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INSIDE

NEWS Valley View sets estimated tax levy

Sports Romeoville defends title

www.romeovillebugle.com

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Our Village, Our News

NOVEMBER 29, 2012

Vol. 7 No. 21

Team effort

Dupage Township, WGN Radio and Chicago Blackhawks lend a hand to families for Thanksgiving By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Laura Katauskas/Bugle Staff

Chicago Blackhawks head coach Joel Quenneville signs autographs during the WGN Radio, Chicago Blackhawks Food Drive at the DuPage Township Food Pantry Nov. 20 in Romeoville.

More than 1,300 families drove up to the DuPage Township Food Pantry and drove into a community ready to give back. In NASCAR-like fashion, cars lined up for the pantry’s annual food donation event and visited six pit stops where trunks were loaded with all the staples for a Thanksgiving dinner. In addition this year,WGN Radio performed a live broadcast from the pantry encouraging listeners

to come out and donate to keep the pantry throughout the holiday season. In return, members of the Chicago Blackhawks came out to lend their support with Blackhawks Coach Joel Quenneville dolling out autographs, and Eddie Olczyk, Blackhawks television coloranalyst and recent inductee to the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame loading up trunks. Blackhawks radio coloranalyst Troy Murray also was on hand. Bolingbrook resident Steve Miller See BLACKHAWKS, page 2


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News

BLACKHAWKS Continued from page 1 said it was a great way to help the community and meet sports favorites. “The DuPage Township has an office in Bolingbrook and I usually try to get involved somehow. And then I heard about the Blackhawks—it’s a win-win, it’s a good cause and a chance for an autograph.” It was a win as well for Quenneville, who said the opportunity was well worth the effort. “We are all here to help out,” said Quenneville.“We have a fine partnership with WGN and are happy to be able to give back to our fans and the community.” The live broadcast by Bill Leff at the food pantry, 719 Parkwood Ave., Romeoville, was part of WGN Radio Hometown Voices Tour presented by Allstate.While the drive was able to support the community, organizer Shirley Grzenia said the levels of donations have dropped over the past few years, at a time when the need is increasing.

Laura Katauskas/Bugle Staff

DuPage Township Supervisor Bill Mayer lends a hand during last week’s food drive at the DuPage Township Food Pantry in Romeoville.

The pantry always needs donations, and at this time is particularly low on the following items: spaghetti sauce, noodles, boxed mashed potatoes, Tuna Helper, Hamburger Helper, peanut butter, jelly, crackers, canned vegetables, canned fruit, soup, coffee and tea, and toiletries. Items can be dropped off at the Food Pantry distribution center and at DuPage Township

Offices; 241 Canterbury Lane, Bolingbrook. The pantry serves the Bolingbrook and Romeoville communities and is available to DuPage Township families who are experiencing a food crisis. Residents may come to the pantry twice a month from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. For more information, call Shirley Grzenia at 815-886-7986.

Laura Katauskas/Bugle Staff

Organizers came out to fill the trunks of over 1,300 families during the WGN Radio, Chicago Blackhawks Food Drive at the DuPage Township Food Pantry in Romeoville.

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

Valley Views sets tax levy By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Valley View District school officials will be asking for more than a 4 percent increase in the amount of property taxes they receive toward their 2013 budget. Though home values continue to depreciate, and the economy is still in flux, the school district is predicting a tax levy of under 5 percent, 4.21 percent to be exact. Property taxes account for 78 percent of the district’s revenue, Assistant Superintendent Gary Grizaffi reported to the school board. He explains that by approving the tentative levy, the district will retain the ability to request the maximum aggregate extension allowable under the Tax Cap. The Tax Cap limits the property tax increase for existing property owners to the Consumer Price Index or

5 percent, whichever is less. In the case of the 2012 levy request, that increase will be capped at 3 percent exclusive of existing debt service. The extension request is higher than what the actual extension will be due to the fact the equalized assessed valuation and new property values are unknown at this time. By requesting the higher extension, the school board will reserve the right to adjust the levy in the future until as late as April 1, 2013. It also will allow the levy to be more accurate due to the actual EAV and new property values being finalized. The tax levy is used to determine the tax rate for property owners in each of the cities, towns, or villages that make up a school district. The tax paid by each property owner equals the assessed value (1/3 the market value) less any deductions (such as

homeowners exemption, senior exemption, etc.) times the tax rate (per $100 of assessed value). School districts are left to rely on growth in EAV to meet their budgetary needs and use the EAV to determine the tax levy and bases the 2012 projections from the Will County Supervisor of Assessments, as well as assessors in DuPage and Lockport townships. District statistics show the EAV in Valley View has declined approximately 7.5 percent, or $190 million, marking a steady decline over the past several years. However, they said there is $7 million estimated in new growth. Grizaffi said because the EAV and percentage growth in new construction are estimated, it is impossible to say with certainty what tax rate will be generated. The final levy is expected to be adopted Dec. 10.

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Walking in a Winter Wonderland Fat Ricky’s, Recreation Department host holiday event By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Teaming up together again, the Romeoville Recreation Department and Fat Ricky’s restaurant are hosting an event that will add a little sparkle to everyone’s holiday. For its second year, the Winter Wonderland and Hope for the Holidays event will be held in

combination from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Dec. 7, at the Recreation Department, 900 W. Romeo Road. The village normally hosts an event for its residents during the holidays, and for the past three years, Fat Ricky’s restaurant has spearheaded a fundraiser aimed at collecting food items and donations to help out those in need in the community. A holiday meal box is prepared for

each family, along with a box of groceries. To help collect much-needed items for the community, admission to the event is one nonperishable food item. In return, those items will be used for Fat Ricky’s Hope for the Holiday’s care packages. Indoor activities -- including children’s entertainment, face painting, inflatables, a Book

Fair, crafts and a picture with Santa (available to the first 300 children) -- will all be held within the Recreation Center. Kicking off the event, and new this year, will be the Parade of Lights, scheduled to begin at 5:30 p.m., where community members will help lead Santa to the Recreation Department. The parade route will begin at A. Vito Martinez Middle School, 135th

and Belmont streets, and will end at the village hall after a stop at the Recreation Center for the annual tree lighting ceremony. Santa will light the 30-foot spruce tree at 6 p. m. outside the Recreation Center. Romeoville firefighters will provide and serve hot chocolate and cookies following the parade and at the beginning of the tree lighting ceremony.

Mobile Workforce Center announces December schedule Workforce Services Division of Will County has announced the December schedule of its Mobile Workforce Center. The mobile unit travels throughout Will County to help residents with resume development, cover letters, and job applications. The workforce center contains 11 computer stations, internet access, and offers keyboarding lessons, as well as resume and job search assistance using online listings including jobs4people.org and Illinois workNet. The Mobile Workforce Center will be at Bolingbrook IDES, 321 Quadrangle Drive, Bolingbrook, from 9:30 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on Mondays with the exception of Dec. 24, when MWC will be in for maintenance. On all Tuesdays except Christmas Day, it will provide service from 9:30 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 3 p.m. at the main entrance to Governors State University, 1 University Parkway, University Park. It will be at Plainfield Public Library, 15025 S. Illinois St., Plainfield, from 9:30 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 3:30 p.m. each Wednesday. Wilmington City Hall, 1165 S. Water St., Wilmington, will host MWC from 9:30 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 3 p.m. every Thursday. The unit will be at Frankfort Township Office, 11000 W.

Lincoln Highway, Frankfort, from 9:30 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 3 p.m. on Fridays. Will County Executive Larry Walsh encourages job seekers to take advantage of the service, which is offered at no cost to county residents. Workforce Services is under the Will County Executive’s office and is led byAdministrative Manager Susan Flessner. For additional information about the Workforce Services Division of Will County, go to www.jobs4people.org.

Workforce Services offers five-workshop series in December Workforce Services Division of Will County has announced its December schedule of workshops designed for job seekers. “Workforce Services has developed some wonderful workshops to aid our residents,” Walsh said. “These classes will give residents an edge when looking for and applying for jobs.” “Many of our customers have not needed to look for work in a long time,” said Susan Flessner, WSD Administrative Manager. “These workshops help them brush up on their job search skills, and maybe learn some See WORKFORCE, page 5


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Village embarks on Christmas ‘Operation’ By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

The season of giving is upon us, and the village of Romeoville is encouraging others to get involved and help those in their community. In one of the toughest economic climates, the village’s Operation Christmas program is in need now more than ever. The village has begun accepting registrations to assist the growing number of families in the community in need for the upcoming holiday season. Organizers say Operation Christmas brings joy and hope to needy families throughout the community. The program is to give people who are struggling financially the opportunity to receive gifts for their families. “Operation Christmas is an opportunity to help local families who are less fortunate have a great holiday,” said Dawn Caldwell, one of the event’s organizers. “Over the years, village employees,businesses and

residents have come together and embraced this program and have provided clothing and toys to over 300 children annually. This is truly what Romeoville is about, a community that cares and comes together when needed.” The deadline for adopting families an supplying gifts is Friday, Dec. 14. In its annual program, those willing to support a community family can adopt-a-family,agreeing to purchase the following for each: one new outfit (shirt and pants) for each child ages 12 and under; one clothing gift certificate in the amount of $30 for each child age 13 to 18; one new toy for each child 12 and under; one gift certificate for $20 for each child 13 to 18. For more information on registration or adopting a family or dropping off a donation/ gift, call 815-886-6337 or email Dawn Caldwell at dcaldwell@ romeoville.org or Pastor Suzanne Hurdle at revhurdle@sbcglobal. net.

