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F E B R UA R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8 V O L . 2 3 I S S U E 10 SHOREWOODSENTINEL.COM

CHICAGO DEFENDER Chicago Defender becomes a national voice for African Americans

SEE PAGE 4

EVENTS

Calendar Events Upcoming events in your area SEE PAGE 15

SPORTS

Girl power Joliet West’s Schwab is No. in the nation SEE PAGE 7

BUSINESS Dave Says Needing a co-signer means not ready to buy a house SEE PAGE 11

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NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

COMMUNITY NEWS >> SHOREWOOD

Ball celebrates 10 years of HUGS BY MEGANN HORSTEAD For the Bugle @BugleNewspapers sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

It was an evening of celebration, chocolate tasting and good deeds. Shorewood HUGS’ annual Hugs and Wishes Chocolate Ball took guests back in time to revel in Manhattan’s socialite life depicted in the movie “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”. “It’s always good to see your vision come to fruition,” said Molly Babyak, a current board member and past president of Shorewood HUGS, referring to the way this year’s gala has come together. “It’s rewarding to see how hours of work comes to life.” The annual gala was meant to help the organization in raising funds to grant wishes in 2018. Every year, Shorewood HUGS fulfills approximately 100 wishes to people who are in need, disabled or deserving. Throughout the banquet hall,

chocolate tasting stations were set up for guests to peruse. Chocolate sponsors this year included Bella Cucina, Candy and Corn, Cheesecakes by James, Covered in Chocolate, Fannie May, HUGS Chocolate Martini Shots, Joliet Junior College Culinary Arts Program, Milano Bakery, Nothing bundt Cakes and Sweet Gallery Cups & Cakes. Guests tried their hand at betting in the silent auction, bidding on raffle prizes and competing in

the Audrey Hepburn look-alike contest. They also enjoyed entertainment from JPW Productions, a cash bar and appetizers catered by Bella Cucina. With the help of social media, this year’s gala sold out several weeks in advance with 450 tickets purchased. Babyak said the event has a history accomplishing this feat. “It’s mind-boggling to know we’ve been embraced all these years,” said Sue Coyle, one of the

founding members of Shorewood HUGS. The organization started in 2008 with five friends whose children were friends with one another. Since then, Shorewood HUGS has up to 50 members. “It means more than we thought it would [seeing the organization in its 10th year,]” said Rita Guenther, another founding member for Shorewood HUGS. Coyle agreed. “It means so much [knowing that the organization has seen continued success,]” she said. To complement the organization’s work, Shorewood HUGS has made its presence in the community known in the past by offering support to Morning Star Mission, Team Make a Difference and the American Cancer Society. “Shorewood is a small town, and there wasn’t anything else like this before,” Coyle said. “It’s all meant for women to get involved, and our members have embraced

it. They have great ideas.” Coyle gave credit to Shorewood HUGS’ ability to recruit new members enabling them to get the word out about what they strive to do. “Everyone has different ideas and whenever we can branch out, [the more we’re able] to make a difference,” she said. Later in the evening, a champagne toast was held to commemorate Shorewood HUGS and its 10th anniversary. “I think since we have such great support, the organization’s mission will continue,” Guenther said, referring to Shorewood HUGS’ future. “The younger members have gotten involved. It’s more than we ever envisioned.” This year’s gala was co-chaired by Heidi Serena and Susan Underwood. To get involved or learn more about the work of Shorewood HUGS, visit www.shorewoodhugs. org.


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NEWS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

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CITY NEWS

Haunts coming to old Joliet prison Joliet mayor casts deciding vote to give entertainment company a one-year sublease

BY MEGANN HORSTEAD For the Bugle @BugleNewspapers sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

Plans to bring Halloween spooks and haunts to the site of the old Joliet prison have risen from the dead following discussion by members of the Joliet City Council at their Feb. 6 meeting. In a 5-4 decision, officials extended a one-year, $25,000 sublease agreement to Evil Intentions Haunted House, with Mayor Bob O’Dekirk casting the tiebreaking vote. Council members Pat Mudron, Larry Hug, Don “Duck” Dickinson and Michael Turk voted against the deal. O’Dekirk said prior to Evil Intentions, no proposals of note were desirable for the former Joliet Correctional Center Discussions between the City of Joliet and the Elgin-based entertainment company regarding the site in question date back to August 2017. “It was before the City actually had the [intergovernmental agreement,]” Deputy City Manager Steve Jones said. “It was at a point of where we had our on-again, off-again discussions of whether the city would want to get into the prison business, as I’ll call it.” When Evil Intentions originally came to the City, they had a desire to introduce some plans for hospitality beyond the idea of a haunted house. Since then, City of Joliet staff have been in talks with the State of Illinois to accelerate the effort to make the project possible. “We still don’t have the answers,” Jones said. “I mean, we’re trying to figure out some of the utility issues. We’re still trying to figure out how this can go from where it is now—with very limited power on that side—to something that could accommodate potentially thousands of people.” The City determined that Evil Intentions is a viable entity to occupy the correctional center. To date, there have been at least five inspections by the prospective tenant to assess and analyze the site’s conditions. Mudron questioned why the

council should consider moving forward with the vendor, considering that no single City staff member knows what’s best for Joliet. To date the City of Joliet has received some other inquiries pertaining to the site. Jones said time is of the essence, and the City needs to ride the momentum of this particular vendor to get the project started. “We’re so far into this [process] with trying to do the analysis, so that when we do it, we do it right,” he said. “If we do open this up for other proposals at this point, I think we take 2018 out of the game because, in effect, I think it’s going to have to have a lot more analysis for someone starting out from scratch.” Jones negated the idea of holding off on approving the sublease agreement for two weeks and said some of the issues pertaining to what types of vendors operate the site are to be worked out at the Prison Committee level moving forward. Hug questioned if the sublease agreement is fair to Evil Intentions. The City of Joliet is aware that Evil Intentions would like to make this a permanent commitment. Jones tried to reassure Hug that the vendor is aware the agreement is for a limited run. “We also have to figure out what it is we want this prison to be,” he said. “Those discussions really have to occur at the Prison Committee.” The agreement stipulates that a rent credit of up to $100,000 is extended to the tenant for any expenses they put into the building, opening up an opportunity to extend the length of the deal in terms of time. “Our staff recommendation is that we proceed with Evil Intentions, but obviously, as I said, there’s a point where the big picture starts to come into play,” Jones said. “I think that’s the point of where we open this thing up and we make sure that whatever the vendor situation is, it’s not just a haunted house, it’s a full-blown entertainment center. We look at

