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Oc to b e r 13, 2 0 1 6 v o l . 1 1 i s s u e 15

Pare down the paper invasion #romeovillebugle

community

Family Business Community business celebrates 70 years See Page 3

sports

League of Her Own Illinois female pioneer for women’s wrestling See Page 9

column Dave Says Morton Grove opens fall photo contest See Page 15

romeovillebugle.com

see page 6

featured column

come to order


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VAlley VIew School dISTRIcT

District sees positive results from state assessment however, elementary grades were below state level in both ela and math By laura Katauskas Bugle staff @Buglenewspapers sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

A second year of state assessment results show Valley View School District 365u gaining growth in most categories, despite elementary grade levels dipping below state performance. Valley View students recently received results from the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) test, which serves as an an “educational

GPS system” that is designed to measure students’ current performance in English/Language Arts and Math. The test administered by the state is defined as gauging what students need to learn in order to be ready for the next grade level and, by the end of high school, for future success in college and careers. PARCC is more closely aligned with Common Core standards (as compared to the state’s former test, the ISAT), focused on critical

thinking and real world application, which is required by the state and adhered to by the district. English language arts/literacy (ELA/L) assessments focused on writing effectively when analyzing text. Mathematics assessments focused on applying skills and concepts, understanding multi-step problems that require abstract reasoning, and modeling real-world problems with precision, perseverance, and strategic use of tools. In both content areas, students also demonstrated their acquired skills and knowledge by answering selected-response items and fill-inthe-blank items. While Valley View School District

middle school students did significantly better than the state in both categories, elementary grades were below state level in both ELA and Math. The good news, say district officials, is that when when comparing

cohorts of students (following the same students as they enter a new class), those same grade levels are showing continued progress compared to last year. see DiSTriCT page 7


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buSINeSS >> bolINGbRooK

Community business celebrates 70 years family-run business award emblem moved from Chicago to Bolingbrook in 1986 By laura Katauskas Bugle staff @Buglenewspapers sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

Simple pride in a job well done, an attention to detail and a sense of family are at the core of what keeps Award Emblem, a local business running for 70 years, with its employee dedication to product excellence a given. The family-run business, started as an emblematic jewelry company in Chicago in 1946, Charles Klein had taken over a portion of the FH Noble Company that was in the business of making Purple Hearts after the war. Acknowledging the need for recognition-type products, meaning pins and awards, the company very quickly turned into Award Emblem in early 1950s and later handed down to Robert Klein. “My grandpa took the business to a different level. It was like a stroke of genius at the time, deciding to build a business directed toward schools who would see a new crop of students each year and it’s been successful,” said Jason, the thirdgeneration to co-run the business with brother Justin and father, Bob. “The second part of the plan was

“my grandpa took the business to a different level. it was like a stroke of genius at the time ...” - JASoN KleIN

mail-order catalogs—we were one of the first to start that business.” Over time, moving to Bolingbrook in 1986, Award Emblem crafted its own niche into building a small empire in the awards and trophies realm, creating customized pins, trophies, and plaques to schools and business across the United States. Award Emblem moved to Bolingbrook on a personal invitation from Mayor Roger Claar, explains Bob. “He told us he had a plan and a vision for Bolingbrook and we were the first business that Roger extended that invitation to,” said Bob. “We came here on the ground floor and are a testament to Roger’s vision.” The company made a home for

itself in the vacant Mexican restaurant at 179 E. South Frontage Road and has been there ever since. Jason said it was then his father who took the business again to new heights, “I was young and I was hungry,” said Bob, “we went after it and the business just started coming. It just came natural; I was concerned more with organization more than sales. and the sales just came. The company is producing 450,000 catalogs a year with business in 50 states. And what has kept them in business, are the employees, agrees the family owners. “There are not many companies that can say more than half of their employees have been with them for more than 25 year—it’s incredible,” said Jason. “All this depended on who you had working for you and without them you are dead,” said Bob. “That and customer loyalty, you can count on one hand how many customers we lost over the years.” Jason says you can attest their success to the personal attention given to the product that is handmade and filled to order. From bars of gold or brass, each item is cut, stamped from thousands of different molds, trimmed,

fused, bathed in liquid gold or nickel, hand-painted with enamel and polished, all by hand. Years of service, has the core team of employees, seemingly effortlessly work through the process, with one common theme in mind—quality. “Sometimes I can be polishing for hours, even days, but that’s what it is –American made,” said Dan Cook, who has been with the company since 1974. For Sharon LeVine , her love for the job comes from the camaraderie and family-like atmosphere where she has learned every facet of the business over her 17 years in the company, where bringing dogs to work is okay and time spent together is encouraged. Micro-management isn’t the style at Award Emblem, where 70 years in the making, confidence in the process and its people has catapulted its veteran staff. Being in business for such a length of time has played to the company’s benefit, building a huge inventory of product---Jason explains while some competitors may have a band pin, they have a pan flute pan—allowing for very specific categories out of the thousands of products they have customized over the years. However, Jason said the cost of

manufacturing in Illinois is starting to take a toll on the business in the years of the recent recession but it won’t hold them back. Just as each generation has taken the business to different heights, Jason and Justin are looking to find alternative manufacturing at a different price point, to compete with China, possibly considering to fulfil a need to have a lower priceline, looking at new methods to do that. But that also means going back to their roots, explains Justin, pounding the pavement and pursuing clients from banks to insurance companies. “The last three years have been ok; we’ve been working hard to make it better but the hard fact is that it is a hard to be in manufacturing, yet it is a great story about our business--our family and our employees; everyone pulled together.” And yet another thing they agree on—they all plan to continue. Celebrating 70 years with the company are employees, Bill Koc, Erika Poletti, Shelly Casto, Lee Barton Marissa Lund, Dan Cook, John Pasinski, Hector Ortiz, Sharon LeVine, Nancy Malloy, Joan Clinton, and Kelly Redwinski. For more information, check out www.awardemblem.com or call 1-800-852-8892.