WORKFORCE Continued from page 4 new job search techniques that didn’t exist five or 10 years ago.” Choosing a new career will help those who have been laid off and would like assistance to determine which careers best suit their skills and interests. It will be offered at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, and at 2 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 20. A session on job search skills, Master Your Job Search, will be offered at 2:30 p.m.Wednesday, Dec. 5, and at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 18. Stand Out Resumes will be offered at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 11, and at 10:30 a.m.Wednesday, Dec. 26. Learn the basics of creating a competitive resume.

Attendees may bring current resumes and have one-on-one reviews with WSD staff by request. Participants will learn interviewing techniques at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 12, and at 2 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 27, in Successful Interviewing. Learn how to prepare for a job interview, be confident and make a positive impression. Attendees may each schedule an individual, digitally recorded mock interview after completing the workshop. Networking Your Way to a New Job will help job searchers learn how to develop relationships and contacts with relatives, friends and acquaintances who can assist with the job search. The class also includes the use of social media in networking. The workshop will be held at 10:30

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a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 19. All workshops will be held on the fourth floor of the JJC City Center Campus building at 214 N. Ottawa St. and are offered at no cost for Will County residents.Workshops last about an hour, depending upon the number of participants. To reserve a seat, contact Roxy Sefcik by phone at (815) 723-3884, or e-mail at rsefcik@ willcountyillinois.com. In addition, WSD’s computer lab will be open at 3 p.m. Thursdays and at 10:30 a.m. Fridays for job seekers who wish to learn basic computer skills. Walk-ins are welcome at computer labs. For additional information about the Workforce Services Division of Will County, go to www.jobs4people.org. WSD is under the County Executive’s office.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

Police Blotter

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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Ruth Matchette-Tucker, 51, 903 Dunbridge Lane, was arrested at 10:45 p.m. Nov. 4 and charged with battery on the 900 block of Dunbridge Lane.

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Terrence Fizer, 38, 21511 S. Cormorant St., Crest Hill, was arrested at 2:18 a.m. Nov. 8 and charged with DUI, no insurance, illegal transport of alcohol and improper lane use near Weber Road and Renwick Road.

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A business in the 1300 block of Normantown Road reported a theft at 3:53 p.m. Nov. 9. A truck filled its gas tank and drove off without paying for the fuel. Cost of the fuel is $855.

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A business in the 800 block of Crossroads reported a theft at 11:28 a.m. Nov. 16 of 78 AR Parrot Drone 2.0 and 7 Parrot MKi9100 Bluetooth music kits taken from the warehouse. Estimated cost of the items taken is $24,800.

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Mateusz Kolodziej, 26, 4741 Lorel Ave, Chicago, was arrested at 1:01 p.m. Nov. 9 and charged with soliciting a prostitute on the 1200 block of Normantown Road.

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John Mora, 48, 4300 Glen Drive, Plainfield, was arrested at 12:24 p.m. Nov. 9 and charged with soliciting a prostitute on the 1200 block of Normantown Road.

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Adrianna Torres, 23, 710 Geneva, was arrested at 1:26 p.m. Nov. 9 and charged with driving without a driver’s license, uninsured and improper lane use near Route 53 and Marquette Drive.

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Gloria Reyes, 37, 225 Smith St., Joliet, was arrested at 3:59 p.m. Nov. 11 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of Weber Road.

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Lauren Matuszak, 26, 19120 Jackie Ave., Lockport, was arrested at 5:19 p.m. Nov. 12 and charged with retail theft on the 200 block of Weber Road.

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A resident in the 700 block of Essex reported a

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burglary and a theft from motor vehicle at 2:05 p.m. Nov. 12. A spray pump, hose, taping knives and several tools were taken from the vehicle while it was parked in the street in front of the residence. Estimated cost of the items taken is $5,200. Franco Lopez-Rodriguez, 33, 21822 Junction Road, Plainfield, was arrested at 3:54 a.m. on Nov. 12 and charged with driving without lights and without a driver’s license near

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Weber and Normantown roads. A business in the 300 block of Independence Boulevard reported criminal damage to property at 8:45 a.m. Nov. 13. A landscape rock was used to damage a window of the business. Estimated cost is $500. Pillow, 19, 16412 13 Kasey Borio Drive, Crest Hill, was arrested at 3:54 p.m. Nov. 14 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of Weber Road.

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Francisco Flores, 29, 1720 Randall, St. Charles, was arrested at 8:41 p.m. Nov. 14 and charged with DUI, speeding, no driver’s license, improper lane use on Route 53 and Chambers Drive.

Arturo Garcia, 33, 3006 Kilpatrick Ave.,Chicago,was arrested at 9:02 p.m. Nov. 16 and charged with no driver’s license and uninsured motor vehicle in the 100 block of Dahlia.

Jason Woods, 26, 104 Highpoint Drive, was arrested at 12:43 a.m. Nov. 15 and charged with driving with a suspended license, an uninsured motor vehicle, speeding and instate warrants near 135th Street and Arsenal Road.

Daniel Madlock, 26, 1851 Waverly Court, Crest Hill, was arrested at 4:11 p.m. Nov. 17 and charged with DUI, no driver’s license, a failure to wear a seatbelt and the illegal transport of alcohol near Route 53 and Normantown Road.

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Forum What’s on your mind? You are invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to Matt Honold, managing editor, at mhonold@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy; just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@ buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your Cub Scout run a fundraiser car wash? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred.

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

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Illustrated Opinions

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Schools

Valley View earns national award Valley View School District 365U is among fewer than two dozen school districts in Illinois and just over 500 school districts across the continent who today were named to the College Board Advanced Placement Honor Roll which recognizes school districts for

“opening AP classroom doors to a significantly broader pool of students.” VVSD was also one of only two such honored school districts in Illinois with an enrollment consisting of at least 30 percent African American, Hispanic and American Indian

students. “We applaud the extraordinary efforts of your devoted teachers and administrators,” said David Coleman, president of the College Board. “You have not only expanded student access to AP course work, but have also enabled more students

to achieve on a college level, which is helping to create a strong college-going culture.” “Your dedication to providing rigorous coursework to a growing population of students is commendable,” added Jennifer McDonnell, Senior Director, K-12 Services for The College Board’s Midwestern Regional Office. “Improvement in Advanced Placement results takes a sustained effort.” Qualification for the District Honor Roll is based on examination of AP data from May 2010, 2011 and 2012 data for all students who took AP examinations each of those years. Among the requirements: An increase in participation in/access to AP by at least 4 percent in large districts, at least 6 percent in medium districts and at least 11 percent in small districts A steady or increasing percentage of exams taken by African American, Hispanic/ Latino and American Indian/ Alaska Native students; and Improvement of performance levels when comparing the percentage of students in 2012 scoring a 3 or higher (the number necessary for college credit) to those in 2010. Thanks to an increase not only in the number of Advanced Placement courses offered but also in the efforts of both teachers and administrators, both Bolingbrook High School and Romeoville High School have shown significant gains in

the numbers of students taking the exams as well as in the numbers of students scoring 3 or higher (out of 5) on the exams. Five years ago 132 BHS students took 227 exams with 95 scoring 3 or better. Last year 198 students took 336 exams with 140 of them scoring 3 or higher. At RHS, which has a smaller student population, 43 students took 61 exams with 26 scoring 3 or better in 2008. Last year those numbers grew to 103 students taking 155 exams with 80 of them scoring 3 or better. VVSD Advanced Placement teachers include Dr. Mike Moro, Steve Stefanski, Chuck Niebling, Dan Rush, Adam Hill, Rick Dellamorte, Rachel Dieter, Tina Paulus, Adam Rio and Christi Veale at Romeoville High School as well as Brian Castiglia, Amy Kearnes, Anthony Clark, Amber Jirsa, Danielle Speciale, Leticia Wallace, Heather Colombatto, Irene Jang, Barbara Sterner, Jason Nikowitz, Nanette Davies, Stacey O’Connell, Todd Rio, John Flynn, Kwynn Olson, Larry Fisher, Steven Hughes, and Matthew Jones at Bolingbrook High School. “I congratulate your district – students, educators, families, community – on all the hard work and commitment put into opening access and having high expectations for performance in AP courses and exams,” McDonnell said.


Calendar ONGOING 5th Annual “Coat the Kids”. Starting November 10th through December 10th (Coats due back to the Lions by December 12th or sooner) the Bolingbrook Lions and Leos will be collecting kids winter coats (new or very lightly used) to be distributed to local schools, churches and shelters. Please see your local contact to determine how you can help.All questions should be directed to Estela Coite, Marcy Cosgrove or Mick Kozy: ecoite@arrow.com, marcycosgrove@gmail.com or srtcw@aol.com. 5th Annual Christmas Celebration Event— “Singing for Charity.” 12 to 3 p.m. at WJOL Radio Studios, 2410B Caton Farm Road. Marilyn’s Café Society Radio Show will broadcast live on 1340AM WJOL radio key community leaders, listeners, and others “sing for charity” featuring WJOL’s very own, Steve Brandy as special guest co-host. “Guest singers” (can include you) will raise a minimum of $100 to participate in this annual event/broadcast. Businesses can sponsor this broadcast for a minimum of $300 which entitles them to radio announcements, name/ logo on flyers, logo presence on Marilyn’s website, and a table for promotional items at the VIP Reception and studio broadcast. For more information, call 779456-0034. Holiday Coloring Contest. Nov. 1-25. Kids age twelve and under, pick up your holiday coloring sheets at the front desk and return by Tuesday, November 25th! Prizes will be awarded for first, second, and third place for age groups. All entries will be displayed at the Recreation Center beginning Monday, November 26th. Winners will be announced at Winter Wonderland on Friday, December 9th. All entries not picked up by Friday, December 21st will be removed. American Girl Fashion Show. The American Girl Fashion Show is a fun-filled event for girls and their families, friends and favorite dolls. Celebrate the experience of being a girl, whether yesterday or today, through a colorful presentation of historical and contemporary fashions. Hosted by Easter Seals Joliet Region. To benefit Children

with Disabilities at Easter Seals Regional Pediatric Center. Event takes place between Nov. 16 and 18. If your daughter/ granddaughter is interested in modeling, please contact Teresa Summers at 815-730-2052 Ext. 2. Golden Age Club. Thursdays noon to 4 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Department. Members must be 50 years and up to join, and may do so by coming to any Thursday meeting. Transportation is available by calling the Recreation Department at 815886-6222 at least 24 hours before the event. For more information about the club, call Noel Maldonado at the Recreation Center. Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit environmental organization is dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815-834-1611. Bolingbrook Machine Knitting Club. All skill levels are welcome to begin or further their knowledge of knitting with a machine. The group meets the last Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m. There is no charge to attend this group. They meet in the community room of Bolingbrook Fire Station 4, 1111 W. Boughton Road. Please park on the west side of the building. For more information, contact Rose at 630 739-2784 or Sharon at 630 471-9650. Birth After Cesarean. Meet other moms who are planning their natural birth after cesarean section. Come for encouragement, support and information to plan your next birth. Meetings at noon the first Monday every month in