things on the east side, as I call it, [as] more of the circus atmosphere—the fun stuff, the heavy crowds. The west side, clearly, is more historical in nature.” Jones said it is his vision for the City of Joliet to consider purchasing the property from the State of Illinois in the future, if the venture proves to be something worthwhile. “We’ve hitched our wagon to this horse because it’s gotten us from nowhere to having the potential to open up the prison, to start some of the tours, to start some of the improvements, to start some income coming in, but, in effect, there’s going to be a decision [that] has to be made where we’re all in,” Jones said. Plans for the east prison have not yet been identified, to date. Councilman John Gerl gave kudos to the efforts of Joliet staff in getting the project started. “It sounds like there’s been a rapport that’s been created, as well, with Evil Intentions,” he said. Evil Intention’s Halloween programming is slated to begin on site this fall.

Police officers’ eligibility list extended

Also at the meeting, the Joliet City Council examined an ordinance authorizing the extension of the Joliet Police Department’s police officers’ eligibility list. The measure intends to help the City in meeting the demand for hiring new police officers. “It is currently a year old, and the chief had asked that we extend that for one year,” Gerl said. The measure, as presented, was scheduled to expire on Feb. 14. Members of Joliet’s Fire and Police Commission recommended that the City extend the police officers’ eligibility list. Council action will save Joliet an estimated $35,000 in recruiting and testing costs.

Annexation agreement for land near former Silver Cross Hospital

repealed The City took action to repeal an ordinance allowing for the execution of an annexation agreement for land near the former site of Silver Cross Hospital. It was brought to the City’s attention recently that some of the property identification numbers and one of the legal descriptions were incorrect. Joliet staff relies on the land surveyor/consulting engineer hired by the petitioner to submit the correct technical information. Officials took action in December 2017 to annex eight parcels of land at the former site of Silver Cross Hospital near Maple Road and Hebbard Street. The City Council’s vote positions Joliet to review the annexation agreement at a later date. A public hearing is to be held Feb. 15 by members of Joliet’s Plan Commission to get community input.


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We want to hear from you! Send us your feedback at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

GUEST COLUMN

Chicago Defender becomes a national voice for African Americans BY THE CHICAGO DEFENDER On May 5, 1905, Robert Sengstacke Abbott founded the Chicago Defender newspaper in a small kitchen in his landlord’s apartment, with an initial investment of 25 cents and a press run of 300 copies. The Chicago Defender’s first issues were in the form of four-page, sixcolumn handbills, filled with local news items gathered by Abbott and clippings from other newspapers. Five years later, the Chicago Defender began to attract a national audience. By the start of World War I, the Chicago Defender was the nation’s most influential Black weekly newspaper, with more than two thirds of its readership base located outside of Chicago. During World War I, the paper utilized its influence to wage a successful campaign in support of The Great Migration. It published blazing editorials, articles and cartoons lauding the benefits of the North, posted job listings and train schedules to facilitate relocation, and declared on May 15, 1917, as the date of the “Great Northern Drive.” The Chicago Defender’s support of The Great Migration encouraged Southern readers to migrate to the North in record numbers. Between 1916 and 1918, at least 110,000 people migrated to Chicago, nearly tripling the city’s Black population. Following the war, the Defender covered controversial events such as the Red Summer Riots of 1919, a series of race riots in cities across the country. The Chicago Defender campaigned for anti-lynching legislation and for integrated sports. In 1923, the Chicago Defender introduced the Bud Billiken Page, the first newspaper section just for children. The Chicago Defender, along with the Chicago Defender Charities, is the producer and organizer of the world famous Bud Billiken Day Parade and Picnic. The parade originated in 1929 as a vehicle to showcase children. Today, the Bud Billiken Parade is

the largest event of its kind. Columnists at the Defender included Walter White and Langston Hughes. The paper also published the early works by Pulitzer Prize winning poet Gwendolyn Brooks. Heralding itself as the “The World’s Greatest Weekly,” the Defender spoke out against segregation of the armed forces in the early 1940s and actively challenged segregation in the South during the civil rights era. In 1940, John H. H. Sengstacke, Abbott’s nephew and heir, assumed editorial control and continued to champion for equality. In 1956, the Chicago Defender began publishing on a daily basis. In 1965, Stengstacke purchased The Pittsburgh Courier, including it in his Sengstacke Newspaper chain, along with papers such as the Michigan Chronicle in Detroit and the Tri-State Defender in Memphis. Sengstacke served as publisher of the Defender until his death in May

1997. The Chicago Defender is the flagship publication of Real Times Inc., a media company that also includes among its holdings the Michigan Chronicle, the Front Page, the New Pittsburgh Courier and the Tri-State Defender. One hundred and four years later, the Chicago Defender won the prestigious John B. Russwurm Award during 2009’s National Newspaper Publishers Association Merit Awards Gala, along with two first place and two third place awards, including the John H. Sengstacke General Excellence Award. Editor’s note: The weekly Illinois Bicentennial series is brought to you by the Illinois Associated Press Media Editors and Illinois Press Association. More than 20 newspapers are creating stories about the state’s history, places and key moments in advance of the Bicentennial on Dec. 3, 2018. Stories published up to this date can be found at 200illinois.com.


