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NEW HOMES

Bugle

May, 2013

SPECIAL INSERT Today’s New Homes features new houses and area locations

NEWS Romeoville man charged with sex abuse, child porn

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INSIDE

www.romeovillebugle.com

Our Community, Our News

MAY 9, 2013

Vol. 7 No. 44

COMMUNITY FLOODED WITH

VOLUNTEERS

Romeoville Community Work Day supports storm cleanup at Isle a la Cache

By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

J

ust in time to clear the flood debris, more than 300 volunteers came out to participate in the area’s Community Work Day late last month to beautify and improve the Will County Forest Preserve’s Isle la Cache Museum and other nearby preserves. In more than four hours

of work, volunteers removed 2,000 cubic yards of non-native vegetation; stacked 12 brush piles for burning; resurfaced the quarter-mile natural surface trail at Keepataw Preserve with wood chips, and stained a bench and fence at the preserve; cleaned debris along both the north and south sides of Centennial Trail; cleaned debris from Prairie Bluff See VOLUNTEERS, page 3


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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

News

Local man charged with sexual abuse, child porn Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow announced that a Romeoville man has been charged with multiple counts of criminal sexual assault and child pornography. Timothy J. Brandt, 36, of 420 Glen Ave., Romeoville was arrested Thursday following a joint investigation by the Will

County State’s Attorney’s High Technology Crimes Unit, the Romeoville Police Department and the U.S. Secret Service. Brandt was arrested Thursday after detectives executed a search warrant at his residence. Brandt was charged with two counts of Predatory Criminal Sexual Assault of a Child, five

counts of Aggravated Child Pornography and seven counts of Child Pornography. The Predatory Criminal Sexual Assault and Aggravated Child Pornography charges are Class X felonies that are punishable by a minimum six years in prison with no option for probation if the defendant is convicted. The arrest was the result of a two-month investigation launched by State’s Attorney Glasgow’s High Technology Crimes Unit into the distribution of child pornography over

the Internet. Detectives took possession of Brandt’s computers pursuant to the search warrant. Bond for Brandt was set May 3 at $7.5 million. He must post 10 percent to secure his release while awaiting trial. Anyone with information regarding the arrest of Brandt is asked to contact Detective Paul Tuuk of the Romeoville Police Department at (815) 886-7219. The Will County State’s Attorney’s Office reminds the

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Timothy J. Brandt,

public that charges are not evidence of guilt. A defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.


THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

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Inaugural Truckin’ 5K set for May 18 By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

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Volunteers clean up littler at Isle a la Cache during Community Work Day in Romeoville.

VOLUNTEERS Continued from page 1 Preserve and Isle a la Cache Museum; and deposited wood chips around trees and weeded a garden at Isle a la Cache Museum. Forest Preserve Public Information Officer Bruce Hodgdon said the Community Work Day began six years ago as a partnership with Comcast. The cable company wanted to sponsor a Comcast Cares Day in Joliet, and the Rock Run Preserve was chosen to hold the program since it is the site of the “Ride the Rock,” event, an annual 15-mile family bike ride through Joliet, Crest Hill and Rockdale. This year, Comcast elected to hold the work day in Romeoville, and the Forest Preserve selected Isle a la Cache to prepare for the upcoming Island Rendezvous to be held June 8 and 9. JULIE, Inc. co-sponsored the event. In addition to employees from these two organizations, more than a dozen other organizations and groups attended the workday. Companies whose employees pitched in included Citgo, Home Depot, Harrah’s Casino, Walgreens and Geek Squad. Homer Tree Service donated

“Bringing so many

from different backgrounds together for a common purpose is what the annual Community Work Day strives to do.” Bruce Hodgdon, Will County Forest Preserve work crews to help with wood chipping. Students from Lemont High School, Joliet West High School, Joliet Junior College, Northeastern Illinois University and University of St. Francis joined volunteers from Big Brothers Big Sisters, Joliet Job Corps and Boy Scout Troops 22, 75 and 83 and Cub Scout Pack 99 to contribute their time and effort. About 20 regular Forest Preserve volunteers provided guidance and worked with the various groups at their designated worksites. District volunteers assisted in registration, demonstrated brush stacking, drove shuttles, operated chainsaws and applied herbicide. Another 21 Forest Preserve staff members took part in the Work Day. “Bringing so many from

different backgrounds together for a common purpose is what the annual Community Work Day strives to do,” said Hodgdon. “This goal was realized at Isle a la Cache Museum on a lovely spring morning.” Volunteers were greeted by opening remarks from invited dignitaries: John Noak, Mayor of the Village of Romeoville; Michael Parker, vice president of Field Operations for Comcast; state Rep. Emily McAsey, D-Lockport; Joe Babich, president of the Forest Preserve Board of Commissioners; and Forest Preserve Executive Director Marcy DeMauro. Five District Commissioners presented a resolution proclaiming April 27 “Comcast Cares Day”: Kenneth Harris, Bolingbrook; Reed Bible, Plainfield; Mark Ferry, Plainfield; Steve Balich, Orland Park; and Jacqueline Traynere, Bolingbrook.. The Forest Preserve normally holds the Community Work Day on the last Saturday in April. Next year’s date is not set as of yet. However, those wishing to participate or looking for more information on volunteering— individuals, families or groups— can contact the Volunteer Supervisor, Renee Gauchat, at 815/722-7364 or by email at rgauchat@fpdwc.org.

Whether you want to run a race, touch a truck, navigate an obstacle course or learn more about what the community has to offer, a new event is set to get residents out and about. In its inaugural run, the village of Romeoville and the Romeoville Chamber of Commerce will be hosting the Truckin’ 5K, Saturday, May 18. A 5K run/walk will begin at 8 a.m.; a kid’s one-mile obstacle run at 9 a.m.; and the Touch-aTruck, Fun Fair and Business Expo will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Romeoville Village Hall, 1050 W. Romeo Road. Runners of all ages are welcome and can register online at www.romeoville.org

or at the Recreation Center. Pre-register for $25 for the 5K Run/Walk before May 14 or $30 on race day between 7 and 7:45 a.m. The Kids Race is $5 if registered before May 14 and $10 the day of the race. The route for the run is the same as the previous Cinco de Mayo Run, which includes a multi-terrain course. New to the course will be optional obstacles for those looking for an extra challenge. In addition, giveaways will be distributed to the first 200 participants. The Fun Fair and Business Expo will include an opportunity for kids to explore emergency vehicles, construction equipment and various trucks; inflatables, face painting, a craft area, DJ, food, children’s entertainment and games.

Senators call to end VA backlog U.S. Senators Mark Kirk (RIL) and Dick Durbin (D-IL) joined a bipartisan group of 67 Senators in urging President Obama to take direct action and involvement in ending the current Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) disability claims backlog.

The Chicago Regional Office – which processes claims for all Illinois veterans – is the fourth most backlogged processing center in the country. More than 82% of its 20,000 claims have been pending for more than 125 days, which is significantly above the national average.


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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

Romeoville seats newly-elected village board, mayor By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Officially reclaiming the mayoral seat and village board positions, the United Party was sworn in at the past board meeting. Will County Judge Paula Gomora administered the Oath of Office to incumbent Mayor John Noak, trustees Brian Clancy, Jose Chavez and Dave Richards, and Clerk Bernice Holloway. “I would like to thank the village residents for having confidence in us. We look forward to another four years of continued progress,” said Noak. Trustees agreed, thanking the community and their families for their continued support. Noak has served as mayor since February 2008 as Romeoville’s first full-time Mayor. Holloway has served as village clerk since November 2010, and trustees Brian Clancy, Jose Chavez and Dave Richards have served since 2008. All will serve another four-year term. In addition, Noak recognized Romeoville residents, Patti Holloway and Ken Burgess who were elected at DuPage Township trustees, and Victor Zack as White Oak Library trustee.

LAURA KATAUSKAS/STAFF REPORTER

The oath of office to was taken by incumbent Mayor John Noak, trustees Brian Clancy, Jose Chavez and Dave Richards, and Clerk Bernice Holloway.

Community Briefs Pet Adoption Day at Abri Credit Union Abri Credit Union will host a Pet Adoption Day from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 11, at Weber and Renwick roads, Romeoville. Four local pet rescue organizations that help find animals forever homes will be on-site with dogs and cats available for adoption. Homeless Animal Rescue Team of IL (HART), 4 Paws 4 U 4 Ever, Romeoville Humane Society & Joliet Township Animal Control will all be participating in this annual event. Visit www.abricu.com for links to the shelter pages and more information on how to adopt.