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

Romeoville. Contact Melanie at 253-861-5897 or VBACesarean@ aol.com

family together to hear stories and sing songs in the storytime room.

Are you affected by someone’s drinking? Open meetings are held every third Friday of the month from 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. Contact Al-anon/ Alateen at 815-773-9623 or visit www.niafg.org for more information.

Knitter’s Nest. 10 a.m. to noon at the Fountaindale Public Library. Weekly drop-in knitting and crochet group in the library’s board room.

Large Food Pantry. Power Connection’s food pantry is open on the second and fourth Mondays of the month from 1 p.m.-6:45 p.m.at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. Enjoy your shopping experience. For a $20 donation you can shop the aisles of canned/boxed goods, drinks, desserts, snacks, breads, fruits & vegetables. You will also receive a pre-selected bag of meat.There is no income verification and ALL residents of Illinois are welcome. The Resale Connection is also open from 9 a.m.-6:45 p.m. on those Mondays. Donations accepted Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Call (630) 679-6899 or visit www.thepowerconnection.org for more information. Bolingbrook Amateur Radio Society. The Bolingbrook Amateur Radio Society meets on the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Fire Station #5, 1900 W. Rodeo Drive in Bolingbrook. All ham radio enthusiasts are invited to attend. Meetings usually include a presentation and refreshments. VE testing is held prior to each meeting at 6:30 p.m. for those wishing to take any level of license exam. Candidates must bring a photo ID, any pending Certificates of Successful Completion, and the test fee of $15. For more information, visit www.k9bar. org. Family storytime. 7-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the Fountaindale Public Library. On Tuesday evenings, get the

Fly tying. 7-8:30 p.m. at Outdoor World, 709 Janes Ave., Bolingbrook. Join master fly tier Bob Davenport in the Fly Fishing Department for some great tips on fly tying and to answer any questions or concerns you may have. For more information, call the store at 630-296-2700. Employment. Will County Workforce Services host its free weekly Career Café for job seekers at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday in Room 519 of the JJC Renaissance Center, 214 N. Ottawa St., Joliet. Reserve a spot by calling 815-727-4444, Ext. 122, or emailing bwashington@ willcountyillinois.com.

NOVEMBER 28 Great Reads Book Club. 7-8 p.m. in the Fountaindale Public Library’s Board Room. Discussion of “We Need to Talk About Kevin” by Lionel Shriver. For more information visit the library.

NOVEMBER 30 Claymation Movie-making for the Family-Holiday Edition. The Lockport Township Park District is offering Claymation Moviemaking for the Family- Holiday Edition for ages 5 yrs and older at Gladys Fox Museum, 231 E. Ninth St., on Fri., Nov. 30th from 6:30pm-9pm. Each family works together to create characters out of clay and bring their creations to life using digital cameras and animation software. Fee: $58/ Resident-$68/Non-resident. For more info. visit www. lockportpark.org or call 815838-3621, ext. 0.

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DECEMBER 4 Forever Plaid’s “Plaid Tidings”. The Lockport Township Park District is offering a trip to Forever Plaid’s “Plaid Tidings” at the Theater in the Centre in Munster, IN for all ages on Tues., Dec. 4 from 12:45pm-5:30pm. Enjoy this smash hit musical about a famous singing group, The Plaids. You’ll enjoy this holiday treat! Fee includes main floor seats and transportation. Fees: $63/resident; $73/non-resident. For more information, call the Lockport Township Park District at 815-838-1183, ext. 207 or visit www.lockportpark. org.

DECEMBER 5 Chills & Thrills Book Club. 7-8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Library. Get chilled and thrilled at the Fountaindale Library with a good mystery and good discussion. Discussion will be on “Christmas at the Mysterious Bookshop” by Otto Penzler. Pick up a copy of the book at the library.

DECEMBER 6 Wine Around the World. At the DuPage Township Levy Center. Presented by the Bolingbrook Area Chamber of Commerce and the Bolingbrook Arts Council. Sponsored by Binny’s and Southern Wine and Spirits. For ticket and sponsorship information, visit www.bolingbrookchamber.org. The Winter Wonderettes – Pheasant Run. The Lockport Township Park District is offering a trip to The Winter Wonderettes at Pheasant Run in St. Charles for all ages on Thurs., Dec. 6 from 11am5:30pm. A holiday musical of the 60’s. Fee includes main floor seats, lunch and transportation. Fees: $84/resident; $94/nonresident. For more information, call the Lockport Township Park District at 815-8381183, ext. 207 or visit www. lockportpark.org.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

News

Area Big Brothers Big Sisters form Latino Advisory Council Are you concerned about Latino children in your community? Big Brothers Big Sisters is forming a Latino Advisory Council to assist in advancing its efforts to serve the Latino population in its service area of Will, Grundy, Kankakee and Iroquois counties. The initial meeting is scheduled for 12 p.m.,Thursday, Dec. 13 at Big Brothers Big Sisters, 417 Taylor St., Joliet. This informational session is open to anyone concerned about Latino children in Will, Grundy, Kankakee and Iroquois counties. Lunch will be provided. The Latino Advisory Council will consist of respected and accomplished leaders in the areas of government, business, media relations, social services, etc. Representation from current and alumni big brothers and big sisters, alumni littles and/or their families will also be included. Richard Rodriguez, of Joliet, will chair the Latino Advisory Council and he sits on the Big Brothers Big Sisters Board of Directors. Office manager Vivian Mather and social worker Lorraine Guerrero will work with the committee as well. “Latino children are our largest growing demographic

of children,” Guerrero said. “I hope that whoever comes to our December 13th meeting, will leave with a sense of responsibility to help Latino youth. We want to inspire community leaders to empower Latino youth, whether they work with us or find their own niche to do so.” “The experience and input from the Latino Advisory Council membership will provide guidance and ensure quality, culturally and linguistically appropriate mentoring services to the Latino community,” said Big Brothers Big Sisters CEO Lisa Morel Las. “They will also assist us in shaping and prioritizing our future direction around service to the Latino population.” Members will be expected to commit time, influence and energy in furthering the work of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Latino Mentoring Initiative. Specific responsibilities include: • Provide guidance to Big Brothers Big Sisters’ leadership in order to ensure that the strategic plan of the organization includes the needs of the Latino population and strategies for meeting such • Provide feedback on emerging and best practices

within the Latino population • Recommend direction and methods for outreaching to and serving the Latino population • Provide guidance and support in identifying and leveraging potential partnerships and resources that will supplement the LMI efforts • Become informed about the organization’s mission, vision, values and programming in order to better service in the capacity of advisory board member • Attend quarterly Latino Advisory Council meetings “The Dec. 13 meeting will provide information on our evidence and research based mentoring program and why it is a proven success and crucial to children in our community,” Guerrero said. “While this is an effort to increase mentors for our youth, our hope is that even if something bigger or different comes out of it, we’ll be happy.” For more information about Big Brothers Big Sisters, visit the agency’s new Latino-focused website at www.latinobigs. org To register for the meeting, contact Mather at 815-7232227 or e-mail Rodriguez at richardrodriguez36@gmail.com.