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VAlley VIew School bRIeFS

Oct. 21 Vendor Fair to benefit Martinez student activities Martinez Middle School is holding a fundraising Vendor Fair from 3 to 7 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 21. The Fair will feature roughly a dozen vendors including The Pampered Chef, Young Living Essential Oils, Rodan & Fields, Paparazzi, Avon, Trades of Hope and more. A portion of the proceeds will go toward Martinez student activities. The Fair is at the school, 590 Belmont Drive, Romeoville.

bRooKS TeAcheR To ReceIVe AwARd FoR heR woRK IN lIbeRIA Brooks Middle School’s Kathy O’Dwyer will receive the St. Clare of Assisi Award at the third annual Franciscan Works Children of Hope benefit Oct. 22 at the Ukranian Cultural Center in Chicago. O’Dwyer is being recognized for “her continuous effort in helping Franciscan Works and Liberia Mission flourish.” The 6th grade social studies teacher first traveled to war-torn Liberia, West Africa in the summer of 2011, spending time working with the children and staff at St. Michael the Archangel School which is run by Franciscan Works. She has returned to the school every year since then. “I’m a Franciscan and we believe in helping the poor. These are the poorest of the poor. They have no education. They have no infrastructure,” she said before her summer 2012 trip. “We believe that through education we can help people raise themselves up.” Proceeds from the 6 p.m. Oct. 22 will support the education of the students O’Dwyer works with in Liberia. Tickets, at $50 each, may be purchased at www.harvestforhopechicago.org. A dinner and live music are included in the ticket price. Franciscan Works is an organization dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty around the world. The school was founded in the wake of a brutal civil war that ended more than 10 years ago. Students who attend are either orphans or come from single parent families. “These students have seen horrors we can’t imagine, yet they are so loving and full of joy,” O’Dwyer said. “It’s the best feeling in the world to be a part of this.”

publIc INVITed To luKANcIc NIGhT AT The MuSeuM ocT. 20 The 3rd annual Lukancic Middle School Night at the Museum in slated for Thursday, Oct. 20. The event, which runs from 6 to 7:30 p.m., will feature studentcreated exhibits on Mesopotamia, colonial America, student-created civilizations and progressive personalities. Refreshments will be available. Several raffles will also be held. The public is invited.

20 VVSd STudeNTS choSeN To peRFoRM AT IlMeA dISTRIcT FeSTIVAlS Twenty Valley View School District 365U high school students have been selected to participate in the Illinois Music Educators Association (ILMEA) District Festivals on either Nov. 12 at Hampshire High School or Nov. 19 at Lake Park High School. All of the students selected are now eligible for consideration for ILMEA’s All-State festivals.

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coluMN >> coMe To oRdeR

Pare down the paper invasion time for an annual “review and pare down” routine I’ve recently taken on the self-assigned duty of spending a minimum of 5 minutes each day de-cluttering my office. “Ah ha!” you’re probably thinking, “Even the professional can’t keep her office organized.” Not so fast, dear reader. My office is actually very well organized – it’s just time for my annual “review and pare down” routine. But rather than doing it in big chunks, I’m breaking this project down into small steps to get it accomplished. Five minutes a day (OK, it’s so much fun that I typically spend 15 minutes a day) may not seem like much, but over the past three weeks I’ve pared down two file drawers and should have my project completed by the end of the month. Inspired by the multiple bags of papers I’m recycling and the shredder that’s been working overtime, here are some ideas about how to reduce the amount of paper flowing into your life: JeTTiSon JUnK MAiL Junk mail can disguise itself as fun or interesting items, but it’s still junk if it’s not something you’ve invited into your home. I’ve used both of the fol-

cOme TO Order By Sue Becker lowing free services and they’ve definitely helped lighten my mail carrier’s load: • CatalogChoice.org is a one-stop website to simplify the process of unsubscribing from unwanted catalogs. • OptOutPreescreen.com will help you opt out from receiving credit card or insurance offers. reDUCe THe nUMBer oF reCeipTS Consider whether you need to get a receipt for each of your purchases. If it’s not for something you may return (e.g., gasoline), you won’t need it for reconciling your debit or credit card statement, it’s not for a major purchase or item under warranty, and you won’t need it for budgeting or tax purposes, you can most likely decline receiving a receipt. Your overstuffed wallet will thank you. ponDer BeFore YoU prinT Before automatically hitting the print button for emails and computer-generated documents, consider whether you really need a paper ver-

sion. Maybe setting up a better filing system for your emails and electronic documents will help you trust that you’ll be able to find those items when you need them, saving you the time, trouble and paper to print them. CoMpUTeriZe YoUr CreDiT CArD BiLLS AnD oTHer FinAnCiAL STATeMenTS Do you need physical copies for tax or legal reasons? If not, maybe you can access them online and free up lots of space in your file cabinet. MiniMiZe MAGAZine SUBSCripTion Be ruthless in evaluating which magazines you actually read, and unsubscribe from those you don’t. If the current issue shows up before you’ve read the prior issue(s) consider paring back on the number of subscriptions you have. Do you get several publications on the same subject? Maybe you can decide which one offers the best information and unsubscribe from the others. I’d love to hear what other ideas you have to pare down your paper flow. Sue becker is a certified professional organizer in chronic disorganization who helps individuals and businesses discover the simplicity, harmony, and freedom of being organized and productive. She also speaks to companies and organizations about how to get organized and make the most of their time. Sue can be reached at www.pilesToSmiles.com or 630-3737400.

