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FEBRUARY 27, 2014

Vol. 8 No. 34

LOCaL

Community mourns teen lost to violence Valle was allegedly murdered by her exboyfriend, died Feb. 17

superintendent JAmes mitchem

By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Friends and family said their final goodbyes as 15-year-old Briana Valle was laid to rest at Resurrection Cemetery in Romeoville Monday. Valle was allegedly murdered by her ex-boyfriend and died Feb. 17. She and >> see mourns | page 4


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

News WILL COUNTY

Stepping Stones offers help for addictions Center provides features individualized treatment, care to persons suffering Well-known actor Philip Seymour Hoffman was not immune to the powerful pull of drug addiction. He had reportedly fought alcoholism and other drug dependence for years, but died from an apparent heroin overdose just this month. Drug addiction is indiscriminate. It can entrap anyone in any stage of life, but a Joliet substance use disorder treatment facility is here to help. Stepping Stones Treatment Center provides individualized treatment and care to persons suffering from the disease of addiction, even if they are unable to pay for the cost of services. Its treatment programs have been saving lives for more than 40 years. “Addiction is a chronic condition, just like diabetes and hypertension,” explains Stepping Stones Clinical Director Paul Lauridsen.“And like those diseases, seeking treatment is the allimportant first step.”

Quitting drug and alcohol use is very difficult to do alone. Stepping Stones is a recovery facility that offers various treatment options for individuals with a substance use disorder. Every person is treated for his and her individual needs at the facility. Additionally, emotional factors, such as depression, are identified and addressed. Sometimes it is those issues that began the attraction to drugs and alcohol in the first place and they certainly can be a factor in recovery. With the therapeutic care, along with a safe, nurturing environment and a compassionate staff, patients begin to see their self-worth and regain their confidence. “We develop a relationship with the individuals who come to us for help,” Lauridsen said. “We care about them, and treat them with respect. By the time they leave they will have a plan to continue their recovery, a plan on how to manage their lives, and a sense of hope.” For more information, call Stepping Stones Treatment Center at (815) 744-4555, extension 135, or visit www. steppingstonestreatment.com.

Stepping Stones has several treatment programs, including: • Intensive residential services, which provides 24-hour treatment and monitoring for men and women who need a controlled setting to begin their recovery. • Extended residential care, where residential units are provided for men and women in recovery. Residents develop lifestyles free of alcohol and other drugs. • Men and women’s recovery homes, for post-treatment. This service supports residents and helps them strengthen skills needed for independent living. • Intensive outpatient services, which provides 9 or more hours per week of education and counseling. • Outpatient counseling, which provides relapse prevention programs and continued recovery needs. • Recovery support services, which include regular check-ups and connections to support groups or activities.


News cover story

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

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Parents continue to question Valley View School board also authorized the execution of an employment separation agreement By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Fallout continues within the Valley View School District regarding the resignation of Bolingbrook High School Principal Michael White, which has led to further criticism of the school board and current administration. Making known both their presence and their displeasure with the current school board and administration, community members came out again to Monday’s school board meeting, questioning the direction the district is headed after not supporting a principal considered by many as a valuable asset. “I recognize that as a result of what has happened at BHS, the community has suffered,” said Superintendent James Mitchem. “As superintendent, I take full responsibility for the issues that have come up. Never in a million years would I have thought that we would be looking for our third principal in four years.” Yolanda Jordan, former Bolingbrook High School Dean of Students, was named as Interim Principal at BHS for the remainder of the school year. Jordan stepped in as acting principal Feb. 18 after the early departure of White, who, according to Mitchem, left after

he and the district mutually agreed upon an administrative leave. At the time he submitted his resignation in January, White said the decision to resign did not come easy, calling the staff and students at BHS second to none, “At the very least is gives the impression that you are too busy to listen. You have your heads down when you should be paying attention to all of us.”

- Bolingbrook resident Michelle Abrams

and that he felt he had reached the limits to what he could do to support BHS. Since then, parents, students, and community members created a grass-roots effort, praising White for his work at BHS while also calling attention to what has been called a lack of support from administration. At Monday’s meeting, the school board authorized the execution of an employment separation agreement. The move caused further questioning from the public as to what further impact this agreement will have on the district. “In my humble opinion, minimal,” said School Board

President Steve Quigley. Attorney Cindy Hansen said while such information could not be openly discussed, those documents could be obtained via a FOIA request. Jordan, who has been Assistant Principal at Romeoville High School for nearly four years, came to Valley View as a Dean in 2006. She helped found and sponsor a wide variety of student organizations at both RHS and BHS including RIGHT (Really Intelligent Girls Hanging Together), Mr. RIGHT, Guide Right, and Multicultural Club. Some parents questioned why one of the assistant principals at BHS were not chosen to fill the role and felt an administrator from the same school rather than RHS would have been more logical. “From my perspective, the administration at BHS have been significantly engulfed in the recent issues, and I felt it was important that we have someone come in with a fresh perspective,” said Mitchem. “…I believe it was in the best interest of everyone considering there is some division in that building.” In addition, some community members took issue with the school board, calling their actions rude and inappropriate. Bolingbrook resident Michelle Abrams called attention to what appeared as texting by school board members during recent meetings. She said the action could be construed as either just plain rude, that they were texting one another during the meeting,

or communicating personal business when they should have been professional. “At the very least is gives the impression that you are too busy to listen,” said Abrams. “You have your heads down when you should be paying attention to all of us.” She called on the board to create a no cell phone policy in an effort to end rude behavior and curb public suspicion. After her comments, the board took a vote and adopted a policy for no cell phone use during the meeting. Board members said despite the criticism they were not deliberately texting or ignoring community members

Board member Dan Falese said he was concerned people were jumping to conclusions when for instance, he himself, works off an IPad during the meeting following the agenda,not working on personal business. A special Town Hall meeting will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 6 as a means for the community to ask any questions they may have of the school district. The open forum, which will take place in the Bolingbrook High School cafeteria, will not include any type of formal program. Attendees are asked to enter through Door 17 on the school’s southeast side.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014 >> mourns, from page 1 her mother were brutally shot Feb. 13, in the 300 block of Emery Avenue, while pulling out of their driveway. Her family wants her to be most remembered as a beautiful, goofy, silly-hearted, big-eyed girl, who was filled with life. Across from the cemetery, a marquee on the restaurant Brother’s Home Plate reads “Our condolences to the Valle family,” and the sentiment is felt throughout the community that witnessed a “senseless killing” unfold last week. Many who did not even know Valle sent their thoughts and prayers to the family, coming out to show their support. Friends described her as a beautiful angel who was very bright and will be missed by all. A fundraiser is being planned from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. March 2 at

PHOTO COURTESY RUSSO’S HILLSIDE CHAPELS

Photo of Briana Valle

Stone City Saloon, Romeoville. Nearly $3,000 has been raised to help the family cover medical costs.To donate visit www.gofundme.com. Erick M. Maya, 23, of 5600 Park Ave., Cicero, faces first-degree murder charges, attempted murder, aggravated battery with a firearm and an unlawful use of a weapon by a felon in

connection with the shooting. Maya, who did not speak, appeared via closed-circuit television from the adult detention facility at a hearing Feb. 18, where a public defender representing him entered a not guilty plea. Bond was previously set at $5 million. A preliminary hearing is set for 9 a.m. March 11, at the Will County Courthouse, 14 W. Jefferson St., in Joliet. Meanwhile, Romeoville Police said they believe they may have found the weapon used in the shootings. They and the Romeoville Emergency Management Agency searched the neighborhood for evidence related to the Feb. 13 shooting. During the search, police say a handgun was located in a yard near the intersection of 135 Street and Hickory Avenue. It is believed that this was the gun used in the shooting.