Lewis receives $65K grant for rain collection Lewis University has received a $65,000 grant for a rainwater collection system through a grants program sponsored by Hanson Material Service, Midwest Generation and ComEd. The collection system gathers water and stores it in a 200,000-gallon tank previously provided by the Romeoville municipal water system. The project is expected to be completed by spring 2013. The collected rainwater will be used for campus irrigation or cooling towers. The new rainwater collection system will preserve natural water systems since it will reduce Lewis’ use of a well for irrigation purposes.The system will also reduce the use of salt for softening water used for the cooling towers since the collected rainwater doesn’t need to be softened. The project is expected to reduce dependence on

the aquifer and preserve it for the natural habitat in the Romeoville area. The aquifer serves the nearby Lockport Prairie Nature Preserve, which is one of the few remaining habitats for the endangered Hine’s emerald dragonfly and other rare plant and insect species. Hanson Material Service, Midwest Generation and ComEd have been working with state and federal agencies to develop a conservation plan for the endangered Hine’s emerald dragonfly.The partners initiated the grant program, with funds received from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, to support additional projects that further the preservation of the endangered species and its habitat. The Hine’s emerald dragonfly is highly dependent upon groundwater, so Lewis University’s efforts with this project are instrumental to protecting its habitat.


taKe 5 C ro s s w o rd P u z z l e

Across

Down

1 Name thought to mean “father of many” 8 Like Rubens 15 Song title words after “The future’s not ours to see” 16 Novel genre 17 20th-century Riyadh-born ruler 18 Axes to grind 19 1966Candlestick Park highlight 21 Pier gp. 22 Correct 23 “I give up!” 24 Inclement weather sounds 26 Early L.A. Times publisher Harrison Gray _ 28 Acronymous gun 29 Old Turkish leader 31 “The Curse of Capistrano” hero 33 Small missions? 34 Baseball glove

part 36 Theoretical extreme 37 Health facility 40 Not at all active 42 Mainline? 44 Ride 47 Stiff 49 Close call 50 They’re involved in joints 52 Old pol. divisions 54 Emmy-winning NFL analyst Collinsworth 55 Subject of an annual contest held in Brooklyn 58 Suppress 59 Ambushed 61 “1984” superstate 62 Son of Aaron 63 Arrival time for the fashionably late? 64 Diminishes

1 EPA stat 2 Aptly named soda brand 3 Circulation measure 4 Charge 5 Wave makeup 6 “Any fool can make __”: Thoreau 7 Squeaked by 8 Small part 9 Wikipedia’s globe, e.g. 10 Correct 11 Nick of “Heartbreakers” 12 Move from the edge 13 “The Odds Against Me” autobiographer John 14 1956 Moses player 20 __ bath 21 __ facto 25 Shortened, in a way 27 Certain Eur. miss 30 Old Nair alternative 32 Density symbols, in physics

35 Military bigwig 37 Daydream 38 Sartre, for one 39 They may be brown or pale 40 Not stacked 41 Rear 43 Pops since 1905 44 Final stage, as of a career 45 Memorial tablet 46 How batters must bat 48 Gardening gadget 51 Hot stuff 53 Old 56 CBS maritime drama 57 Hair treatments 60 J et al.

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

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H o ro s c o p e s Pace yourself. There’s nothing you can do today that you can’t do tomorrow. Take advantage of a day off by recharging your batteries for the coming week. Good manners are contagious so be on your best behavior.

If you’re afraid of rotten apples, don’t go to the barrel, pick them from the tree. Sticking to the same antiquated routines may simply result in repeating past mistakes. Try to come up with fresh and original ideas this week.

All work and no play isn’t much fun. Explore your inner child using imagination and taking flights of fancy. Focus on activities you enjoy rather than work. Important decisions should be postponed until later this week.

Don’t take it personally. If you read between the lines and search for insults, you’re likely to find them. Take the chip off your shoulder and try to make the best of every situation in the week ahead.

Don’t be your own worst critic. You shouldn’t torture yourself over shortcomings when you possess so many strengths. Do what you do best in the week ahead instead of trying to do what you can’t.

Every rose has thorns. Don’t let appearances fool you, just because everything appears rosy on the surface doesn’t mean that there aren’t unforeseen pitfalls lurking around the corner. Remain on guard this week.

Go ahead, make your day. Resolve to be selfish by doing whatever brings you the most enjoyment in the week to come. Your time is usually rationed by your schedule, but you can create your own time slots.

Expect the unexpected. Leave a bit of wiggle room in your schedule to account for unforeseen surprises in the week ahead. It would be to your benefit to make a point of finishing whatever you begin.

Take a break. Spend some time away from that big project you’ve been working on and you’ll be amazed at the fresh perspective you receive. Save decisionmaking until later in the week.

Beware the green-eyed monster. Don’t envy another’s success, especially when their gain benefits you as well. Allow everyone time in the limelight and wish them well this week. Your turn will come soon.

Make your choice count. Don’t just flip a coin when faced with a crucial decision. Take the time to do your homework and figure out which option is best. Business will be the top priority this week.

Fog clouds the path ahead this week. There are many variables that are obscured regarding a new endeavor. It may be better to wait until events unfold and you have more facts, before starting anything new.

Tribune Media Services 2012

Sudoku

J umble

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: •MOURN •WRATH •COUPLE •RENDER

Answer:

When the campers got caught in a heavy cloudburst, it felt like -- A “DROWN” POUR


12

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Spartans win final game at WJOL Thanksgiving Classic, page 15; Maine South QB leads All-Area,

www.romeovillebugle.com

page 16

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

13

Romeoville defends tournament title By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Romeoville was able to defend its own Thanksgiving Tournament title with an impressive four-game performance. The Spartans (4-0) won all four games by double digits. “It definitely means a lot (to win our own tournament),” Romeoville coach Julio Carrasco said. “For many years we couldn’t win a game in this tournament. It’s nice to win the tournament back-to-back years and play well.” “We wanted to do what we did last year and take it back and win it again,” Romeoville senior Brianna Harris said. “We believed in each other and thought we could win it and we did.” Romeoville finished the tournament Nov. 19 with a 6744 win over Lockport. It led 4214 at the half and was able to get its bench involved throughout the game. “I told the girls that this would be a big test for us because we didn’t play great the first three games,” Carrasco said. “Defensively we’ve only allowed 30 points to the first three teams, but offensively we’ve been up

and down. Today the girls came out in the first half and took it to them. Lockport changed things up in the second half and frustrated us a little bit, but we managed to get the win.” “It feels really great,” Romeoville senior Kiera Currie said. “Our leaders on the court have done a good job and we have proven that we do have a bench.” Currie led the way with 15 points. Harris was right behind with 14 points, while Angelica Osusky tallied 11 and Abby Smith had 10. The Spartans saw a bunch of zone throughout the tournament, but did a good job of moving the ball around and getting good looks. “We’ve been working on (zone offense),” Carrasco stated. “We knew teams would be collapsing on Kiera. We’ve seen that the whole time. We wanted to make the offense wider and give us some angles to cut. We started attacking the baseline.” “We want to move the ball as quickly as possible,” Harris said. “We wanted to get some open shots and do what we have to do to score.” “We’ve been practicing more See TITLE, page 14

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Brianna Harris had 14 points in the title game of the Romeoville Tournament.


14

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

Sports TITLE Continued from page 13 of an inside-outside game,” Currie said. “Especially with working with zones a lot, we can get into the middle.” Romeoville opened the tournament with a 57-30 win over Joliet Central as Harris scored 11 points, while Currie (11), Smith (11) and Osusky (10) also scored in double figures. The Spartans also defeated Lemont 41-28 (Currie 19 points) and Guilford 61-32 (Currie 13, Osusky, Smith, Harris 12 points each). The success in the tournament should help them for the conference season as they hope to defend their Southwest Prairie Conference title in an improved conference. “It really prepares us for conference,” Currie said. “It lets

us see what we have and we know we have a strong bench. We should be really strong this year and hope to have another good season in conference. We know our flaws and what we need to work on for conference.” “It gives us a lot of confidence,” Harris added. “A lot of us listed on our goals to win this tournament. I’m pretty sure that this boosts our confidence a lot. We need to improve on our defense and our passing. We made a lot of sloppy passes.”

BOYS BOWLING Romeoville rolled over Oswego East 3,391-2,971 in an SPC match. Dakota Vostry led the way with a 790 series (279-235-276). Brandon Lisak-Talley added a 694, Kyle Zaremba had a 650 and Jacob Young rolled a 605. staylor@buglenewspapers.com


Sports

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

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Spartans end tournament with a win By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Heading into the final game of the WJOL Thanksgiving Classic Nov. 24 in the seventh-place contest against Joliet Catholic Academy, Romeoville coach Jeff Bambule had worries facing the winless Hillmen. “Playing with no practice and going up against (JCA) coach (Joe) Gura’s match-up zone, I was really worried about that,” Bambule said.“We were fortunate to know some shots down. Rashad Steele came off the bench and hit some shots to get them out of that matchup zone. Steele hit all three of his shots, two from behind the three-point arc, to give the Spartans the 59-42 win, their first of the year.The loss kept JCA winless. “It was a good first victory,” said senior Jimmy Moon.“It was good to get the win as a team.We played good defensively all tournament, but today we shot the ball well. Once we started making shots, it helped us run the offense.”

Moon led all scorers with 15 points on 5 of 11 shooting. He connected on three of his seven attempts from three. James Boyd added nine points for Romeoville, while Christian Diaz, Jaylon Richardson and Anthony Love all contributed six. “It was a group effort,” Bambule said. “Moon is our number one threat offensively at this point, but all the guys are showing us stuff. We learned a lot here. We faced some different styles, we got to see some things and we got to play everybody.” Bambule was happy with the competition the Spartans got to see in the tournament. “Providence, Lockport and Minooka are good teams,” he said. “JCA, they play some young players, but coach does a nice job with them.” Romeoville did see pressure defense and averaged nearly 15 turnovers per game, something they have to work on. “We learned a lot here,” Moon said.“We learned we have to work on our ball handling and handling

the pressure.” Moon paced the Spartans in scoring the entire tournament, averaging 9.25 points per game, but he is happy to see his teammates coming on early in the year. “It helps that more people are contributing overall so if I am not scoring, other guys are able to step up,” he said. “I am trying to be a leader and show the guys that we can do some things this year.” Earlier in the tournament, Romeoville got scoring from different places, as it lost 53-32 to Providence behind eight points from Mitch LaFond, fell 52-36 to Minooka with Diaz leading the way with seven points and 49-34 to Lockport with Moon pouring in 18 points. “These kids are good kids and they work hard,” Bambule said. “We struggled this week at times with pressure. It shows what we have to work on, but the attitude and effort is there, so we will be OK.” mark@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Romeoville’s Jaylon Richardson tries to shoot over a JCA defender at the WJOL Classic.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

Sports

Alviti throws, runs to the top By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