METRO

NEWS FROM THE SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

SCHOOL NEWS BRIEFS

Troy Spelling Bee champs named This year’s Troy Community School District 30-C Scripps Spelling Bee champions have been announced. First place went to 7th grader Emmanuel Zamoras, Second place went to 7th grader Angela Conde, and Third place went to 6th grader Ivan Chen. The students are from Troy Middle School and William B. Orenic Intermediate School. The competition went more than 20 rounds before the first place winner triumphed. Emmanuel Zamoras will continue to the Will County Spelling Bee, which will be held at Lockport East High School, on March 7. Judges for the bee were Troy Superintendent Dr. Todd Koehl and Director of Curriculum and Assessments Kristin Johnson. Sponsors of the Spelling Bee are Troy teachers Shari Pagel and Sheryl Kubistal, and the pronouncer was teacher Emily Semplinski.

Preschool Open House scheduled Troy School District 30-C is offering a Preschool Open House on Saturday, Feb. 24, at 10 a.m. or on Wednesday, April 18, 5:30 p.m. at Troy Cronin Elementary School, 210 E. Black Road, Shorewood. Park in front of building and enter Door 2. This is for parents of children who will be age 3 or older by September 1, 2018 to take a one-hour tour of the classrooms and an opportunity to learn more about our exciting preschool program. For additional information visit www.troy30c.org, then select the Quick Link to “Troy Preschool Program.” Or call Troy Cronin at (815) 577-7314.

Coffee with the Superintendent Troy Community School District 30-C will host “Coffee with the Superintendent” on Thursday, March 1, 9-10 a.m. at the Don D. Bacon Administration Center, 5800 W. Theodore Street, Door 10, behind Troy Middle School.

The event will be an informal time to drop in and meet Superintendent Dr. Todd Koehl for a chat or to ask questions about the district. Troy Executive Director of Finance and Operations, Elaine Colombo, will be there, as well. This will be the second of two coffee events with administrators the district will host this school year. The event is open to parents, community members and staff. There is no structured agenda, and those interested can drop in any time during the hour. Coffee and donuts will be served. For additional information, call the Troy District Office at (815) 577-6760.

Joliet Cyborgs to unveil robot for 2018 Robotics Competition Feb. 27 The Joliet Township High School Cyborgs Robotics Team will unveil their latest robot during a public exhibition from 5 to 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 27 at the JTHS Administration Center, 300 Caterpillar Drive in Joliet. Members of the public are invited to watch the students’ hard work in action as the robot performs programmed skills in preparation for this year’s FIRST Robotics Competition challenge. The showcase will be held in the Cyborg’s workspace in the warehouse located in the back of the Administration Center. It will begin with a student-led presentation that reviews the build season and this year’s game, followed by a demonstration of the robot, and ending with an open session where guests can meet the robot and ask questions. This is the Joliet Cyborgs seventh consecutive year of participation in the Midwest Regional FIRST Robotics Competition. The international competition “For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology” pairs high school students with professional mentors to design, build, and program a robot in 6 weeks to compete in a sports-like event. Joliet Cyborgs Coach Tom Connelly said, ““The Joliet Cyborgs robotics team is excited to present our 2018 robot for the FIRST Power Up competition. Come see our students showcase the functionalities of the robot that they have spent the last six weeks hard at work planning, designing, constructing, and programming.”

5


6

TAKE 5

FOR WHEN YOU NEED 5 MINUTES FOR YOURSELF! WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

ARIES

MARCH 21 TO APRIL 20

You might prefer to be a trail blazer and doer of daring deeds but in the week ahead you are more likely to earn disapproval for your efforts. Maintain a low profile and steer clear of disputes.

GEMINI

M AY 2 2 T O J U N E 2 1

Don’t hide the truth or obscure the facts. Overcome obstacles and objections by holding honest discussions. Emphasize the mutual benefits rather than pointing out the weaknesses this week.

LEO

J U LY 2 3 T O A U G U S T 2 1

Don’t fall prey to wishful thinking as this week unfolds. Don’t ignore the people who support and appreciate you even if you think you can do better elsewhere. Be romantic, not gullible.

ACROSS 1 PREPARES TO STRIKE, IN A WAY 6 WHERE MANY LEADING MALES MAY BE SEEN? 15 NOCTURNAL PROBLEM, USUALLY 16 SOURCE OF SOME SAUCE 17 LETS 18 HELP 19 CHIC MODIFIER 20 ADVERTISERS SAY IT SELLS 21 MOTHER OF HUEY, DEWEY AND LOUIE 22 SERVICE PROVIDERS 24 HALL OF FAME NHL COACH ROGER 26 SMALL POWER SOURCE 27 PARAGON 28 TOOK A SHOT AT 29 STICKS 33 GOOGLE GOAL 34 “SEMPER FIDELIS” COMPOSER 35 “I LIKE THAT!” 36 ENCOURAGEMENT BEFORE A SHOT 39 MILLIONS CAN PLAY IT AT ONCE 41 FREQUENT GREENSTREET COSTAR 42 OLYMPICS COMPETITOR SINCE 1896 43 TO THE EXTENT THAT 46 QUAINT INN ROOM UPRIGHT 47 ADJUST ONE’S SIGHTS 48 GET EVEN WITH 49 PIC SANS NOM, PAR EXEMPLE 50 PET IDENTIFICATION AID 53 COME UP WITH __ 54 RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH FEATURE 55 “CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE”

NOVELIST 56 GOT BACK TO ONE’S OFFICE? 57 THREW WIDE, SAY

DOWN 1 COURSES AROUND COURSES 2 BELLINI’S “CASTA DIVA,” FOR ONE 3 METROPOLITAN AREA 4 MUSER’S WORDS 5 NORDIC CARRIER 6 AGRICULTURAL UNITS 7 CULMINATION 8 MD’S EMPLOYEE 9 GEORGE WASHINGTON RECEIVED AN HONORARY ONE FROM HARVARD U. 10 PREPARED 11 PLAY THAT INSPIRED AN OPERA 12 GRUELING GRILLINGS 13 __ PARK, CALIF. 14 IMPALA, E.G. 20 SUBJ. OF SOME “BOSSYPANTS” CHAPTERS 23 LIKE SOME TIMERS? 24 OMINOUS OATER

SYMBOL 25 “HAIRSPRAY” MOM 27 LOGITECH PRODUCT 29 TRANSVAAL SETTLERS 30 IT MAY HAVE A BELL ON IT 31 BAG LADY? 32 CUT 34 SHOT CONTENTS 37 MAKER OF AGEDEFY PRODUCTS 38 INSULIN, FOR ONE 39 PRECEDED 40 THEORETICALLY 42 LAWYER’S CHARGE 43 DEFENSIVE COVERING 44 IT FLOWS THROUGH TROYES AND MELUN 45 PRIMA __: SELFEVIDENT 46 OSTRICH, FOR EXAMPLE 48 IPHONE DISPLAY 51 AGCY. CONCERNED WITH DRUG-RESISTANT BACTERIA 52 IN 53 EQUALS

LIBRA

SEPTEMBER 24 TO OCTOBER 23

Friends and co-workers can be a great resource for financial advice in the week ahead. Make purchases that require good taste in the next two days. Avoid disagreements later in the week.