News

local

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

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valley view

Officials adjust school calendar Submitted photos

Rep. Natalie Manley congratulates winners of the FootPRINT fund awarded by Allegra printing.

Giving back through print Allegra FootPRINT Fund awarded to organizations with local group efforts

organization goals including service expansion, program enhancement and maximization of existing resources, as well as the organization’s innovation and By Laura Katauskas resourcefulness.  Staff Reporter “At the end of the day you want to know To help non-profit that you are helping organizations in the an organization who area leave there own needs it and will footprint on the benefit from it,” said community, Allegra Wilhelm. Printing of Romeoville/ Allegra launched the Bolingbrook is giving FootPRINT Fund as these groups the Rep. Natalie Manley part of its Community (D-Joliet) 98th means to do it. Care Campaign, Awarding more District outlining a way for than $40,000 throughout the organizations to afford the past seven years, Tom and Linda printing of brochures,newsletters, Wilhelm, owners of Allegra, have forms, invitations, posters and been donating their services to other print communications. The jumpstart local group efforts. overall hope was that the fund This year alone, Allegra awarded would help unite and strengthen $7,000 worth of print and graphic local communities by assisting design services for promotional eligible nonprofit organizations and informational materials, to in brining awareness to their be split between 15 different cause. non-profits throughout the Will Today recipients use the awards County area that applied for the for anything from brochures and Allegra FootPRINT Fund. posters to trade show banners “This year’s winners of the and T-shirts. FootPRINT Fund demonstrate “The program is intended the type of commitment and to make it a little easier for our ingenuity that we are looking for community organizations to in recipients of this award,” said make a difference, one step at Tom Wilhelm. “We are honored a time,” said Wilhelm. “And it is to support them in their local a way for us at Allegra to thank efforts.” the community for its ongoing Recipients included ADOPT, business and support.We may not animal shelter, American Cancer live in Bolingbrook or Romeoville, Society, American Legion Post but I think as a business owner 52, Diamond Youth Foundation, we spend our time here—and it I Support Community, Illinois is important to give back to the Aviation Museum, Joyfest community that supports you.” Planning Committee, Loaves and Wilhelm was also very thankful Fishes Community Pantry, March for the support of local legislators of Dimes, Romeoville Historical such as Representative Natalie Society, Southwest Suburban Manley who read a proclamation Immigrant Project, St. Andrew for each award winner at a recent the Apostle Catholic Community, ceremony held in their honor. Transforming Lives Academy,Villa Allegra who has offices in both St. Benedict Foundation. Romeoville and Bolingbrook is a Groups were selected by a leading provider of all products review panel based on how print and services to help market small services will be used to further to medium size businesses.

The new draft calendar for 201415 will have classes start Aug. 19, end tentatively May 29 By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

After further review, school district officials are pulling back on an earlier start to the Valley View School District 2014-15 school year. This school year began a few days earlier than the past and the district was looking to start even earlier next year. The rationale behind the move was to have the first semester end before the holiday break, allowing for testing and grades before the vacation. The first draft called for

classes to begin Aug. 13 and the school year to end May 22 as long as there are no snow emergency days. Upon first review, school board members asked further information be shared with the community before any action was taken. The school district sent information to parents and conducted a community survey regarding the calendar. Survey results show that 287 responded that the calendar was starting too early, with weather being too hot, and an adverse affect on vacations. A total of 86 respondents approved of the new calendar. A committee consisting of parents, community members, teachers, office staff, administrators, union members and a school board member developed the calendar and have since revised the calendar based on this feedback. The new draft calendar for

2014-15 will have classes start Aug. 19 and end tentatively May 29. The first semester would still end before winter break, which would begin on Dec. 22. Spring break would be April 3-10. The committee raised a concern about the imbalance in the length of semesters due to curriculum pacing, including middle and high school courses that are only one semester long. However, a new state assessment test that is to be taken starting next school year, will have to be done in the second semester. The committee found that the timing of this made it acceptable to build a calendar with imbalanced semesters since instructional days will be taken from the second semester to administer the assessment.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

Police Blotter

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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Mark Ballard, 42, 315 Healy, was arrested at 7:50 p.m. Feb. 8 and charged with retail theft on the 200 block of S. Weber Road.

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Martin Gonzales, 20, 5325 S. 74th Ave., was arrested at 1 a.m. Feb. 9 and charged with no valid driver’s license, no insurance, unsafe equipment and illegal transport of alcohol on the intersection of Route 53 and Murphy Drive.

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Magdalena Tychowska, 19, 7900 W. Suburban Lane, Bridgeview, was arrested at 1 a.m. Feb. 9 and charged with an illegal transport of alcohol, possession of drug equipment and the illegal possession of alcohol on the intersection of Route 53 and Murphy Drive.

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Amber Rosales, 20, 3947 N. Long Ave., Chicago, was arrested at 1 a.m. Feb. 9 and charged with illegal transport of alcohol, in-state warrant, illegal consumption of alcohol, and the possession of drug equipment on the intersection of Route 53 and Murphy Drive.

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Anna Shallcross,22,230 Charlestown Drive, Bolingbrook, was arrested at1 a.m. Feb. 9 and charged with the illegal transport of alcohol on the intersection of Route 53 and Murphy Drive.

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Brian Weber, 21, 145 Dahlia Drive, was arrested at 2:27 a.m. Feb. 9 and charged with DUI, failure to reduce speed, and failure to notify police of an accident on the intersection of Concord and Spangler.

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Travonn Washington, 37, 21550 Freeport Court, Plainfield, was arrested at 5:04 p.m. Feb. 11 and charged with an in-state warrant in the 1000 block of Romeo Road.

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Rene Ruiz, 27, 316D Woodcreek, was arrested at 11:45 p.m. Feb. 11 and charged with an in-state warrant, driving with a suspended license, no insurance, obstructing justice and a suspended registration on the intersection of Weber and Taylor Roads.

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Carolyn Watkins, 54, 2200 Oneida St., Joliet, was arrested at 6:22 p.m. Feb. 12 and charged with obstructing an officer on the 1000 block of Romeo Road. Moore, 36, 7121 Sangamon, 10 Kevin Chicago, was arrested at 7:47 p.m. Feb. 12 and charged with driving with a suspended license and no registration on the intersection of Highpoint Drive and Serenity.

Rosa Pacheco-Mejia, 24, 2098 Country Club Drive, Woodridge, was arrested at 10:59 p.m. Feb. 12 on the intersection of Route 53 and Taylor Road.

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Gina St. Vincent-Null, 43, 4 Elgin Ave., was arrested at 11:03 p.m. Feb. 12 and charged with driving with a suspended license, no insurance, one headlight, and an expired registration on the intersection of Normantown and Dalhart.