coMMuNITy bulleTIN >> upcoMING eVeNT

Halloween family fun at Bolingbrook Park District Celebrate Halloween at Bolingbrook Park District Oct. 21 and 22 for Family Halloween Fun Night, Parkie’s Pumpkin Patch and Halloween Harbor. Co-sponsored by the Bolingbrook Lions Club, Family Halloween Fun Night (formally known as Halloween Happenings) will take place 5:30-7:30 pm Friday, Oct. 21at the Bolingbrook Recreation & Aquatic Complex. Participants are invited to show off their Halloween costumes and enjoy a fun-filled evening with the whole family. Activities include carnival games,

special inflatables, photo booth, magic show and storytelling by the Fountaindale Public Library. Cost for the event is $4 per child (ages 18 months-15 years old) if preregistered before 10 p.m. Oct. 19. Tickets purchased at the door are $5 per person. Registration is currently open and can be completed online at www. bolingbrookparks.org or by visiting any one of the park district facilities. That same day at 7 p.m., over at Pelican Harbor Indoor Aquatic Park, Parkie’s Pumpkin Patch will take place. Participants can hunt for their perfect

pumpkin from a floating pumpkin patch and then stay to decorate it. To complete the Halloween weekend, Halloween Harbor will be open from noon to 4:30 p.m. at the Pelican Harbor Indoor Aquatic Park. Enjoy games and activities based on some favorite monsters and watch Hotel Transylvania at 3 p.m. There is no extra cost after the price of admission into Pelican Harbor. For more information on all of our Halloween events, please visit. www.bolingbrookparks.org or call (630) 739-0272.


polIce The following items were compiled from the official reports of the romeoville and bolingbrook police department. appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

bolINGbRooK Tori Orlowski, 21, 301 Robinhood Court, was arrested at 1:23 p.m. Sept. 29 at Meijer, 225 N. Weber Road, for retail theft.

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Antonio Bazaldua, 41, 118 E. Robinhood Way, was arrested at 3:08 a.m. Sept. 30 at the residence for domestic battery and violation of order of protection.

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Ebony Nichols, 35, 6610 Minerva St., and Taleshia Robinson, 39, 7217 S. Langley St., both of Chicago, were arrested at 10 p.m. Sept. 30 at Meijer, 225 N. Weber Road, for retail theft and burglary.

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Christopher Mathis, 43, 1409 Waterside Drive, was arrested at 4:55 p.m. Oct. 2 at Weber Road and Thackeray Drive for DUI.

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Jose Garcia, 23, 5617 Willow Springs Road, Countryside, was arrested at 8:18 p.m. Oct. 2 in the 500 block of Remington Boulevard for driving too fast for conditions, no insurance, improper lane usage and DUI.

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DiSTriCT from page 2 For instance, in Math, students from 4th to 5th grade increased their scores by 1 percent; in 5th to 6th, they rose 5 percent; 6th to 7th grade increased 0.3 percent and 7th to 8th grade increased 12 percent; however 3rd to 4th grade decreased 14 percent, a drop, the district said it is not taking lightly. “Though we may be behind, we are moving closer to the state standard in elementary, increasing our scores over last year and in middle school we have surpassed the state-that is the trend we want to see,” said Adam Hurder, executive director of educational services, PK-5. In ELA, students from 3rd to 4th grade increased by 0.8 percent; 4th to 5th grade increased their scores by 1.6 percent; in 5th to 6th, they went down 1.0 percent; 6th to 7th

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Marcus Jester, 20, 390 Spruce Lane; Deandre Ford, 19, 2339 Mayfield Drive, Montgomery; and Javon Burruss, 19, 1130 S. Michigan Ave. Chicago, were arrested at 3:34 p.m. Oct. 3 at Macy’s, 645 E. Boughton Road for retail theft.

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Cheyenne Sauseda, 19, 1758 Red Bud Drive, was arrested at 11 a.m. Oct. 5 for criminal damage to property.

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Alfredo Ruiz-Chaparro, 24, 2953 75th St., Woodridge, was arrested at 1:35 a.m. Oct. 6 in the 200 block of Frontage Road for improper turn at an intersection, failure to signal, failure to yield, flee to elude peace officers and DUI.

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RoMeoVIlle Thomas Speakman, 54, 1440 Lily Cache Lane, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 5:12 p.m. Sept. 21 for battery.

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Benjamin Bailey, 40, 530 S. Susan St., Romeoville, was arrested at 9 p.m. Sept. 23 in the 1000 block of Schmidt Road for DUI, no insurance and illegal transportation of alcohol.

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Victor Robinson, 31, 2129 Arthur Ave., Lockport, was arrested at 8:32 p.m. Sept. 28 at Normantown and Townhall for speeding, no insurance, possession of cannabis and possession of drug paraphernalia.