SAGITTARIUS

NOVEMBER 23 TO DECEMBER 22

Use every opportunity to clear the air and put relationships on track in the first part of the week. By the end of the week people may easily misunderstand your motives or intentions.

AQUARIUS

JANUARY 21 TO FEBRUARY 19

Sweet dreams are made of this. You may become more romantic and preoccupied by your inner fantasies as this week unfolds. Use your imagination when purchasing tasteful household decor.

SUDOKU

TAURUS

A P R I L 2 1 T O M AY 2 1

Speak calmly and clearly and then people will listen to what you say. During the week ahead you can improve your reputation and engender good will by encouraging teamwork.

CANCER

J U N E 2 2 T O J U LY 2 2

You might take pride in good heart-keeping rather than good housekeeping in the week ahead. Put your best efforts into mending fences and head off misunderstandings in advance.

VIRGO

AUGUST 22 TO SEPTEMBER 23

Your artistic and creative side might begin to bloom during the week ahead. Your job might entail some handicrafts or using your imagination. Learn to do something that is inspiring.

SCORPIO

OCTOBER 24 TO NOVEMBER 22

The upcoming week provides numerous opportunities to be creative or create lasting relationships. Make major purchases and sign agreements as early in the week as possible.

CAPRICORN

DECEMBER 23 TO JANUARY 20

Be honest with yourself as well as others in the week to come. Don’t beat around the bush or cover up financial expenditures. Make key decisions as soon as possible or next week.

PISCES

FEBRUARY 20 TO MARCH 20

Embrace what is offered. Someone could offer you an incentive to begin a new study, to join a team sports program or to travel early this week. Every opportunity contains a hidden benefit.

JUMBLE

Tribune Content Agency, LLC. 2018

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

JUMBLES:

• ACUTE • ICING • SURVEY • PURSUE

ANSWER:

TO LEARN ABOUT THE COSMOS, CARL SAGAN ATTENDED A -- “UNIVERSE-ITY”


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

PAGE 7

FEATURE

AMONG

THE BEST Joliet West sophomore is ranked No. 2 in the country at her weight class after big win last summer

BY MARK GREGORY Sports Editor @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com

Fargo. Most people know it as the 1996 Coen brother’s movie starring Frances McDormand and William H. Macy. In wrestling circles, however, Fargo means something completely different. Fargo, North Dakota is the home of the Cadet and Junior National Championships – the most prestigious tournament of its kind in the country. It was there last summer that Louisa Schwab burst on the scene with a 5-1 win over fellow Illinois competitor, Randi Robison of East Peoria in the championship match at 122 pounds of the U.S. Marine Corps USA Wrestling Cadet Women’s Freestyle Nationals. That title helped Schwab earn the No. 2 spot on the National Girls High School Rankings

2

RANK FOR SCHWAB IN THE COUNTRY

when they were released last month. The rankings, as comprised by, National Wrestling Hall of Fame, USA Wrestling and FloWrestling created the national rankings to recognize the top high school girl wrestlers in the nation. Schwab, a sophomore at Joliet West, is No. 2 at 122 behind Grace Figueroa, a senior from Selma High School in Sanger, California. The Plainfield resident is one of three Illinois wrestlers on the list at 122, leading Robinson and Kerigan McKenna, a senior from Yorkville High School. “It was pretty cool when I saw it and I got kind of excited and now I just want to see if I can get it to the No. 1 spot in the future,” she said. While Schwab competes in the girls tournaments in the summer, in the winter she is SEE BEST PAGE 9

1

HER PLACE AT FARGO LAST SUMMER

PHOTO BY MARK GREGORY

Louisa Schwab is the No. 2 ranked 122 pound female wrestler in the country.


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8 SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

ST. FRANCIS

Jordan sets USF three-point record Kamari Jordan (Bolingbrook, Ill./Bolingbrook) set University of St. Francis women’s basketball’s record for most career 3-pointers as the Saints took out Holy Cross 80-60. Jordan’s second 3-pointer of the afternoon, which came at the 6:08 mark of the second quarter, gave her 283 for her career. She passed Jacqie Storm who held the record since 2010. Jordan’s record-breaking 3-pointer came as a part of a 15-0 run in the second quarter that sent USF (18-7, 15-3 CCAC) ahead by 16. Paige Gieseke (Algonquin, Ill./Dundee-Crown) led St. Francis with seven points during the spurt. On defense, the Saints held HCC (11-17, 5-13 CCAC) without a point for over five minutes. After Holy Cross pulled within 11 in the third quarter, USF answered with seven straight points and cruised to the 20-point victory. Jordan finished with a gamehigh 27 points, while Kaitlin Aylward (Elmwood Park, Ill./Trinity) added 24. USF scored 50 of its 80 points in the paint and shot 50 percent from the field. St. Francis also forced 18 turnovers while only committing seven and outrebounded Holy Cross 34-28 (16-9 on the offensive glass). Jessica Norris (17 points) and Tagin Schultheis (16) led the visitors who shot 12 of 24 from 3-point range.