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Shayna Adams, 19, 1719 William Drive, was arrested at 12:15 a.m. Feb. 13 and charged with illegal possession of alcohol in the 400 block of N.Weber Road.

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Arshiya Begum, 41, 345 Daffodil Drive, was arrested at 3:31 p.m. Feb.

13 and charged with retail theft in the 200 block of S. Weber Road. Alisa Cruz, 20, and Malvin Cruz, 50, 1610 Ashbury Lane, were arrested at 7:18 p.m. Feb. 13 and charged with retail theft in the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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Rubicel Arriaga-Rios, 27, 533 Laurel Ave., was arrested at 8:50 p.m. Feb. 14 and charged with no valid driver’s license, no insurance, improper lane use and failure to reduce speed in the 700 block of N. Independence.

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Vasquez-Gonzalez, 46, 821 N. 17 Jose Bluff, Joliet, was arrested at 3:37 p.m. Feb. 16 and charged with no valid driver’s license and speeding on the intersection of Route 53 and Airport Road.

Kelly Grant, 50, 25020 Canterbury Court, Plainfield, was arrested at 6:42 p.m. Feb. 17 and charged with DUI, and improper parking on the intersection of Weber Road and Remington.

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A theft over $500 was reported at 7:22 a.m. Feb. 17 in the 0-100 block of Rock Road at Unknown person(s) took a trailer containing 40,000 pounds of unknown metal from the business lot. The trailer is valued at $3,500. The value of the metal is not known at this time.

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Darryl Koppit, 35, 426 Garland, was arrested at 5:26 p.m. Feb. 18 and charged with an in-state warrant in the 1000 block of Romeo Road.

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ForuM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community.

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

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Illustrated Opinions

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COLUMN

Yes, I have more ‘burning’ questions Concerns about why the County Board has spent nearly a year trying to regulate leaf burning First of all, I have to say I screwed up. In a recent column taking the County Board to task about its handling of revisions to the county’s burning ordinance, I said they made it even more restrictive by suggesting a distance of 300 feet from structures instead of 1,000. Obviously, that’s wrong. But then, I still have trouble with using the sideways “v” signs to indicate “greater than” or “less than.” Not that it’s applicable in this case, because they didn’t. But … I screwed up. I still have a question on the burning ordinance though: Why are they doing this? Now I came to this party late. The County Board’s Public Health and Safety Committee has been dealing with this for nearly a year. They took it up at the behest of some residents, including those who live in incorporated areas – cities and villages – where they cannot burn leaves at all. That’s key here: The main issue is burning leaves, Joliet resident Maraline Mattke, who has been championing changes to the ordinance on behalf of those with breathing difficulties, reminded board members at a recent committee meeting. She said smoke from burning leaves contain toxins, much the same as smoke from burning plastic, she said. She has to practically stay inside during leaf burning time, she said, and she knows there are a lot of people

with breathing problems who have to do the same. I do not doubt this at all. While I love the smell of burning leaves, my son, now grown, had chronic breathing problems growing up. The decision was relatively easy for us since we live in incorporated Joliet. We couldn’t burn leaves anyway. And we did our best to stay away from places where they would be doing it at other times. What would we do if we had lived next to a person who burned leaves anyway, or who, like Mattke’s neighbor, is in an unincorporated area where burning leaves – and most other things – is allowed within 50 feet of another structure? If I were her neighbor, I would not burn on days the wind was blowing toward her house. Simple as that. But let’s say I had a neighbor who didn’t care to be neighborly and burned leaves whenever they wanted. And I had no recourse because that person, as unneighborly as they are being, is doing nothing illegal. That is really the crux of why the County Board has spent nearly a year trying to legislate something as ephemeral as leaf burning, and dragging farmers (who are by state law exempt) and other unincorporated residents into the discussion. Most of whom have no issue with open burning. To that end, after the recent health committee meeting, I

turned around in my chair and asked John Cicero, Executive Director of the Will County Health Department, what he thought. He said they hadn’t received any complaints, and anyway, it’s a Land Use Department issue, since the burning ordinance is under that department. So it hasn’t been a big deal to local health officials, whom I have great confidence in, by the way. Yet County Board members still are talking about changing the ordinance to limit burning – not really distinguishing leaves in all this, by the way – to certain times of the year and up to 1,000 feet from a structure or from anyone who has a chronic breathing disorder. Seriously. I know, right? As Board Member Don Gould said, you could be legal one day and illegal the next, depending who moved in next door. If the County Board feels as though they have to do something at this point (and a number are starting to say leave the ordinance as it is), change the limit to 100 feet and move on. Otherwise, as Mattke told the committee, encourage mulching leaves instead of burning. She has leaves from 50 trees, she said, and her husband uses a lawn mower to cross cut them into mulch that can be left on the grass. Or, my suggestion: Let ‘em blow in the wind. But please just move on. This has burned up too much valuable time as it is. Nick Reiher Managing Editor


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

News village board

>>news briefs Romeoville Chamber board position open The RomeovilleArea Chamber of Commerce has an open board position. If you would like to volunteer your time and be a committed member submit an application it to the Chamber office. The deadline to submit an application is Friday, March 7. All applications will be

forwarded to the Nominating Committee with elections held in late March. The RomeovilleArea Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors meet the second Thursday of every month at 8 a.m. at the Chamber office. The Board of Directors attend monthly

membership luncheons on the second Tuesday of every month. All Board Members are expected to take an active leadership role in the Chamber, which may include chairing a committee and assisting in Chamber events such as “After 5” networking events.

Crafters needed for Humane Society fundrasier Are you a crafter? Do you have handmade items you’d like to sell? Please contact the Romeoville Humane Society,

they will be hosting an Easter Craft Fair fundraising event April 12th, in Romeoville. Email their Fundraising Chair

@ dlove0825@yahoo.com, please indicate Spring Craft Fair in the subject line and she will give you a call.

New bar and gaming facility to open In December, a total of $1.2 million in revenue came from video gambling in village By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

It’s nice to see some activity in this area after the retail center becoming victim to the recession for awhile.” - Mayor John Noak

A new bar and lounge will be setting up shop in the Budler Retail Center soon. The owners of On the Rocks Spirits and Gaming came before the village board recently for a special use screening is needed. permit to open a facility Trustee Linda that would include Palmiter agreed video gaming and be there may be a need located in the southernfor a buffer zone. most units of the Budler “We will keep Retail Center. an eye on it,” said “It’s nice to see some Noak. “We will be activity in this area very diligent in after the retail center Mayor John Noak monitoring this becoming victim to the facility and will take recession for awhile,” said Mayor additional action if necessary.” John Noak. A public hearing was On the Rocks plans to build previously held on the matter, out the 2,775-square-foot interior and residents in the area were space to include a bar, lounge, notified. No residents attended table area, video poker machines that public hearing. and a storage area and office. The village has six facilities “This is a nice business to within town that offer video have come to town, and overall, gambling, including Lost Acres, we are pleased with the project,” Mickey’s Grill, Stone City Saloon, said Trustee Dave Richards. Mongo McMichaels, Stella’s Bar The owners have a second and Grill and Larry’s bar. facility located in Joliet that this Noak said the village has model will be based on. had no problems in the past Noak said the owners have a year with this new addition. good standing in the community In December, a total of $1.2 with a good reputation and a million in revenue came from history that is in line with what video gambling. the village has in the area. Of that amount, the village Trustee Sue Miklevitz asked if received approximately $5,000. there was adequate parking and “It’s becoming an important mentioned adding screening element for these establishments, to protect the neighbors in the allowing them to increase their area. profits,” said Noak. “We haven’t Village officials indicated had any problems with it which parking is within code limits, says a lot about how well run with a fence in place and that our businesses are and what it will be determined if further kind of residents we have.”