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FoR MoRe polIce bloTTeRS, Go To buGleNewSpApeRS.coM

grade increased 3.8 percent and standards and best practices. It is pay off,” said Hurder. PARCC results are just one as7th to 8th grade increased 1.6 per- just so exciting to see this evolusessment given to students and tion.” cent. Hurder explained that is has student success is factored into a “We are very proud of these scores, in many areas, our middle been the work of the district to en- myriad of measures given to calcuschool students have surpassed sure there is one approach and one late growth. However, the PARCC state scores, said Karen Flories, ex- experience in aligning the curricu- test is now more aligned with standards seen on a ecutive direcstudent’s report tor of educacard. tional services, “we are continually adapting the curriculum to match Hurder ex6-12. “As a unit the grade levels so that students have a seamless plained the district, this is transition began with superintendent mitchem ...” goal is to use becoming a dAM huRdeR, eXecuTIVe dIRecToR oF all data points true testament educATIoNAl SeRVIceS, pK-5 to further meathat what we sure a student’s are fostering growth and unin the elemenderstanding of specific material. tary grade levels is transferring to lum for grades K through 12. In addition, the school district “We are continually adapting the middle school and high school. This should be a huge celebration curriculum to match the grade lev- has noticed that with this second for administration’s collaboration els so that students have a seamless PARCC test, this is the first time across grade levels to ensure our transition and that transition be- the district is seeing consistency students are developing with the gan with Superintendent Mitchem. in scores, where as with the former curriculum tied to common core We are now starting to see the work state test, the ISAT, scores would

swing wildly. “We couldn’t pinpoint where the problem was before; now we feel we have a good pulse on what works and what doesn’t and that’s a major win,” said Hurder. Overall, PARCC results have had a positive effect on the district. “As an entire district, when we look at our cohort groups, we are moving these kids up and that is how we are approaching instruction--through collaboration, students are growing. There are no excuses, each child can reach mastery,” said Flories. As each school evaluates in scores, the district intends to point out best practices of those who may have scored higher in a given area. For a full look at the district’s report card, check out www.vvsd.org under state assessments or www. illinoisreportcard.com.


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TAKe 5

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ARIES

MARCH 21 TO APRIL 20

Fight the good fight without a demonstration of might. It could be tempting to throw your weight around in the early part of the week. Put ambitions in their proper perspective. Slow and steady wins the race.

GEMINI

M AY 2 2 T O J U N E 2 1

You are just one of the family. During this week you may find that the secret to success consists of compromise, consensus and listening to advice. You might take the back seat to others but still come out ahead.

LEO

J U LY 2 3 T O A U G U S T 2 1

Make your move on the chessboard of life. Solve problems by considering logical sequences. Accomplish your goals via careful planning and forethought in the week ahead. Remain patient when dealing with emotional issues.

ACROSS 1 ALSO 4 HOTELIER HELMSLEY 9 MAKE SMALL ADJUSTMENTS TO 14 POST-ER AREA 15 FIRST STAGE 16 ABBA’S “__ MIA” 17 BLACK-AND-WHITE CRUISER 19 HIGH-TECH PREFIX WITH SPACE 20 MEMORIAL __ KETTERING: NYC HOSPITAL 21 TEENSY BIT 23 WORD ON A PENNY 24 YIN’S PARTNER 25 BLACK-AND-WHITE PUZZLES 27 WHEN DOUBLED, A PACIFIC ISLAND 29 ACTOR DICAPRIO, FAMILIARLY 30 BLACK-AND-WHITE MUSIC MAKERS 35 “THE JETSONS” BOY 39 GO OVER SNOW 40 PAINKILLER WITH A MELTAWAYS CHILDREN’S BRAND 42 “__ MARIA” 43 2014 FILM ABOUT CIVIL RIGHTS MARCHES 45 BLACK-AND-WHITE COMPANION 47 OUTFIELDER’S ASSET 49 BROUHAHAS 50 BLACK-AND-WHITE FLAG 56 TAKE FIVE 59 OCTOBER BIRTHSTONE 60 CURLY-HORNED GOAT 61 HAPPEN 62 REALLY CASUAL “NO PROB!” 64 BLACK-AND-WHITE OCEAN PREDATOR 66 PAL OF THREEPIO 67 BEHAVE THEATRICALLY 68 TYPE 69 WAY UP OR WAY DOWN 70 MEETING OF CHURCH

DELEGATES 71 ALBANY IS ITS CAP.

DOWN 1 SLIGHTLY SLOSHED 2 CITY IN FLORIDA’S HORSE COUNTRY 3 RELEASED FROM JAIL UNTIL TRIAL 4 DIVING LAKE BIRD 5 PICTURE THAT SHOWS MORE DETAIL: ABBR. 6 “SESAME STREET” GROUCH 7 “SWEET!” 8 GILLETTE RAZORS 9 HBO RIVAL 10 “TOTALLY AWESOME!” 11 CAMPFIRE GLOWER 12 MODIFY, AS A LAW 13 GO-__: MINI RACERS 18 TEASE RELENTLESSLY 22 ISP OPTION 25 LIKE DENSE BROWNIES 26 LITTLE SHAVER, TO BURNS 28 DIAL TYPE ON OLD PHONES 30 LTR. ADD-ONS 31 EISENHOWER NICKNAME 32 DAYS OF YORE,

QUAINTLY 33 SUPPORTING VOTE 34 NBC SHOW THAT CELEBRATED ITS 40TH ANNIVERSARY IN FEB. 36 CAUSE AN UPROAR OF BIBLICAL PROPORTIONS? 37 FERTILITY CLINIC EGGS 38 ITCH 41 ACTOR SHARIF 44 SHOPLIFTER CATCHER, OFTEN 46 HANDHELD BURNING LIGHT 48 MED. SCAN 50 __ BROTHERS: POP MUSIC TRIO 51 DIZZYING PAINTING GENRE 52 COFFEEHOUSE ORDER 53 BASSOON RELATIVES 54 POTENTIALLY INFECTIOUS 55 FORMER JAILBIRD 57 TARNISH 58 TOUGH HIKES 61 DIDN’T PAY YET 63 LAUGHS FROM SANTA 65 FROM __ Z

LIBRA

SEPTEMBER 24 TO OCTOBER 23

Everybody listens when you speak. You seem to have good judgment and a tolerant attitude so everyone heeds your every word. Ignore fringe elements that attempt to appeal to your base instincts in the week ahead.

