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INSIDE

SPORTS Vogt earns top billing for area softball team

NEWS Village ‘beefing up’ ethics ordinances PAGE 3

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Our Village, Our News

JUNE 28, 2012

Vol. 6 No. 50

Contest Winners!

Voyager Media Father’s Day Tie Coloring Contest Winners won tickets to the Joliet Slammers and a tool set from MyGofer.

Caudil Spencerer James and fath

Quarry Withdrawn Plans to move forward with quarry removed from table

“They have withdrew their application for expansion and we are rectifying what was discovered in a billing error that was from many years ago.” John Noak, mayor

Mia Vaughn and father Bleu

By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

In a new agreement between the village and the Material Service Corporation, plans to move forward with any changes to its operations have halted and the village is recouping costs owed. While a request made last fall by the Material Service Corporation to expand its quarry operations was off the table for some time, residents were still concerned over any possible changes being considered by the company.Yet, even with this new agreement, some are still concerned the issue will only come up again in the future. Village Attorney Rich Vogel prefaced that the development and settlement agreement

Jonathan Lina res and father Michae (Not Pictured) l

does not make any changes whatsoever to any current annexation agreements, zoning of special use permit ordinances. He said that the agreement resolves a number of outstanding issues between the company and the village. First, the agreement outlines signal improvements at Route 53 and Material Service Drive, and the right of way at Taylor Road. During the process of reviewing the corporation’s proposals, it was found that the company owed the village slightly more than $500,000 in tax differential payments dating from 1999 to 2010. The agreement states that company will pay back those funds in three installments; $250,000 See QUARRY, page 2


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THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

QUARRY Continued from page 1 by April 2013; approximately $130,758 by April 2014; and the balance by April 2015. Lastly, the agreement includes the withdrawal of the pending development application.It states that the company wishes to defer further action on or consideration of the development application and formally withdraws it from village review. It also states that if the application is reinstated or an equal application is filed in the future, the application fee will be credited towards the amount due to the village. “Both parties have wanted to come to an agreement and we have,” said Mayor John Noak. “They have withdrew their application for expansion and we are rectifying what was discovered in a billing error that was from many years ago.” While the expansion agreement is now officially halted, residents like Tomasz Suliga who has been taking a continued stand on the issue, said he was disappointed in

the move, saying it was nothing more than a political move to push back the issue after the upcoming local election next April. He addressed the mayor at the village board stating, “I am disappointed...I thought this was an opportunity to do something about the issues, not sit and wait. Blasting is still continuing and still disrupting. It’s not pleasurable for the people around there. Yet nothing is being done. This is an election issue. Hopefully another candidate will listen to us. All you have done is kicked the can down the road.” Noak reiterated that the company withdrew its proposal. “We have to treat them like any other company who makes a proposal, there is a process

News involved and one that we follow,” said Noak. “I do not anticipate any action. We have worked to resolve our issues with this agreement.” Suliga, who lives in the subdivision across from the quarry, has been questioning the company’s proposal and current operations since it was first announced that the company was looking to expand late last year. Residents have openly voiced their concern about white dustlike clouds overlapping the streets after a blast and sound levels based on scientific research likened to the decibel levels of a jet airplane. Material Service owns nearly 100 acres at the quarry west of Route 53. Material Service’s

most current agreement with Romeoville was drafted in 1995 and allows daily blasting on its property. Material Service owns a total of 1600 acres and has

additional operations east of Route 53 since the 1950s, up and down the I&M Canal. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com


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Village makes preemptive strike against conflict By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

In a proactive measure, the village is beefing up its ethics ordinances, hoping to head off any unforeseen issues in the future. After working on the ordinance for some time, the village amended its ethics ordinance, making changes in regards to hiring practices, conflicts of interest and compensation. “None of this is in response to any particular issue,” said Mayor

John Noak. “We are setting the bar higher at a time when we are not being directly affected by any issue.” The ordinance outlines that any family member of a full-time elected official is ineligible for initial hire or appointment to any full-time employment position with the village. In addition, to avoid any conflicts of interest, vendors, contractors, and bidders must disclose to the village any interests that anyone associated with them might have in the

government of the village such as employment or service on a commission. For contracts more than $100,000, these groups must report all individuals who hold more than one percent ownership and is related to an elected official or employee, if the contractor or vendor employs any elected official or village employee, or if they have any compensated independent contracting or consulting relationship with any elected official or employee within the preceding two years.

In terms of compensation, it clarifies that the village president (mayor) elected in 2013 will be calculated and paid in accordance within the provisions of this ordinance and also prohibits elected officials from receiving compensation from employment, consulting or independent contracting relationships with any city or village contiguous to the village of Romeoville. Noak said the village has professional hiring practices in place and this ordinance is

hoped to reassure the public that the village is operating properly with its contractors and vendors as it should be. “I think this is the right thing to do right now,” said Trustee Joe Chavez. “All you have to do is watch the news and see the issues that are affecting towns all over Illinois. We are seeing it and we are sitting here are not hiding anything and are doing this now.” The amendment passed unanimously. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com

Local politicians, residents celebrating “Day of the Immigrant” By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

In a celebration of what immigrants of this area bring to the country, Bolingbrook will play host for the Southwest Suburban Immigrant Project’s 2012 Day of the Immigrant. Bolingbrook Mayor Roger Claar will open the event, which will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday at Village Hall, 375 W. Briarcliff. Claar will join Congresswoman Judy Biggert, local politicians and Romeoville Chamber of Commerce president

Bridget Domberg in a discussion regarding immigrant issues. To highlight their contributions, immigrant entrepreneurs and motivational speakers will be on hand to voice their success stories. This is the second year such an event has been held. However, last year’s event, held in Naperville, was set up as a walk/recessional to honor these individuals. “We wanted to go bigger and set up more of an expo, getting resources out to as many people as possible,” SSIP spokesman

Ross Reed said. “Bolingbrook and the mayor as well as Congresswoman Biggert have all been very supportive, giving up their time and making resources available. Their contributions of time have been wonderful and extremely helpful in getting out the voice of the immigrant.” Reed said the group’s goal was set to have 500 attendees but wouldn’t be surprised if that number doubles to 1,000. SSIP has reached out to many church and local organizations to spread the word. In addition to the conference,

a resource fair will be held to help individuals pick up any information they may need. Musical performances and festivities, including rock climbing, train rides, fire truck tours and a chance to grab a bite to eat also will be offered. According to Reed, the event was designed to highlight the contributions, success stories and cultural influences of the immigrant community living in the southwest suburbs of DuPage and Will County. “This is about getting the whole community involved to

see why immigrants help make this country great,” Reed said. “We are not about forcing our ideas on anyone. We want to be seen as open and friendly and want to invite the community to see what is lying in their own backyard. We want them to see what talent is there.” Some of the performers of the event are local residents. Reed said the group hopes the event will grow each year and says the plan is for the festivities to travel throughout the southwestern suburbs, with Romeoville slated next.

Valley View seeks community input Valley View recalls 251 teachers after RIF By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

The Valley View School District is looking for some feedback from the community. A year into the “new view,” officials are seeking input to gauge progress and gain insight for future endeavors. You can find the survey online at www.vvsd.org and submit responses over the next few months. Currently the survey is available only online. However, paper copies can be requested and will be provided to ensure all responses are collected. “This avenue of collecting information is one opportunity for our community stakeholders

to provide feedback as necessary to continuous improvement,” director of K-12 assessment Kelly Gilbert, who is heading up the survey process, said. While the survey will continually be live for the next few months, during July, the district will be utilizing the responses as part of its strategic planning process. “We are hoping to receive feedback that will allow us to align our efforts together and to allow us to reflect on what is best for our community and our students,” Gilbert said. Gilbert explained this is the first time in several years that information regarding future

programming has been sought throughout the entire district. “The initial responses will be thoroughly reviewed and used to make decisions that are in the best interest of our district and most importantly for our students,” Gilbert said. The survey asks participants to rate its levels of dedication to higher academic learning, strengths and weaknesses, discipline,academic progress,and touches on future programming, trying to gauge interest in various programs such as preschool,afterschool activities, community partnerships, safety, volunteer, and vocational programs.

katauskas@buglenewspapers.com

By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Under much scrutiny in April, the Valley View School District was forced to lay off more than 400 teachers and aides. While this year’s numbers were high, the Reduction in Force process, is a common one. Teachers are sent a pink slip in the spring but can later be recalled. As of this point, Executive Director of Human Resources Sharon Hawks, reported that out of the 266 certified teaching personnel that

received notices, 251 were recalled. Hawks said that at this time, the district is finished with the recalls for certified staff unless someone resigns their teaching position, which will create a vacancy. However, the district is still working on the aide list and is approximately 75 percent completed. Regarding aides, there were 163 RIFs and to date 104 have been replaced. Hawks said the district is still close to its target of approximately 35 not being recalled. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

Will County historians work to preserve our past By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

Over the next several weeks, the Bugle will shed insight on the Will County Historic Preservation Commission. Preserving Our Past will journey to a handful of registered Will County historic landmarks, take a closer look into the historic survey process, and introduce readers to members of the commission and the work they do. Many people cringe at the very mention of historic preservation. Bad memories of boring teachers, preaching the lessons of the past, are usually what this seemingly quixotic term brings to mind. However, for nine Will County residents, historic preservation isn’t an idealistic goal or an unwanted burden. Their mission is a labor of love, and the Will County Historic Preservation Commission is where they call

Submitted Photo

The Ogren-Reed House in Plainfield Township is one of the 43 historic structures.

home. “It’s just people that love history,” Will County Executive Communications Director Anastasia Tuskey said. “They want to do what they can to preserve it.” Since 1992, the HPC has committed itself to uncovering

and preserving Will County’s historic landmarks. In those 20 years the HPC has seen a number of history enthusiasts fill the ranks of the nine-member commission. Two of those members Virginia Ferry and Michael Lambert, have been with the HPC since its inception.

