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INSIDE

SPORTS Spartans want to win a state title

www.romeovillebugle.com

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NEWS IDOT considers express lanes on I-55

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Our Village, Our News

NOVEMBER 8, 2012

Vol. 7 No. 18

Work begins on new athletic center New facility will house an indoor soccer field, basketball courts and conference rooms. By Laura Katauskas Staff reporter

Calling it a day of renaissance, more than 100 residents, and local and state officials came out to celebrate the ground breaking of the Romeoville Athletic and Events Center, the first development in the plan for a new downtown area 10 years in the making. “This is an exciting day for the village of Romeoville—it is the renaissance of the downtown,” said Village Manager Steve Gulden. “It is in fact a new beginning… We have been at work for this for a very long time. This will evolve to become a community space that will have people coming from all over Romeoville and beyond.”

Design plans for the new 66,000-squarefoot center include an indoor soccer field with cross-field capabilities, two basketball courts and conference rooms. Village officials believe the multipurpose center will attract various events like boat shows or convention type events, and, in turn, bring the traffic to the area that has sought revitalization for the past decade. “As the first component in the downtown redevelopment project, the new athletic center will be a catalyst for economic development by attracting attendees from around the region who will contribute to the local economy,” said Mayor John Noak. “It is our expectation that this center will encourage additional restaurants and See ATHLETIC CENTER, page 3

Laura Katauskas/Bugle Staff

Trustees Sue Micklevitz and Ken Griffin, Mayor John Noak, clerk Bernice Holloway, and trustee Dick Richards pictured during ground breaking of athletic center.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

ATHLETIC CENTER Continued from page 1 commercial/retail development in the downtown area as well as reinvestment along the Route 53 corridor.” While the center itself was enough for officials and residents alike to boast about, it was the mark of this new beginning that brought the community out to witness the rebirth of an area that had always been meant for a downtown since its origin as Hampton Park in 1961. “This has just been a field of green grass for years—now we can hope for more traffic and people to come back to the area,” said Pat Considine, owner of Flexible Pavement, a business still standing in the area. I took a risk staying here. But I grew up here. I wanted to stay here. Now we can start to see the kids come back here.” The property, a section of 9.5 acres within the Spartan Square Development, was purchased by the village in 2008 and borders Route 53 on the east; Townhall

Drive on the west, Phelps Ave on the north; and Alexander Ave on the South. “Over the past decade, Romeoville has flourished but with much growth toward Weber Road,” said Rick Hitchcock, president of Hitchcock Design, who has been working on various downtown redevelopment plans since 2004.“Yet, here we had this great traditional frame here off of Route 53, yet instead of a place where the community came together, we saw the area languish. …But clearly the objective to build a new center has come together with a community-wide appeal and the support of surrounding neighbors.” Once completed, the village envisions a village square that will serve as a gathering place as well as space for future community events. “The village intends to remain fiscally responsible in order to make this project successful and will always remain resident driven,” said Noak, acknowledging the work done over the years by the volunteer, resident Downtown Redevelopment Committee. For those committee members it was pure excitement to see the

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Laura Katauskas/Bugle Staff

Mayor John Noak speaks to crowd during ground breaking ceremony.

dirt finally turn and symbolize the start of a mission they are set to complete and one that will mark history. “It is just so exciting for this neighborhood—for this town, for Will County,” said Shirley Pergler, resident since 1961. “We had a vision and we stayed with it. We never gave up.”

Still others said the process was painfully slow,but now can eagerly anticipate a new beginning. In poignant speeches to mark the occasion, all principals of the project, including Hitchcock, the Architect Daniel Atilano and Contractor Pat Harbour Jr., applauded the village on its fiscal responsibility,commenting on the

village’s solvency and dedication to investing efficiently. As construction proceeds on the athletic center, plans continue for the existing retail center to be demolished once all leases have been honored. The completion date for the new Athletic and Event Center is anticipated in December 2013.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

Symphony of Lights Village, Promenade holiday event celebrates 6 years By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

There is no other brighter sign the holiday season is upon us than the switching on of holiday lights, and there is no other show in the area quite like the “Symphony of Lights” at the Promenade. For its sixth year, the village of Bolingbrook and the Promenade have partnered to mark the beginning of the holiday season with an opening show of the famed “Symphony in Lights.” The opening includes an entire day filled with holiday festivities beginning at 3 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 10. Activities will continue throughout the afternoon, ending with the lighting of the Christmas tree at 6:30 p.m. and the first Symphony in Lights

show of the 2012 Holiday Season at dusk. Holiday activities will include traditional visits with Santa, carriage rides, gingerbread contest, kids’ holiday crafts and story telling, ice sculpture demonstration, live Santa reindeers, a live Nativity scene, and a mitten and food drive. Nightly Symphony in Lights shows will continue at dusk on the hour until 9 p.m. through Dec. 31. The production is the largest commercial holiday light show of its kind, featuring more than 250,000 highly efficient LED lights embedded in thousands of feet of holiday foliage and choreographed to the music of the Trans-Siberian Orchestra. The show is created with 1,100 channels of computer

programming and 60 computers. The three-song program takes approximately 54,000 clicks on a computer mouse and requires approximately 50 miles of wire to run the electricity.   Promenade officials said in a press release that “Symphony in Lights” is called the largest, most energetic, innovative, public holiday light show in the country that twinkles and shimmers as it illuminates the million-square-foot Promenade Bolingbrook Shopping Center in Bolingbrook. Spectators will experience an “in the round” viewing phenomenon, as 40 “life-sized” snowflakes dance around a massive 48-foot tall tree in the center’s Village Green gathering area. LED lights at the shopping center run the entire show on the amount of

energy needed to power only one average-sized home. Creator, Carson Williams of Mason, Ohio, first came to the attention of a national audience for decorating his home with Christmas lights synchronized to the music of the TransSiberian Orchestra. A video clip of his decorated home took the Internet by storm in 2005. The Internet frenzy resulted in an interview for Carson on NBC’s Today show, followed by a video of his holiday light show featured on a Miller Lite beer commercial and now, for the sixth year in a row, at The Promenade Bolingbrook. The management team from the Promenade actually was caught up in the frenzy of the light show when it first aired as well and had tracked Williams

down to inquire if they could work with him. A deal was struck, and The Promenade partnered Williams with a designer, Parker 3D, which made the actual snowflakes. There are only three shows like it, and The Promenade owns the rights to the only one in Illinois. Sponsored by Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital, the collaboration on “The Symphony in Lights Show” at The Promenade Bolingbrook involved more than 75 people in six states and includes 60 miles of electrical wire; one-half mile of steel cable; 6,000 ornaments and more than 1,000 hours of computer programming. Visit www. thepromenadebolingbrook. com for full details.

Ownership shifts for Bugle, Sentinel, Enterprise By Sherri Dauskurdas Staff Reporter

Bugle, Sentinel and Enterprise Newspapers welcomed new ownership this month, as the weekly suburban news chain was purchased by entrepreneur and community news advocate Ray Stanton. Stanton, a Canada native who owns 25 community newspapers in Illinois, Maine and Ontario, purchased the Plainfieldbased newspaper group Oct. 12. The group publishes weekly newspapers covering Joliet, Shorewood, Plainfield, Romeoville, Bolingbrook, Westmont, Downers Grove, Woodridge, Niles, Park Ridge and Morton Grove. “This group of papers is a value to the communities they serve,” Stanton said, adding he plans to keep the community

papers strong and dedicated to local news and events. To that end, he has retained Michael James, previously head of advertising for the newspaper group, as the company’s General Manager/ VP Advertising & Sales. A veteran of the west suburban community newspaper industry, James recently received the Illinois Press Association 2011 Advertising Sales Manager of the Year award at the group’s annual convention. “My new role is simply to make these award-winning newspapers the best and most profitable community newspapers in the counties we serve,” James said. The company, which will be renamed Enterprise Newspaper Corporation, also has named Nick Reiher to head up editorial operations for the Joliet Bugle.

Reiher also will continue as editor-in-chief of the Farmers Weekly Review in Will County, a position he has held since February. He has spent more than 25 years in Will and DuPage counties as both a reporter and editor.A Joliet resident, Reiher is also president of the Exchange Club of Joliet. “I am very happy to be managing editor of the Joliet Bugle,” Reiher said. “Community journalism will be at the forefront of the revitalization of the newspaper industry, and I want to remain at the forefront of community journalism. That will be our mission at the Bugle.” Voyager Media, which previously owned the newspaper group, purchased the Bugle Newspapers in 2003 and subsequently the Enterprise and Sentinel.


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County offers IDOT officials consider cash to catch express toll lanes on I-55 heroin dealers By Robin Ambrosia Staff Reporter

By Sherri Dauskurdas Staff Reporter

Education about heroin is everywhere, from schools to churches, hospitals to kitchen tables. But starting this month, community efforts turn from education to enforcement, as police and prosecutors look to residents for assistance in nabbing drug dealers. The Illinois State Crime Commission, in partnership with Will County prosecutors, will begin offering $1,000 cash rewards in exchange for information leading to the arrest and conviction of anyone who provides heroin to a juvenile in Will County. The program was piloted by the ISCC in DuPage County earlier this year, as heroin distribution cascaded across the western suburbs. In October, Will County surpassed its record heroin deaths, reaching 31. DuPage reported 59 seizures

and undercover purchases in 2011. Naperville alone had 47 heroin arrests last year. The alarming rate of growth has caused communities to take notice, and take aim, at dealers, users and sources of the drug. Law enforcement officials say, Interstate 88 corridor has become known as the “the heroin highway,” and the potentially deadly drug is being exported from Cook County into Will and DuPage counties. Further, use of social media, a societal acceptance of similar prescription opiates and the low cost to get high have allowed heroin to become a sweeping scourge across communities, regardless of race, gender or socioeconomics. The reward program is designed to work as a complement to the Will County’s Narcotics Prosecution Unit, which has won convictions against 146 heroin dealers, including 46 dealers in 2012.

