mercer’s ability to combine emotional lyrics with aggressive guitar playing

4:00 PM 5:00 PM

OMAR SÁNCHEZ OMI 6:30 PM

LOS ANGELES DE CHARLY

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TASTE OF JOLIET

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TASTE OF JOLIET

fest hours & admission The 2018 Taste of Joliet is a general admission festival. Admission prices for all three days are listed below.

Saturday, June 23: Open Noon – Midnight GENERAL ADMISSION: $11.00 IN ADVANCE $16.00 ON THE DAY FRONT SECTION RESERVED: $47.50

Sunday, June 24: Friday, June 22:

Open Noon – 8 PM

Open Noon – Midnight

GENERAL ADMISSION: $5.00 ON THE DAY (NOON – 3 PM) $10.00 ON THE DAY (3 – 7 PM)

NOON – 3 PM - FREE GENERAL ADMISSION: $11.00 IN ADVANCE $16.00 ON THE DAY FRONT SECTION RESERVED: $47.50

Children 11 and under accompanied by an adult are FREE all weekend. Seniors (age 62+) are $5.00 all weekend. Everyone (including children) must have a ticket to enter the Front Section. There is a $3.00 service fee to purchase tickets online.

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location & parking

THE 2018 TASTE OF JOLIET WILL BE HELD AT ATI FIELD AT JOLIET MEMORIAL STADIUM, IN THE HEART OF JOLIET.

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SCHOOLS NEWS BRIEF

Steelmen Class of 1993 invited to 25th reunion on June 23 The Joliet Central Class of 1993 is cordially invited to their 25th reunion on Saturday, June 23, which will begin with a morning tour of the Joliet Central High School campus and conclude with a dinner dance party in the evening. Alumni are highly encouraged to take a tour of the Joliet Central High School campus and check out the new Student Center, which has won several architectural awards for its excellent design. The time and date of the Joliet Central High School campus is 10 a.m. on Saturday June 23. Email latinmex22@ yahoo.com if you plan to attend.

The evening celebration will take place beginning at 6:00 p.m. in the Las Vegas ballroom of the Harrah’s Joliet Hotel & Casino on 151 N Joliet St in Joliet. The cost of admission is $25 per person and includes a buffet dinner (beginning at 7 p.m.), dessert, and entertainment provided by a DJ throughout the evening. The reunion will have an open bar from 6 to 7 p.m., followed by a cash bar from 7 to 10 p.m. There will also be a photo booth, raffle giveaways and a 50/50 raffle. The reunion is sure to be an evening of fun, food, friends, and nostalgia. Twenty hotel rooms at Harrah’s are available at a special rate for Joliet Central Class of 1993 members on a first-come, first-serve basis. Tickets can be purchased online at https://jthsalumni.nationbuilder.com/class_of_1993_25th_ reunion.

NEWS ABOUT SCHOOLS IN YOUR COMMUNITY WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

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SENIORS

50+, Seniors becoming more tech-savvy Technology is the future, and digital communication has opened many doors for people around the world. Although younger generations have grown up with technology at their fingers, Baby Boomers and older adults did not. But in spite of that, studies show that growing numbers of seniors are open to the idea of technology and even seeking ways to further their use and knowledge. According to a 2014 study by Pew Research Center, 59 percent of seniors regularly use the internet — a 6 percent increase from the previous study conducted in 2012. Today, 67 percent of adults age 65 and older say they go online. Pew also says that, although seniors consistently have lower rates of technology adoption than the general public, four in 10 seniors now own smartphones, which is more than double the amount that did in 2013. Seniors in Australia are especially tech savvy, as Deloitte’s mobile consumer survey found 78 percent of Australian seniors aged 65 to 75 own a smartphone, up from 69 percent in 2016. While stereotypes have long painted seniors as technologically inept, seniors are actually more socially and digitally engaged than ever before. Seniors use technology in many different ways. Some use mobile apps to manage medications and doctor’s appointments and monitor their fitness regimens. Some families employ 24/7 alert systems or smarthome technology to keep

seniors comfortable and safe at home for as long as possible. Noninvasive, “smart” technology can analyze factors such as whether or not doors are left open, if there has been movement in a home, or whether appliances/lights are on or off. This represents a great way for families to stay informed and provide assistance even if they are not nearby. SilverSurfers, a senior-based information website, says other tech that seniors are embracing includes online dating; audio and digital books; online shopping, which is especially valuable to seniors who have mobility issues; and social media, which can keep seniors connected to others and feeling less lonely. A study conducted by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco found 18 percent of American seniors live alone, and 43 percent report feeling lonely on a regular basis. Loneliness can increase death risk. Social media and internet connectivity can be an important tool in helping seniors feel like active members of society. Technology is no longer just for teenagers or active workers. Seniors are increasingly embracing technology and becoming a fast-growing demographic for tech usage. LP183768 SOCIAL MEDIA TEXT: Although younger generations have grown up with technology at their fingers, Baby Boomers and older adults did not. But in spite of that, studies show that growing numbers of seniors are open to the idea of technology and

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FOR ACTIVE ADULTS 50+ IN THE COMMUNITY WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

Sentinel 6-20-18  
Sentinel 6-20-18  
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