“Michael Lambert, who was the founder of the commission, contacted me because I was interested in historic preservation,” Ferry said. Prior to coming to the HPC, Ferry was the cofounder of the Joliet Area Historical Society. She brought that passion with her to the HPC, and this commitment to the preservation of history propelled her to become the HPC’s chairman in 1999, a position she still holds. “It was a long process,” Ferry said.“It started with just figuring out a way to preserve some of these landmarks. One thing led to another and here we are today.” Like the county it represents, the HPC’s landscape has changed over the years. This fact has made the HPC’s mission more important now than ever before. Tangled up in the growth of its sprawling neighbor to the east, Chicago has in many

Relay for Life kicks off June 30 By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Striving to make a difference, teams of residents will be coming together to fight cancer at the village’s second annual

Relay for Life. The event will kick off at 2 p.m., Saturday, June 30, at the village hall grounds located at 1050 W. Romeo Road with the first Survivor Lap beginning at 2:30 p.m. The Luminara

ceremony will be held at 9 p.m. Walking for their own reasons to not only honor cancer survivors and remember those lost, but also to raise funds and awareness to help save lives, 164 participants have already

registered with 23 teams raising more than $36,400. Village officials encourage residents to come out and support the event. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com

“Music for Malaria” concert set for June 29 Around the world, one child dies every 45 seconds from malaria. Fortunately, this devastating disease can be treated and prevented. On Friday, June 29, Good Shepherd Church in Romeoville will host a “Music for Malaria” concert. The free event takes place 6-9 p.m. at the outdoor

amphitheater at the Village of Romeoville Municipal Center, located on Romeo Road. Everyone is invited to bring their families and a blanket to hear performances by praise bands from four Lutheran churches in the area: Faith Lutheran Church in Joliet, Good Shepherd Church in Romeoville,

Rockin the Ville Laura Katauskas/Bugle Staff

Residents came out for the first concert of the Rockin the Ville series Thursday evening. Tropixplosion, a Caribbean show band, performed at the Deer Crossing Park Amphitheater at 1050 Romeo Road. The next performance will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. July 19 by the Neverly Brothers, who will perform a guided muscial tour through rock ‘n’ roll history with hits from the 1950s American Rockabilly, Rock n’ Roll and Rhythm and Blues.

Resurrection Lutheran Church in Channahon, and Shepherd of the Hill Church in Lockport. An interactive educational area will offer all ages the opportunity to learn more about malaria, how it can be cured, and what you can do to help. The “Music for Malaria” Concert is a free event. Financial

gifts and donations will be accepted, with all of the money raised going to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA)’s Malaria Campaign. Please contact Good Shepherd Church with any questions: call 815-886-4354 or e-mail welcome432@gmail. com.

ways pushed the tremendous development Will County has seen in the recent years. As residents of Chicago move west, new housing developments and chain stores have come with them. Covering 850 square miles, Will County is one of the largest counties in the state.Although the HPC only catalogs structures in unincorporated Will County, this is not a small area.Approximately 66 percent of Will County is unincorporated. Currently the HPC is engaged in a massive survey that is attempting to make sure the history of this area isn’t lost with increasing commercial development. The current Rural Historic Structures Survey Project began in 1999, and its mission is to improve upon an earlier survey that began in 1988. Historic See PAST, page 10

Cooling Centers available Keep in mind with extreme weather conditions, cooling centers are available at the Recreation Center, 900 West Romeo Road and Fire Station No. 3 at 698 Birch Drive. If a cooling center is needed after 9:30 p.m., residents are asked to contact the Police Department at 815-886-2141. If you have elderly or disabled neighbors please check on them. For more information please contact Romeoville Emergency Management 815886-0021.


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Village plans Independence Day celebration The village of Romeoville will host an Independence Day Celebration July 3 at Deer Crossing Park, 1050 W. Romeo Road. The Hat Guys band will be performing on the amphitheater beginning at 7 p.m. The band, activities, and food will be at Deer Crossing Park; fireworks will be held at Village Park, 900 W. Romeo Rd. and will begin at 9:15 p.m. Later in the week, in a joint effort between the Romeoville Recreation Department and the Lockport Township Park District, Splish Splash will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. on Sunday, July 8

at Volunteer Park at 1100 Murphy Drive. Enjoy a day full of wet, wacky, and wild fun with your family and friends. Water-themed inflatables and games featuring prizes will allow you to cool off and enjoy the weather. Once you have cooled off take a trip under the sea for a theatre performance of Little Mermaid by the Round Lake Park District theatre group. Performance starts at 6 p.m. Concessions will be available to purchase throughout the event. For more information about both events, contact the Romeoville Recreation Department at (815) 886-6222. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com

Bugle File Photos

Participants play bags during last year’s Independence Day party.

I-55 Interchange at Airport Road long way from reality By Sherri Dauskurdas Staff Reporter

In what can only be described as the earliest of discussions, a public hearing last week addressed the future plans for a Will County stretch of I-55. The area being studied includes about four miles of I-55 from south of Airport Road to one mile north of Route 126/ Lockport Road. That includes all of Route

126 south of I-55, a 4,500-foot section of 135th Street east and west of Essington and 3,5000 feet of Essington north of Route 126, according to the Illinois Department of Transportation. Over the past year, V3 Companies has been working on a study for the possible expansion of the I-55 interchange at Route 126, and for the possible creation of a new interchange at I-55 and Lockport Street/Airport Road. The project is being guided

by community advisors from Plainfield, Romeoville and Bolingbrook, and members of all entities got together with residents June 21 to discuss potential challenges, traffic routes and the like. Congestion on the stretch of highway,and the roadways which connect, is due in part to limited exiting options for travelers. Right now, drivers on Route 126 can only enter I-55 northbound, pushing southbound drivers

further into local traffic, or forcing entrance to a congested I-55 earlier in their journey. Similarly, northbound drivers on I-55 cannot exit onto Route 126 at all. As such, a full, twoway interchange is proposed for Lockport Street/Airport Road, within the boundaries of Romeoville. Potential congestion on Weber Road and nearby Route 30 also is being considered. New interchanges, improvements to existing ramps

Morton Arboretum kicks off preservation project Through a $6,075 grant from American Water, the nation’s largest publicly traded water and wastewater utility company, The Morton Arboretum will kickoff an innovative DuPage River wetlands restoration project on Thursday, July 21 at 5:30 p.m. at Crowley Marsh, the site of the sustainability project. The goal of the project is to engage and educate volunteers for the Arboretum’s Woodland Stewardship Training Program to help with the removal of a quarter mile of clay tiles blocking natural drainage for the Crowley Marsh wetlands. It also is designed to help educate the public about this significant sustainable initiative on the Arboretum’s east side, according to Kurt Dreisilker, Manager of Natural Resources for The Morton Arboretum.

“Today, few natural areas across Illinois and the Great Lakes Region realize their potential ecological value, diversity, and long-term sustainability,” said Dreisilker, who will present an overview of the project to volunteers and others at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, June 21, at Crowley Marsh. “This project helps us demonstrate how improving natural areas increases biodiversity, or the variety of organisms in a given region, and contributes to the health of the environment.” Community involvement plays a paramount role in the project, Dreisilker said. “Increasing the number of trained stewards to carry out and even supervise restoration activities will greatly improve the ability to conserve and protect natural areas,” he said.