Flood aid available Individuals affected by recent flooding may benefit from the following websites, phone numbers and attached documents: • Contact Map for Local Red Cross and County EMA offices: http://www.state.il.us/iema/ contacts/contacts.htm

• Red Cross Hotline: 1-800 Red-Cross • Federal Links: http://www. ready.gov/ • State of Illinois Updates and Links: http://www.ready. illinois.gov • Disaster Declaration Process Brochure: http:// www.illinois.gov/ready/ SiteCollectionDocuments/ DisasterDeclarationProcess. pdf • IEMA (Illinois Emergency Management Agency) FAQs for People Affected by Flooding (PDF)

Congressman Foster opens office in Joliet Congressman Bill Foster (IL-11) opened his Joliet office with a ribbon cutting ceremony and open house reception. The office is located at 195 Springfield Ave., Ste. 102, Joliet, IL 60435 and can be reached at (815) 280-5876 or foster.house.gov. Office hours will run from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.


THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

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Students get real-life lesson in distracted driving By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Don’t Drink and Drive. Txting & Driving, It Can Wait. Stay Alive. Drive 55. No Text is Worth Dying For. The road signs and slogans are everywhere, but the sight of a fellow classmate lying next to a wrecked car speaks volumes. Or so the organizers of a mock traffic accident hope, driving home the message during prom weekend that distracted driving can lead to death. The demonstration, put together by the RHS Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD), the Romeoville police and fire departments and Pfeiffer’s Towing, took place as RHS students prepared for prom to emphasize the dangers of drinking and distracted driving. The accident was set up in the field next to the main entrance to RHS, so everyone arriving by car or by bus could witness what was happening as they came to school. “People learn in different ways, some more visual, some more hands on. This week, we’ve tried to get the message across in every way we could,” said Traffic Sgt. Chris Burne. “…We’ve seen the faces on the kids as they come by, and you can tell it affected them—to see their classmates laying there fatally injured— it’s an eye-opener. It makes it real.” According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) young drivers, ages 15- to 20-years old, are especially vulnerable to death and

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Romeoville High School prom-goers Daniel Quan, Caitlyn Vodicka and Amara Markovic portray victims in a staged two-vehicle accident caused by a drunk driver.

injury on the roadways.Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for teenagers in America. Mile for mile, teenagers are involved in three times as many fatal crashes as all other drivers.

Cracking down on cell phones And in a recent move to crack down on cell phone use while driving, the Romeoville Police Department performed a four-hour detail, during which 46 tickets were issued for distracted driving, texting or cell phone use in prohibited areas. “That’s 10-12 an hour—that’s quite a bit,” said Burne. “We saw people driving by texting while we were issuing tickets. If we had more officers are the detail, that

number could have doubled.” Texting and cell phone use in and around town are fast becoming an epidemic says Burne, who has been on the force for 13 years. He has seen a significant increase in rear-end accidents caused by distracted driving in the past few years. “It is a problem, and we are trying to curb that action with information sharing and public management—it is a major issue,” said Burne. “The pure numbers of distracted driving has increased, and that is a problem for teenagers who have never driven before and are not as experienced. But it’s not just teenagers who are texting. There are a lot of adults out there, too, and they aren’t as good at it.”

Burne also reminds that it is not just the major issues like drinking and texting while driving, but grabbing for that CD or purse. “We’ve seen everything from putting on a makeup to typing on a laptop or reading a book,” Burne said, noting that’s an accident waiting to happen. He also reports busy intersections such as Weber and Normantown roads see a high rate of rear-end accidents. “People are looking down at their phone and don’t stop in time,” said Burne. “If you’re not hands free, shut the phone off while driving.” It’s probably not enough to turn the ringer off, he explains, “we are all of a curious nature; we want to know what it is.We hear the beep, and we have this need to check that email, text or call. Silence it, and put it in the glove box until you stop driving.” Police traffic stops, safety inspections and an all-inclusive information blitz on driving safely were all part of a project to keep new drivers safe on the road at RHS last week. Burne said the police department felt it was important to emphasize all areas of distracted driving, including texting, playing music too loudly and traveling with too many people in the car. The week started with officers stationed at the exits of the high school during dismissal. Officers passed out nearly 250 candy bars as a reward to those drivers who were wearing a seat belt and a written warning to those who were not. As a follow up, officers stopped cars leaving school the following day and issued tickets to those students who were culprits of distracted driving. This year, it was only a few, eight students.


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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

Police Blotter

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

Joseph Torrison, 36, 11S480 Walter, Naperville, was arrested at 12:38 a.m.April 21 and charged with DUI, no insurance, possession of cannabis and possession of drug equipment near Route 53 and Alexander Circle.

Lee Smith, 18, 534 N. Maggie Lane, was arrested at 1:23 a.m. April 7 and charged with battery on the 600 block of N. Weber Road.

Rudy Guevara, 32, 5543 Berringer Lane,Webster,TX, was arrested at 12:09 a.m. April 22 and charged with disorderly conduct and criminal trespass to real property on the 1200 block of Lakeview Drive.

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Javion Ewing, 18, 745 N. Central Ave., Chicago, was arrested at 1:23 a.m. April 7 and charged with disorderly conduct on the 600 block of N. Weber Road.

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Susanne Masserello, 40, 1807 Innercircle Drive, Crest Hill, was arrested at 7:29 a.m. April 13 and charged with DUI, no insurance and improper parking in roadway near Route 53 and Joliet Road.

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Thomas Wilcox, 33, 8513 Foxborough Way, Joliet, was arrested at 7:01 p.m.April 17 and charged with DUI, no insurance, improper lane use and driving too fast for conditions near Renwick Road, west of Route 53.

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William Leming Jr., 25, 403 Charlestown Drive, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 1:22 a.m. April 19 and charged with disorderly conduct on the 700 block of Rogers Road.

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Martin Ortiz-Herrera, 47, 119 Ferndale Ave., was arrested at 5:26 p.m.April 19 and charged with DUI, hit and run and improper backing on the 100 block of Ferndale Avenue.

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Dylan Somma, 19, 332 Emery, was arrested at 4:26 p.m. April 22 and charged with aggravated battery on the 200 block of McKool.

Kevin Morales, 25, 21515 Franklin Circle, Plainfield, was arrested at 2:45 p.m.April 23 and charged with retail theft on the 200 block of S. Weber Road.

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Daniel Poplawski, 48, 228 Arlington Drive, was arrested at 1:46 a.m.April 16 and charged with disorderly conduct on the 200 block of Arlington Drive. Tiffany Vinson, 30, 1300 Goldfield Lane, Joliet, was arrested at 12:23 a.m. April 17 and charged with DUI, driving too fast for conditions and disobeying a traffic signal near Normantown Road and Weber Road.

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Anthony Venegas, 23, 21315 Cascade, Plainfield, was arrested at 3:23 p.m. April 22 and charged with speeding and no valid driver’s license near Weber Road and Belmont Drive.

Campbell Jr., was 14 Ricky arrested at 2:21 a.m. April 23 and charged with burglary from a motor vehicle near the 1200 block of Lakeview Drive.

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Joseph Covelli, 23, 609 Lynn, was arrested at 7:22 p.m. April 14 and charged with criminal damage to property on the 600 block of Lynn.

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Ashley Oshea Tucker, 27, 1903 N. Raynor, Crest Hill, was arrested at 3:15 p.m. April 24 and charged with no valid driver’s license and no insurance and improper lane use near Arlington and Everette. Susana Acosta, 39, 3800 Harms Road, Joliet, was arrested at 5:44 p.m. April 24 and charged with retail theft and obstructing an officer on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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Amato, 42, 601 18 Patrick Chestnut Drive, Oswego, was arrested at 1:29 a.m.April 25 and charged with the possession of cannabis and drug equipment on the 1200 block of Lakeview Drive. Castillo, 20, 415 19 Martin Garnsey, Joliet, was arrested at 5:15 a.m. April 25 and charged with in-state warrant, speeding and no insurance near Route 53,south of Taylor Road. Maya Horton, 18, 430 n. Garfield, Lombard, was arrested at 3:37 p.m.April 25 and

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7 charged with retail theft on the 200 block of S. Weber Road. A resident of the 0-100 block of Kenilworth Circle reported a criminal damage to property at 4:07 a.m. April 26. A landscaping rock was used by unknown persons to damage a window of the home. Estimated cost to repair the window is $500.

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A lawn maintenance worker reported a theft more than $500 at 9:55 a.m. April 26. Leaf blowers and lawn trimmers were taken by unknown persons from a job site in the 1200 block of Lakeview Drive. Estimated copy of the property taken is $500.