Take 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Faux-antique decor 11 Nurses 15 Words next to many 22-Down 16 Malaysian Chinese shoe designer Jimmy 17 It’s hard to write with one 19 Cub games setting: Abbr. 20 Hidden Valley competitor 21 “Hah!” 22 Small-screen princess 23 Sing ballads, say 24 Word in a Le Pew address 26 Tab alternative 29 Foe of the fictional spy agency CONTROL 30 Pump parts 32 Authorizing 33 First-aid practitioner, briefly 34 In reality 36 Cutting remark 37 Don’t bother 39 Jard’n occupant 40 They’re built on

Down benches 41 Pretends 43 Yupik craft 45 Thomas who cocreated “Free to Be ... You and Me” 46 Spanish autonomy Castile and __ 47 Astronomy Muse 49 Stick with a spring 50 Brief black-andwhite flash? 53 Hunter’s companion 56 Singer of the children’s album “Camp Lisa” 57 Prevented from getting unruly 58 Minute 59 Biological cooler

1 What collaborators should be in 2 Garment feature that’s sometimes detachable 3 Family title 4 Like some news 5 Stock character? 6 Dweller on the Red Sea 7 Hutch contents 8 European trio in a Christmas song 9 Soc. Sec. supplement 10 Rogers __: Toronto stadium 11 Cheesy stuff 12 “Color me surprised!” 13 Shot glass 14 Bar supply available at the touch of a button 18 Pretentious 22 Check alternatives 23 “Welcome to the human network” tech giant 24 Desert mount 25 “GET FIRED

UP!” candy 26 Passes out 27 Phil Jackson, for most of the ‘70s 28 Early birds? 29 It may wash up onshore 31 Leaving for 34 Toots 35 2010 Western remake that garnered 10 Oscar nominations 38 Presently 40 Success on a mat 42 Haunted house sounds 44 Farm sound 46 Ton o’ 47 Jamaican hybrid fruit 48 Act like a pig, in a way 49 Star of Looney Tunes’ “for Scent-imental Reasons” 50 Fitness brand 51 Ivy League member 52 Cultivated 54 FF’s opposite 55 Bent piece

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

Horoscopes Unsolicited advice is sometimes as unwelcome as unsolicited criticism. You have very good intentions and may be enthusiastic about helping others in the week to come. Remain sensitive, as some people must make their own decisions.

Age before beauty. Learn something valuable in the week to come from those who are older and wiser. Educational opportunities should be embraced with open arms. Remain sensitive to subtle undercurrents within the family.

One for all and all for one. Your happiness depends on the happiness of everyone this week. When you participate in a group effort, whether at home or at work, consider which actions will be in the best interests of everyone.

When opportunity knocks, be sure to answer with a smile. You could be rewarded in material ways or with recognition in the week ahead. Or you can create your own rewarding circumstances by starting something significant.

Eat the energy bar and you’ll go far. Get prepared to make your mark in the week ahead. You may find valuable advice or the answer to your prayers. If you can’t move forward with a pet project, then it wasn’t meant to be.

Strike a balance. You may be challenged to spend your money wisely this week. One part of your psyche wants to add to a nest egg for the future and the other side wants to fritter away pocket cash on transitory delights.

Right now, you might prefer your own company. Managing your time and home could be a priority. By the end of the week, however, you may be anxious to have someone by your side, even while tackling the most mundane jobs.

Pursue the future with fleet feet. The second half of the week could be an ideal time to develop sound plans for the future. You might consider adopting some new habits that boost your health and well-being.

Good Samaritans are celebrated. Practice putting others’ interests ahead of your own in the week to come. Since others respect your judgment and leadership abilities, you might receive a public pat on the back.

Take pride in discretion, not secrecy. If you are going to let the cat out of the bag, it’s only fair to be kind to the cat. In the week ahead, your desire for personal privacy may be at odds with your need to be straightforward.

Explore your options, not just opinions. You may meet several people this week who introduce you to new ideas and progressive techniques. This is a good time to test a relationship without making a firm commitment.

Your love life may be an exercise in excitement during the week ahead. You may attract new people who are fascinated by your open-minded views and “anything goes” attitude. Your intuitions are 80 percent trustworthy.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Content Agency 2014

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • ODDLY • LOVER • IMBIBE • HALVED

Answer: Passing the signs on the road for hours left them -- BILL BORED

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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014


INSIDE: Former Bolingbrook coach and former girls basketball players suspended by IHSA, page 12

romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

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Young Spartans fall in opener of Regional By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Normally, when a coach meets the media after the final game of the season, part of the conversation is always about the seniors, what they meant to the program and how they will be replaced next year. That conversation was not necessary for Romeoville girls basketball coach Julio Carrasco as the team had no seniors on the team. The Spartans fell 51-48 to Plainfield Central in the opener of the Romeoville Regional on a buzzer-beating three pointer by the Wildcats’ Michaela Schlattman. After falling by double digits in the fourth quarter, the Spartans battled back and took a brief lead late in the contest. They came back partially on the scoring of Lexi Marin, who tallied 13 of her team-high 18 points in the second half. The other part was Romeoville’s defense, which held Hennessey Handy to only eight second-

half points after she scored 16 in the first half. “We wanted to stop (Handy) and we did a real nice job in the last few minutes, but it came down to what it has come down to the whole season,” Carrasco said. “We don’t box out, we don’t get rebounds and we missed too many easy baskets. It really shouldn’t have come down to that, but I thought Plainfield Central hit the shots when they had to and that was a great shot by (Schlattman). We played to a two-point game last time and I think they are doing a nice job and their coach (Jennifer Murphy) is doing a nice job, she has them motivated.” The Spartans all season were paced by several young players, including the backcourt of Marin, a freshman, and sophomore Skye Osborne. “There is a real nice core,” Carrasco said. “Cherish (Smith) inside and we have Nia (Harris) and Perla (Gutierrez) that we have to get more aggressive, but they will be OK. Jade

Warner was probably our back half of the season MVP and she is going to be good.” Carrasco said he knows the Spartans have the will-towin, but he said the offseason workouts will be focused on fixing the little things that stop a win. “They have the fire that they want to compete,” he said. “These girls fight and they want to win, it is the little things that we have to fix. You can be the smallest son-of-agun out there and you can still box out and have intensity on rebounding. I think we will be alright. It will be a push in the offseason but I think we will be OK. I am ready to get rolling and get things going again. So, we will take a few weeks off and get going.” • The Romeoville boys basketball team will open the playoffs Monday, March 3 at the West Aurora Regional. The Spartans will take on conference foe Plainfield North at 8 p.m. mark@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Perla Gutierrez and all of her Spartan teammates are expected back next season.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