“The Crowley Marsh project will improve ground water supplies for the Arboretum’s wetlands and ultimately the environment. We’re teaching adults and children about importance of wetlands and other natural areas.” Stakeholders in the project include the American Water Environmental Grant, and Huddleston McBride Drainage Co., of St. Charles, which is providing contracting services to remove the drainage tiles. The Morton Arboretum grant is one of six totaling $25,766 awarded to organizations throughout the country. Established in 2005, American Water’s Environmental Grant Program offers funds for innovative, community-based environmental projects that improve, restore or protect the

watersheds, surface water and/ or groundwater supplies in the communities. “The Environmental Grant Program helps local organizations carry out initiatives that not only benefit our watersheds, but increase awareness and community participation.” said Karla Olson Teasley, president of Illinois American Water. “The work completed through this grant will help restore the Morton Arboretum Wetland while engaging and educating the public about this important resource.” Tom Chinske of Illinois American Water added:“Working with local communities on projects like this educates the public and helps ensure quality water service today and for the future.”

and even expanded frontage road access to the expressway all were options discussed in a plan that, in the best of circumstances, would see work begin no sooner than 2017. Studies are to continue through 2014, followed by nearly two years of design and planning, officials said.


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Police Blotter

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination. Terry Tuma, 63, 565 Smith Road, Lisle, was arrested at 1:28 a.m. on June 7 and charged with improper lane use, DUI, and the transport of alcohol near Weber Road and Grand Haven.

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Karen Dodoer, 41, 234 Woodlawn, New Lenox, was arrested at 9:08 p.m. on June 11 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of Weber Road.

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Carlos Jara, 20, 104 Highpoint Drive, was arrested at 4:19 p.m. on June 12 and charged with disobeying a stop sign, no driver’s license near Budler Road and Tuscany.

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Sergio Ramirez, 33, 525 Glen Ave., was arrested at 7:16 p.m. on June 12 and charged with reckless driving, improper lane use, unlawful stopping and the failure to wear seatbelts near Normantown Road and Sedgemeadow.

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A business in the 1300 block of Marquette Drive reported a theft at 2:58 p.m. on June 11. A semi-trailer was taken while it was parked in the business’ lot. Estimated value of the trailer is $9,000.

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Gregory Recht, 38, 910 W. Huron, Chicago, was arrested at 2:58 p.m. on June 13 and charged with speeding and driving with a suspended license near Normantown Road and Brunswick Lane.

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Rigoberto Chavez Jr., 19, 510 Chase Street, Joliet was arrested at 11:07 a.m. on June 13 and charged with burglary, possession of a controlled substance on the 1400 block of Normantown Road.

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A resident in the 100 block of Wedgeport reported criminal damage to property at 6:17 p.m.on June 14.An unknown weapon was used to damage a glass patio door. Estimated cost to repair the damage is $500.

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Brenda Milam, 52, 353 Windsong Court, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 1:13 a.m. on June 14 and charged

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with retail theft on the 400 block of Weber Road. Montiel, 21, 4450 10 Miguel Richmond, Chicago, was arrested at 6:19 a.m. on June 15 and charged with speeding and no driver’s license near Taylor Road and Paragon. Jacob Henderson, 20, 19315 Janet Ave., Lockport, was arrested at 4:42 p.m. on June 15 and charged with theft on the

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400 block of Weber Road. Christopher Conklin, 18, 19315 Janet Ave., Lockport, was arrested at 4:42 p.m. on June 15 and charged with driving with a suspended on the 400 block of Weber Road.

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resident in the 700 13 Ablock of Farragut reported criminal damage to property at 8:58 a.m. on June 16. A cutting instrument was used to damage

two tires and the trunk of a vehicle that was parked in the driveway of the residence. Estimated cost of the damage is $1,050. Aimee Tomsik, 33, 11276 Palmer Lane,Twinsburg, Ohio, was arrested at 12:29 a.m. on June 18 and charged with the possession of drug paraphernalia on the 1200 block of Lakeview Drive.

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A resident in the 600 block of

Huron reported criminal damage to property at 4:42 p.m. on June 18. Unknown persons threw eggs at a vehicle while it was parked in the street in front of the residence. Estimated cost of the damage to the vehicle is $500. Shelie Jones, 43, 344 Emery, was arrested at 6:19 p.m. on June 19 and charged with no driver’s license, uninsured, an expired registration near Belmont Drive and Paragon.

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Forum

What’s on your mind? You are invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to Matt Honold, managing editor, at mhonold@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy; just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@ buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your Cub Scout run a fundraiser car wash? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred.

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

Publisher & Editor Rich Masterson publisher@buglenewspapers.com Managing Editor Matt Honold mhonold@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Sherri Dauskurdas Rick Kambic Laura Katauskas Jonathan Samples Robin Ambrosia Sports Reporters Mark Gregory mgregory@buglenewspapers.com Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication Letters to Editor: 9 a.m. Friday sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

www.buglenewspapers.com Vice President of Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Production Manager Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Sales sales@buglenewspapers.com Voyager Media Group, Inc. P.O. Box 1613 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 3 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 3 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

Illustrated Opinions

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ONGOING Tai Chi and Westfield Walkers. Senior Services Center of Will County wants to keep seniors healthy and living independently as long as possible. Tai Chi is offered at the center on Tuesday’s and other locations throughout the county. This is a 12-week program. Join us on Mondays and Wednesdays as we walk the mall. Not only do you get the benefit of walking twice a week, once a month we offer a free breakfast at Panera and an opportunity to hear a speaker provided by Provena Health. You can take a 12-week Tai Chi class for a $20 suggested donation, and you can join our Westfield Walkers Club for $25 per year. For more information call at 815-723-9713. Munchkin Market at the Farmer’s Market. 6-8 p.m. at the Lockport Farmer’s Market and Car Show on Monday nights. Libraries from White Oak Library District will be coming to the farmer’s market to tell stories and have some fun. Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit environmental organization is dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at

815-834-1611. Birth After Cesarean. Meet other moms who are planning their natural birth after cesarean section.Come for encouragement, support and information to plan your next birth. Meetings at noon the first Monday every month in Romeoville. Call Melanie at 253861-5897. Managing Multiples. A support group open to couples that are still expecting, parents of multiples or even parents who have one or more children who just need to get their life in order. The group will meet the second Thursday of each month from 10 – 11:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to bring their babies.The class is free. For more information call (630) 527-5369. Breastfeeding support group. Led by a certified Lactation Counselor, meets on the first and third Wednesdays of the month from 11:30 a.m. to noon (following Cradle Talk). Join other breastfeeding moms for support and to have any questions answered. No registration required. For information and location, please call (630) 527-3957. Nurturing Mom. A support group is a free support group for new moms or moms-to-be who are experiencing emotional lows, depression, anxiety, fearful thoughts, difficulty sleeping, or

Calendar other troubling behavior. Led by a licensed clinical psychologist and a therapist with extensive backgrounds in women’s services and postpartum depression, this support group meets weekly; on Thursdays from 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Registration is suggested.To register for these classes, please call (630) 527-6363.

774-8902 or 815-774-8922.

Need a Job or GED Classes? Education Service Network NFP Inc.’s Career Seekers GED/ Workforce program, a program of the Regional Office of Education is located at 179 North Chicago St. Joliet, Illinois 60432. We offer GED classes/resume preparation/ job placement for participants between the ages of 16 and 21. Classes meet Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon; Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 1 to 3 p.m. We also offer GED classes at our satellite site at the Friendship Centre at HighPoint, 175 South HighPoint Drive, Romeoville on Monday and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information call 815-

Food Pantry. To better serve your needs, Power Connection’s Large Food Pantry will now be open on the second and fourth Mondays of the month from 1 to 6:45 p.m. at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. Next month, June 11 and 25. For a $20 donation you can shop the aisles of canned/boxed goods, drinks, desserts, snacks, breads, fruits & vegetables. You will also receive a pre-selected bag of meat. There is no income verification and all residents of Illinois are welcome. The Clothing Pantry is open from 9 a.m. to 6:45 p.m. on those Mondays. We carry clothing for men/women/ children as well as household items, furniture, sundries, toys

Are you affected by someone’s drinking? Open meetings are held every third Friday of the month from 7 p.m.8:30 p.m. at 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. Contact Al-anon/Alateen at 815-773-9623 or visit www. niafg.org for more information.

and more. Donations accepted Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call (630) 679-6899 or visit thepowerconnection.org for more information.

JUNE 30 Relay for Life. Raise funds for cancer research and programs, and remember and celebrate the lives of those who have or had cancer. For information on how to get involved in the Relay for Life of Romeoville, visit www. relayforlife.org/romeovilleil.

JULY 2-7 Water Powered Boats. 10 a.m. to noon and 1-3 p.m. at the DuPage Children’s Museum. Drop in to the museum’s art studio to create and sail a waterpowered boat. No registration is required.