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of the 800 block 23 Aofresident Mystic Lane reported a criminal damage to property at 7:55 a.m. April 28. Unknown persons damaged a vehicle that was parked on the street in front of the residence. Estimated cost to repair the damage to the rear window, door and taillight is $1550.

Adrian Olvera, 19, 11401 S. Preakness Drive, Plainfield, was arrested at 12:17 a.m. April 27 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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Michael Salazar, 20, 24208 Whispering Trail, Plainfield, was arrested at 12:17 a.m. April 27 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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Sebastian Valdez, 20, 2 Michele Court,Bolingbrook, was arrested at 12:17 a.m. April 27 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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Oscar Sanchez, 20, 1684 William Drive, was arrested at 12:57 p.m. April 27 and charged with speeding, no insurance and no valid driver’s license near Weber Road, south of Romeo Road.

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Phillip Juhl, 25, 15043 Hartland Drive, Lockport, was arrested at 1:49 p.m. April

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27 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of South Weber Road. Ryon Kendrick, 21, 12817 Pintail Road, Plainfield, was arrested at 5 p.m. April 27 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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Ricardo Perez, 20, 21923 w. Taylor Road, Plainfield, was arrested at 12:03 a.m. April 29 and charged with theft of lost property on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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Mauricio Grimaldo, 20, 41 Paladino Drive, was arrested at 4:18 p.m.April 29 and charged with an in-state warrant on Murphy Drive and Heritage Parkway.

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Steven Knoth, 31, 702 Honeytree, was arrested at 11:41 p.m. April 29 and charged with an in-state warrant near Honeytree Drive and Harris Lane.

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For more Romeoville blotter, go to www.buglenewspapers.com


ForuM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy! Just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred. Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

General Manager V.P. Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Managing Editor sweditor@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Sue Baker Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Sports Reporter Mark Gregory mgregory@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Manager Pat Ryan pryan@enterprisepublications.com

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Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Enterprise Newspapers, Inc. 23856 Andrew Road #104 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication sweditor@buglenewspapers.com www.buglenewspapers.com Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 12 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 12 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

Illustrated Opinions

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Schools

THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

Two Martinez students semi-finalists in contest Two Martinez Middle School students have earned semifinalist honors in the “Letters about Literature” contest sponsored by Illinois Secretary of State’s office and the Illinois Center for the Book. Judges liked essays written by seventh graders Chris Kerwin and Danny Spatz.They were selected from more than 6,100 entries.

RHS second in JJC robotic competition The Flexo team from Romeoville High School finished second in the Novice Division at the 2013 Joliet Junior College Robotic Challenge April 26. Will Caron, Cole Brooker, McDavis Ansere and Robin Czajowski combined to design and program a robot that bested 13 other northern Illinois schools. Glenbard East won the competition, edging RHS by 6 points. RHS beat third place Ottawa High School by 19 points.

RIGHT Jr. helps shape Martinez girls By Delorise Ivy, Valley View School District

With a little help from their sister organization at Romeoville High School,students at Martinez Middle School in Romeoville have launched R.I.G.H.T. Jr. (Really Intelligent Girls Hanging Together.) Started last year by Anleeta Buchanan and Kim McElroy,with help from R.I.G.H.T. founder and RHS Assistant Principal Yolanda Jordan, R.I.G.H.T. Jr. is designed to give the girls a strong foundation to help them manage middle school as well as transition smoothly into high school. R.I.G.H.T Jr. meets once a month, addressing such issues as self-esteem, bullying, peerpressure, dining etiquette and more. The group has also adopted some activities from the Dove Self-Esteem Workshop Guide. During the current school year, Buchanan and Amanda Carvelli have served as co-sponsors.

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Students at Martinez Middle School in Romeoville have launched R.I.G.H.T. Jr. (Really Intelligent Girls Hanging Together.

“I am so proud of the activities we have had so far,” Buchanan said, pointing to a visit by Jordan for a Q&A on high school expectations. Jordan even brought the girls t-shirts which they wore for yearbook pictures. White Oak Library’s Young Adult Librarian brought the group books on self-esteem

and fashion as well as some novels. The group also had an “awesome” book talk and plans to visit the library together to support the programs there. On the schedule for the remainder of the school year is the creation of Vision Boards consisting of a collage of images that support what each student would like to achieve in life and

what makes them special, an etiquette lesson where girls will learn proper table etiquette and fun facts about table manners, and a May 18 “tea time” event with RHS R.I.G.H.T. girls. “One of the best things about sponsoring R.I.G.H.T. Jr. is the parental support,” Buchanan said. “Our parents are awesome and very supportive.”


Calendar MAY 11 A Community Collection Drive. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Friendship Center at 175 S. Highpoint Drive, Romeoville, for those looking to dispose of their worn U.S. Flag properly. To earn his Eagle Scout badge, Boy Scout Kyle from Troop 19 in Plainfield is hosting the project. In addition, various drop offs are located throughout the Will County area including: St. Mary Immaculate Church, Plainfield; St. John Lutheran Church, Joliet; A. Vito Martinez, Middle School, Romeoville; Romeoville High School; Romeoville Recreation Center; Highpoint Friendship Center; Romeoville; White Oak Library branches in Romeoville, Crest Hill, and Lockport; and The VFW Post 5788 in Lockport.You can also call Kyle for pick up at 815-886-1196. Flags will be retired in a ceremony at 2 p.m. May 27 at the VFW Post 5788 at 1026 E. 9th Street., Lockport. The public is invited. Hooks, Needles, & More Craft Club. 1-2:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Crafters of all kinds! Join us to work on your favorite portable craft project! Knitters, crocheters, embroiderers, scrapbookers, jewelry makers, etc. are welcome! Patterns and helpful tips will be shared. Beginners welcome, and if you’d like to learn to embroider or cross stitch at Crest Hill, contact Amy before the event to get a short list of supplies to bring.

How to check out library e-books. 2 to 3 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Library staff will demonstrate how to download eBooks from the Library’s OverDrive collection at no cost to you. After the short presentation, stay for a hands-on training with your own e-reader. Registration is required.

MAY 13 Monday Kids Club. (Snakes) 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Anything can be discovered between the pages of a book! Come to Monday Kids Club to learn about science, animals, art, history and more! This program is for children 5 to 9 years of age.The program is limited to 25 kids, so please register at the children’s services department to reserve your spot.

MAY 15 Learn About Medicare. 6 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Join us for an introduction and overview of Medicare and how it works. David Wylly, of the Medicare Solutions Network, will detail what Medicare covers, what it doesn’t, and your options for additional coverage. We will discuss Medicare Supplements, Part D Drug Prescription coverage, and Advantage Plans, as well as cost saving strategies for the years ahead. There will be a question and answer session after the presentation.

An Evening with Dan Brown. 6 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. We are excited to offer our patrons an unique opportunity to take part in a LIVE VIDEO STREAM with #1 international bestselling author Dan Brown. Join us for Dan Brown at Lincoln Center: An Evening of Codes, Symbols, and Secrets. Mr. Brown will be talking about his new novel Inferno (on sale May14th), and about science, religion, code, book publishing, movie making, and a few surprise topics. There will be refreshments and a drawing for a copy of Inferno so join in the fun! Registration is required.

MAY 16 Trash or Treasure 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Trash or Treasure? Professional appraiser Rex Newell of Rex’s Antiques will take a look at your collectibles and let you know what they’re worth.The first 40 registrants to sign up will have one (1) hand-held item appraised—only one (1) item per household. Seating is limited, so register early! Those not bringing in items or those on the waiting list are welcome to come and watch as Rex appraises the items of the first 40 people.

MAY 18 Plant Sale. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Bolingbrook Garden Club, under the tent at the Bolingbrook Aquatic Park at 200 Lindsey Lane, rain or shine.

THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

MAY 19 Coining Ceremony. 9 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. at the Living Water Community Church, 190 Lily Cache Lane, Bolingbrook. We will be honoring servicemen and servicewomen with two recognition services. As part of our appreciation for our military personnel, we will have a Coining Ceremony. If you are a current or former service member, please join us for this special recognition and allow us to thank you for your service.

MAY 20 Monday Kids Club. (Seed Buddies) 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Anything can be discovered between the pages of a book! Come to Monday Kids Club to learn about science, animals, art, history and more! This program is for children 5 to 9 years of age.The program is limited to 25 kids, so please register at the children’s services department to reserve your spot.

MAY 23 Stay Safe Online. 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Annerino Community Center, Bolingbrook. Just in time for summer vacation this informative 90-minute program will provide you with the tools and information needed to prevent online threats. Learn how to control Facebook, Instagram and Skype settings and profiles. Valuable techniques will be taught to ensure your children are safe and protected from

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online threats. Understand the latest cyber bullying tactics, how to discuss sexting, and how our “always-on” society impacts personal and family safety. Keep your data private and understand how to close leaks in your home network. This class will take a proactive approach to keeping your data private and secure.