MEN’ BASKETBALL Iain Morison (Canberra, Australia/St. Edmund’s) became one of the University of St. Francis men’s basketball program’s top 10 career scorers as the Saints fell to Holy Cross 76-57. Morison, who reached 1,000 points in USF’s victory over Lake Forest earlier this season, hit the top 10 mark early in the first half and now has 1,259 career points, which places him ninth on the program’s all-time scoring list. The center from Australia led the Saints (10-17, 7-11 CCAC) with 19 points in Saturday’s contest, while Pietro Badalassi (Canberra, Australia/Marist) added 14. Holy Cross (17-11, 11-7 CCAC) started the game by making seven of its first eight shots from the field.

After trailing by as much as 10, USF fought back to within six after a Terrion Howard (Champaign, Ill./ Centennial) layup, but HCC continued its momentum. When the half was over, the visitors were shooting 64.5 percent from the field and 57 percent from 3-point range. After trailing by 25 at the break, USF slowly chipped away at the deficit. St. Francis held HCC to just two points over a six-minute stretch in the second half, slicing the margin to 15. However, the hosts could not fully recover in the loss. Morison once again showed off his efficiency, knocking down 7 of 9 shots from the field. Ryan Peter (Shorewood, Ill./Joliet Catholic) and Hayden Witt (New Lenox, Ill./ Lincoln-Way West) tied for the team-high with five rebounds, while Morison and Howard both dished out three assists. Four Holy Cross players reached double figures, led by Travon Brackett’s 20 points. USF held HCC to just 25 points and three 3-pointers in the second half.

WOMEN’S SOCCER Arely Sanchez (Plainfield, Ill./ Plainfield Central) has signed a letter of intent to join the University of St. Francis women’s soccer team, head coach John Nikchevich announced Monday. Sanchez played forward at Plainfield Central High School for head coach Ken Schoen. She also brings many years of club soccer experience to the Saints. “This recruiting class is full of quality student-athletes that will make the university proud and Arely fits right in,” Nikchevich said. “Arely has a nice skill set and shows good decision making under pressure. I look forward to watching her develop and take that skill set to another level.” Sanchez will join the team in the fall of 2018 and plans to study biology at USF.

WOMEN’ TENNIS Erika Edrada (Romeoville, Ill./ Romeoville) posted a big comeback in singles play as the UniverSEE USF PAGE 10


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SPORTS

BEST FROM PAGE 7 part of the Joliet West boys wrestling team. “She is an important part of the team. She has wrestled mostly JV this year and she has a winning record and most of her wins are by pin, so she is a pinner,” said West coach Chuck Rumpf. “She is a captain, so she is a leader, and if she makes the varsity lineup or not, she is smart and she sees this as a mechanism to get to her goals and she has big goals. If she wrestles with the guys in the winter, that will help her with the guys in the summer. “I have never coached anyone like Louisa, that’s for sure. I have never had a national champ at Joliet West. She is the only one, guy or girl, who has won Fargo. It has been fun to coach her.” Schwab said her goals during the winter season are not to have the best record or win the most tournaments – it is to get better for when she wrestles her peers in the summer. “It has been a fun and I can definitely see the growth and the change,” Schwab said of wrestling against the boys. “A lot of the guys I wrestle with now, I have known for a long time and it gets a little difficult because when you’re younger you can keep up with them and beat them, but as they get bigger, they out muscle you, but it is still fun to be able to wrestle them. Obviously, the older I get, the more girl tournaments there are and I can branch out to that, but I still get to wrestle with them. “There is a reason they have it separated between the men and the women – at a certain age there is a physicality difference and getting beat up a little bit really helps me. Then when I wrestle the girls, I can feel the difference and that is to my advantage, I know when I wrestle the guys, I am not always going to win all the time and that

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM doesn’t really bother me. It gives me the confidence when I wrestle girls because I know I put the practice in and worked harder and it makes a huge difference.” Schwab gets what she wants during the high school season, as the guys do not take it easy on her. “They treat me the same as everyone else and that is all I have ever asked for,” she said. “It would almost be an insult if they took it easy on me.” Rumpf said he never had to talk to his wrestlers about how to treat Schwab. “I have never had to say anything to one. It was just kind of understood,” he said. “I never had to pull them aside or anything. They just see her as another part of the team.” That idea of treating Schwab as another wrestler is something she wanted from the beginning, said Elias Medina, president and head coach of the Bolingbrook Junior Raiders wrestling club, where Schwab competed her seventh and eighth grade years. “When she was in seventh grade, I had Jimmy Pierandozzi and Nick Stemmet and other tough kids. So, she worked out with all these guys and the first thing I told her is I was just going to treat her as a wrestler and she never asked for any kind of special treatment,” Medina said. “As a matter of fact, there were times she got banged up I had to pull her aside. She actually had more to overcome because she could have easily said, ‘my shoulder hurts or my neck,’ because I knew she was banged up, but she was not going to be the one to come out. That is just how tough she is. The best thing we did as a club was from the day she came in to the day she left, we treated her only as a wrestler because that is what she wanted.” Her growth has taken her to so far already as just a sophomore, but why did Schwab decide wrestling was the sport she wanted to compete in?

“My dad wrestled in high school and my brother actually did MMA and Jiu-Jitsu when we were younger and I kind of started doing it with him and then once I got into fifth grade I want to do a school sport so this is the closest thing to that as I could get to, and I just stuck with us throughout the years,” she said. She is now hoping wrestling takes her even further – like college or following in the footsteps of Lockport graduate Haley Augello, who finished seventh in the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio. “I feel like we are still really small compared to men’s college wrestling, for example, but I feel like the more people I can get to come in at the younger age - everybody below me - is what really matters because they are the ones that are going to make the sport bigger. Once all these other colleges start accepting women’s wrestling and they are including into their programs, then we are going to have so many more people,” she said. “There a couple colleges that I have looked at that I like, but I have a feeling that in the future there are more colleges that will start offering it. They will start to notice it’s not really expensive.” With two years left to decide on a college program, Schwab has more immediate goals. Right now, I am focusing on Body Bar (Women’s National Championships) to get on a National Team and placing again at Fargo,” she said. Whatever she does, will never be a surprise to her coaches. “It is fun to watch her wrestle because none of this came as a shock to me. When people read this article, people will be impressed because they see the more finished product,” Medina said. “But seeing her coming up, I am not amazed where she is because her work ethic was second to none in the room and that is with a room full of guys who are now ranked in the top five in the state.”