SAGITTARIUS

NOVEMBER 23 TO DECEMBER 22

You will win if you are neat as a pin. If your organizational skills and ambitions have gone AWOL this might be a good week to remedy the situation. Avoid making major purchases for the next few days.

AQUARIUS

JANUARY 21 TO FEBRUARY 19

You can be logical, responsible, and practical. Don’t let a chance to impress friends and co-workers with your intellectual analysis pass you by. Earn brownie points for dependability as this week unfolds.

SUDOKU

TAURUS

A P R I L 2 1 T O M AY 2 1

You can be affectionate and charming in private. But you may easily lose your temper in public. In the week to come it will be best to focus on close personal relationships and prove you can live up to commitments.

CANCER

J U N E 2 2 T O J U LY 2 2

Remain poised to parry a partner’s pushy posturing. You may feel manipulated by others in close connection as this week unfolds. Concentrate on keeping up your end of a bargain and others will respond in kind.

VIRGO

AUGUST 22 TO SEPTEMBER 23

Spread good will and good taste. Acting on your finer impulses might result in a smile or a sincere thank you perhaps when you treat someone to lunch or a gift. In the week ahead you are wise about the true value of a dollar.

SCORPIO

OCTOBER 24 TO NOVEMBER 22

Blend business and pleasure to achieve your end. Your heightened social aptitude gives you just the right touch to instill trust. You’ll go further this week by being outgoing and friendly than by following strict protocols.

CAPRICORN

DECEMBER 23 TO JANUARY 20

Enlist the encouragement of your inner efficiency expert. In the week ahead you can get further faster by carefully plotting and planning your path in advance. Shrug off an intense desire to take complete control.

PISCES

FEBRUARY 20 TO MARCH 20

Smile and the world smiles with you. As this week begins your charming ways can impress and dazzle others, so this is an excellent time to make new contacts. Steer clear of taking financial risks for the next few days.

JUMBLE

Tribune Content Agency, LLC. 2016

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

JUMBLES:

• POUCH • CASTE • GUITAR • FURROW

ANSWER:

TOO MUCH WINE CAN RESULT IN THE -WRATH OF GRAPES


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page 9

>> inSiDe: lewis harriers plaCe in CrossoVer meet pAGe 11

FeATuRe

CLASS OF

her Own Just 3 years out out of high school, haley augello is already a pioneer of women’s wrestling in illinois By marK gregory sports reporter @hear_the_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com

It is rare that an athlete that had a hard time cracking the varsity lineup in their sport is inducted into the school’s athletic Hall of Fame. But Haley Augello is a rare athlete. The 2013 Lockport Township High School graduate didn’t place at the IHSA state wrestling meet. She never won a tournament and was a back-up most of her career, however, she made her Olympic debut in this past summer’s Rio De Janeiro games in the 48kg class of women’s freestyle wrestling – finishing ninth overall. “I didn’t walk away with what I wanted - I didn’t bring home that medal. So, as long as I stay healthy, I will stay with it for another cycle,” Augello said. “I love the sport very much and the experiences were great and that just lit a fire in me for the next one and to go and get my goals accomplished.” Augello opened her tournament

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plaCe aUgello finished in the olympiCs

with a dominant win over 2015 World bronze medalist Jessica Blaszka of Netherlands, 7-0. In her quarterfinal, Augello came close to defeating three-time World champion Eri Tosaka of Japan, but dropped the match, sending her to the repechage round, where she fell 3-2 to two-time World medalist Zhuidyz Eshimova of Kazakhstan. While her goals were not met this time, the experience was one Augello said she will never forget. “I got to meet all the men’s basketball team at the opening ceremonies and I met [gymnastic gold medalist] Simone [Biles] at the closing ceremonies. It is crazy seeing all these people of different shapes and sizes coming together to represent the USA and that was such a surreal moment to see all melting pot of cultures, skin tones, men, women, all coming together to represent the country and that is what the Olympics is all about. Augello is the first Olympian from Lockport, but she knows her accomplishments and honors do not only represent her community

see pioneer | page

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points she lost By in her final matCh

phoTo by MARK GReGoRy

Olympian Haley Augello was inducted into the Lockport Hall of Fame at the homecoming football game against Bolingbrook.


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lewIS

Flyer men place third at conference crossover Lewis University men’s cross country had a lot of competition at the Conference Crossover meet hosted on-campus, but were able to run away with third place. The Flyers had an average time of 25:26.46 in the 8000 meter race. Third place was earned for the Flyers thanks to the fourth place worthy running of junior Michael Leet (Arlington Heights, Ill./Prospect). Michael finished the race with an overall time of 24:44.74. Juniors James Frederickson (Racine, Wis./Case) (25:14.42), and Xavier Reed (Valpariso, Ind./Valparaiso) (25:30.53) also finished in the top 25 of the race.

woMeN’S cRoSS couNTRy Following the completion of the 15 school Conference Crossover meet the Lewis University women’s cross country team finished the race in fifth place. As a team the Flyers had an overall time of 22:59.10 and a team score of 154. The top performers for Lewis were Abby Tripp (Schaumburg, Ill./Conant), who was the top runner for the Flyers running a time 22:38.22, Mollie Dalton (Hoffman Estates, Ill./Conant) who ran 22:46.98, and Megan Shaffer (Mattoon, Ill./Mattoon) with 23:00.63. The Flyers compete next in the GLVC Championship in Rolla, Mis-

souri October 22.