ONGOING 2nd Annual Joliet Slammers Baseball Fundraiser. Tickets on sale now. Come out with your friends and family on June 21 to help support your American Legion.There will be baseball, fireworks (to Disney Classics), raffles, food, drinks and fun for $10. Plenty of free parking also. Help us support our Veteran programs locally and throughout Will County. Power Connection’s LARGE FOOD PANTRY. Open on the 2nd and 4th Mondays of the month from 1 p.m. to 6:45 p.m., at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. Enjoy your shopping experience. For a $20 donation you can shop the aisles of canned/boxed goods, drinks, deserts, snacks, breads, fruits & vegetables. You will also receive a pre-selected bag of meat. There is no income verification and ALL residents of Illinois are welcome.The Resale Connection is also open from 9am-6:45pm on those Mondays. We carry clothing for men/women/children as well as household items, furniture, sundries, toys and so much more!


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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

News

GREAT READ CULMINATES WITH LINCOLN PROGRAM

A

Photos by Laura Katauskas/staff reporter

braham and Mary Todd Lincoln were alive and well during a reenactment of Lincoln’s life at the Bolingbrook Fountaindale Library, culminating the 2013 Great Read community literacy program. Impersonators Max and Donna Daniels performed May 2, a Night at the Theater,The Great Read Finale in which they told the story of Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the theme for this year’s literacy program. The program joined Plainfield-area community members in their desire to inspire readers to enjoy any books about the 16th president and take part in numerous fun, historical and educational programs dedicated to Lincoln. The Great Read was presented by the Plainfield School District 202; the Plainfield, Joliet, Fountaindale, Shorewood-Troy libraries; Joliet Junior College; Plainfield Township; and the Joliet-area Barnes and Nobles stores. An art contest depicting Lincoln was also open to all ages. Plainfield teacher Dan Niwa encouraged his art class students to participate in the program, including sixth graders Eliza Buschtawm and Addie Dietz. The Great Read was also supported by grants from the Plainfield Foundation for Excellence, the Friends of the Public Library, Enterprise Publications and other participating member organizations.


taKe 5 C ro s s w o rd P u z z l e

Across

Down

1 Party leader 5 ___ Sea, off Siberia 9 Short-necked European fruit 14 Neutralizer of a sort 16 Theater name 17 Ben Franklin, e.g. 18 City on the Aar 19 Solutions for unfair situations? 20 Not so tough 21 Modern address 22 “1-2-3” singer Barry 23 Tracker or Canyon 24 Fifth-century date 25 Haberdashery item 27 Brand for which Garfield was once spokescat 28 Patricia Neal’s Oscar film 29 Fountain output 30 They fall in war films 33 One may go over your head 35 Space-saving

display 38 Brothers 42 Lucy of “Kill Bill” 43 Body protector 44 Worn out 46 Gives a thumbsup 47 Antiquity, quaintly 48 Old televangelism letters 49 Burden 50 Adjust at the garage, perhaps 52 Composer for whom an annual violin competition is named 54 Nonreactive 55 Deadpan features 56 Suit material 57 Woman in a tree? 58 Suit material 59 Give away 60 Tablets from doc

1 Shows nerve 2 London’s setting 3 Conked out 4 One of the Jacksons 5 Carnegie Deli offering 6 Dismissive sorts? 7 Narrow inlets 8 “Barbara __”: Beach Boys hit 9 White meat source 10 Rejections 11 Bible’s City of Palm Trees 12 Confessed 13 They get you in 15 Magnetic induction unit 20 Hockey game clincher 23 Driving problem 26 Currency with King Mongkut on the fifty 27 “As You Like It” forest 31 Secret rival 32 “O Fortuna” composer 34 Agreed 35 Wedding arranger?

36 Perfectly restored 37 Stark 39 Attendants 40 Done 41 Many Suffragette opponents 45 Half a legendary bluegrass duo 48 Advisory group 51 Press 52 Minute opening 53 First name in linguistics 55 Co. heads

Tribune Media Services 2013

THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

H o ro s c o p e s Concentrate on aspirations rather than ambitions in the early part of the week. Hold off implementing investment strategies. You might be faced by an unexpected bill or added duties at an inconvenient time.

Frustrated desires may be a signal that you are heading down the wrong path. For the best results, steer clear of confrontations and keep your nose to the grindstone in the first half of the week.

You can’t always fly by the seat of your pants. Accuracy could be essential in the week to come. Count on solid support and good advice, especially if caught up in a whirlwind of changes.

Mary had a little lamb whose fleece was white as snow. Avoid problems by not associating with people who spread dirt. The early part of the week is not a good time to enter into agreements.

Accept the good, the bad and even the ugly with good grace. Don’t make irrevocable judgments about people or key decisions about financial matters early this week. Logical thinking is your key to success.

The first half of the week is not a good time to strike bargains, make major purchases or have machinery repaired. Hold off on decisions that could affect your financial condition.

No one is hiding the truth under a rock. You suspect the worst of someone when you don’t receive the answer you want. Put major decisions on the back burner, rather than putting your foot down this week.

Be proud of your accomplishments. Ignore that little nagging voice that urges you to do something selfish. Your stamina and ability to cope with emergencies could be tested for a few days this week.

Thank your lucky stars for an understanding mate or a helpful friend. Some situations might be exasperating in the early part of the week. Don’t count your chickens before they hatch.

Unexpected policy changes could cause setbacks. You may hear of an opportunity to increase your net worth, but hold off on making your move until things settle down later in the week.

Tiptoe through the tulips. Don’t stir up resentment by taking control without permission. Get plenty of rest so that you can tackle a heavy load of responsibilities in the early part of the week.

If you can’t trust your eyes and ears, trust your instincts. Some people may surprise you by being cranky or difficult to deal with this week. Employ your powers of understanding to bypass controversy.

Sudoku

J umble

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • PROBE • MAGIC • IMPACT • SNAPPY

Answer:

The matrons described the X-rated movie as a __ “SIN-EMA”

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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Long-time Bolingbrook coach Tony Smith is leaving Valley View,

www.romeovillebugle.com

page 15; Local stat leaders, page 17

THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

13

Spartans looking to heal for home stretch By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Saying Plainfield South has a good hitting team this season is like saying Lebron James is a pretty good basketball player. The fact is, when they are on, the Cougars can flat out rake. South hit the ball well in the first two games against Romeoville, handing the Spartans their first two 10-run rule losses of the season. But the way the Southwest Prairie Conference works, Romeoville pitcher Thomas Goodyear allowed the highscoring Cougars just three hits for the game in a 4-0 shutout win to avoid the sweep. Raul Ibarra had a triple and three RBI, while Brandon Lisak had a pair of hits. Romeoville coach Dave Haskins was not overly concerned about the two large defeats, as the Spartans are battling injury and getting some young players acclimated to varsity baseball. We are struggling right now, but that is alright,” Haskins said. “The thing we have to do to get out of this is to grow together. The senior leadership is stepping in. “We made some moves and brought some young guys up to flip the lineup a bit and we See SPARTANS, page 14

Mark Gregory/Bugle staff

Mitch Zack and the Spartans had a few days off last weekend that coach Dave Haskins hoped help them get healthy for the playoffs.


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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

Sports SPARTANS Continued from page 13 have to get healthy. We have some hanging arms and some sore arms.” Haskins said they Spartans had guys pitching their first starts of the season, which he admits is harder against a tough hitting team like South. “Our Nos. 2 and 3 pitchers couldn’t go, so the first two games of the series we threw guys that probably shouldn’t be in that position. It was their first starts of the season, but they stepped up and battled. But we have to tip our cap to them because they are a great team.” After the series with the Cougars, Romeoville had the weekend off for prom, allowing them a chance to heal up. “We have to get through this,” Haskins said. “We have the

weekend off for prom, so we have three days to get healthy. But, that is OK, we have to get healthy for the end of May.Those were the first two games we have been slaughtered. Every other loss is 2-1 or 3-2. But we will be OK. “We will get some rest over the weekend and we will get healthy and we will bounce back against Minooka. Hopefully our horses are ready to go so we can see what they can do against another quality opponent.” The one thing Haskins was pleased about in the losses was the way the team battled even being down big early. “I was very pleased with their efforts,” he said. One of those players was sophomore Josh Krueger who homered for the only run in the second game of the series. It was his third game in a row with a homer.