“Matt Al-vi-ti … Matt Al-vi-ti.” This chant from the Maine South student section could be heard at regular intervals not only at every home game during Matt Alviti’s stellar senior season, but throughout the brilliant three-year career of the Hawks’ quarterback. “You hear them, and it’s awesome to know that the whole school is behind you,” said Alviti, the Voyager Media 2012 Football Player of the Year. “It’s a great honor,” said Alviti regarding being named Player of the Year. “I had a great career at Maine South playing in a great system. The coaches put me in a great situation and I had great teammates. I can’t get this award without my teammates as well as the coaching staff.” Alviti threw for 2,740 yards this season—completing 68 percent of his attempts—with 28 touchdown passes and only five interceptions. He also was a threat on the ground, rushing for 843 yards and 19 touchdowns. Alviti’s versatility will fit him well as he takes his talents next fall to Northwestern University, a great place for multidimensional quarterbacks. “I think the sky’s the limit for him (at Northwestern) with the offense they run,” said Maine South head coach David Inserra. “They do an incredible job of pulling the best out of the quarterbacks they have. He has the arm strength, the athletic ability and the toughness to play that position.” “I think I’ll be able to succeed well in their offensive system,” Alviti added. “That’s one of the big reasons I picked Northwestern.” Alviti took over as the starting QB his sophomore year and helped guide Maine South to the Class 8A state championship— winning 12 consecutive contests after the team had lost its first two games of the year. The Hawks then rattled off another 10 in a row during Alviti’s junior season in 2011 before falling in the second round of the playoffs (10-1 overall). This season, the Hawks (11-1) won 11 straight and advanced to the quarterfinals. All told, Maine South

compiled a 33-4 record with Alviti under center. But Alviti’s career numbers are even more noteworthy. He finishes with 9,746 total yards, ranking him fourth unofficially in IHSA history. He’s also fifth all-time in passing yardage (7,788) and passes completed (538), and is tied for ninth with 78 career TD passes. “What he’s done just in sheer numbers is phenomenal,” Inserra said. “Leading the team to the state championship as a sophomore, he was definitely the leader of that team. He did everything he could to duplicate that feat his junior and senior years.” The rest of the members of the Voyager Media All-Area Football Team are:

A.J. APIQUIAN S e n i o r linebacker from Plainfield Central led the team with 65 tackles, 11.5 for loss, with two sacks. “Excellent reader, great blitzer and our leading tackler,” Central coach John Jackson said. “He is very versatile and was a free safety last year. He was an impact player and our defensive leader.”

AARON BAILEY Despite missing nearly five games with injury, the University of Illinois-bound Bolingbrook quarterback posted 1,091 yards of total offense and 16 total touchdowns. The 2011 Voyager Media Player of the year, his coach John Ivlow calls Bailey “The best player in state.”

CALEB BAILEY Bailey, a linebacker for Romeoville, led the team with 104 tackles and also spent some time on offense, gaining 288 yards with three scores on just 42 carries. “Caleb Bailey is one of the best

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Matt Alviti threw for 2,740 and ran for 843 yards for Maine South. He is the Voyager Media Football Player of the Year.

football players I have had the pleasure of coaching,” Romeoville coach Jeff Kuna said. “Caleb has been our Defensive MVP the last two years and has set almost every defensive

statistical record in our program. He has a great combination of speed, strength and athleticism which has made his a very versatile defensive player, from playing the run, to pressuring the quarterback or dropping into coverage.  Caleb has played great for us over the last two seasons, but I still believe he is learning the game and his best

football is yet to be played.”

NICK BARGIONE Chris James was quick to give credit to the Notre Dame’s offensive line throughout the season for his success, and Bargione was one of those See ALL-AREA, page 17


Sports ALL-AREA Continued from page 16 linemen who helped spring James for long gains. Bargione started the 2011 season at tackle before moving to guard this year. He also saw plenty of action in the defensive line in 2012. “You always need someone on the offensive line to captain things, take charge and direct traffic, and Nick kind of did that,” said Notre Dame coach Mike Hennessey. “With Chris’ stats, you have to have guys up front that are doing a tremendous job. All five guys did a tremendous job for us.”

JACK BENEVENTI Sophomore quarterback burst onto the scene this season, completing 181 of 303 passes for 2,318 yards and 20 TDs.After only one season, he is 700 yards and four TDs shy of the school record.

“As a sophomore he stepped up and had some spectacular games for us,” said Benet coach Pat New.“He is only going to get better the next two years.”

HERB BETANCOURT Betancourt was one of the Notre Dame’s leaders on defense. His prowess for making big plays helped lift Notre Dame to the Class 6A quarterfinals this season—the Dons’ best postseason finish since 1997. “He took and ownership and leadership on the defensive end,” said Hennessy. “He’s an excellent athlete, and has very good overall speed. Because of that, we were able to put him in a lot of different situations to make him effective, and therefore, make our defense effective.”

J. B. BUTLER No matter who was in the backfield this season, JCA moved the ball on the ground to the

tune of 3,682 yards, a lot of them coming behind Butler. He also posted 20 tackles as a part-time defensive lineman. “To be a two-year starter already by the end of your junior year on our offensive line at left tackle says a lot about his abilities,” said JCA coach Dan Sharp. “He has great feet and great athleticism, and we can also use him as a pulling guard. He has a first-class motor, always making that push forward, and he did a great job blocking field goals and extra points. “When we needed help and physicality in the interior of our defensive line, we knew who to turn to.”

VONTAE DIGGS Downers North junior had 56 tackles, 16 for losses and six sacks. “He will be a Division-I

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012 prospect if he put some meat on for next year,” North coach John Wander said. “He has big play potential every snap he is in the game.”

BRYCE DOUGLAS A powerful defensive tackle, the Illinois recruit was a threeyear starter and was the defensive MVP in the Southwest Prairie Conference for Plainfield Central. Douglas tallied 48 tackles, 12 for a loss, with 3.5 sacks, one interception and a forced fumble. “He is the strongest Player I’ve ever coached,” Jackson said. “His value is in the fact that he demanded double teams from opponent’s offenses yet he still dominated games despite it.”

JORDAN ELLINGWOOD The senior finished his career as the second leading career rusher in Plainfield Central history. This year he tallied 1,066 yards

17

rushing and 12 touchdowns. “He is one of the toughest (If not the toughest) football player I’ve ever coached and one of the best football players I’ve ever coached,” Jackson said.

JACK EURITT Senior broke the school’s record for receptions in a season, catching 55 passes for 850 yards and 10 touchdowns. “He is a terrific athlete and set the school record for receptions,” New said. “He made some huge plays for us this year.”

BRETT FOX The three-year starter for Plainfield North spent time on both sides of the ball at linebacker and tight end. He had 94 tackles See ALL-AREA, page 18


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

ALL-AREA Continued from page 17 on defense with 2.5 sacks and two fumble recoveries, and had six catches for 92 yards and three touchdowns. “Brett is a tough, physical two-way player for us,” North coach Tim Kane said. “How he played the game on both sides of the ball raised everyone else’s level as well due to his tenacity and intensity.”

CLIFTON GARRETT The Plainfield South junior linebacker totaled 107 tackles on the season, 10.5 for a loss, and a fumble return for a touchdown. He also contributed four touchdowns on offense. He is being recruited by several top college football programs across the country. “He is an outstanding competitor, and has outstanding talent,” South coach Ken Bublitz said. “Clifton demonstrates tremendous closing speed and impressive finishes on tackles. He was able to get involved in the offense as the season continued demonstrating excellent hands as a receiver, toughness as a runner and aggressiveness as a blocker.”

TY ISAAC In a school that has produced great high school running backs, the USC-bound Isaac passed them all, posting 5,315 yards in his JCA career. Despite battling nagging injuries from the first game of the season this year, Isaac still rushed for 1,500 yards and 22 touchdowns. “I told him after our last game, ‘I never saw anyone run the ball better in a brown jersey than you,’ ” Sharp said. “We finally get Ty healthy and the season is over. He had an amazing career year here, playing in two state championship games and being

our all-time leading rusher, but I what will remember the most is how well he handled all the attention, all the accolades, with such humility and class. And I know USC can’t wait to get him on their campus.”

ZACK JACKOVICH The junior defensive back posted 66 tackles this season and was third on the team with 35 solo tackles. A Johnny-on-thespot player most of the season, Jackovich posted a team-best seven interceptions. “When Grant Harrison went down with an injury before the season opener against Providence, Zach stepped into that hole at free safety and made his mark on our secondary,”Sharp said. “When we were struggling to come up with turnovers at the start of the year, Zach would intercept a pass, or even two, and that’s something every defense is looking for - that timely turnover. And he can only get better for next season.”

CHRIS JAMES James, who led Notre Dame in rushing as a sophomore, took his game to the next level, and then some, during his junior season. James’ combination of power, quickness and speed enabled him to pile up 2,089 yards and 29 touchdowns on the ground, while adding 252 yards and three scores receiving. “Chris did a great job getting himself prepared for this season, getting bigger, faster, stronger, adapting and maturing,” said Hennessey. “He had a better sense and better vision for holes, and better anticipation.”

BLAKE KING T h e Northwesternb o u n d offensive lineman, King was the catalyst for everything Minooka did offensively this season, being able to block for the run or pass.

Sports “Blake was a solid player for us all year,” said Minooka coach Paul Forsythe.“Obviously, he was someone who we tried to run behind whenever we could.”

TYLER LANCASTER

this season, while catching 34 passes for 349 yards and one score. On the defensive side, was a fixture in the defensive backfield and had one interception for a touchdown. “He was such an explosive player for us,” New said. “He is a physical player that is really explosive with the ball in his hands. He ran the ball for us, was a receiver, defensive back and he was also a return man.”