State transportation officials have proposed using shoulders along Interstate 55 between Interstate 355 and Interstate 90/94 to increase the flow of traffic during peak hours. “Currently, we have three lanes in each direction, so we are looking to maximize the use of the existing shoulder to add a fourth managed lane,”John Baczek,Illinois Department of Transportation Project and Environmental Studies Section Chief said at a recent open house.“Shoulders are wide enough for buses already along certain portions, so let’s see if we can be creative using what we have while realizing we don’t have a lot of money.” Implementation of a managed lane along I-55 between I-355 and I-90/94 would convert the existing shoulder lane in both directions to be an express toll lane, a highoccupancy vehicles lane or a combined high occupancy toll lane. The proposed project is in phase one of a three-phase process.This

phase includes collecting and analyzing data, including traffic, safety, population, employment and issuing environmental documentation. Baczek said they are several months into the first phase, which he said will last two years. The current issues being addressed on I-55 are the existing long-term traffic, operational and safety needs along that the corridor. Phase-two is developing a purpose and need plan, contract

plan preparation and land acquisition. “We need to analyze what is the market for the corridor and what usage would make the most sense,” Baczek said.“We are looking to the concept of a managed lane, which is being used in other large cities.” Minneapolis has designed an express toll lane for solo drivers to use by paying an electronic toll. It is open 6 to 10 a.m. and 3 to 7 p.m. weekdays, then open to general See EXPRESS, page 8


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination. Derrick Voris, 22, 483 Linda Lane, Lynwood, Alyssa Rosin, 22, 4724 Orrefors Court, Joliet, Damitre Thomas, 26, 959 John Street, Joliet, and Keith Bell, 22, 228 Williamsburg Court, were all arrested at 1:20 a.m. on Oct. 17 and charged with the possession of cannabis near the 1200 block of Lakeview Drive.

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Fatima Hernandez, 19, 711 Geneva, was arrested at 6:53 a.m. on Oct. 19 and charged with driving without a driver’s license, hit and run, an uninsured motor vehicle and failure to reduce speed near Naperville Drive and Six Pines Drive.

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Sherman Cleveland, 22, 4700 Gilson, Plainfield, was arrested at 7:14 p.m. on Oct. 19 and charged with the unlawful use of a weapon and no FOID card on the 1200 block of Lakeview Drive.

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Diallo Brown, 24, 4700 Gilson, Plainfield, was arrested at 7:14 p.m. on Oct. 19 and charged with possession of cannabis on the 1200 block of Lakeview Drive.

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Isaiah Young, 22, 4700 Gilson, was arrested at 7:14 p.m. on Oct. 19 and charged with a Will County FTA warrant on the 1200 block of Lakeview Drive.

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Alex Vasquez, 18, 21713 Inverness Drive, Plainfield, was arrested at 1:06 a.m. on Oct. 21 and charged with driving with a suspended license, fleeing/eluding a police officer, possession alcohol, speeding, an uninsured motor vehicle, resisting and disobeying stop signs near Lancaster and Taylor Road.

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Rex Moss, 41, 140 Ashbury, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 10:43 p.m. on Oct. 22 and charged with battery on the 1100 block of Independence Boulevard.

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Antoinette Hearns, 20, 1461 Pioneet Road, Crest Hill, was arrested at 8:24 p.m.

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Police Blotter

on Oct. 23 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of Weber Road. Ashley Barr, 18, 13923 s. Oakdale Court, Plainfield, was arrested at 3:19 p.m. on Oct. 23 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of Weber Road.

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Wyatt, 42, 601 10 Robert Hamrick Ave, was arrested at 5:55p.m on Oct. 23 and charged with retail theft, DUI, flee an officer, reckless driving, uninsured, speeding, improper lane use, possession of a controlled substance on the 200 block of Weber Road.

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Kerr, 51, 6144 N. 11 Christine Gregory Road, Fowlerville,

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MI, was arrested at 8:40 p.m. on Oct. 24 and charged with DUI, uninsured motor vehicle, and failure to reduce speed near Renwick Road and Route 53. A parent at a ball game in the area of Belmont and 135th Street reported a burglary from motor vehicle at 6:56 p.m. on Oct. 24. A duffle bag and its contents were taken from the vehicle. Estimated cost of the bag and its contents is $650.

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in the 400 block 13 Aofbusiness Weber Road reported

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a battery and a retail theft at 4:21 a.m. on Oct. 25. Unknown persons took merchandise from the business without paying the retail value of the merchandise.When confronted, they pushed a store employee. Estimated cost of the items taken is $1,769. 39, was arrested at 3:34 p.m. on Oct. 25 and charged with disorderly conduct on the 300 block of Eaton Avenue.

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Bumke, 14 Charles 301 Fremont Ave.,

Biros, 27, 539 15 Wayne Cermak Road, Braidwood, was arrested at 7:28 p.m. on Oct. 26 and charged with DUI, uninsured motor vehicle, possession of cannabis, paraphernalia, and a controlled substance on the 400 block of Weber Road. Poppleton, 27, 301 16 Donald ½ Eldora Avem Weeping Water, NE, was arrested at 7:28 p.m. on Oct. 26 and charged with DUI, driving with a suspended license, possession charged with DUI, uninsured motor vehicle, possession of

cannabis, paraphernalia, and a controlled substance on the 400 block of Weber Road. Norato, 29, 17 Miguel Southport Court,

1962 was arrested at 7:33 a.m. on Oct. 26 and charged with failure to yield, driving with a revoked license near Enterprise Drive and Naperville Road. Bennie Williams, 55, homeless, was arrested at 5:03 p.m. on Oct. 26 and charged with solicitation and panhandling near the Weber Road and I-55 ramp.

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Vazquez, 31, 1796 19 Jesus Autumnwood Lane, was arrested at 3:02 a.m. on Oct. 27 and charged with a failure

to yield near Taylor Road and Weber Road. Noe Alarcon, 20, 325 Stuart Ave, Aurora, was arrested at 10:35 p.m. on Oct. 27 and charged with driving without a driver’s license, and an accident involving a non-injury near the 700 block of Weber Road. Arturo Gonzalez,23,15962 S. Weber Road, Lockport, was arrested at 2:40 p.m. on Oct 27 and charged with the possession of cannabis near Honeytree and Farmbrook.

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A resident in the 1300 block of Highpoint reported a theft at 10:40 a.m. on Oct. 28. Jewelry was taken from the residence. Estimated

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cost of the jewelry is $1,050. Black, 19, 23 Andrew Montclaire Court,

404 was arrested at 6:34 p.m. on Oct. 28 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of Weber Road. Julio Grimaldo, 18, 78 Rockledge Drive, was arrested at 3:48 p.m. on Oct. 28 and charged with retail theft on the 300 block of Weber Road.

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Diaz, 29, 5815 S. 25 Arturo Rose, Countryside, was arrested at 1:04 a.m. on Oct. 29 and charged with driving with a suspended license, an uninsured motor vehicle and speeding near Route 53 and Airport Road.


Forum What’s on your mind? You are invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to Matt Honold, managing editor, at mhonold@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy; just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@ buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your Cub Scout run a fundraiser car wash? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred.

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

General Manager V.P. Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Managing Editor sweditor@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Sherri Dauskurdas Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Jonathan Samples Robin Ambrosia Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Sports Reporter Mark Gregory mgregory@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Manager Pat Ryan pryan@enterprisepublications.com

www.facebook.com/thebuglenewspapers www.twitter.com/buglenewspapers

Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Enterprise Newspapers, Inc. 23856 Andrew Road #104 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication sweditor@buglenewspapers.com www.buglenewspapers.com Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 12 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 12 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

Illustrated Opinions

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

EXPRESS Continued from page 5 traffic the rest of each weekday and on weekends. Variable fees are based on traffic levels in the express lanes to ensure traffic flows 50 to 55 mph.Tolls also depend on where you enter and the length of your trip. The ETL signs read “open” when the lane is open to general traffic and a price when tolling is in effect. Baczek said the federal government is not promising any significant increases in funding, so currently only phase one is funded. As part of the planning process, IDOT will explore various ways to fund the construction of the project.A law in Illinois states that IPASS has to be compatible with any future toll roads. “If funding were available, phase two would take from two to three years,” Baczek said. “Right now, we only have funding for phase one only. If we did have funding for all

three, we’d be looking at a sixto seven-year project down the road.” Phase three is construction. IDOT is managing the consulting contracts and overall study and will act as a joint lead agency with Federal Highway Administration for the preliminary engineering and environmental study. “This study looks at longterm vision of traffic, safety and operations,” Baczek said. “We’ve been working with RTA and PACE. There are PACE buses currently moving along the shoulder in order to move transit along the corridor. “We are envisioning this corridor could include active lane management – each lane would be managed through technology. Individual overhead electric signs per lane would have either an ‘O’ for open or an ‘X’ for closed. Lanes could be closed to allow emergency vehicles through to an accident, too.” Interstate 55, formerly known as Route 66, was built as a major North–South route connecting St. Louis to Chicago metropolitan

News areas. During the 1970s, Route 66 was replaced by I-55. Many of the two-way service roads along I-55 were the original Route 66 lanes. IDOT has created a survey for rush hour drivers on I-55 to share their input. The survey includes multiple-choice questions such as whether you are a driver or passenger in the car, where do you enter and then exit I-55, what disruptions do you encounter and if you would pay a fee for a managed lane. There are three exits in DuPage County which are Lemont Road in Darien, Kingery Road in Willowbrook and County Line Road in Burr Ridge. The study and more information about the project can be found at: www.i55managedlaneproject. org/.Baczek said this project is separate from the current construction on I-55, which includes routine maintenance such as resurfacing, patching and pothole filling. “We did a robust resurfacing contract which is intended to last five to seven years, depending on truck volume,” Baczek said.