JULY 3 Cook-a-book. 6-7 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Whip up a delicious treat that combines famous children’s books with See CALENDAR, page 9


THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

CALENDAR Continued from page 8 yummy crafts, activities, and games. Sign up in children’s services or call 815-886-2030. Teen Advisory Group. 6:307:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. For grades 7-12. Come have a say in what goes on at the library. Help choose what equipment should be bought, what programs should be held, and more. There will be snacks, soda, and games. Sign up at the library or call 815-886-2030. Independence Day Celebration. 7 p.m. at Deer Crossing Park, 1150 W. Romeo Road. The Hat Guys band will be performing in the amphitheater at 7 p.m., and there will be activities and food to enjoy. At 9:15 p.m., fireworks will be held at Village Park, 900 W. Romeo Road.

JULY 4 Village Board Meeting. 6-8 p.m. at the Village Hall, 1050 W. Romeo Road. The public is invited to public Village Board meetings.

JULY 5 Brick Building Club. 4-5 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Have fun building your own creations with LEGO bricks supplied by the library. Finished works will

go on display until the next session. For ages 6 and up.

JULY 7 Cosplay Day. 2-4 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Come to the library dressed as your favorite character from popular culture. There will be food, and prizes for the best costumes. For grades 7-12. Sign up at the library or call 815-886-2030.

JULY 8 St Joseph Academy Benefit Picnic. 1 to 9 p.m. at St. Joe’s. Come check out ALTUS. Four longtime friends from Plainfield brought their love of different music styles (alternative, metal, and classic rock) together with their musical talents to create their unique sound ALTUS! They will be playing from 2 to 4 p.m. Then from 5 to 9 p.m. join us for JUNKYARD DAWGS. Come enjoy some delicious food from :Louisiana Barbeque, Big Wheel, Raffles and more – for additional information please contact St. Joseph Academy at 815-7234567. Splish Splash. 4-7 p.m. at Volunteer Park, 1100 Murphy Drive, Romeoville. Enjoy a day full of wet, wacky, and wild fun with your family and friends. Waterthemed inflatables and games featuring prizes will allow you to cool off and enjoy the awesome weather. Once you have cooled off, take a trip under the sea for a theatre performance of Little

Mermaid by the Round Lake Park District theatre group at 6 p.m. For more information, contact the Romeoville Recreation Department at 815-886-6222.

JULY 9-15 Energy: Science Discovery. 10 a.m. to noon and 1-3 p.m. at the DuPage Children’s Museum. Drop in to the museum’s art studio to experiment with cars powered by everything from gravity to rubber bands and light.

JULY 9 Mix-it-up Monday. 4-5 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Have fun with activities, games, and crafts focusing on food. For ages 6-9. Sign up at the library or call 815886-2030.

JULY 10 Live action Angry Birds. 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Knock down some pigs at the library. Everything is supplied; just bring your birdflinging skills. Sign up at the library or call 815-886-2030.

JULY 11 Free Football and Cheerleading Clinic. 6 to 8 p.m. at Dale Blum Field – Romeoville Recreation Center. For children between the ages of 6 and 14. (Cannot be entering HS in the fall) Please visit www. ryfcspartans.org for details. Drop-in crafts. 11 a.m. to 1

p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Drop in anytime between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. to make a foodthemed craft. No registration is required. Book discussion. 11 a.m. to noon at the Romeoville Library. Come take part in a lively discussion of “Wuthering Heights,” Emily Bronte’s classic tale of love and revenge. Pick up a copy of the book at the Romeoville Reference Desk.

JULY 12 Free Football and Cheerleading Clinic. 6 to 8 p.m. at Dale Blum Field – Romeoville Recreation Center. For children between the ages of 6 and 14. (Cannot be entering HS in the fall) Please visit www. ryfcspartans.org for details. Summer

Utility

Savings

9

Seminar. 6 p.m. at the DuPage Township Levy Center, 241 Canterbury Lane, Romeoville. State Rep. Emily McAsey is partnering with the Citizens Utility Board to host a summer utility savings seminar where trained experts will provide residents information about how they can save money on their utility bills. To RSVP for the seminar, contact McAsey’s constituent office at 815-3720085. Homemade cleaning supplies. 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Come and learn to make your own eco-friendly cleaning supplies. Make a glass cleaner, all-purpose cleaner, dishwashing liquid, and an oven cleaner. Everything will be provided to take home and enjoy. Sign up at the library or call 815-886-2030.


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THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

Northern Will County Water Agency claims official status By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Though meeting for years as an ad-hoc committee, the Northern Will County Water Agency has claimed official status, clearing a path to potentially take over the water system currently under the operation of Illinois American Water. According to Bolingbrook Village Attorney Jim Boan, the five communities, Bolingbrook, Homer Glen, Romeoville, Woodridge and Lemont have been meeting on an “ad hoc” basis since 2008. On June 11, the five towns actually formed the agency, adopted by-laws and appointed officers.At the meeting mayors Jim Daley (Homer Glen) and Roger Claar (Bolingbrook) were appointed as co-chairs of the Agency. Lemont Mayor Brian Reaves was appointed vice-chair; Romeoville Mayor John Noak was appointed secretary and Woodridge Mayor Bill Murphy was appointed as treasurer. The official formation of the agency now classified the group as a public entity subject and is subject to the Open Meeting Act and its requirements. For years the neighboring

PAST Continued from page 4 Preservation Manager Eileen Franz said the new survey is identifying historic farmsteads and other historic structures from before 1960. “We have a consultant who goes out and intensively surveys rural structures,” Eileen Franz said.” Aside from these surveys, the HPC also determines what properties become historic landmarks.Will County’s Register of Historic Places is currently made up of 43 structures. “It’s a recognition for the property owner that they have a landmark property,” Franz said. In addition to the work done by the commission, Will County officials also are doing what they can to support the HPCs mission. Although most of the commission’s funding comes from a variety of grants, including the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, Will County offers some

communities have been battling over what the village calls neverending rate increases and the water company defends as required maintenance costs. According to Boan, the group has been working on legislation and gathering information regarding the original cost of the pipeline, operational and maintenance expenses, and reviewing water related purchase and sale agreements. Upon notice of the formation of the agency, Illinois American Water Senior Manager Michael Smyth released a statement saying,“The agency is essentially a local, government funded start-up organization that states its goal is to acquire a private company that is not for sale. Eminent domain proceedings cost taxpayers millions in litigation and take years to complete…” Boan explained that the agency will be making a “good faith” offer to Illinois American Water to buy their American Lake Water subsidiary and only if the two parties can’t agree on a price would condemnation then be an alternative that the board may consider. “We are not for sale and

therefore are not accepting offers,” Smyth said. The next step or only other option would be for the water agency group to pursue an eminent domain proceeding. Smyth continued to call on the mayors, challenging the agency to show the true cost such an endeavor would take. “Respectfully, having met for years, the Agency’s mayors have an obligation to transparency and full disclosure, to share with their taxpayers and our customers the true costs of litigation, a timeframe, and a plan to fund, operate and maintain what must remain a well-run water company,” he said. The agency continues to contend that the goal of the agency is to stabilize and control water rate increases and explore the feasibility of acquiring the Lake Michigan water transmission line, which runs from Bedford Park to the southwest suburbs. Some or all of each community receive water from the pipeline. American Lakewater Company, a wholly owned subsidiary of Illinois American Water, owns the pipeline. Key to continuing the push to create its own water system, is

funding as well. However, the more important support comes from officials’ willingness to work with the organization. The HPC is overseen by the Will County Executives Office. According to Tuskey, Will County Executive Larry Walsh fully supports the

commission’s agenda. “He totally embraces historic preservation,” she said. “He knows that our past is an important key to the county, too, as well as our future. He by no means wants to railroad over historic preservation to bring in economic development.”

whether or not the move would be cost effective. According to Boan, the group has conducted a current feasibility study to

ensure costs would be lower. The next meeting will be held Sept. 10 at the Homer Glen Village Hall.