Sports

Ex-Bolingbrook coach, players suspended By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Just hours before former Bolingbrook girls basketball coach and four former players, Kristen Moore, Amarah Coleman, Destiny Harris and Lexi Smith, were set to face Thornton Fractional North Feb. 19 in the IHSA State Series, they were forced to forfeit over a series of IHSA by-law violations. The Vikings were also forced to forfeit all games played this season, including the two wins over Bolingbrook and Lincoln-Way East. After splitting their head to head games, the Raiders and Griffins now share the SouthWest Suburban Conference title that

had belonged to H-F. Although not the way they would have preferred to win a share of the league title, it does extend the Raiders’ consecutive streak of nine straight championships that date back to the inception of the league in 2005. Originally,the IHSA had accepted H-F’s self-imposed penalty that would include the suspension of Smith and 11 varsity players and participate in the state playoffs with other players. However, in the morning of Feb. 19, the school asked to appear before the IHSA Board of Directors during the Board’s regularly scheduled meeting. After an official ruling to suspend Smith and 11 players, H-F appealed. After deliberation, the Board upheld the Executive Director’s decision and required the school to forfeit its regular-season wins from the 2013-14 season. The violations center on the IHSA’s Independent Team Participation By-laws (3.107), Athletic Season Limitation By-laws (2.090) and Open Gym Limitation By-laws (3.161).  “Not adhering to these bylaws created a distinct advantage

for the Homewood-Flossmoor girls’ basketball program,” said IHSA Executive Director Marty Hickman in a statement on the IHSA website. “The school has admitted to violating IHSA Bylaws  2.090  and  3.107. In fairness to the teams in the tournament who abided by IHSA rules, removing Homewood-Flossmoor from competition was the most equitable decision.”  The violations were found during the independent investigation lawsuit by one of the current players accusing Smith of improper recruiting. Neither HomewoodFlossmoor nor the IHSA found any recruiting violations. “We are still in the initial review of what occurred at the school and when,” said Hickman. “From the information provided thus far, other programs at the school may have also violated our Season Limitation and Open Gym by-laws. However, we will not know the full scope of the possible violations until we have completed our investigation. The investigation into the aforementioned recruiting violations is ongoing as well.” Follow Mark @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Former Bolingbrook coach Tony Smith and former players were suspended by the IHSA.


Sports

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

13

Collins a leader for Raider wrestlers By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

The wresting season this year was not an easy one for Bolingbrook, as the Raiders went through a plethora of issues, starting with several injuries to key wrestlers before the season even started and ended with one of the top Raiders leaving the team prior to the state series. Through it all, coach Dan Bullivant said the seniors did a good job of leading the team despite not even having a full lineup at some meets. One of those seniors was Andrew Collins at 145 pounds. He was the lone wrestler to win a match at the Normal Community West Sectional, beating Plainfield South’s Joseph Miner 7-0 in the opening round. From there, Collins needed just one more win to advance Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Andrew Collins was one match away from advancing to state this season.

to the state tournament, but unfortunately, he lost his final three matches. “It is disappointing because he is a kid who worked hard in the offseason and worked hard all year and things just didn’t go his way today,” Bullivant said. “Even when we were down big in dual meets, he would do the extra things. When we needed a pin, he would go out and try and get us a stick. He was we everything we asked of him this year as a leader.” Collins said he understood his role on a rebuilding program. “It was tough,” Collins said. “I had to be an assistant coach. We had to keep everyone’s spirits up, especially the new kids when they get down and we have to keep them motivated. Then we lost a good player at the end of the year. It was hard, >> see LEADER | page 14


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

Sports

Flyers win 24th straight home game The No. 15 Lewis University women’s basketball team had five Flyers score in double figures on Saturday (Feb. 22), as they collected a 75-63 victory over McKendree University for their 24th-straight win at Neil Carey Arena.

The Flyers improve to 21-4 on the year and 15-2 in Great Lakes Valley Conference action while the Bearcats fall to 8-17 on the campaign and 3-14 in league play. Redshirt sophomore guard Jamie Johnson (South Holland,

Ill./Marian Catholic) led the Flyers with 19 points,five assists and four rebounds. Sophomore forward Mariyah Brawner-Henley (Skokie, Ill./Niles North) collected her 21st double-double of the season with 14 points and 13 boards as junior forward Jess Reinhart (Normal, Ill./Bloomington Central Catholic) chipped in 13 points and six rebounds. Junior guard Kristin Itschner (Metamora, Ill./Peoria Notre Dame) tallied 12 points, four boards and two blocks while

sophomore guard Alyssa Dengler (Chicago, Ill./Trinity) scored 10 points for the Flyers. “Getting the offensive balance that we had tonight is big for us,” Lewis head women’s basketball coach Lisa Carlsen said.“It makes us a tough team to prepare for.” “We did a nice job establishing things defensively early in the game,” Carlsen continued. “Something we talked about over the last 48 hours is making sure we don’t have the defensive breakdowns that have plagued us

over the last week or so.” Lewis, never relinquishing the lead, shot 50.8 % (32-of-63) from the field while holding the Bearcats to shooting 30.8% (24of-78) from the floor, tallying 52 points in the paint. The Flyers also won the battle on the boards 46-42 and blocked seven Bearcat shots. The Flyers wrap up the 2014 regular season on Thursday (Feb. 27) when they host UW-Parkside for a 5:30 PM tip-off at Neil Carey Arena.

>> LEADER, from page 13

went out my sophomore year and got my school done and came back last year and this year I kept my grades up and got to sectional,” he said. “My mom always told me once I start something, always fight through it and never quit it and wrestling was something I loved to do since I was little. The coaches helped keep me motivated.” Collins wasn’t the only Raider to participate at the sectional level. At 182, junior Victor Armand fell to state qualifier

Johnnie Foster of Bloom, at 220 senior Eli Carbajal lost to Plainfield South’s Ethan Stachniak. •Romeoville sophomore Dan Carreno lost to Lincoln-Way Central’s Brandon Dominiski. •Bolingbrook boys basketball will open its playoff push Tuesday, March 4 at 7 p.m. at the Plainfield East Regional. The Raiders will face the winner of Downers Grove South and Batavia.

but we had to keep fighting.” Fighting is something that wasn’t new to Collins, who had to fight just to get on the mat his junior year. “I missed two years with grades and stuff,” he said.“It was hard work.” But Collins love for his sport fueled him to improve his studies. “I knew I loved wrestling and I knew I needed to be good in school to be able to do it, so I

Follow Mark @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com


sPorts

BOYS BBALL Points Per Game Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East George Sargeant, Maine South Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Jalen Jackson, JCA Grover Anderson, Lockport Andrew Palucki, Maine South Evan Hines, Niles West Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Corey Evers, Plainfield South Romeo Magliore, Niles West John Campbell, Lockport Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Jake Nowak, Plainfield North Devin Blake, Downers North Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Ray Greco, Downers North Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Kevin Krieger, Plainfield North Shane Ritter, Plainfield South Kelly, Westmont Jake Smith, Minooka Shane Murray, Lisle Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Little, Westmont Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle Nick Novak, Plainfield East Jojo Rios, Niles West Joe Butler, Minooka Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South Robbie Brooks, Plainfield Central Logiurato, Westmont Adam Alexander, Minooka Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Rebounds Per Game Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle Devin Blake, Downers North