“He has been having a great week and a half for us,” Haskins said. “We are very pleased we have him for two more years.” Krueger said he has been seeing the ball well. “I have liked what I have been seeing and I have been able to drive them,” he said. “We have to try and give 100 percent no matter what the score is.” In the series opener, Kruger was 2-for-3 with a homer and two RBI, while Brian Hurley also had a home run. The game before against Plainfield East, Krueger had a homer and three RBI in Romeoville’s 5-4 loss to the Bengals. Mike Torres was 3-for-4 with a triple, Matt Bottcher was 2-for-4 with a double and Lisak had a home run. Hurley took the loss, striking out nine and allowing two earned runs on eight hits in seven innings.

SOFTBALL Romeoville defeated Oswego East 10-6. Olivia Valdez homered and had two RBI for Romeoville. Romeoville then fell to Plainfield East 3-2. Taylor Massaro was 2-for-3 with homer, Abby Smith tripled and Briana Floyd drove home an RBI for the Spartans.

GIRLS SOCCER Minooka blanked Romeoville 7-0.

GIRLS TRACK The Spartans were fourth as a team at the SPC meet last weekend. Raven Kelly was a conference champion in both the shot put and discus. In the shot, she posted a distance of 41-feet, 3.5 inches, while in the discus, she threw it 110-9.5.


Sports

THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

15

Smith leaving Valley View By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Bolingbrook basketball coach Tony Smith announced May 2 that will be leaving his coaching job as head girls basketball coach of the Raiders to take the same position at HomewoodFlossmoor High School, pending approval by H-F District 233 school board on May 21. “It is a great opportunity for me to go there and build,” said Smith, who will continue to teach Health as well.“It was something I couldn’t pass up on all the things going on at Homewood.” Smith took over the Lady Raiders in 2001 and posted a 329-39 record, winning four state titles, including three straight from 2009-11. “Tony has meant a lot to the Bolingbrook community and to our high school,” said Bolingbrook AD Rob Rose. “He basically built this program from the ground up and turned it into one of the best programs in the nation. I am a Bolingbrook guy, Tony is a Bolingbrook guy. Me and Tony go way back and I wish him all the best. I am going to miss him. It is not something I am happy about, but it is a good opportunity for him. If it wasn’t, I’m sure he wouldn’t be leaving.” Smith said that he looks forward to trying to build the Vikings into the same type of program he built at Bolingbrook. “We were able to build a great program at Bolingbrook and I think it is a program that can go on and on,” Smith said. “This is a new challenge now and it is kind of a refreshing challenge to go

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Tony Smith is leaving Bolingbrook to coach at HomewoodFloosmoor.

and try and do it again.” Smith will be reunited with Alec Anderson, former athletic director at Bolingbrook who left after the 2011 season to take the same job at H-F. “Alec was one of the big parts that I chose to go out there,” Smith said. “I know him and I know he is a person I enjoyed working with. But, this was one of the biggest jobs out there.” Smith said his first goal at H-F will be win a SouthWest Suburban Conference championship, something only Bolingbrook has done since the inception of the league.

“The first plan is to win a conference championship. I know that has never been done by anyone other than Bolingbrook since the conference started,” Smith said. “I will always be cheering for them when they are not playing us, they will always have a special part in me.” While at Bolingbrook, Smith coached two of the most decorated players in state history in Morgan Tuck and Ariel Massengale. Tuck was Illinois Ms. Basketball as a freshman and a senior and was Gatorade Player of the year in 2012, while Massengale was Ms. Basketball in 2011. He was also coach of the McDonald’s All-American West team this year “Bolingbrook gave me an opportunity and I will always be grateful for them. I have had a lot of good times here and have a lot of friends at Bolingbrook,” Smith said. “I have to thank Mayor (Roger) Claar for his support. I want to thank the kids over the years for being dedicated student athletes. What we have done here, I know it shows how hard the kids have worked. It is an honor to have worked with them.” Smith said he plans to implement the off season workout program for the Vikings as soon as he is officially approved by the board. “I am hoping to start to make the transition at the end of the month,” Smith said. “Because there will be a transition.” There will also be a transition in Bolingbrook and Rose said the search will be open to all takers.’

“Once H-F approves him, we will be able to post the position,” Rose said. “We are not opposed to in-house candidates, but in fairness to our kids, we are going

to open it up and look for the best possible coach we can find.” Follow Mark @2Mark_My_Words mark@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013


sPorts

BASEBALL

Average Danny Mayer, Downers South .507 Charlie Donovan, Westmont .493 Tyler Butler, Plainfield South .481 Max Brozovich, Minooka .462 Zac Taylor, Downers South .460 Ryan Schlicher, Westmont .447 Rick Salazar, Plainfield South .439 Troy Southard, Downers North .436 Cody Grosse, Joliet West .426 Brian Hurley, Romeoville .426 Jason Kenealy, Plainfield Central .424 Josh Krueger, Romeoville .423 Alex Galik, Downers South .423 John McNulty, Plainfield South .421 Derek Bangert, Lockport .417 Matt Zinnecker, Downers South .417 Connor Kopach, Downers North .415 Zack Burdi, Downers South .407 Matt Zaboudil, Downers North .405 Jermaine Terry, Plainfield South .404 Matt Ryan, Plainfield Central .404 Victor Garcia, Plainfield South .400 Matt Cranley, Plainfield South .389 Nick Dalesandro, JCA .383 Robert Kokoszka, Westmont .382 John Smith, Plainfield South .377 Nick Sramek, Bolingbrook .377 Jack Arkus, Niles West .375 Hits Danny Mayer, Downers South 34 Ryan Schlicher, Westmont 34 Charlie Donovan, Westmont 34 Max Brozovich, Minooka 30 Josh Krueger, Romeoville 30 Zac Taylor, Downers South 29 Neal Tyrell, Minooka 27 Tyler Butler, Plainfield South 26 Rick Salazar, Plainfield South 25 Jason Kenealy, Plainfield Central 25 John McNulty, Plainfield South 24 Victor Garcia, Plainfield South 24 Zack Burdi, Downers South 24 Troy Southard, Downers North 24 Cody Grosse, Joliet West 23 Brandon Lisak, Romeoville 23 Dion Ursino, Notre Dame 23 Nick Sramek, Bolingbrook 23 Joe Carnagio, Minooka 23 Joe Becht, Downers South 23 Matt Ryan, Plainfield Central 23 Christian Armstrong, Plainfield Central 22 Steve Wittkamp, Minooka 22 Alex Galik, Downers South 22 Zach Moran, Westmont 22 Connor Kopach, Downers North 22 Runs Ryan Schlicher, Westmont 41 Charlie Donovan, Westmont 33 Zac Taylor, Downers South 29 Neal Tyrell, Minooka 23 Jean Pietrzak, Westmont 23 Tyler Butler, Plainfield South 23 Mike Torres, Romeoville 22 Joe Carnagio, Minooka 21 Zack Burdi, Downers South 20 Connor Kopach, Downers North 20 Larry Holman, Joliet West 20 Max Brozovich, Minooka 19 Jermaine Terry, Plainfield South 19 Josh Krueger, Romeoville 19 Kevin Raher, Downers South 19 Joe Becht, Downers South 19 Troy Southard, Downers North 19 Blake Kerzich, Plainfield Central 19 Robert Kokoszka, Westmont 18 John McNulty, Plainfield South 18 Alex Galik, Downers South 18

RBI Danny Mayer, Downers South Charlie Donovan, Westmont Derek Bangert, Lockport John McNulty, Plainfield South Max Brozovich, Minooka Jean Pietrzak, Westmont Tyler Butler, Plainfield South Josh Krueger, Romeoville Doubles Max Brozovich, Minooka Josh Krueger, Romeoville Charlie Donovan, Westmont Danny Mayer, Downers South John McNulty, Plainfield South Nick Sramek, Bolingbrook Zac Taylor, Downers South Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Troy Southard, Downers North Michael Ferri, Notre Dame Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Chayancze Stirbis, Plainfield East Zack Thomas, Joliet West Mike Torres, Romeoville Matt Bottcher, Romeoville Brad Elmore, Bolingbrook HR Derek Bangert, Lockport John McNulty, Plainfield South Joe Carnagio, Minooka Doug Matthews, Lockport Ted Snidenko, Lockport Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Josh Krueger, Romeoville Tyler Butler, Plainfield South Nick Sramek, Bolingbrook ERA Cody Pazik, Niles West Kyle Colletta, Niles West Eric Duzan, Lockport Lucas Fisher, Downers North Steven Waldrop, Bolingbrook Josh Mitchell, Minooka Patrick Dillon, Notre Dame

34 34 26 23 23 22 20 20 10 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 0.41 0.51 0.70 0.78 1.01 1.14 1.18