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SPORTS

USF FROM PAGE 9 sity of St. Francis women’s tennis team defeated Lindenwood-Belleville 5-4. Needing two points to take the team match, the Saints (1-2) received wins from Edrada at No. 5 and Haley McLain (Plainfield, Ill./ Plainfield Central) at No. 6. Trailing 5-0 in her first set, Edrada battled all the way back to win the set in a tiebreak. She rode that momentum to a 7-6(5), 6-1 victory that put USF on the brink. Just a few minutes later, McLain clinched the Saints’ win with a 6-2, 6-1 win at No. 6. In doubles play, Merle Schlaeger (Hanau, Germany) and Eva Lopez (Zaragoza, Spain) put USF on top by breezing through their No. 1 doubles match 8-1. The Lynx (4-5) took the other two doubles contests to jump ahead 2-1 heading to singles. Schlaeger (6-1, 6-1 at No. 1) and Lopez (6-1, 6-0 at No. 2) put USF up 3-2 with a pair of quick singles triumphs. Edrada and McLain provided the decisive wins for the Saints. St. Francis hosts NCAA Division I Western Illinois University next

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM Friday, February 16. The match will begin at 1:30 p.m. at Challenge Fitness in Lockport.

TRACK AND FIELD The University of St. Francis men’s track & field team split between a pair of meets on Saturday. Some Saints continued competition at the Grand Valley State Big Meet, while others traveled to the Pat Heenan Invitational. At GVSU, Cam Knudsen (Channahon, Ill./Minooka) paced the Saints by taking second in the 3,000-meter run (8:34.76). His time was good for an NAIA “A” qualifying standard. Jordan Duncan (St. Charles, Ill./St. Charles East) added a sixth-place finish in the 200-meter dash with a time of 22.41 seconds. In Naperville, Sam Bandemer (Plainfield, Ill./Plainfield East) took fourth in the 60-meter dash (8.83 seconds). Misael Tobias (Plainfield, Ill./Plainfield South) was the top NAIA finisher (fifth overall) in the 800-meter run (1:59.95). Alex Cooper (Marysville, Wash./Lakewood) added points by taking sixth in the 3,000-meter run. In the long jump, Nick Murray (Manteno, Ill./Manteno) and

Noah Fritz (Bourbonnais, Ill./ Bradley-Bourbonnais) placed fifth and eighth respectively. Jason Lopez (Minooka, Ill./Minooka) added a seventh-place showing in the weight throw. The Saints look to defend their title at the CCAC Indoor Championships hosted by St. Ambrose next weekend, February 16-17.

BASEBALL The University of St. Francis baseball team opened its season with a doubleheader split against Martin Methodist, taking game one 9-4 before falling in game two 10-9 in 15 innings. USF 9, Martin Methodist 4 The Saints put up a pair of threespots in the late innings to earn a 9-4 season-opening victory over the Redhawks. With the game tied at three in the top of the sixth, Kevin Rada (Valencia, Venezuela/Calusa Prep Fla.) began USF’s offensive outburst with a two-run home run to right field. Later in the inning, Pat Michalak (New Lenox, Ill./ Lincoln-Way Central) added his second RBI single of the game. USF totaled three more runs in the top of the seventh. Back-to-back

RBI doubles from Nick Dabrowski (Plainfield, Ill./Oswego East) and Rada, followed by a sacrifice fly from Michael Quiram (Shorewood, Ill./Joliet Catholic), put St. Francis ahead comfortably 9-3. On the mound, Quiram escaped a mini jam in the seventh and then sat down the Redhawks in order in the final two innings to earn the save. Starting pitcher Kevin Mampe (New Lenox, Ill./Lincoln-Way Central) earned the win with five innings of three-run ball and also scored the Saints’ first run of the new season. All nine St. Francis starters contributed to the team’s 16 hits. Michalak led USF with three knocks, while Rada drove in three. Martin Methodist 10, USF 9 (15 innings) The teams played long into the night until the Redhawks won a marathon game two 10-9 in 15 innings. USF held 3-2 and 7-3 leads early but Martin Methodist rallied to send the game to extra innings. The Saints had their backs against the wall in the bottom of the 12th as the Redhawks loaded the bases with nobody out.

Kyle Massaro (Romeoville, Ill./ Romeoville) escaped the jam by forcing a grounder to first, a pop out to shortstop and a fly out to centerfield. Two innings later, the Saints broke the 7-7 tie. With one away, John Riordan (Chicago, Ill/St. Laurence) singled to start the top of the 14th and pinch runner Noah Kararo (Oswego, Ill./Home school) advanced to second on a Zach Earls (Channahon, Ill./Minooka) sacrifice bunt. In his eighth at-bat of the evening, Mampe singled home Kararo to give USF an 8-7 edge. However, Martin Methodist answered in the bottom of the inning to keep the game going. The combination of brothers Pat and Aaron Michalak (New Lenox, Ill./Lincoln-Way Central) moved USF ahead by one in the 15th. Pat walked to start the inning and then moved to second on a groundout before Aaron subbed in as a pinch runner. Aaron moved to third on another groundout before scoring on John Peterson’s (Palos Heights, Ill./St. Laurence) RBI single. Martin Methodist rallied for two runs on four hits in the bottom of the inning to take the victory.