Peterson’s sister present during FBI search of Hammel Woods By Laura Katauskas Sherri Dauskurdas Staff Reporter

Illinois State Police are offering no official comment on a joint effort with the FBI that included a day-long search of Hammel Woods, near Shorewood Nov. 5. However, the presence of Cassandra Cales, sister of Stacy Peterson, has many presuming the effort was directed at locating the missing Bolingbrook mom. The search included dogs, a helicopter and personnel from state and federal authorities in the 400-acre Will County forest preserve. It concluded Monday evening. Monday’s unexplained search comes on the heels of a guilty verdict handed down in September for Peterson, who was convicted of killing his

third wife Kathleen Savio after she was found dead in a dry bathtub in 2004. Her death was originally ruled accidental until new suspicion arose after Drew’s fourth wife, Stacy Peterson, went missing in 2007. Drew Peterson was a suspect in her disappearance, but her body was never found. During the Savio court trial, testimony included hearsay testimony from a lawyer consulted by Stacy Peterson that said she claimed Drew Peterson killed Savio. Drew Peterson has maintained that she ran off with another man. At the time of the verdict, Will County State’s Attorney Jim Glasgow alluded to the fact that the investigation of both Stacy Peterson and Lisa Stebic would continue with new strength.


Calendar ONGOING 5th Annual Christmas Celebration Event— “Singing for Charity.” 12 to 3 p.m. at WJOL Radio Studios, 2410B Caton Farm Road. Marilyn’s Café Society Radio Show will broadcast live on 1340AM WJOL radio key community leaders, listeners, and others “sing for charity” featuring WJOL’s very own, Steve Brandy as special guest co-host. “Guest singers” (can include you) will raise a minimum of $100 to participate in this annual event/broadcast. Businesses can sponsor this broadcast for a minimum of $300 which entitles them to radio announcements, name/ logo on flyers, logo presence on Marilyn’s website, and a table for promotional items at the VIP Reception and studio broadcast. For more information, call 779456-0034. Holiday Coloring Contest. Nov. 1-25. Kids age twelve and under, pick up your holiday coloring sheets at the front desk and return by Tuesday, November 25th! Prizes will be awarded for first, second, and third place for age groups. All entries will be displayed at the Recreation Center beginning Monday, November 26th. Winners will be announced at Winter Wonderland on Friday, December 9th. All entries not picked up by Friday, December 21st will be removed. American Girl Fashion Show. The American Girl Fashion Show is a fun-filled event for girls and their families, friends and favorite dolls. Celebrate the experience of being a girl, whether yesterday or today, through a colorful presentation of historical and contemporary fashions. Hosted by Easter Seals Joliet Region. To benefit Children with Disabilities at Easter Seals Regional Pediatric Center. Event takes place between Nov. 16 and 18. If your daughter/ granddaughter is interested in

modeling, please contact Teresa Summers at 815-730-2052 Ext. 2. Golden Age Club. Thursdays noon to 4 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Department. Members must be 50 years and up to join, and may do so by coming to any Thursday meeting. Transportation is available by calling the Recreation Department at 815-886-6222 at least 24 hours before the event. For more information about the club, call Noel Maldonado at the Recreation Center. Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit environmental organization is dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815-834-1611. Birth After Cesarean. Meet other moms who are planning their natural birth after cesarean section. Come for encouragement, support and information to plan your next birth. Meetings at noon the first Monday every month in Romeoville. Contact Melanie at 253-861-5897 or VBACesarean@ aol.com Are you affected by someone’s drinking? Open meetings are held every third Friday of the month from 7 p.m.8:30 p.m. at 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. Contact Al-anon/Alateen at 815-773-9623 or visit www. niafg.org for more information. Large Food Pantry. Power Connection’s food pantry is open on the second and fourth Mondays of the month from 1 p.m.-6:45 p.m. at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. Enjoy your shopping experience. For a $20 donation you can shop the aisles of canned/boxed goods, drinks, desserts, snacks,

breads, fruits & vegetables. You will also receive a pre-selected bag of meat. There is no income verification and ALL residents of Illinois are welcome. The Resale Connection is also open from 9 a.m.-6:45 p.m. on those Mondays. Donations accepted Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Call (630) 679-6899 or visit www.thepowerconnection.org for more information.

NOVEMBER 8 Get Organized, Stay Organized, and Save Money! 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. Have you ever had to pay an extra charge on a credit card or bill because you paid it late? Do you ever run to the grocery store (again!) to pick up a few things that you forgot the last time you shopped? These practices cost you time and money. Learn how to get organized, stay organized, and save money in the process! Lots of tips and great ideas will be offered, and you will feel in control of your life! Join Beth Randall of Joe Organizer for this great, no cost program. Call, e-mail, or stop by in person to register. For more information, call 815-886-2030.

NOVEMBER 9 Popcorn and movies. Noon to 2 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Department. Bring your friends or make new ones

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012 at this active living program for residents aged 50 and up. Fee is $1 per person, and includes popcorn and refreshments prior to the movie.To register to attend, contact the Romeoville Recreation Department at 815866-6222.

NOVEMBER 10 Microsoft Word 2010 Level 2. 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library,201W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. Build up your Word skills with this class. Learn about find and replace, headers and footers, automatic page numbers, page breaks, advanced formatting, bullet points and numbers, spelling and grammar checking, and more. Basic computer and Word skills are required before taking this class. Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. Call, visit, email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets in the Computer Lab.

NOVEMBER 11 Relating to someone with Alzheimer’s. As Alzheimer’s disease and dementia progress, friends and family members may find it difficult to spend time visiting with the person with dementia. This program will provide insight into dementia and its effect on communication and behavior, and will introduce participants to techniques they can use to make visits more

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comfortable and meaningful for all concerned. Registration is free, but required. To register, call Mickey Peterson of the Alzheimer’s Association at 815744-0804. Veteran’s Day. 10 a.m. Edward “Doc” McCartan Veteran’s Memorial Garden, 11 Montrose Dr.

NOVEMEBR 13 Teen Crafts : Mini Book Charms. 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. Make your own handmade miniature book charm. Forget crocheted doilies and itchy knit sweaters! Get your craft on with practical, simple, and decidedly unboring projects for everyone. Grades 7-12. Microsoft Word 2010 Level 2. 2 to 3 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. Build up your Word skills with this class. Learn about find and replace, headers and footers, automatic page numbers, page breaks, advanced formatting, bullet points and numbers, spelling and grammar checking, and more. Basic computer and Word skills are required before taking this class. Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. Call, visit, See CALENDAR, page 12


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

Schools

Preparing for College

Counselors say be prepared and have a plan By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

‘Tis the season for college admissions applications, and schools like Bolingbrook High School are offering “college nights” to help students and parents delve into all the research and paperwork that a college application requires. Local libraries are hosting college fairs, and local universities will be offering seminars on how to navigate the process. Most families that find themselves in turmoil are those that are truly ignorant of the process. Once you become educated on how the system works, things will go much smoother, explains Ryan Cockerill, Director of Admissions at Lewis University in Romeoville.

BHS recently hosted its senior parent night, with breakout sessions for more than 200 participants on choosing the right college and how to pursue college applications. Chris Breen, Director of Guidance at BHS, said this year the school offered a different format with smaller workshops in answer to parent and student’s interests. Timing is key, counselors agree, especially noting that each college has its own set of deadlines. Breen warns that deadlines have now moved up as well and that submitting information as soon as possible is paramount. “The biggest unknown is that there is a secret out there, the priority deadline—yet no one knows for sure when it is,” said Breen. “It is a date colleges internally use to put certain

students who meet that deadline into a certain category. My advice is to always get your information in as early as possible so you are not left out of the process.” What used to be due in December or January in the past, is now most likely due in November as colleges have more applications to deal with, counselors explain. “There is no excuse to miss a deadline with the availability of online tools,” said Cockerill. …” But he also advises that while many colleges look good online, it is wise to visit the college campus to see if it truly fits with your personality before you apply. Another question, Cockerill denotes in what he calls the “Duh!” category that some surprisingly miss, is if a student is dead set on a particular major,

make sure the school offers that major and note what ACT scores or grades are needed to pursue that field. “It basically comes back to do your homework online and make sure you note each school’s requirements,” said Cockerill. “If you have a question, send an email. In most cases, you will get a near immediate response.” Cockerill suggests checking out these websites critical in helping prepare for college— www.collegezone.com that covers all aspects of what is needed for a prospective college student and www.iacac.org that lists every college and resource fair throughout Illinois. BHS also has college counseling tips on its website at www. bhs.org under the Guidance Department. “We do not want any students

to be blindsided—we encourage students and parents to start doing their homework early, even in freshman year,” said Breen. “Parents and students can come to the college/career center anytime it is open or call to make an appointment.We will work with everyone who needs it.” But applying to college is only the first step. More hurdles are on the way—the road to financial aid. Typically, students need to seek out help with financial aid and scholarships in January. BHS is planning a financial aid night for January 23 and a FAFSA completion night on February 6 in which parents and students will work in the computer lab and complete the FAFSA using their financial documents. Lewis University will offer a similar evening.

30 questions to ask a college representative Academics

Career Services

What majors or degrees do you offer? Are online classes available? What percent of your students graduate? Do you have internship programs? Will I have an adviser to help me with scheduling and degreerelated questions? How difficult is it to schedule the class schedule I need? Do you offer tutoring services if I need them? How accessible are instructors?

What career services assistance do you offer? Which companies hire your graduates? What is your placement rate? Will you help me find a part-time job while I attend school?

Admissions What in your application deadline? What standards do you use for acceptance? Do I need to take an entrance exam? When may I tour your campus?

Student Life How many students are enrolled? What is the average class size? How big is the largest class? Do you have student organizations and activities?

Financial Aid What type of financial aid is available to me? Is an adviser available to help me with my financial aid application? Do you have a financial aid application deadline? Are scholarships available? What is the total cost, including books, fees, and tuition?

Technology Can I take classes online? What equipment and software am I required to have? Does each student have access to a computer during class time? Does your college have a student Intranet? Will I have an email account and access to the Internet? Courtesy, Rasmussen College


taKe 5 C ro s s w o rd P u z z l e

Across

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

H o ro s c o p e s The new you is not necessarily bigger, but in many ways better. Sometimes, the thing that comes around the corner and surprises you is better than what you planned. Embrace original ideas in the week ahead.