Jean Pietrzak, Westmont Josh Krueger, Romeoville Ryan McQueen, Plainfield South Nick Dalesandro, JCA Trevor Henderson, Plainfield South Evan Martens, Lockport Sam Couch, JCA Troy Southard, Downers North Quinn Ahern, Joliet West Brian Hurley, Romeoville Strikeouts Josh Mitchell, Minooka Trevor Henderson, Plainfield South Jake Herron, Joliet West Tomas Aguilar, Plainfield Central Jean Pietrzak, Westmont Brian Hurley, Romeoville Steve Waldrop, Bolingbrook Nick Rana, Plainfield Central Mitch Vogrin, Minooka Brad Elmore, Bolingbrook Quinn Ahern, Joliet West Sam Couch, JCA Zach Moran, Westmont Nick Dalesandro, JCA Mario Samuel, Bolingbrook Wins Ryan McQueen, Plainfield South Lucas Fisher, Downers North Jean Pietrzak, Westmont Jake Herron, Joliet West Zach Moran, Westmont

THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

1.20 1.21 1.27 1.29 1.31 1.43 1.46 1.68 1.81 1.84 52 50 47 40 39 37 37 36 34 34 33 27 27 25 25 5-0 5-0 5-1 5-1 5-1

SOFTBALL Average Rosa Gonzalez, Joliet Central Marissa Panko, Benet Stephanie Abello, Benet Carolyn Nojiri, Downers North Maeve McGuire, Benet Courtney Grasz, Resurrection Emily Bernath, Resurrection

.625 .603 .593 .545 .543 .521 .508

Ashley Beck, Romeoville .500 Hits Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 41 Breanne Sobotks, Resurrection 39 Marissa Panko, Benet 38 Carolyn Nojiri, Downers North 36 Kristine Bourg, Joliet West 34 Stephanie Abello, Benet 32 Regan Carmichael, Maine South 31 Joy Treasure, Joliet West 30 Carly Dundee, Lockport 30 Rosa Gonzalez, Joliet Central 30 Jennifer Ames, Joliet West 29 Kristina Shahan, Plainfield Central 28 Michaela Schlattmann, Plainfield C. 28 Gabby Voulgaris, Lockport 28 Kelly Pattison, Lockport 27 Nina Anderson, Maine South 27 Timi Tooley, Plainfield Central 27 Emily York, Benet 26 Nina Maggio, Plainfield East 26 Ali Michalik, Benet 26 Julianne Rurka, Benet 25 Maeve McGuire, Benet 25 Summer Stitt, Lisle 24 Kelsey Gockman, Downers North 23 Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central 23 Emily Suwanski, Maine South 23 Briana Floyd, Romeoville 23 Runs Kristine Bourg, Joliet West 32 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 30 Marissa Panko, Benet 28 Jennifer Ames, Joliet West 28 Carly Dundee, Lockport 28 Maeve McGuire, Benet 24 Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central 23 Ali Michalik, Benet 22 Sara Novak, Minooka 22 Carolyn Nojiri, Downers North 21 Joy Treasure, Joliet West 21 Julianne Rurka, Benet 21 Emily Suwanski, Maine South 20 Kelsey Smith, Minooka 20

Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South Sarah Grabowski, Plainfield Central RBI Stephanie Abello, Benet Kate Moriarity, Resurrection Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central Courtney Grasz, Resurrection Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central Julianne Rurka, Benet Maeve McGuire, Benet Doubles Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central Nina Maggio, Plainfield East Gabby Voulgaris, Lockport Alora O’Malley-Molk, Plainfield East CC Budzynski, Maine South Skyler Poel, Westmont Maeve McGuire, Benet Emily York, Benet Lorelei Tokarczyk, Joliet West Jaelyn Tate, Joliet Central Kelly Urban, Lisle Kristine Bourg, Joliet West Joy Treasure, Joliet West Julianne Rurka, Benet Susie Sternard, Westmont Kristen Skala, Westmont Shannon Vaughan, Plainfield North Stephanie Abello, Benet HR Stephanie Abello, Benet Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central Jennifer Ames, Joliet West Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South Kelsey Gockman, Downers North Carly Dundee, Lockport Sara Novak, Minooka Kelly Kennedy, Plainfield North Kate Moriarity, Resurrection Adri Cura, Plainfield South Marissa Panko, Benet Maeve McGuire, Benet Nina Maggio, Plainfield East Cece Floyd, Romeoville

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20 19 38 30 29 27 26 26 26 10 10 9 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 10 7 7 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4


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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013


buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

19

Front Row Motorsports 1, 2 at ‘Dega In the type of stunning victory that has typified racing at Talladega Superspeedway since its inception, David Ragan led an extraordinary 1-2 finish for Front Row Motorsports, which had never won a NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race before Sunday. David Gilliland pushed Ragan, his teammate, to the lead on the final circuit in a green-white checkered-flag finish that took Sunday’s Aaron’s 499 four laps

past its scheduled distance of 188 laps. Gilliland came home second, followed by pole sitter Carl Edwards, Michael Waltrip and series leader Jimmie Johnson. As Ragan put it, two Davids beat the Goliaths of NASCAR racing in one of the sport’s most unlikely finishes ever. Ragan’s victory followed a massive wreck that took the race to overtime--and to near-darkness, in what truly was truly was a

Talladega night. In fact, NASCAR gave the drivers a chance to change their tinted visors for clear ones during the final caution. Afterwards, Ragan tried to put the win in perspective. “I can only imagine what it felt like back in 1988 when Mark Martin got that first win for Jack Roush or when Geoff Bodine won that first race for Hendrick Motorsports,” said Ragan, who scored his only Sprint Cup win

at Daytona in July 2011, his last season with Jack Roush.“I’m sure it was just as special. “A lot of these guys have been to Victory Lane in the Sprint Cup Series and late model racing, short tracks, ARCA – all kinds of series – but to do it here at Talladega in 2013, like I said, it’s a true David vs. Goliath story. I couldn’t be more proud to play my own role.” Ragan restarted 10th and

Gilliland 11th for the final twolap sprint. As the cars raced into Turn 1, they were barely visible from the frontstretch grandstand, but the teammates managed to find each other on the track. For the first time in NASCAR’s new Gen-6 car, Gilliland pushed another car through the corners-to the amazement of Edwards, whose jaw dropped in the postrace news conference as Gilliland described the final two laps.

WEEKLY RACING UPDATE STANDINGS

CHICAGOLAND APPEARENCES

Jerry Markland/Getty Images

David Ragan, driver of the No.34 Farm Rich Ford, celebrates in victory lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Aaron’s 499 at Talladega Superspeedway.

Former NASCAR Sprint Cup Series champion Dale Jarrett and Riverton, Ill., native Justin Allgaier will join fans to celebrate the kick-off of the Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup in Chicagoland Speedway’s Turn 4 Club this September. Allgaier is scheduled to appear with fans on Saturday, Sept. 14, prior to the Dollar General 300 Powered by Coca-Cola with Jarrett appearing on Sunday, Sept. 15, before the GEICO 400 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Race. Jarrett began his NASCAR career in 1982 and went on to win 32 Sprint Cup Series races over his career, including three Daytona 500’s and two Brickyard 400’s. Allgaier, who pilots the No. 31 Brandt car, currently ranks 4th in the NASCAR Nationwide Series point standings, finishing in the top 10 in four of his first six races this season. The Turn 4 Club is a premium, all-inclusive, viewing area located outside of the track in turn 4. It features an indoor hospitality area and an elevated, outdoor close-to-the-action seat with a direct view down pit road.Admission to the Turn 4 Club also includes Pit and Infield Fan Zone Experience passes, driver appearances, V.I.P. parking and a climate-controlled environment.The Turn 4 Club will open with the gates, and will remain open through the event’s conclusion. Tickets start at $395, and are available for Saturday, Sept. 14 and Sunday, Sept. 15, or a weekend package.