Plainfield East center was the main man up front for the Bengals. “He is a Northwestern commit on the offensive line,” CORBETT OUGHTON East coach Mike Romeli said. He had 16 tackles 5 tackles for A nonloss and was very dominant.” starter at the beginning of PAT MALONEY the season, the Minooka When Maine senior proved South coach he earned the David Inserra job and started talks about at defensive Maloney, two back the last seven games of words come the season and ended up with a to mind - pure team-best six interceptions. leadership. “Corbett was the spark that got “Both vocally us out of an 0-3 start,” Forsythe and physically,” Inserra added. said. “He made big plays that “He truly was the emotional changed the outcome of games and verbal leader on this team. for us. With six interceptions in He always brought everyone only seven games started, his together. He’s like a second side of the field was a turnover coach on the field.” The 6-3, waiting to happen.”  275-pound Ball State signee, named CSL South Lineman of KURT PALANDECH the Year, is a two-time all-CSL South pick and had 34 pancake S e n i o r blocks. quarterback “Ball State is getting a winner, and defensive just way he handles himself and back was way he plays,” Inserra said. team MVP for Plainfield NOAH MEYER North. He had 684 rushing Meyer, the yards and seven co-CSL South t o u ch d o w n s , Defensive while throwing for 981 yards Player of the and had 12 touchdown passes. Year, was a He also had three interceptions mainstay on a on defense. Hawks’defense “Kurt has been a great leader that helped lift for us and made so many plays Maine South to for us on both sides of the consecutive undefeated regular ball,” Kane said. “As a QB he is seasons. He compiled a team- dangerous due to his speed, high 83 tackles, including 19 athleticism and throwing ability.  tackles-for-loss. “He’s extremely Numerous times he has made aggressive and changes direction positive yardage plays when it really well,” said Inserra. “He’s had looked like a play for a loss. our leader on defense and we He is being recruited by MAC had a pretty solid defense. We schools, Ivy League schools, and battled a lot of injuries, and he’s D-II schools.” been the one consistent guy all year (defensively).” JAY ROBERTS

PORTER ONTKO Two-way player for 11-2 Benet, Ontko carried the ball for 967 yards and 15 touchdowns

A senior from Plainfield North, Roberts has gone over 1,000 yards rushing each of the past two years, gaining 1,238 this year, with 13 touchdowns.

“Jay is a very physical, powerful between the tackle runner and has carried the load for us for the past two seasons,” Kane said.

KOREY ROGERS Do-everything senior for Joliet West, Rogers was a running back, receiver and played quarterback in the Wildcat. He posted 525 rushing yards, 396 receiving yards and eight TDs. “Korey is a tremendous football player and will be very successful someday because of his hard work,” said coach Jason Aubrey.

BRANDON SALTER A senior running back/ linebacker from Downers North, Salter led team with 802 rushing yards and six touchdowns for Class 7A quarterfinalist. Also had a defensive touchdown. “He is a special athlete who could play almost any position on the field,” Wander said. “He is undersized, but has a heart of gold.”

OMAR STOVER Senior running back carried the ball a team-best 112 times for 1,012 yards and 12 touchdowns on the season for Bolingbrook.

JAMES WILLIAMS Niles West advanced to the postseason for the first time since 2004 this fall, and Williams is a big reason why. The 6-foot, 180-pound Williams, named CSL South co-Defensive Player of the Year, recorded 119 total tackles and 12 tackles-for-loss. He also is a two-time all-CSL South selection. “James plays with a passion and motor that I have not seen in my years of coaching,” said Niles West coach Scott Baum. “He has a knack for being around the football and is a model for being a true student-athlete.”

EMILE WISDOM All conference defensive player for Bolingbrook posted a teamhigh 81 tackles and 11 tackles for loss. He also led the team with six sacks and added three fumble recoveries. “He was a two-year starter and the leader of the defense,” said Ivlow. “He was one of the only seniors on defense and he will be missed.” Mark Gregory and Scott Taylor also contributed


56 www.buglenewspapers.com/basketball

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

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Joliet West wins own tourney By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Heading into the 2012 season, Joliet West and Bolingbrook were already picked to be at or near the top of the class in the SouthWest Suburban Conference. After their battle Nov. 24 in the title game of the, that was only solidified. West won the game 63-56 in their first time in the title game of its own invite. West rode the hot hand of senior guard Morris Dunnigan, who tallied 13 of his game-high 31 points in the fourth quarter, en route to being tabbed MVP of the tournament. “Morris Dunnigan is a great high school basketball player,’’ said Joliet West coach Luke Yaklich.“He has worked so hard to come back from the ACL injury his sophomore year and finally, he’s back to 100 percent. I am super proud of Morris. He put us on his back and led us to the win. When he plays well, we are always going to play well, that is just the pressure of being the best player.” “This means a whole lot,” Dunnigan said of the win. “We have never had a chance to play in this first place game, so it is important. We came to play. We have players that have been on varsity for three and four years, so we have experience this year.” The game was a battle from the beginning, as the teams were tied 15-15 after the opening quarter and were knotted at 2828 at halftime. West held a slim 41-40 after three quarters before pulling ahead late. “This tournament was won in the first two weeks of our practice,”Yaklich said.“There is a reason we put the guys through so much early on.” Senior Carl Tyrell added 17 points for West, although he was not at full strength. “Carl Tyrell had the flu tonight and he was out there playing at 70 percent,”Yaklich said. Bolingbrook (3-1) was led

BOYS BOWLING 1. Romeoville 2. Plainfield Central 3. Lockport 4. Minooka 5. Bolingbrook 6. Joliet West 7. Plainfield North

GIRLS BOWLING 1. Lockport 2. Minooka 3. Joliet West 4. Plainfield East 5. Plainfield North 6. Plainfield Central 7. Downers South

BOYS BASKETBALL 1. Benet 2. Joliet West 3. Notre Dame 4. Bolingbrook 5. Downers South 6. Minooka 7. Niles West

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Morris Dunnigan was tournament MVP of the Joliet West Tournament.

by All-Tournament selectees Kendall Guyton, who posted 20 points and Ben Moore (16). “This is only one battle of three against Bolingbrook,’’ Yaklich said. “They have a great team, Rob does a great job with them. I think out seniors played well and their guys just didn’t have it. It’s going to be a different game the next two. This is a precursor to two more great games.” What the win did give West is

confidence. “It means a lot that we already played one of the top teams in our conference,” Dunnigan said. To get to the final game, Joliet West defeated Thornridge 68-49 behind 19 points from Dunnigan. West also defeated Plainfield South 78-49. Dunnigan led the way with 19 points,while Brandon McCullum added 15. McCullum was also named to the All-Tournament

1. Bolingbrook 2. Maine South 3. Plainfield East 4. Romeoville 5. Benet 6. JCA 7. Plainfield North

WRESTLING team. “I have been coaching for 14 years and B Mac is the toughest player I have coached,” Yaklich said.“He was up sophomore year and was defensive player of the year. He was defensive player of the year last year and is well on his way this year. He is the most mentally and physically tough kid I have ever coached. He is a fighter and it takes a lot to bring him down.” mark@buglenewspapers.com

1. Lockport 2. Minooka 3. Notre Dame 4. Plainfield Central 5. Downers North 6. Joliet West 7. Downers South Rankings are compiled by Mark Gregory and Scott Taylor.


20

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

Travel

Taking Europe slow, with limited mobility Let’s face it: Compared to the United States, Europe is not very accessible to those with limited mobility. In fact, many of my favorite sights - castles and hill towns - were actually designed to be inaccessible. But I’m inspired by the fact that wherever I go in Europe I see people with limited mobility having a wonderful time on the streets, in the museums, in the restaurants, and on the trains. If you have mobility concerns, consider your own situation thoughtfully when choosing which attractions to visit, where to sleep and eat, and what to avoid. Here are some tips to make Europe more accessible: Packing light is especially important. To lighten your load, take fewer clothing items and do laundry more often. Fit it all in a wheeled carry-on bag (9-by22-by-14 inches). If you do bring a second bag, make it a small one that stacks neatly (or even attaches) on top of your wheeled bag. Bring a friend. It’s good to have helping hands along if you need a quick lift up a curb or if you have trouble handling your luggage. In 30 years as a tour guide, I learned that if people who didn’t walk well brought along a supportive partner, their trip went remarkably well. Think about the pros and cons of where you sleep: Rather than stay near the station, you can taxi from the station directly to your hotel and be in the center of the action. Rather than opt for a characteristic bed and breakfast place, take the modern, businessclass hotel with up-to-date rooms, larger bathrooms and elevators,

and facilities designed with easy access in mind. Many q u a i n t e r places will brag they have an elevator, but because of the nature of their building, you’ll still climb many steps to get from the street to your room. Some cities have some fully accessible buses and subway routes. London’s system is the best in this regard, while Paris disappoints. While subway systems can be efficient, public buses can save you lots of hiking with fewer stairs. With a transit pass (most cities sell day passes and multi-day passes), you can hop on a bus just to get down the street without worrying about the chore and expense of buying an individual ticket. If you simply can’t walk long distances, taxis are essential. Any hotel or restaurant can call one to pick you up. With a cellphone and the local number, you can call one from anywhere. And in many cities, it’s easy to hail a taxi on the street. Museums take care of people with limited mobility. People in wheelchairs can skip the line. If you find you need a wheelchair during your visit, larger museums often have them available. And if the museum lacks a public elevator, they may have a service elevator you can use. Many of the most popular sights come with exhaustingly long lines that are easy to avoid if you make a reservation (good guidebooks explain how) or if you hire a

Photo Courtesy of Dominic Bonuccelli

Some European cities are head of the pack when it comes to travelers with limited mobility. Austria’s Salzburg won the European Union’s 2012 Access City Award for its municipal improvements.

private guide (who generally gets to go to the front). Take full advantage of tours. Every town with tourism has a variety of tours that show you the sights from a comfortable seat. Orientation bus tours give you a 90-minute once over lightly. Longer tours usually do the orientation route with a visit to a couple of major sights (which involves some minimal walking). Hop-on, hop-off bus tours vie for your business in nearly every city. They make a circuit lacing the city’s top sights together and give you a ticket good for a day’s worth of hopping on and off, with buses coming by several times an hour. Nearly any company offering

city tours will offer day trips out from a city, providing an easy way to see blockbuster sights on a joyride through the countryside. Every port city has a harbor cruise that gives visitors a relaxing and delightful angle on that town. Cruise ships offer an array of on-shore excursions that generally include an option for those who don’t walk well. Know your limits. You can opt out of that monastery on the hilltop and simply enjoy it from a cafe on the bank of the river below. And, if you’re a good traveler, that cafe time can come with a memorable conversation with locals and an adventure in literally eating and drinking in the culture.