woMeN’S VolleybAll Lewis University redshirt junior Maddie Seliga (St. Louis, Mo./Nerinx Hall) helped the No. 13 women’s volleyball team rally from a 2-1 deficit and extend its winning streak to nine matches with the 2518, 18-25, 19-25, 25-12, 15-5 win over Bellarmine University on Friday (Oct. 7) night. Seliga posted a double-double with a match-high 18 kills, with a hitting percentage of .333 (18-442), and 15 digs to lead the Flyers. With the win, Lewis improves to 14-3 overall and 8-0 in GLVC action, while the host Knights are now 12-5 on the campaign and 3-5 in conference play. The Flyers also received doubledoubles from sophomore outside hitter Elizabeth Hyland (Plainfield, Ill./Plainfield Central) and redshirt senior libero Nicole Yuede (St. Charles, Mo./Francis Howell North). Hyland had 12 kills and a team-best 19 digs, while Yuede had 10 assists and 14 digs. Lewis junior middle hitter Aly Schneider (Granger, Ind./Penn) had 13 kills. Redshirt sophomore setter Abby Becker (Menomonee Falls, Wis./Menomonee Falls) dished out a team-best 39 digs.

woMeN’S SocceR Missouri-St. Louis’ Miriam Taylor scored the golden goal in the 100th minute to give the host Tri-

tons the 3-2 (OT) Great Lakes Valley Conference victory over the Lewis University women’s soccer team at Don Dallas Field on Friday (Oct. 7) night. With the win, UMSL improves to 7-2 overall and 7-2 in GLVC action, while the visiting Flyers fall to 5-6-1 on the campaign and 3-5-1 in conference play. UMSL jumped out to an early 2-0 lead and the score would remain that way until the 78th minute, as Lewis senior Meg Carmody (Orland Park, Ill./Sandburg) cut that lead in half with a tally at the 77:44 mark. Lewis junior forward Angela Toritto (Wood Dale, Ill. / Immaculate Conception), who assisted on Carmody’s goal, helped push the game into overtime, as she found the back of the net with less than four minutes remaining

MeN’S SocceR Missouri-St. Louis’ Jake Meyerkord scored the game-winning goal in the 49th minute to propel the host Tritons to the 1-0 Great Lakes Valley Conference victory over the Lewis University men’s soccer team at Don Dallas Field on Friday (Oct. 7) night. With the win, UMSL improves to 7-3-1 overall and 6-2-1 in GLVC action, while the visiting Flyers are now 3-8 on the campaign and 2-7 in conference play. Lewis outshot UMSL 14-9 and held a 5-3 advantage in shots on goal.

11


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sports

pioneer from page 9 and her school – they represent her sport – a sport that was introduced to the Olympics in 2004. “I had a little different journey as the guys. I wrestled freestyle, the team is folk style. Having to wrestle males, I wasn’t as strong as them and I had to work harder to get to that level,” she said. “I stuck with it and that is the biggest part with women is when it is hard, they have to stick with it when it gets hard. A lot of them don’t and that is why you don’t see a lot of women wrestlers. It is an honor that they recognized my hard work. That is an honor.” Augello said her time in high school was different than that of some of her Olympic teammates, as she did not endure a hard upbringing in the sport, despite her gender. “With women’s wrestling, there have been a lot of [discrimination] other athletes have had that I never had growing up,” she said. “A lot of people asked me when I’m interviewed about the sexist comments that I encountered and honestly, my coaches and my teammates at Lockport really shielded me from anything bad that was being said. I really never got that side of it and I know a lot of girls do and that is why I stand so strongly on women getting comfortable with being strong.

Thursday, October 13, 2016 | buglenewspapers.com “In Illinois, you don’t see a lot of girls wrestling at the younger levels and I think it is important now with women’s wrestling growing as rapidly as it is that we need to bring women’s wrestling to places where it has the support. With me making the Olympic team and showing that I had a comfortable journey at Lockport can hopefully open doors here, in the area and all around Illinois.” Lockport wrestling coach Jake Oster – who was one of the two head coaches had while in the program – said treating her the right way was simply the culture of the team. “Everyone kind of emulates your leader and [former head coach] Joe Williams is one of the highest character people that I ever met,” Oster said. “So, having him at the time probably unknowingly helped too just because he is someone that treats everyone the same and doesn’t come in with preconceived notions. “I am sure there were things said by kids and parents from other teams and I’m sure she heard some of that, but it just wasn’t a thing on our team. When she started wrestling, her dad and the other guys running the Junior Porters at the time, she just wrestled. They always treated her that way and when she started coming to our summer camps, she was just another wrestler. The only time

she was any different than anyone else is when she made the move to wrestling internationally and the only reason she was different is she was on a different practice schedule and she was wrestling freestyle.” Augello’s Porter coaches and teammates may have protected her outside of the room, but inside they treated her like one of the guys. “They held me to the same standard as them,” she said. “They weren’t crying on the side of the mat, so I wasn’t going to cry on the side of the mat. They held me to that standard and that really pushed me as an athlete.” That standard was both emotional and physical. For half of her career, Augello spared with one of the best wrestlers to ever come out of the Porters’ system in Brian Rossi – a three-time state placer, twice taking third and once winning the state title. He is now wrestling at Stanford. “Brian Rossi was my wrestling partner for two years and he is wrestling at Stanford now and that is only one example, I always had tough competition in the room and they never took it easy on me,” Augello said. That came as no surprise to the coach. “I would have expected no less from those guys,” Oster said. “That is something every high level com-

petitor has. They just compete and everyone that is a good high level competitor makes everyone around them better. They know if

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they don’t give their all, they aren’t going to get everyone else’s all to help them.”