24.0 19.3 16.8 16.6 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.7 13.3 13.1 12.8 12.7 12.6 12.4 12.0 12.0 11.6 11.6 11.2 11.1 11.1 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.6 10.5 10.2 10.1 9.8 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.2 9.1 8.8 8.8 8.6 8.4 8.3 9.5 9.0 7.4

Zach Trussell, Lisle Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North George Sargeant, Maine South John Campbell, Lockport Shane Murray, Lisle Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Joe Butler, Minooka Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Josh Smith, Plainfield East Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Kelly, Westmont Matt Mahlke, Downers North Josh Dillingham, Bolingbrook Kevin Krieger, Plainfield North Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Brad Hund, Plainfield Central Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Assists Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Grover Anderson, Lockport Logiurato, Westmont Sean Maloney, Maine South Andrew Palucki, Maine South Jonny Butler, Minooka Myles Ward, Plainfield East Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Little, Westmont Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook Corey Evers, Plainfield South Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Joe Butler, Minooka Neal Tyrell, Minooka Jon Arenas, Maine South Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Nick Novak, Plainfield East Ralph Blakney, Lockport Kelly, Westmont Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Delvin Harris, Plainfield South John Campbell, Lockport Tim Doll, Westmont Isaiah Webster, Plainfield North

7.2 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.0 6.8 6.8 6.3 6.0 5.9 5.6 5.3 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 4.9 4.8 4.8 80 75 66 61 59 57 57 56 55 53 51 49 46 45 44 43 43 43 42 41 40 39 39 39 38 36 35

D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Deiondre Taylor, Lockport Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South Johnny Kostelz, Plainfield Central Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Steals Corey Evers, Plainfield South Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Grover Anderson, Lockport John Campbell, Lockport Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Logiurato, Westmont Andrew Palucki, Maine South Romeo Magliore, Niles West Jon Arenas, Maine South Ralph Blakney, Lockport Jonny Butler, Minooka Neal Tyrell, Minooka Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Joe Butler, Minooka Nick Novak, Plainfield East D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Shane Ritter, Plainfield South Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Deiondre Taylor, Lockport CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook Myles Ward, Plainfield East Tim Doll, Westmont Josh Smith, Plainfield East Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Little, Westmont Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Adam Alexander, Minooka Sean Maloney, Maine South Field Goal % Shane Murray, Lisle George Sargeant, Maine South Julian Torres, Bolingbrook Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Tristin Esker, Plainfield East

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

33 31 29 28 25 49 42 40 37 36 34 33 31 29 28 28 28 27 26 26 24 24 23 22 22 21 21 21 20 19 18 18 17 17 17 16 16 16 .667 .640 .630 .602 .595 .590 .577

Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Matt Hund, Plainfield Central Devin Blake, Downers North Ray Greco, Downers North Romeo Magliore, Niles West Bowen Marks, Downers North Adam Alexander, Minooka Mark Geers, Minooka Davis Neilands, Maine South Jeff Washington, Joliet West Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Justin Windt, Plainfield Central Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Josh Dillingham, Bolingbrook Jaylandt Gilmer, Lockport Free Throw % Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Odi Audisho, Niles West Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East George Sargeant, Maine South Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Andrew Palucki, Maine South Emin Ademi, Niles West Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Grover Anderson, Lockport Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Connor Bielat, Lisle Romeo Magliore, Niles West Cappel, Minooka Brodric Thomas, Bolingbrook Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Torrens, Westmont Ralph Blakney, Lockport Robbie Brooks, Plainfield Central Neal Tyrell, Minooka 3-pointers Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Shane Ritter, Plainfield South Jalen Jackson, JCA Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Nick Novak, Plainfield East Evan Hines, Niles West Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Andrew Palucki, Maine South Johnny Kostelz, Plainfield Central

.573 .570 .550 .543 .539 .535 .533 .530 .530 .520 .520 .515 .513 .510 .500 .500 .500 .980 .833 .824 .820 .820 .790 .778 .773 .771 .770 .760 .757 .750 .742 .740 .720 .718 .710 .710 48 46 41 37 32 31 25 25 25

Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Ray Greco, Downers North Neal Tyrell, Minooka Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Jojo Rios, Niles West Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Jake Smith, Minooka Joe Butler, Minooka Sean Maloney, Maine South Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Tim Doll, Westmont GIRLS BBALL Points Per Game Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Jaida Green, Downers North Emily Schramek, Benet Emily Eshoo, Benet Erin Heide, Minooka Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Chantell Mack, Joliet Central Sarah Costello, Downers North Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Peyton Winters, Downers North Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Monica Barefield, Joliet West Elanta Slowik, Maine East Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Kathleen Doyle, Benet Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Lexi Marin, Romeoville Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Destiny Hollins, Lockport Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Nina Anderson, Maine South Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Rebounds Per Game Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Sarah Costello, Downers North Chantell Mack, Joliet Central

15

25 24 23 23 21 21 19 18 18 18 17 15

18.5 15.8 15.1 14.8 14.3 13.8 12.5 12.3 12.5 12.2 11.8 11.3 11.0 10.6 10.6 10.8 10.5 10.2 9.8 9.5 9.4 9.0 8.9 8.6 8.2 8.2 12.0 9.7 9.5 8.8

>> see stAts | page 16


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

Sports >> STATS, from page 15 Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Cherish Smith, Romeoville Peyton Winters, Downers North Maria Protic, Maine East Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Kyla Creal, Lockport Sydney Arlis, Minooka Elanta Slowik, Maine East Ty Battle, JCA Adriana Acosta, JCA Jenae Rowe, Joliet West Nina Anderson, Maine South Ally Fink, Plainfield South Rachel Sutphin, Plainfield South Laurel Kucharski, Lockport Jaida Green, Downers North Assists Sarah Costello, Downers North Jaida Green, Downers North Bre Sobotka, Resurrection Juatece McNear, Joliet Central Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Kelly Kons, Maine South Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Monica Barefield, Joliet West Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Erin Heide, Minooka Nina Anderson, Maine South Lexi Marin, Romeoville Skyle Osborne, Romeoville Sydney Arlis, Minooka

7.9 7.6 7.6 7.0 6.9 6.8 6.3 6.0 5.8 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.4 5.2 5.1 4.9 4.8 4.8 4.6 4.6 120 76 72 70 69 62 59 57 56 52 49 45 41 39 37

Christina Ekhomu, JCA Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Kathleen Doyle, Benet Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Megan Roberts, Maine South Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Gabriella Galassini, Resurrection Jnaya Walker, JCA Bethany Bachmann, Minooka Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Peyton Winters, Downers North Kailey Foster, Joliet West Monica Nunez, Resurrection Emily Schramek, Benet Bethany Bachmann, Minooka Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Ty Battle, JCA Steals Sarah Costello, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Kianna Campbell, Lockport Jaida Green, Downers North Destiny Hollins, Lockport Bre Sobotka, Resurrection Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Jnaya Walker, JCA Kailey Foster, Joliet West Naomi Mayes, Lockport Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Nina Anderson, Maine South Christina Ekhomu, JCA Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Elanta Slowik, Maine East Jenae Rowe, Joliet West Kate Moriarty, Resurrection