Take 5

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

H o ro s c o p e s

Across

1 Treble symbol 5 Knock for a loop 9 Red Delicious, e.g. 14 Fishing need 15 [Lightbulb!] 16 Bay Area county 17 Landed on a perch 18 Confidenceinspiring 20 Polite egotist’s musical request? (Beatles) 22 “Just __ naturally” 23 Dr.’s field 24 Paranormal 28 Uppercase letters, briefly 30 Weep and wail 33 “__ turn is it?” 34 Paper towel unit 35 GI no-show 36 Adamant egotist’s musical request? (Doris Day) 39 Barely made, with “out” 40 Wild and crazy 41 They may be faith-based or quantum

42 Boxing count 43 Quick on one’s feet 44 “Kings are __ gods”: Shakespeare’s “Pericles” 45 Red, Yellow or Black 46 “So-o-o-o good!” 47 Needy egotist’s musical request? (Supremes) 55 Fettuccine Alfredo topping, e.g. 56 A mere step away 57 “The Threepenny Opera” composer Kurt 58 Walked heavily 59 Sandwich seller 60 Box for Beeb watchers 61 William and Harry, to Charles 62 Black cat, to some

Down

1 Show appreciation at a show 2 Quiet time 3 New York canal 4 Greek salad cheese 5 Run the show 6 Really good (at) 7 Fervor 8 Leisure 9 Gets a smile out of 10 Peeled with a knife 11 Puritanical 12 Bit of poetry 13 Subj. including grammar 19 Sales rep’s giveaway 21 Oregon’s capital 24 Little hooter 25 Fail in the clutch 26 Group of witches 27 Like many flea market items 28 Groanworthy, as a joke 29 Friend in war 30 “Don’t __ the small stuff!” 31 Punchiness 32 Make holy

34 Lion’s warning 35 Declare with confidence 37 Convenience for Northeastern toll-paying drivers 38 “Remember the __!” 43 In good taste 44 Fixes securely (in) 45 T-shirt size 46 City nicknamed “The Heart of Georgia” 47 Canadian tribe 48 Eye, to Yvette 49 Packs away dishes? 50 Dollar rival 51 Reverse, in word processing 52 Rain really hard 53 Like 61-Across 54 “__ Brockovich” 55 100 lbs.

Land on your feet. A few shakeups from the past week could leave you up in the air. Rest assured that, like a cat, you won’t fall down no matter what changes or pressures are brought to bear this week.

Nurture the promptings of moral sense. In the week ahead, those who want to win at all costs may suggest ways to take advantage of loopholes. Stick to high moral ground, even if it seems unpopular.

Open the fortune cookie and read the message, but take it with a grain of salt. Enjoy assurances that things are going well in the week ahead. However, this is not a good week to launch initiatives.

Fixate on fine-tuning friend and foe. In the week to come, don’t get distracted by someone’s charm. Those who help you are not always your friends and those who oppose you are not always enemies.

You don’t need to climb Jacob’s ladder to heighten experiences. There may be more than one instance during the week ahead when you will be tempted to shake things up just to show your importance.

If you wait for perfect conditions, nothing would ever be achieved. But in the upcoming week, starting a key undertaking under poor conditions will only slow you down. Hold off on initiatives.

Virtue in the absence of opportunity is hardly a moral triumph. It may be easy for you to criticize others unless you’ve walked a mile in their shoes. During the week ahead, refrain from value judgments.

There are no dress rehearsals for life. In the week to come, you might be faced by challenges that you are completely unprepared to handle. Don’t make crucial decisions until you are sure of your part.

The wise does at once what the fool does at last. You have been procrastinating, so your money seems to seep out of your pocket. In the week ahead, put a stopper on a financial drain.

Get behind the eight ball before the eight ball knocks you out of place. In the week to come, you might find that strains and stresses take their toll. Avoid making any crucial changes or decisions.

If you hike in the wild, be prepared to wrestle a bear. An exploration of the unknown could put you up against something bigger than yourself. Stick to what you know in the week to come.

There is no shame in being a geek when a geeky problem arises. The dictionary is a good tool that you shouldn’t be ashamed to use in the week ahead. Verify the facts before committing.

SUDOKU

©2012 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • FEIGN • PIVOT • MOHAIR • YEARLY

Answer:

What the deadbeat looked for when his girl told him to get a job -- ANOTHER GIRL

11


12

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: CrackerJacks win fifth straight, page 18; Speedway hosts beach party to introduce new branding, page 19

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012 By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

They say legends are made in the postseason. That was the case for Plainfield Central’s Morgan Vogt. While she had a strong regular season, she turned her game up a notch in the playoffs and helped the Wildcats win their first sectional championship in program history. For those performances, Vogt has been named the 2012 Voyager Media Softball Player of the Year. Vogt finished the season with a .411 batting average, 51 hits, 38 runs, 25 RBI and seven doubles offensively. In her first year pitching since a freshman, she went 12-3 with a 1.48 ERA. “I’ve been surprised with how good (I threw),” Vogt stated. “It’s exciting to throw again. I’m having fun because I’m doing good but I wanted to enjoy my senior year.” In the playoffs though is where she really shined. She led the team to a regional title, blanking Waubonsie Valley on the mound and getting three hits at the plate (single, double and triple), while driving home a pair of runs. In the sectional semifinal, she held Neuqua Valley to one first inning run as the Wildcats rallied to win 2-1. Then in the sectional

13

final, she again limited Naperville North to one first inning run. Offensively her double led to the first run of the game for Central in the bottom of the third and she later drove home an RBI for an insurance run in a 3-1 win. Despite a loss in the supersectionals, Vogt had a clutch two-RBI double with one out in the top of the seventh to tie the game. Several years down the road her remarkable run to lead her team in the postseason will still be remembered. “Morgan stepped up and led this team to the Supersectional,” Central coach Anne Campbell said. “She is an outstanding outfielder, but really showed her versatility when she pitched again this year.She had a breakout year offensively, she was one of the top two hitters all year. She finishes her four-year career with a .341 BA and her name in our record book numerous times.”

SPECIAL MENTION: MAEVE McGUIRE The University of Georgia recruit had a stellar season at the plate for Benet.She had 16 homers from the leadoff position, to go along with 22 doubles, 48 RBI, 69 runs scored and a .528 batting See ALL-AREA, page 14


14

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

ALL-AREA Continued from page 13 average. “She is a game-changer, teams pitch around her from the very first at-bat,” Benet coach Jerry Schilf said. “I was told our regional semifinal opponent’s strategy was to throw the first pitch for a strike, and the rest of the pitches for balls with the hopes she would swing at something out of the strike zone. She went one for two with a double, two RBI, three runs and three walks. She was one shy of the IHSA record for doubles in a season as a sophomore with 26, she is two shy of the single season HR record with 16 and as far as I can tell she has more extra base hits this season than

anyone one else in the history of the sport in Illinois.” The rest of the Voyager Media All-Area softball team is:

JESSIE ANDREE Andree, who transferred from Hinsdale South after her freshman year, fit right in to Downers South’s potent lineup as its leadoff hitter and will be a fixture there for the next two seasons. She hit a robust .508 with a .567 on-base percentage and was 15-for-25 with runners in scoring position. “She’s an outstanding leadoff hitter,” said DGS coach Ron Havelka. “She did a nice job at second base for us and set the table at the beginning of the order.”

CAILEY BAKER The Plainfield Central senior catcher was as clutch as they come, both offensively

Sports and defensively. She tagged out runners at the plate in both the sectional final and supersectional, while driving home the go-ahead run in the top of the seventh against Moline in the supersectional. Finished the season with a .424 batting average, 53 hits, 32 RBI and nine doubles.

JUSSE BUNN Junior first baseman batted .377 with 40 hits, 33 RBI, 10 doubles and three homers for Plainfield East. “She was a big spark plug for us right from the start,” East coach Chris Morris said. “She hit a home run in the first game of the season and took off from there. She was awesome at the plate for us all season long.”

TRESA FAHRNER Junior shortstop batted .445 with 28 RBI, five homers, 14

stolen bases and scored 30 runs for Joliet West. “Tresa is a three year started on the varsity team,” Joliet West coach Heather Suca said.

“She was a leader in our infield this year. She lead our team offensively throughout the entire See ALL-AREA, page 15


Sports ALL-AREA Continued from page 14 season. Not only does she have power but it is also combined with speed that has allowed her to hit 14 extra base hits.”

HALEY GERL Senior catcher for JCA batted .439 with 19 doubles, 58 hits and 30 RBI and was a three-year starter. “The better the competition was, the better she played,” JCA coach Dave Douglas said. “She was the player you wanted up to bat in clutch moments.”

ELAINE HEFLIN Downers North pitcher went 16-5 with an ERA of .36 in 138 innings. She struck out 244 batters, while walking just 30. “Heflin was dominant on the mound, averaging almost two strikeouts per inning and giving up a hit every three innings,” Downers North coach Mark Magro said. “She allowed no home runs. Of her five losses, she deserved to lose only one of them (vs Trinity). The other four were our inability to make some plays causing unearned runs.”

DANI KNAAK J u n i o r centerfielder batted .429 with a .531 on base percentage, while throwing out six runners at the plate. “She has been with me since freshman year,” Bolingbrook coach Jean Ryan-Molk said. “She led the team in batting average.

She is a lefty slapper and on almost all the time. She has great speed. Dani is all over the place in the outfield, she owns it.”

KATY LaCIVITA LaCivita, who will continue playing collegiately at Loyola, was Downers South’s rock behind the plate for the past three seasons. The four-year varsity player spent most of her senior year as the DH after undergoing shoulder surgery last January, but

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012 caught towards the end of the season. She hit .357 with a teamhigh 5 homers and 44 RBIs. “I thought she was very instrumental in the success of our pitchers over the years,” said Havelka. “She had a great career at our school.”