With the right approach and attitude, you’ll find that because you move more slowly, you’ll see a side of Europe that you may have missed on earlier trips. Consider yourself in the vanguard of the “slow travel” movement. It’s a new world out there, and anyone with a sense of adventure can take advantage of all that Europe has to offer. (Rick Steves (www.ricksteves.com) writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and public radio. Email him at rick@ricksteves.com and follow his blog on Facebook.)

(c)2012 RICK STEVES DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.


fancy. Focus on activities you enjoy rather than work. Important decisions should be postponed until later this week.

eNtertaiNmeNt

Don’t be your own worst critic. You shouldn’t torture yourself over shortcomings when you possess so many strengths. Do what you do best in the week ahead instead of trying to do what you can’t.

Take the chip off your shoulder and try to make the best of every situation in the week ahead.

Every rose has thorns.

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012 21 Don’t let appearances fool you, just because everything appears rosy on the surface doesn’t mean that there aren’t unforeseen pitfalls lurking around the corner. Remain on guard this week.

David Geffen ‘Invented’ and dazzling on PBS By Across Liz Smith Media Servicespart 1Tribune Name thought

Down betters. He discovered and shove in 2016, he’ll be back inGo ahead, make your Expect the unexpected. day. Resolve to be selfish by doing Leave a bit of wiggle room in your adored singer-songwriter Laura other hand, 1 EPA stat 35 Military bigwig their corner. On the whateverhe’ll bringsrun youfor the most enjoyment in the schedule to account for unforeseen surprises in 2 Aptlyand namedthis soda launched 37 Daydream to mean “father 36 Theoretical Nyro his maybe not - maybe week to come. Your time is usually rationed by your the week ahead. It would be to your benefit to make a brand 38 Sartre, for one of many” extreme “The Medici of rock ‘n’ roll!” master-minding of 39 careers. 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Don’t envy another’s success, Geffen,” it didn’t emotionally Bob Dylan, make __”: Thoreau 44and FinalGeffen stage, as ofincluded 16 Novelof genre Close call (or you’ve been working on and you’ll be amazed especially when their gain benefits you as which the many49geniuses became super successfully Ono, the Youngbloods, Jackson 7 Squeaked by a career 17 20th-century 50 They’re at the fresh perspective you receive. Save decisionwell. Allow everyone time in the limelight and wish 8 Small part 45 Memorial tablet Genii) speaking onscreen about controversial and feared. Browne and Joni Mitchell) Add to Riyadh-born involved making until later in the week. them well this week. Your turn will come soon. 9 Wikipedia’s globe, 46 How batters David at the I e.g. won’t kill the suspense by this, Geffen’s “discovery” of Tom ruler Geffen, said this, inbut joints must bat party afterward in52 the elegant describing did Cruise and the hit of hits movie 18 Axes to grind Old pol. 10 Correct everything 48Geffen Gardening 19 divisions Nick of La1966Candlestick Grenouille restaurant, Mike on11his ladder to success;gadget suffice it “Risky Business.” His devotion to Make your choice Fog clouds the path Park highlight 54 Emmy-winning “Heartbreakers” 51 Hot stuffand Nichols rose and repeated it as to say it features Crosby, Stills theater, which grewcount. through his Don’t just flip a coin when faced ahead this week. There are many 12 Move from the 53 Old 21 Pier gp. NFL analyst one of his own favorite quotes Nash, the Eagles, his 18-month thea crucial late Michael decision. Take the time to do variables that are obscured regarding a new edge 56 CBS maritime admiration ofwith 22 Correct Collinsworth of“Ithe ofof the love affair with Cher, drama the Guns Bennett,your the Broadway movie homework and figure out which option is best. endeavor. It may be better to wait until events unfold 13 “The Odds 23 give night. up!” That55part Subject an 57 Hair treatments Business experience, will be the top priority and you have more facts, before starting anything documentary simplyannual covered RosesMe”saga, through the “Dreamgirls” and this week. 24 Inclement contest and Against autobiographer 60 J et al. new. weather sounds held in Brooklyn the “how potent cheap music” creation of Asylum and Electra ongoing - Geffen’s coming out as John Tribune Media Services 2012 26 Early L.A. Times 58 Suppress part of Geffen’s life. The film Records on to his experiences gay, and his devotion plus millions 14 1956 Moses publisher 59 Ambushed player Bros., where he ended goes on to show us the premium at Warner donated to the AIDS cause. Harrison Gray _ 61 “1984” __ bath the mansion that the truth-telling of show up20buying If perhaps you think we 28 Acronymous executive superstate 21 __ facto business, Hollywood’s first late Jack Warner observers on the fringe of this gun 62 Sonvery of Aaron 25 Shortened, in a had built. (He 29 Old Turkish 63 Arrival business billionaire, and time howfor hadn’t 1 percent entertainment world wayread about the moguls of leader the fashionably 27 Certain Eur. he became a figment of his own Hollywood formiss nothing!) shouldn’t be going to parties 31 “The Curse of late? 30 Old Nair imagination. The fi lm more or less treads like the one held after at La Capistrano” hero 64 Diminishes alternative This missions? two-hour film on the life softly on the disrupted friendship Grenouille - well, the rich, social 32 Density symbols, 33 Small in physics ofBaseball Geffenglove will be shown on PBS and partnership between Geffen and effective also have to live.This 34 in the “American Masters” series and Steve Ross, but as we know, room full of what hasn’t curdled on Nov. 20. And, forever after, it in the end the young executive in the cream de la cream has will become partPof r ethe v i fiorst-rate u s p u zGeffen z l e ’ s overcame a n s w e r s the free- given and established enormous lexicon of director-producer wheeling Ross. charities. Show business Susan Lacy’s oeuvre. (She has This documentary proves that produces multimillionaires who already given two decades to PBS two hours is hardly long enough are much more generous than and covered Leonard Bernstein, to cover the exploits of Geffen any other group. (I’ll just cite Lionel Hahn/Abaca Press Martha Graham, Julia Child, Judy who eventually surprised the two who were there, Geffen and Director Mike Nichols. Garland, Billie Holiday, Charlie world by becoming the creator, Marlo Thomas.) Chaplin, Norman Mailer, Johnny with Steven Spielberg and Jeffrey I won’t insult you by saying, Carson, Lucille Ball, George Katzenberg, of a new studio “everybody who was anybody effective head, Neal Shapiro, believe madness. rev i o u s p u Peggy z z l e ’ s I’d a nbegin s w e rto s worry a tiny bit. I She didn’t indicate any of this Balanchine, Jasper Johns and named DreamWorks. was there.”PBut partymaker John Lennon. I can’t even begin What’s wonderful is that Siegal produced a bonanza of VIP predict the talented Ms. Lacy to me. I am just using my 47 to name them all.) today Geffen is still young, fresh- names with the help of Charles might escape the public TV rat percent intuition. I liked my own So, David Geffen, a slim little looking, confident, attractive Masson, who owns La Grenouille, race for a more conventional, encounter with the auspicious kid who escaped Brooklyn to and yet ever the same - a hard the absolute last of the best of high-profile, moneymaking subject, David Geffen. I said to fulfill his dream in Hollywood, bargainer, smarter than everyone the inheritance handed down type of film. I think she is ready him: “David, I have known you P r e v i o u for s pmany u z z lyears. e ’ s Iadidn’t n s w eknow r s you becomes a maestro of the rock else, realistic and dreamlike in by Henri Soule, the man who for a feature movie employing generation after starting as an combo, exerting his unending made French food so American. unusual talents. (Her Jumbles: films look were so important!” He laughed agent. “What does an agent do?” care for friends and his So everyone ate great things and absolutely marvelous!) She’d and answered:“Oh, yes, you did!” •MOURN •WRATH •COUPLE •RENDER he asked, at first. implacable will against his foes. sat with someone fascinating - I, be ready for the trials, too, of a Answer: “Nothing,” came the reply. So (The Clintons are given a little with the down-to-earth Susan commercial feature using actors (E-mail Liz Smith at MES3838@aol. When the campers got caught in a heavy cloudburst, it he ended up at William Morris, of this up-and-down treatment Lacy and her husband, landscape and artists because that’s what com.) felt like -- A “DROWN” POUR learning to read letters upside in the documentary, but I am architect Mark Razum. she is doing anyway - showing (c)2012 TRIBUNE MEDIA down from the desks of his betting when push comes to If I were PBS’s genial and us the greats in all their make- SERVICES, INC.