Fill up the virtual bank. Remaining fair and open-minded wins influential friends and assistance that can be banked upon. If you think a deal is too good to be true, ask for advice from mentors this week.

Rituals bring comfort. Whether it is a roast beef dinner with family or putting on makeup before heading to the gym, you can find ways to improve your mood in the week ahead.

Pay attention to the inspirations that pop into your head. You are at your best when you have a congenial companion by your side sharing life’s joys. In the upcoming week, cooperation is the key.

Play your trump card. When people are bluffing, it is much easier to win the pot. You might find the answer or advice you need. In the week to come, show how well you can lead others with winning ways.

Turn the calendar to the wall and leave the wristwatch in the drawer. Don’t measure time spent with family, pets or pursuing your favorite hobby in the week to come. The happiest times can be endless.

Put the pout away. This week may offer you many opportunities to mend fences and listen to heartfelt apologies. Rethink how you’re dealing with personal or financial situation to set things right.

Be observant. Some people see more in a walk around the block than others see in a trip around the world. In the week ahead, be sure to keep an eye peeled for opportunities to improve your life.

Turn on the fog lights. You could be challenged to endorse values and beliefs without having a clear picture of exactly what you are backing. Cut through confusion in the upcoming week.

A wise man said that you can never stand in the same river twice. The more you try to stop progress, the more likely it will rush past you. In the week ahead, be willing to bend with the current.

Team up to take the lead. Family members appreciate your wisdom and may come to you for advice this week. Your unique perspective may encourage others to take the right step and vice versa.

The inside track provides the shortest distance to the finish line. You might think you are going in circles in the week ahead, but careful analysis and measurements will provide you with encouragement.

Down

1 “Les __” 4 As a friend, in French 9 Actor Romero 14 N.L. West team, on scoreboards 15 Noble gas 16 Latin stars 17 MLK birthday month 18 Method of looking for keys? 20 Relay race closer 22 Peace Prize winner Wiesel 23 Wide shoe size 24 Love god 26 Working parts 28 Finishing by the deadline, sometimes 32 Computer pioneer Lovelace 33 Young newt 34 Many Semites 38 Reveal 40 Knight’s ride 43 Harald V’s capital 44 Capital on the Willamette 46 Future fish 47 World games org.

48 Bad-mouthing someone 53 Food packaging unit 56 German river 57 Soccer star Freddy 58 In __: moody 60 Like Chris and Pat, genderwise 64 Call waiting diversion 67 Big name in kitchen gadgets 68 Violet lead-in 69 Steve of country 70 Nth degree 71 Eyelid annoyances 72 In small pieces, as potatoes 73 Punk rock offshoot

1 Whom Goya painted both nude and clothed 2 OPEC cofounder 3 Penultimate element, alphabetically 4 Encourage 5 Couch disorders 6 Raggedy gal 7 Speck of dust 8 How perjurers may be caught 9 Concerto highlight 10 Sixth sense, briefly 11 Brisket source 12 Curved 13 Works in the garden 19 Lofted iron 21 Villainous laugh syllable 25 Acre’s 43,560: Abbr. 27 Prefix with space 28 Fashion statements in the ‘hood 29 “Eureka!” elicitor 30 Sass 31 Early

development sites? 35 2-Down’s location 36 Political group 37 __ puppet 39 Actor Jared 41 Ages and ages 42 He succeeded Coty as French president 45 Latin percussion pair 49 Plastic surgeon’s job, for short 50 Sharper, as eyes 51 Smoothed in a shop 52 Hosp. picture 53 “The Stranger” author 54 X-rated 55 Hale 59 Pad __: Asian noodle dish 61 A portion (of) 62 Chckup 63 Loe letter closing, and in sequence, a hint to the ends of 18-, 28-, 48- and 64-Across 65 Wrath 66 Hobbit enemy

Sudoku

J umble

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • CARGO • FETID • PRISON • BOYISH

Answer:

How the rock star ran for office -ON HIS “RECORD”

11


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

News CALENDAR

snacks. Who is the best gamer, we shall see.

Continued from page 9

Bolingbrook Women’s Club Meeting. 7:30 p.m. in the Nest at the Bolingbrook Golf Club, 2001 Rodeo Drive, Bolingbrook. The Bolingbrook Women’s Club will hold its general monthly meeting. At this event, participants can socialize and learn about the club’s activities. The club is a non-profit organization involved in the community through fund-raising events. For more information call Laura Voss at 630-429-5727 or visit http:// bolingbrookwomensclub. blogspot.com.

email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets in the Computer Lab.

NOVEMBER 14 Game Night. 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. GAME ON. It’s BACK! The triumphant return of Game Night, and this time we will be in our beautiful new Romeoville facility. Challenge your friends to games on the Wii and 360 while enjoying tasty

NOVEMBER 17 Home-Based Business Expo. 12 to 4 p.m. at Ashley Furniture Home Store, 875 E. Boughton Road, Bolingbrook. Free admission. Family Fun. Refreshments. Entertainment. Mad Hatter’s Tea Party. 1 to 2 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. Have you ever painted a rose, or played with a flamingo? Have you ever met a queen or talked to a rabbit? Alice did all these things as she journeyed through Wonderland and now so can you! Enjoy crafts, games and treats as we celebrate the day that Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was first published.


INSIDE: Romeoville announces fall sports Most Valuable Players, page 15; Parent accused of threatening coach, page 16

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

13

Bowlers looking for elusive state title By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

After two top 10 finishes at state, the Romeoville boys bowling team is hoping to take the next step. This year, it starts at the beginning of the season. The Spartans did not win a tournament last year and finished second in both the Southwest Prairie Conference and at the sectional meet for the second straight year. “This year we did say we want to win,” Romeoville coach Tony Talley said of taking home those titles. “We have had that taste of finishing second in the past two years.” A big reason for the lack of wins has been a lack of consistency throughout the season. “We are looking for more consistency this year,”Talley said. “We don’t want to start slow.We had a couple of second-place finishes (in tournaments) last year and were in the top five I think every tournament but one. But we always have that one bad game that brings us down.” Winning a tournament during the season should give them

that winning taste come the postseason. “I think that would help, especially with this group,” Talley stated.“We lose some key guys in Will Thompson and (AllStater) Corey McReady.They are looking to fill those roles. I am looking for our seniors, Brandon Lisak-Talley and Jacob Young to bring some leadership.” Joining the seniors in the lineup are juniors Dakota Vostry and Kyle Zaremba. Both have been regulars their past two years and Zaremba was a sectional champion as a freshman. “It is always helpful to have that experience,” Talley said. “I think that experience of state two years ago helped us last year. Hopefully that experience will continue this year and we can build off that.” Looking to compete for that fifth spot in the rotation is Corey Minchuk, Cody Surges and Steve Vaughn. “All three bowled on the junior varsity level last year,”Talley said. “Steve Vaughn bowled really well last year in the (JV) conference tournament.” With all of the experience combined with talented newcomers, a state title is on the

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Romeoville’s Dakota Vostry and the Spartans are shooting for a state title.

minds of the Spartans. “Our No. 1 goal is to bring a state championship back to

Romeoville,” Talley said. “We never had a team win a state championship in Romeoville

and we want to be the first team to do so.” staylor@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

Sports

Bolingbrook falls in Class 8A playoffs By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Repeating a state title run is not an easy task, especially under the adversity the Bolingbrook Raiders have gone through this season with having to replace nearly an entire defense as well as battle through the injury of quarterback Aaron Bailey. The Raiders were able to put themselves in position to defeat No. 1 seed Neuqua Valley Friday night, but it wasn’t in the cards, as the Wildcats knocked off the defending champs 4433 behind 346 yards and five touchdowns from running back Joey Rhattigan. “He is a powerful runner,” said Emile Wisdom, the lone senior and one of only two defenders from last year’s team. “He keeps his feet moving. I tried to strip the ball and he holds it like no other, like it’s his baby out there.The last runner that powerful that I faced was (JCA senior and USC-recruit) Ty Isaac in little league. “It is hard to swallow right now, but it has to end sometimes. I enjoyed the season and I love the guys I played with. We call each

other our family.” Bolingbrook opened the scoring on a 10-yard TD pass from Bailey to Brandon Lewis, but the back-and-forth started six minutes later when Rhattigan scored his first TD, a 22-yard run. A Jaden Huff run in the second quarter extended the Raider lead, but Rhattigan’s 90-yard answer put the Wildcats on top 14-13. Neuqua struck first in the second half on a seven-yard Rhattigan run, but Bailey answered with a 14-yard keeper for a TD and a one-yard sneak to put Bolingbrook back on top 2722. A Wildcat score late in the quarter gave them a 28-27 advantage. The Raiders then mounted a with a 64-yardTD drive that ended with Bailey’s 20-yard scoring run to go ahead 33-28. However, Rhattigan was not done, as he did his best Mike Alstott impression and carried six defenders into the end zone for the go-ahead score. After a dropped pass on what could have been the Raiders’ chance to get the lead back, Bailey was intercepted, giving

the ball back to the Wildcats. Rhattigan took the ensuing snap 57 yards to end the scoring. Despite obvious acceleration problems early in the game, Bailey rushed for 210 yards on 31 carries and ran for three scores. He was 7-of-17 passing for 76 yards and one score. “This means God’s will is done,” Bailey said of the game. “We wanted to win state, but we didn’t and that is OK. We knew it would come down to the last second, you always see that in NFL games and it was great to get that experience. (Neuqua Valley) is a great team. God bless them. I hope they win state.” Bailey said while it was obvious he wasn’t 100 percent, but he also said he played with no fear of getting reinjured. “You could tell I wasn’t at my actual speed, but I just tried to build it up,” Bailey said. “If you worry about getting hurt, you will get hurt.” Bailey had been on varsity all four years with Bolingbrook, seeing time his freshman year as a wide receiver and quarterbacking the team the past three seasons. “I thank God for this,” he said. “This is a great high school and it was a great four years. I truly had a lot of fun. People say high school flies by and it really does. I am glad I got to play here.” One of Bailey’s main targets the past two years, Chandler Piekarski (5 catches, 67 yards against Neuqua Valley) also will remember the great run he had as a Raider. “The team did their best, it just wasn’t meant to be,” he said. “I was surrounded by a great group of guys. You always shoot for the repeat, but the teams get tougher and tougher. The task is hard to do. “What happened last year is something that can’t be taken away from us. Unfortunately, the chance to repeat wasn’t meant to be, we just have to keep our heads up. I wouldn’t want to be in any other place than right here catching passes from Aaron. He is going to go places and when I grow up, I am going to tell my kids I played with him. It is going to be really fun to watch where he goes.” Bailey’s first stop in the University of Illinois, who are having a winless conference season and some are calling

Mark Gregory/Bugle staff

Bolingbrook’s Aaron Bailey returned to the field, but it was not enough as the Raiders fell 44-33 to Neuqua Valley.

for the termination of first-year coach Tim Beckman. That is something Bailey doesn’t worry about. “I just put it in God’s hands,” Bailey said. “If you read (all the message boards and reports) it just gets your head all discombobulated.” For players like Piekarski and Wisdom, they will look for their college in the next few weeks and months.