15

WHITNEY LANPHIER Plainfield South junior hit .382 with 42 hits, 12 doubles, 31 RBI and 28 runs scored. “Whitney is definitely an See ALL-AREA , page 17


16

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012


Sports ALL-AREA Continued from page 15 important part of our team,” Singler said. “Whitney was able to overcome a leg surgery this past winter to return to our team as a big leader. She is our catalyst and a very tough out. She has one of the quickest bats around and very smart on the bases. She is a wall at third base for us and is very talented. She is committed to play at SIUE after graduation. We are very excited to have her back for a fourth year.”

JACKIE LILEK Posted a 10-2 record with a 1.76 ERA for Minooka. She struck out 73 batters and walked only 33 in 83 innings pitched. At the plate, she batted .287 and scored 15 runs.

“Jackie had another great season for the Minooka Indians,” said Minooka coach Mark Brown. “Jackie had another 10 win season and an era under 2.00. Jackie was great in the circle again in 2012 shutting down quality teams. Jackie’s love for the game is intense. She demands the best from herself and her hard working attitude rubs off on her teammates. Jackie has been a huge part of the Indians success.”

ALYSSA MANNUCCI Junior batted .392 with 47 hits, nine doubles, four homers, 21 RBI and 36 runs for Plainfield South. “Alyssa has been a tremendous asset to our team,” Singler said. “She really stepped her game up this season. She has worked hard to get faster,stronger and improve her game at the plate. She is one

of the best base runners out there. She is very solid in the field and simply a tough shortstop  with tremendous range. She  has also stepped in as a leader this year as our team captain, three-year varsity starter, stat leader in our record books and team MVP two years in a row. “She is committed to play at Loyola after graduation. We are very excited to have her back for a fourth year.”

ANNIE MOLEK Plainfield East junior went 20-11 on the mound with 152 strikeouts. At the plate she had 36 hits, 11 doubles and 26 RBI for regional champs. “Annie has been phenomenal,” Morris said. “She pitched almost every game for us and pitched well. “She’s not overpowering, but she moves the ball around. I

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012 can’t say enough about her on the mound. She hit the ball well this year.”

KAITLYN MULLARKEY One of Maine South’s leading hitters for a second-straight year, Mullarkey batted clean-up, batted over .400 and enjoyed several multi-hit games, including hitting for the cycle against Maine West. “She works hard to be the best that she can, and by her doing that she makes others work harder,” said Maine South coach Emmy Pasier. “She is one of the purest hitters to come out of Maine South.”

KALEIGH NAGLE Junior from Plainfield Central went 11-4 on the mound with a 1.60 ERA. At the plate she batted .358, with 43 hits, eight doubles,

17

25 RBI and 27 runs. “She’s a versatile player who has done an outstanding job on the mound, but really shines at shortstop,” Campbell said. “She has great range and a very strong arm. Kaleigh is one of those players who leaves it all on the field every game and plays very instinctively.”

SARA NOVAK Batted .459 with a team-best 30 RBI for Minooka and scored a team-high 31 runs. As a pitcher, Novak was 14-3 with a 1.40 ERA. She posted eight complete games and struck out 217 batters, while walking 43. “Sara did everything for us this year. She was a dominate pitcher, played the left side of the infield well, and played some left field See ALL-AREA, page 18


18

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

Sports

CrackerJacks win fifth straight game By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

The Midwest Collegiate League has added four expansion teams for the 2012 season, but the league’s defending champion— the Will County CrackerJacks— would like nothing more than to get another crack at the title.

BASEBALL And the CrackerJacks are clearly in championship-hunting mode once again. The CrackerJacks won their fifth straight contest Sunday night after crushing the DuPage County Hounds, one of the MCL’s new squads, 11-2. They are within a game of the South Division leading Northwest Indiana Oilmen, which also is a new team. On Tuesday night, Will County faced the DeKalb County Liners, who lead the North Division and are brand new to the league, as well.The MCL’s fourth expansion team, the Illinois Lincolns, were two games behind Will County in the South Division standings. Vern Hasty, last season’s MCL Manager of the Year, likes the

ALL-AREA Continued from page 17 when we needed her to,” Brown said. “There isn’t anything Sara can’t do on a softball field, she even wants to catch. Sara also led our team in hits, RBI, and OPS. She is a special player and it has been great watching her develop and grow as a player and person.”

MARISSA PANKO Sophomore shortstop hit .587 with 74 hits, 14 doubles, four triples, 35 RBI, 50 runs and 15 stolen bases for Benet. “As the No. 2 hitter, she makes people pay when they pitch around Maeve,”Schilf stated. “She’s a sure-handed shortstop that lead team to third place in Class 4A in 2011.  She has many D-1 schools looking at her, including schools from the Big Ten.”

MARIA PRETE Prete not only is a slick fielder —“She was the rock of our

makeup of his 2012 CrackerJacks, who have players on their roster from across the country. “They were here two, maybe three days prior to our first game, so that didn’t give us a whole lot of time to get the kids together,” Hasty said. “We’re just hoping that they jell among themselves. “Last year it worked out well, and so far this year the kids are really coming together. I know that sounds cliché, but they really are a great group of kids.” Left-fielder Mitch Elliott and shortstop Daniel Nevares— second and fourth in the MCL in hitting, respectively—pounded DuPage pitching on Sunday. Nevares (.366 so far this season) went 3-for-4 and drove in five runs, while Elliott (.419) was 3-for-6. Nevares homered in Will County’s 10-run third inning—a single-game team record for most runs in one inning. Pitching-wise,the CrackerJacks are getting relief help this season from Joliet West product Mike Grindstaff. Grindstaff, who appeared in eight games during his freshman year last spring at Northern Illinois, pitched 1 2/3 innings in the CrackerJacks’ 11-3 triumph over the Chicago

Zephyrs on June 21. He allowed just one hit and faced seven batters, striking out three. “He’s a great kid and he’s going to be a very good ballplayer, no doubt in my mind,” said Hasty in reference to Grindstaff, the 2011 team MVP at Joliet West who went 9-1 his senior year—a single-season school record for most victories. “He came in and threw the ball very hard. I’ll be honest with you, I was a little surprised. He really let it go and was very impressive.” Another new addition to the CrackerJacks is someone who’s near and dear to many Chicago Cubs fans’ hearts. Bob Dernier, the Cubs’ center-fielder during their 1984 season in which they won the National League East title and advanced to the N.L. Championship Series, is Will County’s associate head coach and director of baseball operations. Dernier, who won a Gold Glove and stole 45 bases for the North Siders that season, served as the Cubs’ first base coach in 2011. “These young men with the CrackerJacks are working toward their dream of being

drafted into a major league organization and working their way up to the big leagues,” said Dernier after joining the CrackerJacks earlier this year. “I look forward to working with these young men on a daily basis this summer and hopefully helping them get a step closer to fulfilling the dream.” Meanwhile, Plainfield North graduate Patrick Cashman pitched a scoreless inning for the DuPage Hounds on Sunday and recorded a strikeout. Cashman won seven games for Plainfield North his senior year and helped lead the Tigers to a 31-3 record and the sectional semifinals. He missed what would have been his freshman year at Benedictine University last spring when he suffered a small tear in his rotator cuff in February. Fortunately, Cashman didn’t need surgery, but he said he’s not 100 percent just yet. “It’s a long-term process so I’m not really expecting to get back at 100 percent this summer,” he said.“I’m just trying to get some innings.” Cashman’s fastball topped out between 88 and 90 mph before

the injury. “Right now I’m not where I was,” he said.“I’m trying to work on my off-speed pitches coming back from an injury. I’m just trying to get everything going again. Results don’t really matter to me. Obviously I want to win a championship (with the Hounds); that’s what baseball is all about, but me personally, I just want to try and get everything going and get ready for next year.” Overall, Cashman said he’s enjoying his summer with the Hounds. “It’s different than any other league I’ve played in,”he said.“It’s like a minor league atmosphere so it’s always fun to come out here. There are nice crowds and the guys want to win. It’s a great group of guys.” Plainfield Central product Nick Woltkamp has appeared in seven games in a relief role for the CrackerJacks and is 2-0 with one save. He completed his freshman season at Clarke University in Dubuque, Iowa, starting three games and striking out 12 in 14 innings for the Crusaders.

infield,” said Westmont coach Sue Zapinski—she’s also the Sentinels’ top hitter. Prete was Westmont’s team leader in batting average (.434), home runs (4), doubles (15), on-base percentage (.500) and slugging percentage (.708) while hitting third in the lineup. “She took charge in a good way, and that was really important for us,” Zapinski said. “I see nothing but good things for her.”