2012 Sprint Cup Series 1) Jimmie Johnson 383 2) Carl Edwards -41 3) Dale Earnhardt, Jr. -59 4) Clint Bowyer -67 5) Brad Keselowski -69 6) Kasey Kahne -84 7) Aric Almirola -90 8) Paul Menard -93 9) Kyle Busch -98 10) Greg Biffle -103 11) Matt Kenseth -104 12) Kevin Harvick -107

2013 Nationwide Series 1) Sam Hornish, Jr. . 2) Regan Smith 3) Austin Dillon 4) Justin Allgaier 3) Brian Scott

2013 Arron’s 499 finishers 1) David Ragan 2) David Gilliland 3) Carl Edwards 4) Michael Waltrip 5) Jimmie Johnson 6) Regan Smith 7) Martin Truex Jr. 8) Matt Kenseth 9) Scott Speed 10) Aric Almirola 11) Jeff Gordon 12) David Stremme 13) Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 14) Marcos Ambrose 15) Brad Keselowski 16) Dave Blaney 17) Dale Earnhardt Jr. 18) Clint Bowyer 19) Josh Wise 20) Bobby Labonte


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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013


Health & Fitness

THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

21

How to return to normalcy after a cancer diagnosis By StatePoint Media

Cancer. It’s a word no one wants to hear, yet all too many people are diagnosed each year. With a diagnosis comes many questions, most importantly how to get the best medical care possible. For many, the next logical question is how to maintain a normal life with cancer -- including balancing work, life and health demands. Nearly 80 percent of cancer patients and survivors say continuing work after diagnosis aids recovery, according to recently released survey results from nonprofit organization Cancer and Careers and Harris Interactive. Still, many struggle to find support navigating the work/ life balance of employment with cancer. For some, working through treatment is not a choice, but a necessity. For others, the decision to work is made based on personal preferences. Survey results showed that several factors motivate cancer survivors to continue

working -- including feeling well, wanting to maintain a routine and wanting to be productive. At the same time, 67 percent of surveyed cancer patients and survivors said work/life balance was critical to having a career. Regardless of the situation, experts say that those working through or returning to work following treatment have many factors to consider. “There are many components to manage when people return to work after a cancer diagnosis or treatment, including understanding legal rights, telling co-workers, managing treatment schedules and addressing potential resume gaps,” said Kate Sweeney, executive director of Cancer and Careers, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to serving people working during and after cancer treatment. Sweeney offers the following tips for people transitioning back into the workplace after a cancer diagnosis or treatment: • Before sharing your

STATEPOINT MEDIA PHOTO

Nearly 80 percent of cancer patients and survivors say continuing work after diagnosis aids recovery.

diagnosis, study your options. Learn about the laws that may protect you, know your company’s policies and speak to your healthcare team. • Be mindful of what you say online. Whatever you post becomes part of your online brand, so consider the shortand long-term effects of what you say and do. • When returning to work, ease back into the routine. Make sure you take care of yourself physically and mentally. • Be clear with your coworkers about how they can

support you. • Be prepared to “swivel” the conversation back to workrelated things so the focus isn’t always on cancer. • Rely on free resources to

help make the transition. For example, Cancer and Careers provides expert advice, interactive tools and educational events for everyone dealing with cancer in the workplace, including patients, healthcare professionals, human resource managers and coworkers. More information on how to balance the demands of work and cancer can be found at www. CancerAndCareers.org. Whether you need to work or simply want to stay active during your treatment, having a plan can empower you to thrive in the workplace and leave you with more energy to cope with the rest of life’s details.


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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

Real Estate & Business

Time to end the gravy train Social Security plan: for that ‘special’ employee What it means to you Q. I have an employee on my team who is charming and always trying to get me to give him extra goodies. He wants extra time with me, special treatment or for me to bend the rules for him. I’m exhausted trying to manage him. How do I let him know his gravy train is over? A. Let him know the gravy train is over by helping him realize he is in the workplace and not part of a family where he is the indulged or neglected child. Many adults came from homes in which they either got way too much or way too little from their parents. Both types of adults will expect their bosses (workplace parents) will bend over backwards to make them feel special. If you were raised by people who treated you as a little prince or princess, you go out into the world absolutely expecting the rest of the world to follow suit. If your parents neglected you, you may go out into the world feeling the world now has to make up for the early deprivation you experienced. Most bosses don’t know employee project parenting issues on them and they don’t see this problem coming at all. If you are a manager or supervisor, welcome to the reality of workplace parenting. No one told you that being a leader in a company will mean every employee will paint their unfinished issues with

their parents on your face. If you consider all the weird behavior you’ve seen in employees, the fact they see you as mom or dad may start to make a lot of sense. The problem is you are their boss not their parent. If you want to end these irrational employee expectations you need to see what is happening.You then need to be able and willing to disappoint your employees. Next time your employee charmingly cajoles you to bend a rule, make sure you are in private, repeat back the request, state that you know this will be disappointing and you can no longer bend the rules for them. Now the hard part: Walk away and let your employee look heartbroken or angry. Yes, you’ll feel like a jerk, but no one can be effective in the workplace without repeatedly disappointing other people’s unreasonable demands. The trouble with the gravy train you’ve provided for your “special” employee is that no amount of special treatment can fill his black hole of entitlement. No matter what you’ve done or will do, he will simply keep increasing his demands. If it helps, realize he does this with everyone not just you. Next time you have an employee who nicely asks you to break the rules, realize you’ve received a ticket for the

entitlement gravy train again. Don’t RSVP by breaking the rules even once. If you have other employees that never ask for a favor and honestly once in a blue moon make a request, feel free to accommodate them. Just make sure you communicate you’ll only do this once.You’ll build loyalty from them without changing their normal expectations. No matter what an awesome manager you are, it is beyond the scope of your job description to parent an employee. Even a good psychotherapist recognizes a big part of their job is to let clients know the psychotherapist is not their mommy. You can empathize with an employee who has been given too much or too little without perpetuating their distorted view of the world. One of the richest opportunities in the workplace is to grieve our unrealistic expectations of reality so we can be effective. Give your entitled employee a chance to grieve, do the job or find another manager to be his mommy.

Last word(s) Q. One of my customers is always finding ways I fail him. I keep explaining what I’m doing but it doesn’t help. Is there a more effective response? A. Yes, simply ask him what he wants next time he complains. No one cares about your explanations; they only care about getting what they want.

What are essential 3-6 month expenses? Dear Dave, I’m following your plan, and currently I have $14,000 in my emergency fund. What are essentials for three to six months of expenses? Brian Dear Brian, Basically, you should ask yourself this question: What would it take to operate

my household for a month? There are several different things that could be classified as “essentials,” but if you take those things and multiply the number by three, four, five or six, you’ll see how much money you need to have a fully loaded emergency fund of three to six months of expenses. This is Baby Step 3 in

my plan. Some people get really technical about exactly how many months of expenses they need to save in this range. And that’s okay.You can take a little time to evaluate things before moving on to Baby Step 4, which is investing 15 percent of your household income into Roth IRAs and other pre-tax retirement plans. Believe me, it’s a great feeling See DAVE, page 23

By Jill Schlesinger Tribune Media Services

There’s nothing like proposed changes to Social Security limits to get readers of this column going. After President Obama released his fiscal 2014 budget, a number of you wrote in asking,“What will this mean to me?” Well, let’s start with a quick refresher on the current system. To qualify for Social Security retirement benefits, you need to have worked and paid payroll taxes for at least 10 years. You can check your online benefits statement at www.socialsecurity. gov/mystatement/ to determine where you currently stand. Full retirement age varies from 65 to 67 depending on the year of your birth. The general rule is that if you can afford to do so and are in good health, it pays to wait to retire until your full retirement age (FRA) before you claim benefits (and it’s even better if you can delay until age 70). While you can choose to tap into the system as early as age 62, your benefit will be permanently lower - for some as much as 25 percent less, which also could affect a nonworking spouse, who also will claim based on your work history. Unfortunately, many Americans can’t afford to delay - they need the income as soon as possible. There is one more part of the equation. The government adjusts the amount of your retirement benefit annually to account for rising prices. In 2013, the cost of living adjustment, or “COLA,” was an increase of 1.7 percent. But let’s hit the pause button here. Social Security is not going broke any time soon. Yes, there are fewer workers paying into the system today than in the past, and indeed, more and more baby boomers retire every day. The Social Security 2012 trustee report projected that in 20 years (after 2033), payroll tax income would pay only about three-quarters of scheduled benefits through 2086. But the trustees’ report also offered a different way to think about Social Security - as a share of Gross Domestic Product, or the economy as a whole. Social Security costs equaled 4.2 percent of GDP in 2007, and the trustees project that these costs will increase gradually to 6.4 percent of GDP in 2035 before declining and remaining at about 6.1 percent of

GDP from 2055 through 2086. Many argue that 6 to 6.5 percent of GDP is a small price to pay to fund a program that provides about 37 percent of all income for Americans 65 and older, and a whopping 85 percent for those in the bottom 20 percent of incomes. That’s why legislators and pundits have been floating so many ideas for enhancing the current system, which include increasing full retirement age, raising the Social Security wage base from the current level of $113,700 of earned income, increasing the Social Security payroll tax for high earners, means-testing Social Security benefits for retirees who have incomes above a certain threshold and/or changing the cost-of-living adjustment. The president’s budget focuses on that last option by tinkering with the COLA calculation as a means to slow down the cost of the Social Security over the next decade. The proposal would replace the current measure of inflation (a consumer price index for wage earners, or CPI-W) with one called “chained CPI,” which the government has only been calculating since 2002. Advocates claim that chained CPI is a more accurate measure because it takes into account the fact that consumers respond to the rise in the price of one good by shifting to cheaper alternatives. Chained CPI has shown an average rate of inflation that’s 0.3 percent lower than the government’s current measure, according to the AARP Public Policy Institute. The Obama administration says that this change in calculation would shave $110 billion from the budget over 10 years. However, what would be the net effect of this change on retirees? According to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, the switch to chained CPI could reduce benefits for the average worker who retires at age 65 by about $650 per year by age 75, and by over $1,100 per year by age 85. So, while some combination of these proposed changes could be made to bolster Social Security over the long term, many of them will shrink the already meager benefits of most retirees. Like it or not, this appears to be the new reality of retirement. We should all pay attention and plan accordingly.


THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

DAVE Continued from page 22 to have a big pile of cash sitting there just for a rainy day.You don’t want to go nuts and make it so big that you sacrifice retirement or other important aspects of your life, but after a point you shouldn’t be too concerned whether you have three months or six months of expenses—or somewhere in between—saved just for emergencies. Having a nice emergency fund, along with no debt, creates a wonderful sense of financial peace! —Dave

She stole his identity Dear Dave, If a wife takes out a credit card in her husband’s name without his knowledge, and they get divorced, can the husband claim identity theft? Nancy Dear Nancy, Absolutely! Unless they have power of attorney, anytime someone opens an account in a name other than their own, they have stolen an identity. Being married to someone doesn’t give you the right to sign their name to a document. I knew a guy in the real estate business years ago who was doing a lot of property deals under his own name. Occasionally, the title company would require his wife’s signature, and he would sign her name on the papers himself. Sometimes he signed her name after calling her up and explaining what was happening, and she was okay with the situation.Then, he signed some papers she didn’t know about, and it came back to bite him. He was charged with criminal fraud! You cannot legally sign your spouse’s name without first having power of attorney privileges. If you do, it’s called identity theft. It’s a crime anytime you lie to get money. —Dave Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 266 S. Adler Creek Dr., Romeoville, IL 60446 (Condominium Unit). On the 5th day of June, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: EVERBANK Plaintiff V. JASON A. HENDRY AND CREEKSIDE AT ROMEOVILLE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 757 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1572 Lavender Drive, Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single family.). On the 22nd day of May, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff V. MARIO PULLIAM; TACHON L. PULLIAM; MARIO PULLIAM, AS TRUSTEE OF THE PULLIAM FAMILY 2003 TRUST, U/D/T DATED MARCH 24, 2003; TACHON PULLIAM, AS TRUSTEE OF THE PULLIAM FAMILY 2003 TRUST, U/D/T DATED MARCH 24, 2003; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.; THE WESGLEN MASTER ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 6092 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

For Information Please Contact:

Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax)

FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax)

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 5/9, 5/16, 5/23

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PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 4/25, 5/2, 5/9

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1585 Amaryllis Dr., Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single Family Residence). On the 22nd day of May, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff V. MARICHELLE A. SANTILLANA aka MARICHELLE SANTILLANA, ALREX B. UY and FIRST AMERICAN BANK Defendant.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1912 Tuscany Lane Romeoville, IL 60446 (Condo/Townhouse). On the 29th day of May, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as successor by merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC Plaintiff V. Rosalba Guerrero a/k/a Rosalva Cabrero a/k/a Rosalba Flores; et. al. Defendant.

Case No. 12 CH 249 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Case No. 10 CH 2339 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact:

For Information Please Contact: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 4/25, 5/2, 5/9

Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-12700 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 5/2, 5/9, 5/16


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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013


THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 12TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY - JOLIET, ILLINOIS 13 CH 01149 PNC Bank, National Association PLAINTIFF Vs. Bank of America, National Association successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association f/k/a LaSalle National Bank as Trustee u/t/a dated April 20, 1982 a/k/a Trust No. 106120; PNC Bank, National Association; Unknown Beneficiaries of Bank of America, National Association successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association f/k/a LaSalle National Bank u/t/a dated April 20, 1982 a/k/a Trust No. 106120; Unknown Owners and Nonrecord Claimants DEFENDANTS NOTICE BY PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU: Unknown Beneficiaries of Bank of America, National Association successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association f/k/a LaSalle National Bank u/t/a dated April 20, 1982 a/k/a Trust No. 106120 Unknown Owners and Nonrecord Claimants That this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to-wit: LOT 35 IN BLOCK 6 IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NUMBER 3 A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF SECTION 33 AND WEST 1/2 OF SECTION 34 IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 430 Holden Avenue Romeoville, IL 60446 and which said Mortgage was made by: Bank of America, National Association successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association f/k/a LaSalle National Bank as Trustee u/t/a dated April 20, 1982 a/k/a Trust No. 106120 the Mortgagor(s), to National City Mortgage Services Co., as Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County, Illinois, as Document No. 00435233 Re-recorded R2013025096; and for other relief; that summons was duly issued out of said Court against you as provided by law and that the said suit is now pending. NOW, THEREFORE, UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this Court, Pamela J. McGuire Clerk of the Court 57 N. Ottawa Street Joliet, IL 60432 on or before June 3, 2013, A DEFAULT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU AT ANY TIME AFTER THAT DAY AND A JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PRAYER OF SAID COMPLAINT. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 DuPage # 15170 Winnebago # 531 Our File No. 14-12-27166 NOTE: This law firm is deemed to be a debt collector.

PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff,

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff,

vs.

vs.

MARICHELLE A. SANTILLANA aka MARICHELLE SANTILLANA, ALREX B. UY and FIRST AMERICAN BANK Defendant. No. 12 CH 249

MARIO PULLIAM; TACHON L. PULLIAM; MARIO PULLIAM, AS TRUSTEE OF THE PULLIAM FAMILY 2003 TRUST, U/D/T DATED MARCH 24, 2003; TACHON PULLIAM, AS TRUSTEE OF THE PULLIAM FAMILY 2003 TRUST, U/D/T DATED MARCH 24, 2003; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.; THE WESGLEN MASTER ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. No. 10 CH 6092

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 21st day of November, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 22nd day of May, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: All that certain parcel of land situated in the County of Will and State of Illinois, being known and designated as Lot 985, in Wesglen Subdivision Neighborhood 8, a Subdivision of part of the Southwest _ of Section 7, Township 36 North, Range 10 East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded April 11, 2001, as Document Number 2001-41426, in Will County, Illinois. Commonly known as: 1585 Amaryllis Dr., Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single Family Residence P.I.N.: 11-04-07-314-011-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 4/25, 5/2, 5/9

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 8th day of November, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 22nd day of May, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 979 IN WESGLEN SUBDIVISION NEIGHBORHOOD 8 A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 7 TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 11 2001 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R200141426 IN WILL COUNTY ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1572 Lavender Drive, Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single family. P.I.N.: 04-07-314-032 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 4/25, 5/2, 5/9

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as successor by merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC Plaintiff, vs. Rosalba Guerrero a/k/a Rosalva Cabrero a/k/a Rosalba Flores; et. al. Defendant. No. 10 CH 2339 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 14th day of November, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 29th day of May, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 206 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 5 POD 24, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 12, 1999 AS DOCUMENT R99124552, AND AMENDMENTS THERETO, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1912 Tuscany Lane Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Condo/Townhouse P.I.N.: 03-12-305-013 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-12700 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 5/2, 5/9, 5/16

I528130 Published 5/2, 5/9, 5/16

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS EVERBANK Plaintiff, vs. JASON A. HENDRY AND CREEKSIDE AT ROMEOVILLE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendant. No. 12 CH 757 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 5th day of December, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 5th day of June, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: Unit Number 3321903, in Creekside of Romeoville Condominium, as delineated on a Survey of the following described real estate: Certain Lots in Pasquinelli_s Creekside Subdivision, being a Subdivision of part of the East _ of the Southeast of Section 7, Township 36 North, Range 10 East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded April 22, 2005, as Document R2005-66952, and Certificate of Correction recorded as Document R2005173623 which Survey is attached as Exhibit _A_ to the Declaration of Condominium recorded October 20, 2005 as Document Number R2005-182333, as amended; together with its undivided percentage interest in the common elements, all in Will County, Illinois. Commonly known as: 266 S. Adler Creek Dr., Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Condominium Unit P.I.N.: 11-04-07-405-017-1003 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 5/9, 5/16, 5/23


THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013

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THE BUGLE MAY 9, 2013


Romeoville 5-9-13