“When I came here from Joliet West, I wanted to win the championship and go to college,” Wisdom said. “My first year here, I was able to win a ring and I am glad that I got to be coached by these coaches and realize that college is an option for me rather than just having to get a job after high school.They gave me a light. I want to play ball next year, DII, DIII, I don’t care.” mark@buglenewspapers.com


Sports

MVPs

Romeoville High School recently chose their fall sports MVPs. They are: Cheerleaders, Brittany Acovelli; Poms, Alaina Rice; Boys Cross Country Joshua Sopczak; Girls Cross Country Jessica Cukier; Football, Caleb Bailey; Boys Soccer, Johnathan Silvar; Girls’ tennis, Agata Piatek; Boys golf, Jimmy Moon; Girls Golf, Paige Koranda; Girls Volleyball, Jaelin Mankins.

Flyers drop game at DePaul Despite 23 points and five threepointers apiece from reserve guards Gabe Williams (Chicago, Ill./Farragut) and David Bryant (Batavia, Ill./Batavia), the Lewis University men’s basketball team was unable to overcome a 42-15 first-half deficit, as DePaul earned the 91-74 exhibition victory over the visiting Flyers at McGrathPhillips Arena on Saturday (Nov. 3) night. “We just got off to a bad start tonight,” Lewis head men’s basketball coach Scott Trost said. “They came out and hit shots and we didn’t handle their press very well. “I’m proud of the way our guys battled for 40 minutes,”Trost continued. “We came back, made some shots and did a lot of good things.” Williams was 9-for-17 from the floor, including a 5-for-11 outing from beyond the arc, while Bryant made 8-of-14 shots and 5-of-7

from three-point range. Both were instrumental over the final 26 minutes, as the Flyers outscored DePaul, 59-49. As a team, Lewis was 11-for-23 (47.8%) from threepoint range. “(Gabe and David) were both big (tonight),” Trost said. “We learned a lot about ourselves, we just have to continue to trust the process, because we’re going to win some of games. “We just have to learn every day.” DePaul junior forwards Cleveland Melvin (25 points, 11 rebounds) and Donnavan Kirk (13 points, 10 rebounds) each posted double-doubles to lead the Blue Demons. Sophomore forward Jamee Crockett added 14 points for the Blue Demons, while guards Brandon Young and Charles McKinney both chipped in 10 points. Lewis opens the 2012-13 regular-season in two weeks, as

they head to Big Rapids, Michigan to square off with Ferris State for an in-regional showdown at 6:30 PM.

VOLLEYBALL Lewis University women’s volleyball seniors Jen Krumwiede (Elkhart, Ind./Elkhart Memorial) and Colleen Mitros (Mokena, Ill./Providence Catholic) both had double-doubles in the Flyers five-set 3-2 (27-25, 19-25, 25-19, 22-25, 17-15) victory over No. 10 Indianapolis at Neil Carey Arena on Friday (Nov. 2). The Flyers improve to 20-9 on the season and 12-3 against Great Lakes Valley Conference teams. The Greyhounds fall to 25-4 on the year, 14-1 in the GLVC. “I am really proud of our seniors,” Lewis head women’s volleyball coach Lorelee Smith See FLYERS, page 17

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

Sports

Man accused of threatening coach By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

A Lisle man was arrested Oct. 26 after officials say he made death threats to his daughter’s

volleyball coach for pulling her from the game the previous night. DuPage County State’s Attorney Robert Berlin said 61-year-old John Kasik of the

400 block of Arborview Drive was arrested and charged with felony telephone harassment, as well as misdemeanor counts of disorderly conduct and battery. Berlin said Kasik reportedly

became angry after his daughter was taken out of the Class 2A regional championship game between Lisle and Westmont Oct. 25. He then allegedly followed Dan Dillard, Lisle High school Athletic Director, back to Dillard’s home and started yelling at Dillard while the two were still in their vehicles. According to Berlin, Dillard invited Kasik to meet with him at the high school the next morning to discuss the situation. Later that evening, however, Kasik allegedly left several text and voice mail messages with Lisle girls volleyball coach Matt Hrubesky, threatening to kill him and rape his wife and daughter, Berlin said. Berlin said Kasik met with Dillard Friday morning, Oct. 26, but Kasik became angry during the meeting. When Dillard tried to end the meeting and leave the room, Kasik allegedly bumped Dillard several times while blocking the doorway. Kasik was arrested shortly after the meeting, Berlin said. Kasik coached boys volleyball at Oak Park-River Forest High School from 1992 to 2005, and also was the girls volleyball coach for five years during that span. The boys teams placed second in the state three times and third twice while he was coach. When reached by the Bugle late this week, both Dillard and Lisle High School principal Pete Sullivan declined to comment, and referred all comments to District 202 superintendent

John Kasik Keith Filipiak. “The recently reported highly inappropriate conduct of a parent directed toward certain members of the district’s high school staff has raised a tremendous level of concern within the Lisle District 202 community,” Filipiak said in a statement released to the Bugle. “The district has taken action in the aftermath of this incident to ensure the continued safety and well‐being of our students and staff. “Because this incident involves a pending criminal matter, we do not want to interfere with the work of the State’s Attorney’s office or Lisle Police Department by commenting on the specifics of the matter at this time.” Kasik appeared in bond court Oct. 27. His bail was set at $300,000, and he posted $30,000 cash See ACCUSED, page 17


Sports FLYERS Continued from page 15 said. “No matter what year, you always see both teams elevate their level of play.” Krumwiede had 18 kills and 15 digs for her double-double and two blocks, while Mitros had 19 digs and 13 kills, with four blocks. Carly Perschnick (Dwight, Ill./ Dwight Township) added 18 kills for the Flyers. In the first set, Indianapolis got off to a quick start but Lewis was able to recapture the lead with senior Mary Carroll (Naperville, Ill./Naperville Central) at the service line seven times. The Flyers got points off of three

ACCUSED Continued from page 16 to remain out on bond. Kasik is scheduled to appear before DuPage County Circuit Court Judge John Kinsella on Monday, Nov. 19.

kills by Perschnick, one kill by Mitros and capitalizing on two Greyhound attack errors. The squads kept trading the lead later in the set until Indianapolis won, 27-25, getting the last two points on Lewis errors. Carroll served five times to wrap up the second set for the Flyers, 25-19, earning points off of kills from Mitros and Perschnick and two errors from the Greyhounds. Indianapolis’ won the third set, 25-19. The Greyhounds scored off of kills by Kristina Kerrigan, Arielle Knafel and Brittany Anglemyer. The squads battled in the fourth set, with libero Amy Choi (Vernon HIlls, Ill./Vernon Hills) serving five times to help the Flyers to hold onto the lead for

the 25-22 win. With the momentum on their side the Flyers kept rolling in the fifth set. Perschnick had five of her 18 kills in the final set, while Krumwiede had added three. Lewis is back in action on Saturday (Nov. 3) at Neil Carey Arena to host Saint Joseph’s on Senior Day at 3 PM. The Flyers will honor five seniors, Jillian Carlberg (Urbandale Iowa/Waukee), Carroll, Krumwiede, Perschnick and Mitros after the match.

“The district appreciates the ongoing support and assistance of the Lisle Police Department and will continue to coordinate with members of the law enforcement community to maintain a safe and supportive learning environment for our students,” Filipiak’s statement continued. “The high school

has also worked to ensure that members of the school support team are available to provide assistance for any students in need. We remain committed to ensuring the safety and wellness of our students, staff and members of our school community.”

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The Lewis University women’s basketball team took a nine

mike@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012 point lead into halftime against SIUE but the Flyers fell, 65-56, to the Cougars in an exhibition match-up at the Vadalabene Center on Friday (Nov. 2). The Flyers were led by sophomore Jess Reinhart’s 10 points, 7-for-7 at the free throw

17

line, seven rebounds and two blocked shots. Senior forward Sam Rinehart added 12 points and seven rebounds. Sophomore guard Nikki Nellen scored nine points and had four assists.