JULIANNE RURKA

shares the duties with Hef and never complains. At the plate she hits for average and power. She was second in homers and RBI on the team this year and led it in average. She can run, has a great arm and glove. It’s no wonder that Purdue has given her a full ride when she graduates in two years.”

come at Purdue North Central.”

DOMINIQUE ROA Third baseman batted .345 with 40 hits, 28 RBI and seven doubles for Plainfield Central. She had both game-winning RBI in two sectional wins. “What makes Dominique a great third baseman is her throwing consistency,” Campbell said. “She did not have a throwing error all year, and very few fielding errors. She was a vacuum at third, but really helped our team offensively this year. “Dominique’s play both offensively and defensively were huge in our post season run this year.”

The Benet sophomore, twotime ESCC all-conference selection batted .555 with 66 hits, 10 doubles, four triples, four homers, 52 RBI and 47 runs scored. “She led team in hitting as a freshman with a .472 batting average and followed that up her sophomore season, batting .555,” Schilf said. “Julianne is a catcher during the summer but plays third for the Redwings. Her glove at third has no equal.”

DALE RYNDAK Sophomore pitcher and center fielder from Downers North batted .386 with 34 RBI, nine homers and eight doubles. On the mound she was 12-2 with a .61 ERA in 103 innings. She struck out 129 and walked only nine. “Dale can do it all; another dominant pitcher who also bats third and can play anywhere on the field,” Magro said.“She would be the No. 1 pitcher on 99% of the teams in Illinois but she

MICHELLE SPILLMAN Romeoville senior led team with a .371 batting average to go along with five doubles, four triples and four homers, with 18 RBI. “She has been our power lefty hitter,” Romeoville coach Christina Douglas said. “She led the team in home runs and RBI. Michelle has developed into a well-rounded student athlete who has worked hard to be where she is today. I truly believe if Michelle continues to work hard great things will

mike@buglenewspapers.com

TAYLOR WEISSENHOFER Lockport senior pitcher went 22-5 with a 1.09 ERA, including a no-hitter in the regional semifinal against Plainfield North. She struck out 266 and walked just 40. “Taylor was our “Leader” on the mound,” Chanovec said. “She was able to help keep us in many games until our offense found its way. “She averaged about 10 strikeouts a game and that takes a lot of pressure off of the defense. She was an outstanding fielder and anytime you can have a fifth fielder in the infield it takes hits away.

EMILY YORK Burst onto the scene as a freshman for Benet. Batted .459 with 56 hits, 10 doubles, four homers and 63 RBI. Mark Gregory and Mike Sandrolini contributed


www.buglenewspapers.com/outdoors

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

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Chicagoland Speedway unveils new logo By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

The Chicagoland Speedway kicked off its two upcoming Summer NASCAR weekends Summer Beach Party at Oak Street Beach in Chicago. The party featured NASCAR drivers Danica Patrick, a Roscoe Illinois native, Ricky Stenhouse Jr.,the 2011 NASCAR Nationwide Series Champion and Justin Allgaier, the winner of the 2011 Chicagoland Speedway race. The Speedway also unveiled its new logo, which features a rendering of the Chicago skyline, something they wanted to incorporate to the look and feel of the Speedway. “We wanted to bring the iconic Chicago skyline to our logo and to the Speedway,” said Speedway President Scott Paddock. “Around 40 percent of our fans for the September race are from out of state, so we want to give them some of the look and feel of Chicago.” Paddock said more changes will take place, such as the look of the trams being modeled after the Chicago subway system. “As we kickoff our 11th year as NASCAR’s home in Chicago, we are proud to host two major event weekends of racing for one of the most watched and attended sports in the country. Each year we welcome thousands of guests from all 50 states and several different countries who expect to see elements of Chicago when they come to an event at our facility, and we intend to deliver on that,” Paddock told fans.

Mark Gregory/Bugle staff

Ricky Stenhouse Jr., from left, Justin Algier and Danica Patrick helped introduce their new logo at a beach party Sunday.

He also announced a renewed partnership with another Chicago name. “In addition to our new branding, we’re proud to have our partners at Levy Restaurants, a long-time staple of the Chicago sports and restaurant scene, committed to enhancing the food and beverage experience by bringing classic Chicago foods and introducing signature offerings to the Speedway,” he

said. “Their expertise will allow fans to experience one of the world’s greatest cities each time they visit.” While Chicago classics like the Italian beef, Chicagostyle hot dog and other local favorites will star on the new menu, Chicagoland Speedway and Levy have also collaborated to create several new signature items that can only be found at the Speedway.

The Blueberry Moonshine, the Chicken and Waffle Sandwich, Brisket Slider and “The Intimidator” Dog, fully loaded with homemade mac and cheese and crispy bacon, are just a few new items that will debut at Chicagoland Speedway in 2012. The Speedway will bring other elements of Chicago to fans that will enhance the overall guest experience, including

integrating iconic architectural elements from the city, on-site entertainment, as well as new strategic partnerships with Chicago area-based businesses. For tickets to any Chicagoland Speedway event, call 1-888-629-RACE (7223). For more information on Chicagoland Speedway, stay connected on Twitter and Facebook or by visiting www. ChicagolandSpeedway.com.


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Food

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

WHITE CORN AGNOLOTTI Serves 10 to 12

WHITE CORN FILLING: 1 cup heavy cream 4 ears white organic sweet corn, grated with the medium holes of a box grater 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 3 ounces mascarpone cheese 1 ounce goat cheese 1/8 cup grated Parmesan cheese 1/2 teaspoon minced fresh thyme AGNOLOTTI: 10 thin sheets Basic Pasta

Dough, each about 6 by 12 inches, either store-bought or homemade ( r e c i p e follows) Semolina or all-purpose flour, for dusting 1 large cage-free egg, beaten with 1 tablespoon cold water 1/2 cup organic chicken broth 2 sprigs fresh sage Salt 6 ounces unsalted butter, cut into pieces

For the filling, put the cream in a small skillet and boil over medium-high heat until reduced to about 1/3 cup. Stir in the corn, sugar, salt, and pepper. Cook at a slow boil, stirring constantly, until thick enough to coat the spoon heavily. Transfer to a medium mixing bowl. Stir in the cheeses and thyme. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Rest the bowl inside a larger bowl of ice water and stir occasionally until cooled. For the agnolotti, place a sheet of pasta on a lightly floured work surface. Mound

heaping teaspoons of filling in two rows along the sheet, about 1 inch apart. Brush the egg on the pasta in between the mounds. With a knife or pastry wheel, cut the pasta lengthwise between the rows. With one strip, lift a lengthwise edge over the filling mounds, pressing it down firmly all along the opposite edge to seal. Press down firmly between the mounds to seal in each mound. With a pasta wheel, cut between each mound and trim to form a rim about 1/4 inch all around each mound. Pinch the edges again

to seal. Repeat with the remaining filling and pasta. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Meanwhile, in a heavy skillet over medium-high heat, combine the broth, sage, and butter, stirring until a thick emulsion forms. Remove the sage. Keep the sauce warm. When the water boils, carefully slide in the pasta and boil until al dente, about 2 to 3 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon, draining well. Add to the sage butter. To serve, spoon the agnolotti and sauce into soup plates.

BASIC PASTA DOUGH Serves 10 to 12

3 cups all-purpose flour 8 large cage-free egg yolks 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 2 to 3 tablespoons water Semolina or all-purpose flour, for dusting In a food processor, combine the flour, yolks, salt, oil, and 2 tablespoons water. Process until the dough holds together. Stop and pinch the dough; if it

feels too dry, process in up to 1 tablespoon more water. Turn out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead by hand until smooth. Loosely wrap in plastic and leave at room temperature for 1 hour. Cut the dough into 4 equal pieces. Keep the others covered with plastic while rolling one piece at a time, by hand with a rolling pin or using a pasta machine. For a pasta machine, set the

(c) 2012 WOLFGANG PUCK WORLDWIDE, INC. DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERV-

rollers to the widest opening. Flatten the dough into a thick strip no wider than the rollers. Dust very lightly with flour. Run the dough through the rollers. Fold in thirds, crosswise, and run through again. Repeat 2

or more times, until the dough feels smooth and somewhat elastic. Set the rollers to the next smaller opening and run the dough through. Continue, using a smaller opening each

time, until you reach the desired thinness. (The strip will be long. If your workspace is small, cut the dough in half halfway through the process, keeping the unused half covered.)


THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

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22

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

Real Estate & Business

Even in economics, what goes up must come down Dear Dave, I’m about to graduate from college, and I’m following your plan and trying to focus on my future financial situation. Is the current down economy a cyclical thing and just part of life? DJ Dear DJ, It is. There are always cycles in the economy. I know you hear all this talk about this is the worst recession since the Great Depression, but that’s a bunch of bull. It was worse in 1982, when the Jimmy Carter era came to a close. We had double-digit inflation, doubledigit unemployment and home interest rates were at 17 percent. The current situation has been kind of long and boring. Things haven’t really rebounded quickly. Instead, they’ve just kind of wallowed around and

crawled along. There are a lot of theories as to why it’s happened this way, but the truth is it’s a part of life. Just like you have good and bad times in your personal life, there will always be good and bad times in your financial life. That’s why you need a solid, common-sense financial philosophy that works when things are up and when things are down. The principles I teach about not having debt and investing conservatively over the long haul work every time. Right now, I’m tempted to invest like a wild man and put every dollar I can find into investments, because everything

is on sale. It’s a great time to buy real estate and put money into mutual funds. The best time was about a year and a half ago, but the deals are still there. Just keep investing and working your plan. The idea that you’re graduating at bad time and never going to have a good life is just plain wrong. There’s always some good and some bad out there, and the cycles will always come and go. —Dave

Guidelines for giving Dear Dave, My husband and I are debtfree, and we have $100,000 saved.We like to give, rather than loan, money to family members if they’re having financial problems. Can you give us some advice on how to establish giving guidelines?

Susan Dear Susan, First, you can’t give to a level that it starts to make you worry about your future. Your first obligation is to your own household. Once that’s done, you can help family members and your immediate community as best you can without weakening yourself. The big thing in this scenario, I think, is to make sure you’re helping someone get back on their feet. You’re not helping when you give a drunk a drink, so you have to ask yourself if your generosity is really helping them or if you’re simply enabling irresponsible behavior. I’m not saying this because I’m a control freak. I’m saying it because I don’t believe in investing God’s money unless I see a positive return on investment. In human terms,

Guarantee good luck in the workplace Q. I see people who seem to be born with a rabbit’s foot in their pocket that works. They show up at the right time, say the right thing, and usually get what they want.Are they lucky or smart? A. People who seem to be born under a lucky star are benefiting about 80 percent from smarts and 20 percent from luck. What these means is most of us can discover a lot more luck in our careers if we only learn the right tools.

Words are not cheap when it comes to getting what you want on the job. Words are actually quite hypnotic. You can use language in ways that make people go out of their way to help you or go out of their way to harm

you. Here is a simple example. Next time you call a customer service person, pay attention to what you say after they ask,“How can I help you!” Do you immediately start blaming them for your current problem? Another option would be to pause and say pleasantly, “I am sure you can help me,” and then describe what you need. You may even get one of those companies where the

representatives ask,“How can I give you excellent service today!” You can then reply,“I am sure you will!” The point I’m making is that your choice of language will either put people around you into a cooperative mood or make them feel hostile.You have the power to choose your language and thus a lot of power over your “luck.” ThebiggestproblemIseeinclients See EDGE, page 27

that means helping someone get out of a mess they’re in, while at the time seeing that they are working to make sure they never end up back there again. If they’re buying cigarettes or lottery tickets with the money, then you’re not helping them. Taking this stance isn’t mean, and it doesn’t indicate that you don’t love your family. It means you’re loving them well and want what’s best for them. —Dave Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 5 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.


THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 2041 TRAFALGAR DRIVE UNIT 5 ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (SINGLEFAMILY, TWO-STORY HOUSE WITH TAN SIDING AND ATTACHED, TWO-CAR GARAGE.). On the 18th day of July, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff V. BINISH HUMAYOUN, Defendant. Case No. 09 CH 4385 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 332,568.72 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g) (1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 6/21, 6/28, 7/5

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 361 Ascot Lane Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single family). On the 18th day of July, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: The Bank of New York Mellon as Trustee for The Certificate Holders CWALT, Inc. Alternative Loan Trust 2006-12CB, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-12CB Plaintiff V. Nadiya Pavlyuk a/k/a Nadiya Pavilyuk; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.; Nottingham Ridge Homeowners Association Defendant. Case No. 09 CH 2184 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 203 PELL AVENUE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH TWO CAR DETACHED GARAGE.). On the 11th day of July, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: BANK OF AMERICA, NA S/B/M TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff V. JULIO CAJIGAS AND MARLENE CAJIGAS Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 4194 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 130,876.97 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

For Information Please Contact:

FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax)

PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax)

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published 6/21, 6/28, 7/5

Published 6/14, 6/21, 6/28

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1924 W. Brimstone Road Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single Family Home). On the 25th day of July, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Plaintiff V. Rafael Hernandez; et. al. Defendant.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 226 Nippert Avenue Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single Family Home). On the 25th day of July, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Plaintiff V. Abel Manzo; et. al. Defendant.

Case No. 10 CH 4623 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-25529 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 6/28, 7/5, 7/12

Case No. 11 CH 2268 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-10812 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 6/28, 7/5, 7/12


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THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012


THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

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26

THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

BANK OF AMERICA, NA S/B/M TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff,

The Bank of New York Mellon as Trustee for The Certificate Holders CWALT, Inc. Alternative Loan Trust 2006-12CB, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-12CB Plaintiff,

BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff,

Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Plaintiff,

vs.

vs.

BINISH HUMAYOUN, Defendant. No. 09 CH 4385

Rafael Hernandez; et. al. Defendant. No. 10 CH 4623

Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Plaintiff,

vs. JULIO CAJIGAS AND CAJIGAS Defendant. No. 11 CH 4194

MARLENE

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 13th day of March, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 11th day of July, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 2 IN BLOCK 6, IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NO. 11, A SUBDIVISION IN SECTIONS 3 AND 4, IN TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 3, 1968, AS DOCUMENT NO.R68-6758, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 203 PELL AVENUE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: O N E STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH TWO CAR DETACHED GARAGE. P.I.N.: 11-04-03-108-010 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 130,876.97 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any.

Nadiya Pavlyuk a/k/a Nadiya Pavilyuk; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.; Nottingham Ridge Homeowners Association Defendant. No. 09 CH 2184 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 26th day of January, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 18th day of July, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 130 IN NOTTINGHAM RIDGE SUBDIVISION PHASE 2 ROMEOVILLE, IL, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN PART OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 24, 2002, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2002-70050, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 361 Ascot Lane Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single family P.I.N.: 11-04-04-401-041 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Published 6/14, 6/21, 6/28

Published6/21, 6/28, 7/5

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 6th day of March, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 18th day of July, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 70 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 5 POD 24, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 12, 1999, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R99-124552, IN THE VILLAGE OF ROMEOVILLE, WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 2041 TRAFALGAR DRIVE UNIT 5 ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: SINGLE-FAMILY, TWO-STORY HOUSE WITH TAN SIDING AND ATTACHED, TWO-CAR GARAGE. P.I.N.: 06-03-12-303-004 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 332,568.72 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any.

vs.

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 28th day of March, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 25th day of July, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 58 IN PASQUINELLI’S PRESERVE AT FIELDSTONE UNIT ONE, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 13, AND THAT PART OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 13 LYING NORTHWESTERLY OF THE COMMONWEALTH EDISON RIGHT OF WAY AS ESTABLISHED IN WARRANTY DEED RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO. 848691, ALL IN TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 21, 2003 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2003-265432, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1924 W. Brimstone Road Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 06-03-13-105-015 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-25529 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Published 6/21, 6/28, 7/5

Published 6/28, 7/5, 7/12

vs. Abel Manzo; et. al. Defendant. No. 11 CH 2268 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 28th day of March, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 25th day of July, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 29, IN BLOCK 9, IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NUMBER 13, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 4, IN TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 4, 1967, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R67-10856, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 226 Nippert Avenue Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 04-04-110-018 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-10812 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 6/28, 7/5, 7/12


THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

EDGE Continued from page 22 I coach is their unawareness of the effects of their habitual language. If we have a habit of blaming people, defending ourselves or pointing out what others do wrong, we stop seeing how people react. Then we chalk up bad reactions to bad luck rather than our choice of words. If you want to discover more luck, spend a week pretending a reality show is taping you at work. At the end of each conversation, review the tape. What words did you choose, how did others respond, what did you want, and were there other words you could have used? Once you see that you have the power to change your language, you’ll also see you have the power to change your “luck.” You won’t need lucky stars or rabbit’s feet when you learn to use words as your good luck charm.

The last word(s) Q. I am certain I don’t have my ideal job. I also can’t see how I can ever get that job when I’m stuck working in a position that I only do to pay bills. Is there a way to bridge

the gap between a dead-end job and the job you dream about? A. Yes, stop treating this job like a waste of time and seek out responsibilities that make you

qualified for your dream job. If you can’t grow where you’re planted, you’ll never be ready for your ideal position.

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone,

27

Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006).You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.) (c) 2012 INTERPERSONAL EDGE


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THE BUGLE JUNE 28, 2012

Romeoville 6-28-12  

Romeoville 6-28-12

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