36 36 35 33 33 33 32 31 31 30 27 26 25 25 25 24 24 23 82 62 54 53 50 49 43 41 41 40 40 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 34

Kelly Kons, Maine South Monica Barefield, Joliet West Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Kathleen Doyle, Benet Lexi Marin, Romeoville Ty Battle, JCA Jamari McAfee, Lockport Monica Nunez, Resurrection Jazlene Gonzalez, Maine East Skyle Osborne, Romeoville Treanna Perry, Joliet West Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Laurel Kucharski, Lockport Emily Eshoo, Benet Cherish Smith, Romeoville Field Goal % Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Ty Battle, JCA Peyton Winters, Downers North Emma Hlavin, Benet Sydney Arlis, Minooka Kyla Creal, Lockport Jenna Martin, Benet Kendall McDermott, Benet Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Free Throw % Autumn Lawson, Joliet Central Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Emily Eshoo, Benet Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Faith Heitman, Romeoville Alexis Pease, Minooka Emily Schramek, Benet Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Sam Fagenholz, Maine South

32 30 29 29 29 28 28 26 26 25 25 25 24 24 24 24 23 22 .610 .580 .570 .560 .530 .520 .510 .500 .460 .860 .780 .780 .770 .758 .750 .740 .730 .720


buglenewspapers.com/basketball

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

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Freshman helps Benet take regional crown By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

Freshman Katie Jaseckas was surprised she got into Benet Academy’s West Aurora Regional title matchup with Naperville North at all last Friday night, let alone the fact that she ended up being a major contributor to the Redwings’ 57-46 victory. The 5-foot-11 Jaseckas, whom Benet called up from the sophomore team to join the varsity squad for the postseason, scored eight points and corralled eight rebounds. “I was really nervous on the bench,” she said. “I didn’t expect to go in because I’m a freshman. Coach (Peter) Paul came up to me and I was really nervous. All of the girls were cheering for me and it got me really pumped. Once I got in there, I started to calm down and got a little excited.” Jaseckas scored half of her points in one sequence toward the end of the third quarter, and her heads-up play couldn’t have come at a better time. The Redwings, who fell behind 26-24 at halftime, took a 30-29 third-quarter lead on Emily Schramek’s basket inside, and upped it to 31-29 on a free throw from Jenna Martin. But Benet went into a scoring drought the remainder of the quarter and trailed 3631 following a hoop from the Huskies’ Kayla Sharples (gamehigh 19 points) with less than a minute remaining. However, Jaseckas was fouled after her putback basket made it

36-33. She then missed the free throw attempt for a three-point play, but grabbed the rebound and put it in, enabling Benet to cut the Huskies’ lead to 36-35 by the end of the period. “I was hoping for a threepoint play,” Jaseckas said. “I wasn’t expecting the ball to come right back at me and I just went up (with it).” Guard Kathleen Doyle mused afterward that Jaseckas was the Redwings’ secret weapon. “I told her, ‘I want you to get every rebound that’s even remotely close to your area,’ and she did that,” Doyle said with a smile. “She was being aggressive and she just really pulled through for us.” Doyle pulled through for Benet, too. The sophomore, who finished with 17 points, went to the hoop twice to lift Benet to leads of 39-38 and 43-41in the fourth. Sharples tied the contest momentarily at 43, but Benet went on a 6-0 run, highlighted by a trey from Schramek (team-high 18 points) that essentially put the game out of reach. Doyle then sank six free throws during the final 2:03. “We knew that we didn’t want our season to end tonight,” Doyle said. “We kept saying, ‘We’re practicing tomorrow (Saturday); we’re going to practice tomorrow.’ I feel like adrenaline kicked in and we just knew we had to strap it on and get a stop after stop. It was really fun.” The fun continued, as well, for Paul, who’s retiring after this, his 29th and final year at

the helm. Last Friday’s regional crown was Benet’s fifth in the past six years. Asked if he’s thought about this postseason being his last, Paul said, “No, I really haven’t.” “I told them that I want to practice tomorrow and that’s all I said to them,” said Paul, who also posted his 600th career victory this season. “I think in general I always tease, and the string (of regional championships) was broken last year. (Benet lost to Naperville Central last February, snapping a streak of four straight regional titles.) But once they’re a Mom and their kids are at Benet, they can point up and say, ‘I helped win that one.’ ” “We want to do it for him,” Doyle said. “Obviously we want to do it for our team, but especially for Mr. Paul because he’s such a special coach. After the game you could see how emotional he was because he was so proud of us, and we’re so proud of him.” The Redwings (21-9), who also got eight points from Emily Eshoo last Friday, clashed with top seeded Neuqua Valley in the semifinals of the Joliet Sectional Monday night. Neuqua Valley (26-5) toppled Oswego East, 63-37, to win the Plainfield South Regional. Benet vs. Lockport: The Redwings had little difficulty eliminating Lockport in their regional semifinal game, winning 63-29. Schramek again led the way with 18 points while Jaseckas and Eden Olson each scored eight. mike@buglenewspapers.com

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Benet freshman Katie Jaseckas had eight points and eight rebounds in the Redwings’ 57-46 regional championship win over Naperville North Friday in the East Aurora Regional final.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

Real Estate & Business dave says

Invest now or pay off debt? It’s going to be very valuable to have no student loans than to make risky investments Dear Dave, I went to medical school, and now I have $70,000 in debt. I just started a three-year residency making about $50,000 a year, while my wife makes $40,000. The student loans represent our only debt. Do you think we should be paying this off or investing in a Roth IRA? David Dear David, If I were in your shoes, I’d work on paying down the student loans. That means you may never be in a Roth, but there are other things you can invest in and grow wealth. I realize this may not seem right mathematically, but I don’t always make financial decisions based exclusively on math. Many times I do things based on changing money behaviors—stuff like paying off debts from smallest to largest because it actually works. Personal finance is 80 percent behavior, and only 20 percent head knowledge. So sometimes you have to go with what actually works best overall, in spite of what the technical math shows. In your case, I think it’s going to be very valuable to have no student loans by the time you complete your residency.With three years to go, and living on a $90,000 a year income, you can do it.Then, when you come through the other side as a full-fledge doctor, you’ll have the great income and be sitting there debt-free. Not a bad place to be, right? I understand the Roth seems like a pretty good idea right now, but my advice is to stick with becoming debt-free as quickly as possible. Once that’s done, you and your wife will be able to invest, save, and build wealth like crazy! —Dave

Don’t risk the family farm Dear Dave, My wife started working at a

pharmaceutical company that gave her a few thousand dollars’ worth of stock. In the last year that stock has doubled in value. We’ve considered buying more just to see how it does. What do you think about this? Robert Dear Robert, I understand why you guys would be excited, but you’re still looking at a very risky proposition. Any stock that doubles its value in just one year is highly volatile. It’s very unusual when things like that happen, and the fact is, it could go down in value just a quickly. I think you should be completely debt-free, except for your house, and have an emergency fund of three to six months of expenses in place before you start any outside investing. You should also make sure that 15 percent of your income is already going toward retirement. I don’t mind you dabbling a little bit as long as all the other stuff is taken care of first. But I’d advise you to never put more than 10 percent of your nest egg into single stocks. If you’ve got $50,000 in a 401(k) right now,limit yourself to $5,000 in this area. That way, if the stock tanks and you lose it all, it’s only a small blip on the radar. You’ll still be financially intact and able to retire with dignity. It would be fantastic if this stock went through the roof and you two made a ton of money. That would be awesome! But make sure you limit the potential for damage by limiting your exposure. Don’t risk the family farm, as they say, to make this play. —Dave *Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times best-selling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership.The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Ramsey on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.


THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 240 Gladiolus Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single Family Home). On the 27th day of March, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Fifth Third Mortgage Company Plaintiff V. Michael G. Martin Defendant. Case No. 13 CH 3236 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1040 MONTEGO BAY COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 604464140 (FRAME TOWNHOUSE ATTACHED 2 CAR). On the 20th day of March, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff V. NATHAN L. MASON Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 5030 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 203,280.63 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-13-22504 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/27, 3/6, 3/13

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/20, 2/27, 3/6


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014


THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. NATHAN L. MASON Defendant. No. 10 CH 5030 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 21st day of February, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 20th day of March, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: PARCEL 1: UNIT M3001 IN THE LANDINGS AT MALIBU BAY CONDOMINIUM, AS DELINEATED ON A PLAT OF SURVEY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND: CERTAIN LOTS IN MALIBU BAY TOWNHOMES, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, (P.U.D.), BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF ALL OF LOT 190, IN MALIBU BAY SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JULY 2, 1999 AS DOCUMENT R1999-83523, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS, WHICH PLAT OF SURVEY IS ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT “A” TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED MAY 31, 2000 AS DOCUMENT R2000057273, AND AS AMENDED BY AMENDMENT TO THE DECLARATION RECORDED JUNE 28, 2001 AS DOCUMENT R2001082885 AND AS AMENDED FROM TIME TO TIME; TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS. PARCEL 2: A PERPETUAL EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS PURPOSES FOR THE BENEFIT OF PARCEL I, OVER AND ACROSS LOT 40, IN MALIBU BAY Commonly known as: 1040 MONTEGO BAY COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 604464140 Description of Improvements: FRAME TOWNHOUSE ATTACHED 2 CAR P.I.N.: 11-04-05-215-040-1 001 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 203,280.63 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/20, 2/27, 3/6

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Fifth Third Mortgage Company Plaintiff, vs. Michael G. Martin Defendant. No. 13 CH 3236 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 8th day of January, 2014, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 27th day of March, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 254, IN WESGLEN SUBDIVISION NEIGHBORHOOD 4 UNIT, 1 A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 22, 2000, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2000-90319 AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED MAY 2, 2001 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2001-050599, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 240 Gladiolus Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 11-04-07-309-002 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-13-22504 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/27, 3/6, 3/13


Calendar FEBRUARY 27 Career Fair. 4 to 6 p.m. at Rasmussen College,1400 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. Attend the Romeoville/Joliet Career Fair at Rasmussen College and connect with leading employers in your community. This event is open to the community at no cost. Learn more at rasmussen.edu/careerfair.

MARCH 1 Microsoft Word 2010 Level. 11 a.m. to noon at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Contact: Adult Services desk, 815-886-2030 or  dbroz@whiteoaklibrary.org . Learn how to create a document, edit, format your text, and copy and paste. Create a document from scratch or pick a ready-touse template to make your work so much easier!  Basic computer skills are required prior to taking this class. Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. Call, visit, email or instant message ourAdult Services desk to register. Class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab.

How to Create a Fantasy Baseball League. 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Contact: Adult Services, 815-8862030   lkennard@whiteoaklibrary. org. Learn how to play – and win! – at fantasy baseball, a simulation game that’s fun and exciting. Build a team, acquire players and earn points based on your players’ real-life performances. Location: Meeting Room B - Main Level        

MARCH 3 Cub Fans v. Sox Fans. 6:30 to 8 p.m.at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Are you a Cub fan or a Sox fan? Baseball’s Opening Day is right around the corner. Join author Daniel Helpingstine for a discussion of his book,The Cubs and the White Sox: A Baseball Rivalry, 1900 to the Present. We are not trying to change your baseball loyalty, but join us to find out more about the history of our teams and their fans. Books will be available for purchase and signing after the presentation. Register today to reserve your copy of the book.

MARCH 4 Tri County Special Recreation Association Basketball Game vs. Village of Romeoville Officials. 6:30 p.m. Romeoville Recreation Center, 900 W. Romeo Road. Warm ups at 6:30 p.m., Game at 7 p.m. and Post-game pizza at 8 p.m. RSVP to Kelly Rajzer, Director of Parks and Recreation at 815-886-6040.

MARCH 6 Romeoville State of the Village Address 11 a.m. at Lewis Univeristy, JFK Sports Center, One University Parkway. Luncheon begins at noon. Reservations are required no later than Feb.28.Contact the Chamber office for more information or to make your reservation at 815886-2076.

MARCH 7 Fish Fry Friday. 5 to 8 p.m. Levy Center, 251 Canterbury, Bolingbrook. Combination shrimp, fish, and french fries platter, $10. DJ and cash bar.

ONGOING Are you a crafter? Do you have handmade items you’d like to sell? Please contact the

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014 Romeoville Humane Society, they will be hosting an Easter Craft Fair fundraising event April 12th, in Romeoville. Email their Fundraising Chair @ dlove0825@ yahoo.com,please indicate Spring Craft Fair in the subject line and she will give you a call. Panic Attack Support Group of Bolingbrook. Anyone who is dealing with panic attacks, anxiety attacks, or social phobia is welcome to attend this support group.We meet every second and fourth Thursday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. Please visit Meetup.com to RSVP http:// www.meetup.com/AnxietyPanic-Attack-Support-Group-OfBolingbrook-Naper/. American Sign Language interpreted Mass is offered at St. Francis of Assisi, 1501 W. Boughton Road in Bolingbrook every Sunday at the 8:15 a.m. Mass. Power Connection’s LARGE FOOD PANTRY. Open on the 2nd and 4th Mondays of the month from 1 p.m. to 6:45 p.m., at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. Enjoy your

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shopping experience. For a $20 donation you can shop the aisles of canned/boxed goods, drinks, deserts, snacks, breads, fruits & vegetables. You will also receive a pre-selected bag of meat. There is no income verification and ALL residents of Illinois are welcome.The Resale Connection is also open from 9a.m. to 6:45 p.m. on those Mondays. We carry clothing for men/women/ children as well as household items, furniture, sundries, toys and so much more! Cleaning out your house? We accepts donations Monday-Thursday,9am4pm. Call (630) 679-6899 or visit www.thepowerconnection.org for more information/services available such as our Extension Food Pantry, Computer Classes, Forklift Classes. Volunteer opportunities also available to serve your community. Power Connection Computer Classes. Classes begin at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook.General or Microsoft Word classes are offered. Cost is $30. Call Power Connection at (630) 679-6899, or visit www. thepowerconection.org


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 27, 2014


Romeoville 02-27-14