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news aBoUt loCal BUsinesses in yoUr CommUnity ThuRSdAy, ocTobeR 13, 2016 | buGleNewSpApeRS.coM

coluMN >> dAVe SAyS

Good idea to cash flow school don’t get so excited about paying off your debt that you borrow to pay tuition DeAr DAVe, My wife and I are on Baby Step 2 of your plan, and I’m in graduate school while working full-time. We’re trying to cash flow my education from this point forward after previously taking out student loans. Our household income is $90,000 a year, and we have a car payment. Are we taking the correct approach to handle all this responsibly? DAn DeAr DAn, I love this approach and the fact that you’re willing to work hard and be disciplined to make all this happen. At this point, you just need to lay your finances out and crunch the budget numbers as to what tuition and school are going to cost between now and when you graduate. Your first goal is to do no more harm, meaning that you graduate and finish this degree without tak-

dave says By Dave Ramsey

ing on any more debt. I think beyond that, and I don’t know what you’re paying for the school, you should have some money beyond that to work your debt snowball. Don’t beef up the payments on your debt so heavily that you use up money that you’ll need for tuition. Getting through school will slow down your debt snowball some-

what, but that’s okay. This is a worthy cause, and you’re approaching it the right way. I just don’t want you to get so excited and gazelle intense about paying off your debt that you end up borrowing for tuition. Congratulations on being really smart with your finances and your education. It’s a really neat idea, and you guys are going about it in exactly the right way! — DAVe Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business, and CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven best-selling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 12 million listeners each week on 575 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.

15

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 143 Somerset Lane, BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 (SINGLE FAMILY). On the 3rd day of November, 2016 to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: PHH Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff V. TIMOTHY A. AHRENS; BEACONRIDGE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION; Defendant. Case No. 16 CH 0337 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: SHAPIRO KREISMAN AND ASSOCIATES, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Rd, Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 P: 847-770-4348 F: 847-291-3434 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 10/13, 10/20, 10/27


16

deadline for classifieds: friday at noon Thursday, October 13, 2016 | buglenewspapers.com

Business & Private Party Classified Ads: $16 per week, 20 words or less. Weddings, Births & Engagements: Black & White - $25, Color - $35. Obituaries: $35.

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17 Thursday, October 13, 2016 | buglenewspapers.com

Phone: 815.436.2431 >> Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. FAX: 815.439.2548 email: classifieds@enterprisepublications.com IN PERSON: Enterprise Publications >> 23856 Andrew Rd. >> Plainfield, IL


18

legal listings

BOLINGBROOK

NOTICE OF MANDATORY MEDIATION.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, JOLIET, ILLINOIS FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FANNIE MAE”), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, PLAINTIFF,

YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE MEDIATION DATE GIVEN OR YOUR MEDIATION WILL BE TERMINATED.

VS. KIMROSSI L. TAYLOR; ADRIENNE TAYLOR A/K/A ADRIENNE FARMBY TAYLOR, A/K/A ADRIENNE C. FARMBY-TAYLOR; COUNTY OF WILL; PINE BROOK HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS,

on or before November 7, 2016, A JUDGMENT OR DECREE BY DEFAULT MAY BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU FOR THE RELIEF ASKED IN THE COMPLAINT. PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT, THE PLAINTIFF’S ATTORNEY IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. McCalla Raymer Pierce, LLC

16 CH 1469 1430 WHITE PINE LANE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60490

Attorney for Plaintiff 1 N. Dearborn St. Suite 1300 Chicago, IL 60602 Ph. (312) 346-9088 File No. 257060-51510 I704215

NOTICE BY PUBLICATION

Published 10/6, 10/13, 10/20

DEFENDANTS.

NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU, Kimrossi L. Taylor Adrienne Taylor a/k/a Adrienne Farmby Taylor, a/k/a Adrienne C. Farmby-Taylor Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants defendants, that this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, asking for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: LOT 44 IN PINEBROOK SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED FEBRUARY 16, 1999 AS DOCUMENT R99-20516, IN THE VILLAGE OF BOLINGBROOK, WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1430 White Pine Lane Bolingbrook, IL 60490 and which said Mortgage was made by, Kimrossi L. Taylor, Adrienne Taylor a/k/a Adrienne Farmby Taylor, a/k/a Adrienne C. Farmby-Taylor Mortgagor(s), to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC. Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County, Illinois, as Document No. R2007161182; and for other relief. UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this County, Pamela J. McGuire 14 W Jefferson Suite 212 Joliet, IL 60432 YOU MAY STILL BE ABLE TO SAVE YOUR HOME. DO NOT IGNORE THIS DOCUMENT. By order of the Chief Judge of the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Circuit Court, this case is set for Mandatory Mediation on October 25, 2016 at, 1:00 p.m. at the Will County Court, Annex 3rd Floor (Arbitration Center) 57 N. Ottawa Street, Joliet, Illinois. A lender representative will be present along with a court appointed mediator to discuss options that you may have and to prescreen you for a potential mortgage modification. For further information on the mediation process, please see the attached