Sudoku

TOP POP ALBUMS November 11 through November 17 TITLE

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Night Train Babel Dreams and Nightmares good kid: m.A.A.d city Miracle

TOP DVD RENTALS November 11 through November 17

TOP COUNTRY ALBUMS November 11 through November 17 ARTIST

Taylor Swift Various artists Baby Ne-Yo Aerosmith Jason Aldean Mumford & Sons Meek Mill Kendrick Lamar Third Day

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Red Night Train On This Winter’s Night Tornado Cheers, It’s Christmas Christmas with Scotty McCreery

Hope on the Rocks Tailgates & Tanlines Chief Blown Away

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Taylor Swift Jason Aldean Lady Antebellum Little Big Town Blake Shelton Scotty McCreery Toby Keith Luke Bryan Eric Church Carrie Underwood

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Marvel’s The Avengers Marvel’s The Avengers The Amazing Spider-Man Sony Pictures Dark Shadows Warner Bros. Madagascar 3 Paramount Pictures Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Killer 20th Century Fox The Expendables 2 Lionsgate The Cabin in the Woods Lionsgate Brave Walt Disney Pictures Prometheus 20th Century Fox Rock of Ages Warner Bros.


22

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

Real Estate & Business

Avoid the ‘fight to be right’ to get results Q. I’m an avid reader of this column and am puzzled by why you so often recommend telling coworkers they are right in an argument. I think the truth is important. I always speak my mind. Do I have to pick between making my point and being effective at work? A. Yes, being right and being effective are mutually exclusive choices. When you fight to be right, you guarantee the other person is now at risk of being wrong. Most normal people will then engage in a power struggle with you that will not end in you getting what you want. Clients are always telling me how enlightening it is to find out they are not the only person on the planet who is emotionally insecure at times. Many people don’t realize that everyone in their workplace is walking around wanting to avoid ever

feeling they are inadequate or bad. W e accidentally trigger these fears in our coworkers when we insist on being right. Unfortunately, most of your coworkers identify being right with being good and adequate. Thus, they will fight to the death to be right. If you understand this dynamic, you will become a black belt at workplace politics. You will probably be the only one in your workplace who can emotionally afford to be wrong ... and then get what you want. Most people around you will actually give away what they originally wanted if you will just let them be right. I’ve had executive coaching

clients who have spent years arguing with me about why it is necessary for them to be right. Then one day, they allow the other person to be right and quickly get what they want. Realize there is a long, long checkout line at work of people who will do just about anything to be right. Consider whether you’d rather be in an area with no line with people who can tolerate being wrong and effective. An excellent phrase to practice when a coworker wants to make you wrong is,“You may be right.” You’ll then be able to return to negotiating the outcome you desire because you allowed your coworker to win the power struggle for self-esteem. If you find it nearly impossible to let coworkers win right/wrong arguments, ask yourself what you hope to gain by winning? Anytime you get to be right,

you’ll still face the insecurity of being wrong in the future. Ask yourself what your long-term benefit is by winning one selfesteem power struggle. Now ask yourself what your long-term gain is when you let others be right and consistently get the result you prefer? Who do you figure has the most power and influence at work, the person who is right or the person who gets results? Yes, you’ll have to give up the emotional dessert of immediate satisfaction when you win an argument. However, as time goes by and you accumulate result over result, being right might seem much less delicious.

The last word(s) Q. I have a job I love and I am paid well. I listen to friends who complain about their jobs. Is it cheating to be making good

money to be paid to do what you enjoy? A. No, we do our best work at an activity that feels like adult play. Enjoying our work puts us in a state of creativity and passion for excellence - and that is exactly what others want to pay us for!

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2012 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Letting them in on financial secrets Dear Dave, I’m in a very fortunate position when it comes to my finances. I’m 25, and I make $50,000 a year. I’m also completely debt-free. In your opinion, when is it appropriate to let someone you’re dating know about your financial situation? Anonymous Dear Anonymous, Wow, you are in a great position for someone so young. I’m not sure how you got there, but it certainly wasn’t by being dumb or immature. I think it’s only natural in a dating situation to reveal more about oneself as time passes and the relationship gets deeper and more serious. In my mind, people who start throwing around financial information on a first

date are either extremely superficial or just plain weird. But after you’ve been dating a while, and definitely before you’re engaged, you should know everything about the other person.There should be complete disclosure. That’s called intimacy. There’s no room for skeletons in the closet when it comes to a healthy relationship. Just take your time and make sure you’re both committed to being open and honest about things. Then, as the relationship progresses, the depth of intimacy

and the depth of information will progress in all areas of your lives. —Dave

What’s the worst that can happen? Dear Dave, My wife and I want to do a livein/flip real estate purchase. The idea is to buy a fixer-upper and rent out the basement to help with the mortgage payments. What do you think about the idea? Brian Dear Brian, I love real estate. I’ve flipped a few houses too. But the particulars of the deal make me a little nervous. In a situation like this you need

to do a basic business analysis. You’ve got to have a plan and figure out the worst case scenario. Part of this is determining whether or not you can survive if things fall apart. In this case, the worst case is that you can’t get a renter and the house doesn’t sell. It puts your family in jeopardy if this happens, so to me it’s not an option. Honestly, I think you’ve got house fever right now. The possibility I just mentioned isn’t a rare occurrence. Lots of people have had the same idea, with the best of intentions, and still end up in a big mess. But if you and your wife are willing to accept the possibility of things not working out like you planned—and the fact that you might have to take additional jobs for an unknown period of time just to make ends

meet—then it might be a play. Me? I don’t like putting myself into skinof-my-teeth positions intentionally. When I wore a younger man’s clothes, I was willing to do stuff and ignore the risk involved.Going broke years ago knocked that out of me in a hurry.Any deal that runs the risk of leaving you bankrupt, or the victim of a foreclosure, just isn’t worth it! —Dave * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 5 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 333 MACON AVENUE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (BROWN WOOD SIDED ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH TWO CAR DETACHED GARAGE). On the 19th day of December, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC Plaintiff V. ILIANA C.MARIN Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 731 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 123,974.17 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g) (1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/22, 11/29, 12/6

23

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 493 N. Elle Street Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single Family Home). On the 19th day of December, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Plaintiff V. Consuelo Villalobos; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 6117 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-32942 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/22, 11/29, 12/6

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 409 HOLDEN AVENUE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENCE). On the 12th day of December, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: TCF NATIONAL BANK Plaintiff V. ELIZABETH GARCIA F/K/A ELIZABETH ZARAZVA; AQUA FINANCE, INC.; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 210 W. Birchwood Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 (Residential). On the 19th day of December, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Holders of the HSI Asset Securitization Corporation Trust 2006-HE1 Plaintiff V. Roberta A. Friedman a/k/a Roberta Friedman; et. al. Defendant.

Case No. 12 CH 2231 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Case No. 09 CH 5269 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g) (4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

For Information Please Contact:

David T. Cohen & Associates, Ltd. 10729 West 159th Street Orland Park, IL 60467 708-460-7711 708-460-3426 (fax)

Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-09-33426

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/15, 11/22, 11/29

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/22, 11/29, 12/6


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Plaintiff,

Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Holders of the HSI Asset Securitization Corporation Trust 2006-HE1 Plaintiff,

GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC Plaintiff, vs. ILIANA C.MARIN Defendant. No. 12 CH 731 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 24th day of July, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 19th day of December, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: LOT 7, IN BLOCK 7, IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NUMBER 9, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO A PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 17, 1966 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R66-3911, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 333 MACON AVENUE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: BROWN WOOD SIDED ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH TWO CAR DETACHED GARAGE P.I.N.: 11-04-04-107-007 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 123,974.17 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 11/22, 11/29, 12/6

vs. Consuelo Villalobos; et. al. Defendant. No. 10 CH 6117 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 18th day of July, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 19th day of December, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: LOT 152 IN MARQUETTE’S ESTATES - PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 11, 2003 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2003-084680, AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED APRIL 20, 2004 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2004067439, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 493 N. Elle Street Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 02-32-310-015 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-32942 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 11/22, 11/29, 12/6

vs. Roberta A. Friedman a/k/a Friedman; et. al. Defendant. No. 09 CH 5269

Roberta

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 20th day of June, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 19th day of December, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: PARCEL 1: UNIT 1-20-2, IN HONEYTREE SUBDIVISION UNIT NO. ONE, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JULY 11, 1972, AS DOCUMENT NO. R72-19368, AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED OCTOBER 31, 1972 AS DOCUMENT NO. R72-31828, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PARCEL 2: EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS APPURTENANT TO PARCEL 1 AS SET FORTH IN DECLARATION OF EASEMENTS, RESTRICTIONS, COVENANTS, AND CONDITIONS RECORDED DECEMBER 21, 1972, AS DOCUMENT NO. R72-37074, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 210 W. Birchwood Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Residential P.I.N.: 12-02-27-103-017 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-09-33426 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 11/22, 11/29, 12/6

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS TCF NATIONAL BANK Plaintiff, vs. ELIZABETH GARCIAF/K/AELIZABETH ZARAZVA; AQUA FINANCE, INC.; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. No. 12 CH 2231 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 17th day of July, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 12th day of December, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: LOT 15 IN BLOCK 7 IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION UNIT 3, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF SECTION 33, AND THE WEST 1/2 OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 3, 1959 IN PLAT BOOK 31, PAGES 55 AND 56, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 872683, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 409 HOLDEN AVENUE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENCE P.I.N.: (12) 02-33-406-015-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: David T. Cohen & Associates, Ltd. 10729 West 159th Street Orland Park, IL 60467 708-460-7711 708-460-3426 (fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 11/15, 11/22, 11/29


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 29, 2012

Romeoville 11-29-12  

Romeoville 11-29-12

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