BUSINESS + REAL ESTATE

NEWS ABOUT LOCAL BUSINESSES IN YOUR COMMUNITY WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

COLUMN >> DAVE SAYS

Needing a co-signer means not ready to buy a house DEAR DAVE, My sister has bad credit due to a lot of late payments. She has finally started to change her ways and get control of her finances, because she and her fiancé want to make an offer on a house. The bank won’t approve it if she is on the loan, and his income alone isn’t enough to get the amount they need. His parents are well-off, and they have offered to co-sign on the loan. Is this a bad idea? RHONDA DEAR RHONDA, It’s a really bad idea. Those two have no business thinking about a house right now, and his parents are about to make things even worse with their loving, misguided help. If you need a co-signer, you’re nowhere near ready to buy a home. They need to slow down.

paying off their debts. After that, they need to save up an emergency fund of three to six months of expenses, then start setting cash aside for a huge down payment on their first, modest home. These two have a bad case of house fever. And mom and dad need to step back, look at things objectively, and realize they would not be blessing these kids by helping get them into a home they obviously can’t afford! —DAVE

I mean, they’re just engaged. They don’t even need a house at this point. They should get married, live in a cheap apartment for a while, and work on

* Dave Ramsey is CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven best-selling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 13 million listeners each week on 585 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on the web at daveramsey.com and on Twitter at @DaveRamsey.

COMMUNITY >> JOLIET HOSPICE

JACH hosting adult grief workshops Each session includes a presentation on a grief related topic, followed by group discussion The Bereavement Department of Joliet Area Community Hospice is offering a four session Spring Adult Workshop. Each session includes a presentation on a grief related topic, followed by group discussion. All workshops take place at the Joliet Area Community Hospice (JACH) offices, located at 250 Water Stone Circle, Joliet,, from 6-8 p.m. The program is open to the community. Your loved one did not have to be

in our care for you to participate. There is no fee to participate but pre-registration is required. The sessions will meet March 1, 8, 15 and 22. Topics will include “What is Grief?” with a story shared by Dr. Bill Webster who established The Center for The Grief Journey. Participants will be able to board the “grief train” as we focus on the emotions of grief and new techniques for relaxation and medita-

tion will be learned. In addition we will discuss the importance of remembering and honoring your loved ones, celebrating holidays and special days. To register for this workshop, please contact MaryAnn Burns at 815-460-3282, email her at mburns@joliethospice.org or register online at http://joliethospice. org/support-groups.html.

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DEADLINE FOR CLASSIFIEDS: FRIDAY AT NOON WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

BUSINESS & PRIVATE PARTY CLASSIFIED ADS: $16 PER WEEK, 20 WORDS OR LESS. WEDDINGS, BIRTHS & ENGAGEMENTS: BLACK & WHITE - $25, COLOR - $35. OBITUARIES: $35.

PHONE: 815.436.2431 WEB: buglenewspapers.com/classifieds EMAIL: classifieds@buglenewspapers.com


13 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

PHONE: 815.436.2431 >> Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. FAX: 815.439.2548 EMAIL: classifieds@enterprisepublications.com IN PERSON: Enterprise Publications >> 23856 Andrew Rd. >> Plainfield, IL

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 12TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY - JOLIET, ILLINOIS U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, FOR THE CIM TRUST 2016-1, MORTGAGE-BACKED NOTES, SERIES 2016-1, PLAINTIFF vs. ANDREA B. ALBERICO F/K/A ANDREA B. PETERSEN A/K/A ANDREA B. PETERSON; WILLIAM ALBERICO; ASSOCIATES FINANCE, INC.; CROWN ASSET MANAGEMENT, LLC; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANTS 17CH 2207 Address: 118 Earl Ave Joliet, Illinois 60436 PUBLICATION NOTICE The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given to you, WILLIAM ALBERICO; and UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants in the above entitled suit, that the said suit has been commenced in the Circuit Court of the 12th Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois by the plaintiff against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain mortgage conveying the premises described as follows to wit: LOT 243, IN HYDE PARK, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE

NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 17, PAGE 55, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. COMMON ADDRESS: 118 Earl Ave, Joliet, Illinois 60436 P.I.N.: 30-07-17-106-013-0000 and which said mortgage was signed by ANDREA B. ALBERICO F/K/A ANDREA B. PETERSEN A/K/A ANDREA B. PETERSON, WILLIAM ALBERICO, mortgagors, to Beneficial Illinois Inc. d/b/a Beneficial Mortgage Co. of Illinois, as Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County as Document No. R2007130512; and for such other relief prayed; that summons was duly issued out of the Circuit Court of Will County against you as provided by law, and that the said suit is now pending. YOU MAY STILL BE ABLE TO SAVE YOUR HOME. DO NOT IGNORE THIS DOCUMENT. By order of the Chief Judge of the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, this case is set for Mandatory Mediation April 5, 2018 at 1:30 pm at the Will County Court Annex-3rd Floor (Arbitration Center), 57 N. Ottawa Street, Joliet, Illinois. A lender representative will be present along with a court appointed mediator to discuss options that you may have and to pre-screen you for a potential mortgage modification. For further information on the mediation process, please see the attached NOTICE OF MANDATORY

MEDIATION. YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE MEDIATION DATE GIVEN OR YOUR RIGHT TO MEDIATION WILL TERMINATE. NOW THEREFORE, UNLESS YOU, the said above defendants, file your answer to the Complaint in said suit or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Office of the Clerk of this Court in Will County at Will County Court House 14 West Jefferson Street, Joliet, IL 60432 on or before the March 16, 2018, default may be entered against you at any time after that day and a judgment entered in accordance with the prayer of said complaint. Circuit Clerk Johnson, Blumberg, & Associates, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 Email: ilpleadings@johnsonblumberg.com Ph. 312-541-9710 / Fax 312-541-9711 JB&A # IL 17 5395 I3076549 Published 2/14, 2/21, 2/28