BOLINGBROOK PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

vs. TIMOTHY A. AHRENS; BEACONRIDGE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION; Defendant. No. 16 CH 0337 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 28th day of July, 2016, MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 3rd day of November, 2016 , commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 5, AREA 13, UNIT 2, IN BEACONRIDGE SUBDIVISION UNIT NO. 5, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT APPURTENANT TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED REAL ESTATE AS DEFINED IN DECLARATION DATED AUGUST 24, 1967 AND RECORDED AUGUST 25, 1967 AS DOCUMENT NO. R67-12143 AND DECLARATION OF INCLUSION DATED AUGUST 26, 1969 AND RECORDED AUGUST 26, 1969 AS DOCUMENT NO. R6915865, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 143 Somerset Lane, BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: S I N GLE FAMILY P.I.N.: 12-02-14-301-056-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to ex-

Thursday, October 13, 2016 | buglenewspapers.com

ceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

Bolingbrook, IL 60440

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

the Mortgagor(s), to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Nominee for EquiFirst Corporation, as Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County, Illinois, as Document No. R2006144451; and for other relief; that summons was duly issued out of said Court against you as provided by law and that the said suit is now pending.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

YOU MAY STILL BE ABLE TO SAVE YOUR HOME. DO NOT IGNORE THIS DOCUMENT.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: SHAPIRO KREISMAN AND ASSOCIATES, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Rd, Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 P: 847-770-4348 F: 847-291-3434 MIKE KELLEY Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 10/13, 10/20, 10/27

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS PHH Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff,

s tay i n f o r m e d w i t h l e g a l l i s t i n g s

BOLINGBROOK IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 12TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY - JOLIET, ILLINOIS U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee under Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated as of December 1, 2006 MASTR Asset-Backed Securities Trust 2006HE5 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-HE5 PLAINTIFF Vs. Brenda Lewis; Pine Meadow Condominium Association No. 1; Unknown Owners and Nonrecord Claimants; Richard Kuhn, as Special Representative for Brenda Lewis DEFENDANTS 16CH 01381 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU: Brenda Lewis Unknown Owners and Nonrecord Claimants That this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to-wit: COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 14U Fernwood Drive

and which said Mortgage was made by: Brenda Lewis Andre Lewis executed the mortgage, however this individual is deceased and is not named as a defendant in this lawsuit

By order of the Chief Judge of the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, this case is set for Mandatory Mediation on November 15, 2016 at 2:15 pm at the Will County Court Annex3rd Floor (Arbitration Center), 57 N. Ottawa Street, Joliet, Illinois. A lender representative will be present along with a court appointed mediator to discuss options that you may have and to pre-screen you for a potential mortgage modification. For further information on the mediation process, please see the attached

NOTICE OF MANDATORY MEDIATION.YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE MEDIATION DATE GIVEN OR YOUR RIGHT TO MEDIATION WILL TERMINATE. NOW, THEREFORE, UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this Court, Pamela J. McGuire Clerk of the Court 57 N. Ottawa Street Joliet, IL 60432 on or before November 14, 2016, A DEFAULT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU AT ANY TIME AFTER THAT DAY AND A JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PRAYER OF SAID COMPLAINT. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 DuPage # 15170 Winnebago # 531 Our File No. 14-16-06732 NOTE: This law firm is a debt collector. I705138 Published 10/13, 10/20, 10/27


50+ pluS

news aBoUt aCtiVe seniors in the CommUnity ThuRSdAy, ocTobeR 13, 2016 | buGleNewSpApeRS.coM

19

SeNIoR FeATuRe

How to determine if downsizing is for you downsizing to smaller homes or apartments is a significant step

you the price you are hoping for, delay your downsize until the market rebounds.

A

s men and women retire or approach retirement age, many opt to downsize their homes. Such a decision can save older adults substantial amounts of money while also liberating them from the hassle of maintaining large homes they no longer need. Downsizing to smaller homes or apartments is a significant step, one that homeowners should give ample consideration before making their final decisions. The following are a handful of tips to help homeowners determine if downsizing to smaller homes is the right move. GeT A Grip on THe reAL eSTATe MArKeT Downsizing is not solely about money, but it’s important that homeowners consider

the real estate market before putting their homes up for sale. Speak with a local realtor or your financial advisor about the current state of your real estate market. Downsizing can help homeowners save money on utilities, taxes and mortgage payments, but those savings may be negated if you sell your house in a buyer’s market instead of a seller’s market. If you think the current market won’t get

TAKe inVenTorY oF WHAT’S in YoUr HoUSe Empty nesters often find that their homes are still filled with their children’s possessions, even long after those children have entered adulthood and left home. If the storage in your home is dominated by items that belong to your children and not you, then downsizing might be right for you. Tell your children you are thinking of downsizing and invite them over to pick through any items still in your home. Once they have done so and taken what they want, you can host a yard sale, ultimately donating or discarding what you cannot sell. Once all of the items are gone, you may realize that moving into a smaller place is the financially prudent decision.

eXAMine YoUr oWn iTeMS AS WeLL Your children’s items are likely not the only items taking up space in your home. Take inventory of your own possessions as well,

making note of items you can live without and those you want to keep. If the list of items you can live without is extensive, then you probably won’t have a problem moving into a smaller home. If you aren’t quite ready to say goodbye to many of your possessions, then you might benefit from staying put for a little while longer. ConSiDer YoUr reTireMenT LiFeSTYLe If you have already retired or on the verge of retirement and plan to spend lots of time traveling, then downsizing to a smaller home may free up money you can spend on trips. And if you really do see yourself as a silverhaired jetsetter, then you likely won’t miss your current home because you won’t be home frequently enough to enjoy it. If travel is not high on your retirement todo list but you have a hobby, such as crafting, restoring classic cars or woodworking, that you hope to turn into a second profession, then you might benefit from staying put and converting your existing space into a workshop. Many retirees downsize their homes, but this decision requires careful consideration of a variety of factors.


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