18

sPorts

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

FOOTBALL Passing Jack Beneventi, Benet 1,993 Matt Alviti, Maine South 1,541 Craig Slowik, JCA 1,403 Dan Nagode, Notre Dame 1,283 Ashton McCullough, Joliet West 907 Mike McGivern, Niles West 738 Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North 700 Jake Kotopka, Plainfield East 656 Tommy Galanopoulos, Niles West 619 Mike Zebold, Downers South 579 Alex Corey, Maine East 565 David Edwards, Downers North 486 Mike Smiles, Plainfield Central 470 Jake Bambule, Romeoville 384 Joe Carnagio, Minooka 382 Aaron Bailey, Bolingbrook 315 Rushing Chris James, Notre Dame 1,908 Jay Roberts, Plainfield North 1,120 Jordan Ellingwood, Plainfield Central 1,066 Ty Isaac, JCA 1,043 Porter Ontko, Benet 816 Michael Ivlow, JCA 808 Tyler Reitz, JCA 805 Brandon Salter, Downers North 802 Aaron Bailey, Bolingbrook 774 Kyle Leto, Downers North 765 Omar Stover, Bolingbrook 706 Christian Lopez, Maine East 702 Gabe Corey, Maine East 678 David Edwards, Downers North 654 Miguel Ford, Romeoville 578 Jordan Brown, Joliet West 552 Anthony Underwood, Niles West 538 Nick McTarnaghan, Benet 537 Korey Rogers, Joliet West 525 Nate Gunn, Minooka 509 Matt Alviti, Maine South 500 Gino Giarratano, Plainfield Central 497 Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North 481 Mike Kuzebski, Maine East 474 Jake Kotopka, Plainfield East 446 Max Brozovich, Minooka 419 Javed Lukovic, Maine East 413 Cullen Rompa, Plainfield East 348 Tyler Erdmann, Plainfield Central 321 Dan Nagode, Notre Dame 312 Receiving Jack Euritt, Benet 677 Billy Hirsch, Notre Dame 543 Chris Tschida, JCA 522

Jordan Jones, JCA 449 Jack Toner, Benet 411 Korey Rogers, Joliet West 396 Andrew Milhulet, Niles West 390 Jeremiah Jordan, Niles West 343 Max Brozovich, Minooka 330 Luke Stovall, Minooka 318 Porter Ontko, Benet 289 Richard Olekanma, Downers North 274 Ty Isaac, JCA 269 Adrian Simbulan, Plainfield East 258 Mozell Hargrays, Plainfield East 256 Mark Hammond, Romeoville 242 John Solari, Maine South 236 Jordan Brown, Joliet West 234 Brock Thoms, Plainfield North 222 Nick Surges, Benet 222 Nick Johnson, Niles West 214 Kameron Hargrove, Joliet West 199 Duvane Goodlow, Plainfield Central 199 Total TD Chris James, Notre Dame 27 Ty Isaac, JCA 20 Porter Ontko, Benet 16 Michael Ivlow, JCA 15 Tyler Reitz, JCA 14 Jay Roberts, Plainfield North 13 Jordan Ellingwood, Plainfield Central 12 Aaron Bailey, Bolingbrook 12 Jack Euritt, Benet 8 Matt Alviti, Maine South 8 Omar Stover, Bolingbrook 8 Jordan Brown, Joliet West 8 David Edwards, Downers North 8 Gino Giarratano, Plainfield Central 8 Korey Rogers, Joliet West 8 Kyle Leto, Downers North 7 Billy Hirsch, Notre Dame 6 Andrew Milhulet, Niles West 6 Tommy Galanopoulos, Niles West 6 Nick McTarnaghan, Benet 6 Brandon Salter, Downers North 6 Jake Glotzer, Niles West 5 Trent Cavin, Plainfield North 5 Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North 5 Andrew Milhulet, Niles West 5 Brennan Rompa, Plainfield East 5

VOLLEYBALL

ACES Tessa Griparis, Minooka Kasey Schumacher, Minooka Kat Freebern, Plainfield East Julia Shemaitis, JCA Natalie Yard, Minooka Katie Dugan, Lockport Emily Malone, Joliet Central Krissa Gearring, Bolingbrook Melanie Vujovich, Niles West Kayleigh Harper, Plainfield South Marisa Markus, Bolingbrook Morgan Reardon, JCA Felicia Phan, Niles West Aubrey Ficek, Lockport Elizabeth Hyland, Plainfield Central

68 62 61 60 57 53 50 50 46 46 46 45 42 42 41

Skyler Day, Minooka Mallory Mangun, JCA Britney Lange, Joliet Central Justine Bunn, Plainfield East Erin Eulitz, Plainfield Central Katie Brick, Joliet West Molly Kleppin, Niles West T’ara Austin, Joliet Central MacKensi Welsh, Plainfield East Katie Tabisz, Lockport Alyssa O’Boyle, Plainfield South Assists Mallory Mangun, JCA Kate Federico, Plainfield North Emily Malone, Joliet Central Katie Brick, Joliet West Marisa Markus, Bolingbrook Katie Tabisz, Lockport Felicia Phan, Niles West Hannah Evatt, Plainfield Central Kayla Pfeiffer, Lockport Allison Bowbin, Plainfield East Kelli Holstine, Minooka MacKensi Welsh, Plainfield East Kelly Clucas, Minooka Molly Morello, Niles West Allyson Lindish, Plainfield Central Blocks Katelyn Seeman, JCA Mallory Mangun, JCA Morgan Reardon, JCA Angela Vera, JCA Jane Obradovich, Plainfield Central Justine Bunn, Plainfield East Lauren Truvillion, Plainfield South Claire Hotchkin, Plainfield Central Tessa Griparis, Minooka Elizabeth Hyland, Plainfield Central Laura Kirkorian, Niles West T’ara Austin, Joliet Central Shannon Hagen, Plainfield Central Jalyn Vertin, Joliet West Jessica Karalow, Minooka Digs Katie Dugan, Lockport Sarah Adler, JCA Kasey Schumacher, Minooka Molly Kleppin, Niles West Gaby Bejma, Plainfield East Aubrey Ficek, Lockport Morgan Reardon, JCA Dakota Santore, Plainfield North Kelsey Frain, Joliet Central Julia Shemaitis, JCA T’ara Austin, Joliet Central Dana Nowaczyk, JCA Mallory Mangun, JCA Erin Eulitz, Plainfield Central Ciara Hill, Bolingbrook Taylor Hollow, Joliet West Krissa Gearring, Bolingbrook Olivia Rusek, Niles West Kayla Pfeiffer, Lockport Allie Lindroth, Plainfield North Katie Brick, Joliet West Elizabeth Hyland, Plainfield Central

39 37 36 36 36 35 34 35 33 33 33 705 638 619 586 493 390 362 353 344 303 249 229 220 214 208 111 114 101 100 82 74 67 65 64 62 59 57 53 52 50 410 329 336 302 284 282 261 260 256 238 238 236 231 225 220 215 211 211 205 200 199 199

Kills Morgan Reardon, JCA T’ara Austin, Joliet Central Ciara Hill, Bolingbrook Skyler Day, Minooka Olivia Rusek, Niles West Elizabeth Hyland, Plainfield Central MacKensi Welsh, Plainfield East Kayla Pfeiffer, Lockport Shannon Hagen, Plainfield Central Aubrey Ficek, Lockport Krissa Gearring, Bolingbrook Dakota Santore, Plainfield North Julia Shemaitis, JCA Kelsey Frain, Joliet Central Krista Grunst, Niles West Marisa Markus, Bolingbrook

SOCCER

Goals Rami Dajani, Maine East Ryan Olans, Plainfield East Eric Osika, Lisle Mo Rashid, Plainfield Central Alhaji Kamara, Lisle Mike Brazinski, Plainfield East Jonathan Silvar, Romeoville Matt Coronado, Maine East Kyle Hendzel, Lisle Jon Harmon, Lisle Logan Wright, Plainfield North Rodrigo Garcia, Plainfield South Max Tarasewicz, Lisle Andrew Grabavoy, Downers South Max Tarasewicz, Lisle Eric Diaz, Downers South Dino Tijanic, Maine East Sam LaLonde, Downers South Elijah Bester, Lisle Andres Castellanos, Plainfield North Anthony Skrip, Plainfield South Manny Sanchez, Plainfield South Tom Malitz, Maine East Jameison Jamnik, JCA Nicholas Legare, JCA Assists Eric Osika, Lisle Kyle Hendzel, Lisle Dino Tijanic, Maine East Mike Brazinski, Plainfield East Rami Dajani, Maine East Allan Benitez, Romeoville Jack Freko, Downers South Max Emendoerfer, JCA Alhaji Kamara, Lisle Elijah Bester, Lisle Marco Gonzales, Plainfield East Ryan Olans, Plainfield East Mo Rashid, Plainfield Central Zack Foust, Plainfield North Tyler Petprachan, Plainfield North Matt Pytel, Maine East Miguel Espinoza, Plainfield South Alhaji Kamara, Lisle Andrew Grabavoy, Downers South

401 358 349 347 301 292 254 246 239 230 214 186 176 173 171 160

31 20 18 17 16 15 12 10 10 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 6 6 6 6 6 21 11 9 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5

FOOTBALL 1. Maine South 2. Benet 3. JCA 4. Notre Dame 5. Downers North 6. Bolingbrook 7. Plainfield North

TENNIS 1. Benet 2. Downers South 3. Lockport 4. Joliet Catholic 5. Maine South 6. Joliet 7. Plainfield North

BOYS SOCCER 1. Benet 2. Maine South 3. Romeoville 4. Downers South 5. Plainfield Central 6. Joliet Central 7. Downers North

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL 1. Benet 2. JCA 3. Niles West 4. Plainfield North 5. Minooka 6. Downers South 7. Lockport

BOYS CROSS 1. Maine South 2. Plainfield South 4. Minooka 3. Plainfield East 5. Downers North 6. Downers South 7. Notre Dame

GIRLS CROSS 1. Maine South 2. Downers South 3. Lockport 4. Minooka 5. Benet 6. Downers North 7. Plainfield Central Rankings are compiled by Mark Gregory and Scott Taylor.