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LEGAL LISTINGS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF ILLINOIS WILL COUNTY, JOLIET, ILLINOIS PENNYMAC LOAN SERVICES, LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS. JOANNE PELTON; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANTS. 17 CH 02297 8 IVY STREET JOLIET, IL 60436 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU, Joanne Pelton Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants defendants, that this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, asking for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: THE SOUTH 45 FEET OF THE NORTH 127.40 FEET OF THE WEST 95 FEET OF LOT 1 IN THOMAS KEEGAN’S SUBDIVISION OF THE WEST PART OF BLOCK 9 IN SCHOOL SECTION ADDITION TO JOLIET, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED JULY 12, 1871, AS DOCUMENT 81246, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 8 Ivy Street Joliet, IL 60436 and which said Mortgage was made by, Joanne Pelton Mortgagor(s), to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS A NOMINEE FOR PENNYMAC LOAN SERVICES, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County, Il-

linois, as Document No. R2015062142; and for other relief. UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this County, Andrea Lynn Chasteen 57 North Ottawa Court Joliet, IL 60432 YOU MAY STILL BE ABLE TO SAVE YOUR HOME. DO NOT IGNORE THIS DOCUMENT. By order of the Chief Judge of the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Circuit Court, this case is set for Mandatory Mediation on March 13th, 2018 at, 1:00 p.m. at the Will County Court, Annex 3rd Floor (Arbitration Center) 57 N. Ottawa Street, Joliet, Illinois. A lender representative will be present along with a court appointed mediator to discuss options that you may have and to prescreen you for a potential mortgage modification. For further information on the mediation process, please see the attached NOTICE OF MANDATORY MEDIATION. YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE MEDIATION DATE GIVEN OR YOUR MEDIATION WILL BE TERMINATED. on or before March 2, 2018, A JUDGMENT OR DECREE BY DEFAULT MAY BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU FOR THE RELIEF ASKED IN THE COMPLAINT. PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT, THE PLAINTIFF’S ATTORNEY IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 1 N. Dearborn St. Suite 1200 Chicago, IL 60602 Ph. (312) 346-9088 File No. 264886-141719 I3074545 Published 1/31, 2/7, 2/14

S TAY I N F O R M E D W I T H L E G A L L I S T I N G S WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM


SENIORS CALENDAR FEBRUARY 22 Winter Wonder Night Hike. 5 p.m.

McKinley Woods – Kerry Sheridan Grove, Walnut Lane, east of Blackberry Lane, Channahon. Experience the calm surroundings of Four Rivers during this naturalist-led hike. Practice using your senses and explore the habitat of many nocturnal creatures. reconnectwithnature.org.

FEBRUARY 23 Winter Bird Walk. 10 a.m. at Isle

a la Cache Museum, 501 E. Romeo Road (135th Street), Romeoville. This program starts inside with a quick introduction to winter birds. Then, we head outside to explore the winter birds of Isle a la Cache preserve and the Des Plaines River. Binoculars are recommended. No previous birding experience is necessary. reconnectwithnature.org.

MARCH 3

UPCOMING EVENTS IN YOUR AREA WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

U P CO M I N G E V E N T S I N YO U R A R E A

Super Seeds. 2 p.m. at Isle a la

Cache Museum, 501 E. Romeo Road (135th Street), Romeoville. Have you ever noticed some seeds fly like helicopters or stick like Velcro? In this program, learn all about seeds, where they come from and how they move. Make a seed bomb to take home and plant. reconnectwithnature.org.

MARCH 10 Woodland And River Bird Hike. 8

a.m. at McKinley Woods – Frederick’s Grove, McKinley Woods Road, south of Route 6/Eames Street, Channahon. The best way to learn about birds is to see and hear them! Learn from a naturalist and other like-minded birders as you take a bird hike through oak hickory forest near the Des Plaines River. The hike begins with a short presentation about one particular bird or bird topic. Meet at the Frederick’s Grove Shelter, and be sure to dress for the weather. Hikes are

1-2 miles over uneven natural terrain. reconnectwithnature.org.

MARCH 24 Bunny Breakfast. 8:30 a.m. at Bar-

ber Oberwortmann Horticultural Center,227 Gougar Rd, New Lenox. Enjoy a family-friendly breakfast with our special friend, the Easter Bunny. Each child will receive a gift and holiday crafts to take home. Also included, is an Easter egg extravaganza for each child! Children 2 and under are free. Everyone must be pre-registered; no walk-ins. jolietpark.org. Great Egg Hunt. 10 a.m. at Nowell Park Baseball Field/Heggie Soccer Field. 199 Mills Rd, Joliet. Grab your Easter baskets and head out to Nowell Park Baseball Field or Heggie Soccer Field for the Great Egg Hunt, a FREE event! The parks will be divided by the following age groups: 4 years and under; 5-7 years old; 8-10 years; 11-12 years old. jolietpark.org.

Breakfast and Egg Hunt with Peter Rabbit. 8:30-10 a.m. and 11

a.m.-12:30 p.m. at Prairie Bluff Golf Club, 19433 Renwick Rd., Lockport. Enjoy a buffet-style breakfast with all of your favorite foods. Fee: $13/ Ages 2-11 Resident; $18 12+ years old. For more information, visit www.lockportpark. org or call 815-838-3621, ext. 0.

MARCH 30 Egg-Streme H20 Adventure. 5-7

p.m. at Challenge Fitness pool, 2021 Lawrence Ave, Lockport. The night will consist of swimming, treats, music and games while gathering a basket of eggs. Fee: $8/Challenge Fitness Member; $10/Resident; $13/NonResident. Registration is required. To register or for more information call 815-838-1183, ext. 208.

MARCH 31 Adult Kickball Tournament. 9

a.m. at Nowell Park, 199 Mills Rd, Joliet. Create a team to play in the Nowell Park Kickball tournament! Up to 12 players are allowed on the roster with 10 participating at a time. Teams may be co-ed. This will be a fun double-

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elimination tournament! Prizes will be awarded to the first place team. jolietpark.org.

APRIL 7 Hot Shot Shootout. 10 a.m. at

Hartman Recreation Center, 511 Collins St, Joliet. Come join this fun, one day hot shot shootout at the Hartman Recreation Center. This program is for ages 9 and up. Shooters will have 60 seconds to make as many points as possible from designated areas that will be marked on the floor. The top two scores from each division will advance to the finals. jolietpark.org.

APRIL 14 Faraway 5K. 9 a.m. Grove Road Park,

13217 Grove Rd, Minooka. Run, jump, climb and crawl your way through the middle of nowhere! We’ve combined the grit of an obstacle course race (OCR) with a pristine rural setting to bring you a whole new race experience. The Faraway 5k will have challenges for all levels of participants, and as part of the run3.1 circuit, be assured that there will be plenty of distance to cover. jolietpark.org.


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