35 www.buglenewspapers.com/football

08

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

19

Dons stop Steinmetz to advance in 6A By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

The Dons’ last visit to Hanson Stadium in Chicago two months ago is one they’ve long left in the rear-view mirror. That’s when they played St. Patrick in Week 2 and lost, 40-21. The Notre Dame club that faced Chicago Steinmetz in the second round of the Class 6A playoffs last Friday at Hanson is playing its best football of the season and running on all cylinders. And needless to say, so is Chris James. Coming off a 320-yard, seven touchdown performance in Notre Dame’s first-round victory over Graylake North, James continued to churn out yardage Friday, rushing for 162 yards and two scores as the Dons won, 358. James’ first TD of the evening, a 4-yarder, put the Dons (7-4) ahead 7-0. Midway through the second quarter, James cut back against the grain, and then turned on the jets down the right sideline for his second TD that made it 35-0. James says the credit for his success throughout the season— and particularly in the playoffs— goes to his offensive line: Nick Bargione, Sean Nicholson, Mike Maligranda, Bobby Deleonardis and Mike Mulcrone. “The offensive line has just been killing it,” James said. “They’ve been working hard.” Head coach Mike Hennessey said the Dons’ offensive and defensive line play is a key reason for their postseason surge. “We’re working really well,” Hennessey said. “I think where it’s paying off is at the line of scrimmage. Our offensive line is

doing a great job and giving Chris some great holes. Our defensive front seven is doing a great job against the run. When it comes playoff time, it’s a running game more so than anything else and I think we’re ready to go.” Notre Dame, which had been ousted in the first round each of the past six seasons, broke that skid last week, and with Friday night’s triumph, moves into the quarterfinals. This weekend, the Dons are hosting No. 10-seed Lake Forest, a 23-21 winner over Lakes last Friday night. The Scouts (8-3) feature 6-foot4 strong-armed quarterback Andrew Clifford, running back Stephen Cirame and wideout David Glynn. “Going into the quarterfinals is really something special,” Hennessey said. “There’s only eight teams left. Once you get past the first game you really do have an opportunity to get to the big game, so you take one at a time. The kids are very excited about it.They’re pumped.” Not lost on the Dons and linebacker Tom Sora is the fact that Notre Dame will be playing in front of its fans after two weeks on the road. “We’re up for a challenge,” he said.“It is going to be nice having a home game. We’re looking forward to that very much. “We’re getting a home game and I think that’s key. We kind of have a snowball effect going for us right now. I think there’s nothing better than to bring it back home, get our student section and get all of our fans back out there to support us and show them what we’re made of.” Notre Dame extended its lead

to 14-0 when senior quarterback Dan Nagode hit Matt Nunez in stride for a 41-yard touchdown. “We just ran the ball a couple of times in a row so we gave them play action and he (Nunez) was free,” said Nagode, describing the play. “We knew we had to come out and play our hardest right from the get-go and put them behind early.” Nagode had a pass picked off on the Dons’ next series, but Steinmetz ended up being pinned on its own 1-yard line. Steinmetz quarterback Michael Harris fumbled near the goal line two plays later after being stripped of the ball by Dons’ lineman Alex Garcia. The ball rolled into the end zone, and linebacker Matt Galloway fell on it for a touchdown and a 21-0 Notre Dame lead. Nagode added a 1-yard sneak with 8:30 to go before intermission to put the Dons up 28-0. Dan Dietz, a junior, added 84 yards on 15 carries. Defensively, Herb Betancourt recorded three tackles-for-loss, and Tom Guerin

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Herb Betancourt had three tackles for loss in the Dons’ win.

PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Nominees

Last week’s results Brandon Salter Downers N.

Porter Ontko, Benet 210 rush yards, 2 TDs, INT TD

92%

Ty Isaac, JCA 16 rush, 151 yards, 3 TDs Aaron Bailey, Bolingbrook 210 rush, 3TD, 76 pass, TD Herb Betancourt, Notre Dame 3 tackles for loss Go to buglenewspapers.com to vote for your winner!

Jack Beneventi Benet

1%

Matt Alviti Maine S.

1%

Chris James Notre Dame

6%


20

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012


Health & Fitness

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

21

Dealing with drug shortages The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported sixty-two drug shortages in 2005.There were 157 shortages by 2009, and almost half of these shortages were injectable drugs. Preliminary numbers suggest 300 shortages for 2011, and again one half are of the injectable drug type. There is no doubt that the shortages are increasing, but why is this important? There must be reasonable alternatives. After all, aren’t there about a “zillion” blood pressure medications available? Actually, about one half of the drug shortages reported in 2011 were defined as “critical drugs” by the FDA.That is, drugs for which there is no substitute. In my medical specialty of Oncology, there were about 25 shortages last year. It may be easy to accept that third world countries might have inadequate health care and limited drug supplies, but this could never really happen

in the U.S. Unfortunately it does, and with increasing frequency. The final outcomes may not be known for some time. Several of my patients needed to change treatment programs or go without some of the prescribed chemotherapy drugs for this very reason. Furthermore, not only is the quantity affected but the quality as well. This is particularly true for the injectable generic drugs. The recent spate of fungal contamination of steroids used for back pain injections and the resulting cases of fungal meningitis is the direct result of these quality concerns. If your politics lean to the left you may believe that Obamacare will fix this problem, or if you lean to the right you believe its repeal

is what’s needed. I fear both viewpoints are wrong. The problem is more productionbased than health care deliverybased. Health care reform – or the lack thereof - will not bring an end this problem. Twenty years ago, patents on new drugs for pharmaceutical firms were curtailed in duration and a push towards generic drugs was promoted. Most recent estimates find that 70% of drugs prescribed in the U.S. are generic. Large contracts to major pharmacy retailers and prescription services also keep drug prices down. This has helped to reduce prices but has also limited profits as well. If there is not much of a profit margin, there is not much incentive to produce the generics. Many such medications have only one producer. If that producer leaves the market, stops production for maintenance, or is closed by regulators, drug shortages follow. With a slim profit margin,

the temptation to “cut corners” with quality assurance and safety precautions may be overwhelming. This is particularly important for the injectables where sterility and other quality issues are crucial. There are well-known cases of contamination of parenteral nutrition and the anesthetic propofol, but the most notorious is the recent incident with injectable steroids as mentioned above. The FDA is not blameless and has played its own role in this problem. It has been accused simultaneously of doing too much and too little in regulating this industry. Unfortunately, both are likely true. On one hand they have been accused of too little regulatory oversight, and on the other hand accused of shutting down operations for violations with no prior review or warning. In a situation of not enough production, it takes three years for a potential manufacturer to obtain FDA approval. President

Obama has addressed this issue with an executive order on October 31, 2011 giving broader powers to the FDA to help contain this problem. However, 2012 is on target to surpass 2011’s drug shortage totals. Doctor’s Rx: Dr. Barbara K. Gehrett, MD has remarked that it is possible to optimize two out of three desirable conditions in health care, but never three out of three. The conditions are quality, cost and time. We are currently reaping what we have sown with our decisions over the past twenty years.

Dr. Christopher Rose, M.D. is a physician and author based in Niles, Illinois. The advice contained in this column is for informational purposes only. Readers should consult with their own physician to evaluate any illness or medical condition. Contact Dr. Rose at (847) 965-3200 or www. cancercenterschicago.com


22

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

Real Estate & Business

Better ways to deliver bad news Q. Sometimes, in my job, I have to say things that make people mad. You often talk about how to be diplomatic with coworkers. Is there a way to deliver bad news that doesn’t annoy people? A. No. You can make it less

likely that people will be mad at you, but nothing you do will guarantee that coworkers will never be mad at you. Harry Truman was fond of saying, “I never give them hell. I just tell the truth and they think it’s hell.” The bottom line is sometimes at work you’re in the unenviable

position of having to speak an unpopular truth. You’re right, in my column I offer tools, techniques and strategies that make it less likely people will be mad at you: things like repeating back what people say, making it clear how giving you what you want will get a coworker what he wants, setting limits by pointing out how behaving badly will result in outcomes a coworker doesn’t want, or using specific and behavioral language. However, you can do a surgically impressive job, using every tool in your interpersonal kit, and still have a customer, boss or colleague react with anger. If you assume that you have done something badly every time a person is mad, you’ll end up contributing very little. People at work who never have people mad at them usually are doing nearly nothing. If you want an effective career, cultivate an attitude where you take other people’s anger less personally. You still want to evaluate whether you could have delivered bad news

better, but sometimes people really do just want to shoot the messenger. Next time someone is upset with you ask yourself these questions: Was there a way to have had better timing? Could I have used more neutral language? Did I appeal to other people’s agendas? Did I use language that was vague or specific (i.e. punctual vs. here at 8 a.m.)? Was I careful not to use language that blamed or criticized others? If you have done everything you know, find an interpersonal “coach.” You can talk to a sophisticated friend or a professional for advice. Ask if your “coach” can see anything you could have done better. If neither you nor your coach can identify a better approach, work to be less offended by the angry reaction. Don’t assume that people who are mad at you must be ridiculous because you didn’t intend to offend anyone. People only know their reactions. People generally can’t read your mind and know what you meant. When others are upset with us, they’re mad because of the meaning they assign to our

message. Even on good days, most of us feel personally attacked when people are annoyed with us. Go ahead and feel attacked just don’t react. Next, ask yourself a powerful question: If this reaction was not about me, what theory might I form about what is going on? Over time, if you use this theory, you’ll find you are always more effective than assuming that other people’s anger is all about you. Your willingness to deliver bad news and your skill in doing so means your power, persuasion and prestige at work will rise. Remember this: If you don’t have any enemies, you probably aren’t doing anything!

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2012 INTERPERSONAL EDGe DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 426 N. Maggie Lane Romeoville, IL 60446 (Residential). On the 28th day of November, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP Plaintiff V. Ricardo B. Claravall; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 104 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-35631 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/1, 11/8, 11/15

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1730 W. WILLIAM DR. ROMEOVILLE, ILLINOIS (Single Family Residence). On the 5th day of December, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff V. AVDO MUJCINOVIC, ENISA MUJCINOVIC, AND LAKEWOOD FALLS PHASE 7 HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Defendant. Case No. 09 CH 1333 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 EAST MAIN STREET, SUITE 200 DECATUR, IL 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 fax PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/8, 11/15, 11/22

23

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 446 RACHEL CIRCLE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (TWO STORY, SINGLE FAMILY, SIDED, TWO CAR GARAGE.). On the 28th day of November, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff V. MONA LOVE Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 6309 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 240,053.77 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g) (1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/1, 11/8, 11/15


24

Whether it is a roast beef dinner with family or putting on makeup before heading to the gym, you can find ways to improve your mood in the week ahead.

the inspirations that pop into your head. You are at your best when you have a congenial companion by your side sharing life’s joys. In the upcoming week, cooperation is the key.

Play your trump card. When people are bluffing, it is much easier to win the pot. You might find the answer or advice you need. In the week to come, show how well you can lead others with winning ways.

Turn the calendar to the wall and leave the wristwatch in the drawer. Don’t measure time spent with family, pets or pursuing your favorite hobby in the week to come. The happiest times can be endless.

Put the pout away. This week may offer you many opportunities to mend fences and listen to heartfelt apologies. Rethink how you’re dealing with personal or financial situation to set things right.

Be observant. Some people see more in a walk around the block than others see in a trip around the world. In the week ahead, be sure to keep an eye peeled for opportunities to improve your life.

Turn on the fog lights. You could be challenged to endorse values and beliefs without having a clear picture of exactly what you are backing. Cut through confusion in the upcoming week.

A wise man said that you can never stand in the same river twice. The more you try to stop progress, the more likely it will rush past you. In the week ahead, be willing to bend with the current.

Team up to take the lead. Family members appreciate your wisdom and may come to you for advice this week. Your unique perspective may encourage others to take the right step and vice versa.

The inside track provides the shortest distance to the finish line. You might think you are going in circles in the week ahead, but careful analysis and measurements will provide you with encouragement.

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

Across 1 “Les __” 4 As a friend, in French 9 Actor Romero 14 N.L. West team, on scoreboards 15 Noble gas 16 Latin stars 17 MLK birthday month 18 Method of looking for keys? 20 Relay race closer 22 Peace Prize winner Wiesel 23 Wide shoe size 24 Love god 26 Working parts 28 Finishing by the deadline, sometimes 32 Computer pioneer Lovelace 33 Young newt 34 Many Semites 38 Reveal 40 Knight’s ride 43 Harald V’s capital 44 Capital on the Willamette 46 Future fish 47 World games org.

Down 48 Bad-mouthing someone 53 Food packaging unit 56 German river 57 Soccer star Freddy 58 In __: moody 60 Like Chris and Pat, genderwise 64 Call waiting diversion 67 Big name in kitchen gadgets 68 Violet lead-in 69 Steve of country 70 Nth degree 71 Eyelid annoyances 72 In small pieces, as potatoes 73 Punk rock offshoot

1 Whom Goya painted both nude and clothed 2 OPEC cofounder 3 Penultimate element, alphabetically 4 Encourage 5 Couch disorders 6 Raggedy gal 7 Speck of dust 8 How perjurers may be caught 9 Concerto highlight 10 Sixth sense, briefly 11 Brisket source 12 Curved 13 Works in the garden 19 Lofted iron 21 Villainous laugh syllable 25 Acre’s 43,560: Abbr. 27 Prefix with space 28 Fashion statements in the ‘hood 29 “Eureka!” elicitor 30 Sass 31 Early

development sites? 35 2-Down’s location 36 Political group 37 __ puppet 39 Actor Jared 41 Ages and ages 42 He succeeded Coty as French president 45 Latin percussion pair 49 Plastic surgeon’s job, for short 50 Sharper, as eyes 51 Smoothed in a shop 52 Hosp. picture 53 “The Stranger” author 54 X-rated 55 Hale 59 Pad __: Asian noodle dish 61 A portion (of) 62 Chckup 63 Loe letter closing, and in sequence, a hint to the ends of 18-, 28-, 48- and 64-Across 65 Wrath 66 Hobbit enemy

Sudoku

J umble

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Jumbles: • CARGO • FETID • PRISON • BOYISH

Answer:

How the rock star ran for office -ON HIS “RECORD”

TOP POP ALBUMS October 21 through October 27 TITLE

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ARTIST

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

25


26

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 12TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF ACE SECURITIES CORP. HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST AND FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF ACE SECURITIES CORP. HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-WM2, ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES PLAINTIFF VS. YANELI PEREZ, AQUA FINANCE INC, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEM INC., AS A NOMINEE FOR WMC MORTGAGE CORP., PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOCIATES, LLC, TARGET NATIONAL BANK F/K/A RETAILERS NATIONAL BANK, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANT(S). 12CH 2759 NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given you UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, defendants in the above entitled cause, that suit has been commenced against you and other defendants in the Circuit Court of Will County, Illinois by said plaintiff praying for the foreclosure of a certain mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: LOT 506 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 6 POD 26 BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 12 TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JULY 12, 2000 AS DOCUMENT NO. R2000-074484, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Parcel ID Number: 06-03-12-307-0150000 / 03-12-307-015 Said property is commonly known as: 1984 Wheatfield Drive, Romeoville, IL 60446, and which said mortgage(s) was/ were made by Yaneli Perez and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds as Document Number R2006188091 and for other relief; that Summons was duly issued out of the above Court against you as provided by law and that said suit is now pending. NOW THEREFORE, unless you, the said above named defendants, file your answer to the complaint in the said suit or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Office of the Circuit Court of Will County, Illinois - Chancery Division on or before December 3, 2012, a default may be taken against you at any time after that date and a Judgment entered in accordance with the prayer of said complaint. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. JAMES NICK PAPPAS #6291873 Burke Costanza & Carberry LLP 9191 Broadway Merrillville, IN 46410 (219) 769-1313

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP Plaintiff,

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff,

vs.

MONA LOVE Defendant. No. 10 CH 6309

“THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE” W12-3457 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 12TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION Bank of America, N.A.; Plaintiff, VS. Allen D. Yancey; Wespark Condominium Association; Cearange Yancey; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Allen D. Yancey, if any; Unknown Owners and Non Record Claimants; Defendants. 12 CH 3630 Judge Richard Siegel Courtroom 129 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given to you: -Cearange Yancey that Plaintiff has commenced this case in the Circuit Court of Will County against you and other defendants, for foreclosure of a certain Mortgage lien recorded against the premises described as follows: PARCEL 1: UNIT NO. 382 TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS IN WESPARK CONDOMINIUM, AS DELINEATED AND DEFINED IN THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 52635, AS AMENDED FROM TIME TO TIME, IN PART OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS PARCEL 2: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FOR THE BENEFIT OF PARCEL 1 OVER THE COMMON AREAS AS DEFINED IN PLAT OF WESPARK SUBDIVISION UNIT 1, AFORESAID RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO. R98-3865 AND RECORDED WESPARK DECLARATIONS. C/K/A: 81 Coralbell Court, Romeoville, IL 60446 PIN: 11-04-07-208-119-1005 said Mortgage was given by Allen D. Yancey, Mortgagor(s), to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., acting solely as a nominee for Aegis Wholesale Corporation, Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County, Illinois, as Document No. R2003289777. YOU MAY STILL BE ABLE TO SAVE YOUR HOME. DO NOT IGNORE THIS DOCUMENT. By order of the Chief Judge of the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit Court, this case is set for Mandatory Mediation on October 25, 2012 at 01:00 PM at the Will County Court, Annex 3rd Floor (Arbitration Center) 57 N. Ottawa Street, Joliet, Illinois. A lender representative will be present along with a court appointed mediator to discuss options that you may have and to pre-screen you for a potential mortgage modification. YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE MEDIAITION DATE GIVEN OR YOUR MEDIAITON WILL BE TERMINATED. UNLESS YOU file your appearance or otherwise file your answer in this case in the Office of the Circuit Clerk of Will County, Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, Joliet IL 60432 on or before November 26, 2012, A JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE OR DECREE BY DEFAULT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU FOR THE RELIEF ASKED FOR IN THE PLAINTIFF’S COMPLAINT. Russell C. Wirbicki (6186310) Kenneth J. Nannini (3121924) Laurence J. Goldstein (0999318) James A. Meece (6256386) James D. Major (6295217) Christopher J. Irk (6300084) Emily S. Kresse (6294405) Shara Netterstrom (6294499) Ryan P. McNeil (6308006) Amelia R. Niemi (6308051) Brian M. Larson (6307947) The Wirbicki Law Group LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 33 W. Monroe St., Suite 1140 Chicago, IL 60603 Phone: 312-360-9455 Fax: 312-572-7823 W12-3457

I465230 Published11/1, 11/8, 11/15

Ricardo B. Claravall; et. al. Defendant. No. 12 CH 104 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 6th day of June, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 28th day of November, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: LOT 11 IN MARQUETTE’S ESTATES - PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 11, 2003 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2003084680, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 426 N. Maggie Lane Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Residential P.I.N.: 02-32-311-011 (02-32-300-003 underlying) Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-35631 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 11/1, 11/8, 11/15

vs.

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 4th day of June, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 28th day of November, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: LOT 55 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 7 BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN AND PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JULY 25, 2001 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2001-096217 IN WILL COUNTY ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 446 RACHEL CIRCLE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: T W O STORY, SINGLE FAMILY, SIDED, TWO CAR GARAGE. P.I.N.: (06)-03-13-210-005 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 240,053.77 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 11/1, 11/8, 11/15

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. AVDO MUJCINOVIC, ENISA MUJCINOVIC, AND LAKEWOOD FALLS PHASE 7 HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Defendant. No. 09 CH 1333 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 20th day of April, 2009, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 5th day of December, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: LOT 294 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 7B, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN AND PART OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 20, 2002 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2002-048631 AND AMENDED BY CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED JULY 3, 2002 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2002-108531, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Commonly known as: 1730 W. WILLIAM DR. ROMEOVILLE, ILLINOIS Description of Improvements: Single Family Residence P.I.N.: 06-03-13-216-018-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

I476125

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 EAST MAIN STREET, SUITE 200 DECATUR, IL 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 fax PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Pubished 10/25, 11/1, 11/8

Published 11/8, 11/15, 11/22


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

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28

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 8, 2012

Romeoville 11-8-12  

Romeoville 11-8-12

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