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FEBRUARY 20, 2014

Vol. 8 No. 33

LocAL

Cicero man charged with murder in Romeoville shooting Police say they have recovered gun used in shooting By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

“you usually heaR the phRase, ‘it takes a village,’ iN RefeReNCe to ChilDReN, But iN aCtuality, it Really takes a village to Do aNythiNg aND foR aNyoNe,” saiD viCe pResiDeNt JaNiCe haywooD. “we all NeeD to suppoRt oNe aNotheR.”

BY LaUra KataUSKaS sTaff reporTer in honor of Black history month, a local club hosted “it takes a village,” bringing members together for a community-wide celebration. the Black history month awareness Club presented the program earlier this month

at Bolingbrook high school, its 15th annual presentation. “you usually hear the phrase, ‘it takes a village,’ in reference to children, but in actuality, it really takes a village to do anything and for anyone,” said vice president Janice haywood. “we all need to support one another.”

>> see village | page 3

The 15-year-old Romeoville girl shot in the head by an ex-boyfriend died Monday morning, after being kept on life Erick M. Maya, 23, of support, according 5600 Park Ave., Cicero to the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office. Briana Valle, was pronounced deceased >> see shootiNg | page 5


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

News

community

Local author writes book on handling finances Julianna Branch Lindsey is a retired Valley View teacher of 38 years By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Former educator Julianne Branch Lindsey has authored

her first book, hoping to share her financial knowledge with others who find themselves living from paycheck to paycheck.

A retired Valley View teacher of 38 years, Lindsey says she developed a passion of financial planning to help others to organize their finances after taking a second job as a Financial Planner and a state certified Insurance Agent. She recently published, “A Christian Woman’s Story: From Rags to Riches, Successful Management” and will be hosting a book signing from 1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 22 at Bar Louie at the Promenade, Bolingbrook. She said her mission is to teach and educate fellow Christians about successful money management and hopes to share her knowledge in the form of free seminars with at local area churches. “I use to live paycheck to paycheck and begin to spin your wheels on how you will ever get ahead,” said Lindsey. “I want to show people they can. If you are barely paying the bills, you are not financially sound. I

submitted photo

can teach a few practices to get started.” The book was written as the training manual which will be used at her seminars, which will cover such topics as creating a budget, debt elimination,

diagram of a solid financial house, saving and banking, investing and insurance, and money-saving financial tips. “It’s a step-by-step process that will lead to you increasing your net worth,” said Lindsey.


News

WILL COUNTY

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

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Redevelopment planed for Route 53 corridor Goal is to redevelop Route 53 corridor, keeping in mind the role a new Metra station By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Not all of Romeoville’s recent attention is being placed on Uptown Square; redevelopment plans extend through the Route 53 corridor and beyond. The village recently purchased property just north of Route 53 along 135th Street, essentially an empty parking lot, adding to the acreage the village acquired after purchasing the old Crazy Rock property. Mayor John Noak said the impetus to do so follows the same pattern of development that is being seen with Uptown Square— >> village, from page 1 The not-for profit social organization began in 2000 with the simple idea to build awareness in the community about African American history, past and present. Bolingbrook Attorney Anita Kontoh Scott, Felix George, a DuPage Township Trustee and Bernard Winston founded the Black History Month Awareness Club. The club works yearround to organize their one signature event that has now grown to draw hundreds from throughout the Will County area. The event is held annually during Black History Month, and is geared to all residents regardless of race and origin to assist in building bridges of tolerance and understanding. “This really has now become a way to provide a platform for businesses and organizations to reach people that may not have had the opportunity to connect with one another,” said Haywood. As part of the program, Haywood conveyed that one of the objectives of Black History Month is to offer a rich learning environment that bridges gaps created by ignorance and miscommunication. The program created by the Black History Awareness Club shared the history -- from the likes of President Barack Obama, the first African American to hold that office, to Marcus Garvey,

working on small pieces now to reap large gains in the future. The village’s ultimate goal is to redevelop the entire Route 53 corridor, keeping in mind the role a new Metra station will have on the area. For the past few years,the village has been working in conjunction with CN Railroad and Metra to develop a plan for a new station along New Avenue. The initiative began in 2008 when one of Romeoville’s largest industrial residents, the Citgo Petroleum Company, was about to expand and build a new plant, the village and the company struck a deal. In exchange for variances

a social activist, journalist and civil rights organizer. The group called attention to neurosurgeons such as Dr. Benjamin Carson and Olympic Medallist Gabby Douglas, actors Denzel Washington and Grammy winner Mary J. Blige, among a host of others. It is the intent of Black History Month not to rehash past injustices, but to raise awareness about the manner in which people, events, actors and experiences impacted

for more information...

To learn more about the group, or volunteer your time for next year’s program, call 630-783-8292 or visit www.blackhistory awarenessclub.org.

and shaped the lives of Blacks in America, the program reiterated. A host of speakers including Bolingbrook Mayor Roger Claar, U.S. Rep Bill Foster and keynote speaker Dr. Gilo Kwesi Cornell Logan, a nationally recognized diversity consultant, writer and speaker and founder of S.O.U.L. Creations, addressed the crowd.

that allowed for an additional parking lot to be constructed across from the plant on 135th street, Citgo offered to lease 8 acres of land to the village for a long sought-after Metra station. Citgo also was responsible for the stoplight and left turn lanes recently built to accommodate their parking lot which also will now accommodate traffic flow for a future Metra station. Next, came a federal grant of $4.5 million from the CMAQ (Congestion, Mitigation, and Air Quality) program that will pay for 80 percent of the cost to build the proposed Metra station off of 135th Street and New Avenue. The site for a possible Metra location would be further south on New Avenue, making the stop between Romeoville and Lockport, which

Calling attention to the contributions to those locally, the Smith family was recognized for being named the Bolingbrook Family of the Year, and a host of entertainers joined the celebration from the Muntu Dance Theater of Chicago; a reading of Martin Luther King’s speech “Mountaintop” by Erin Chapman; poetry and book readings; and performances by Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, Hermann Winston, and the Voices of Tomorrow, teen choir of the DuPage African American Episcopal Church in Lisle. The Village of Bolingbrook, Valley View School District 365u, the Bolingbrook Arts Council, the Kontoh Scott and Associates,PC,the Fountaindale Public Library, Andy’s Frozen Custard, Wal-Mart and Kohl’s were gold sponsors of the event. “The growth of this event shows the real need for this enrichment,” said Haywood. “It is so important to support an event that touches the lives of the entire community, bringing together so many different cultures.” The group of 75 volunteers begins planning this event the summer before and is always looking for volunteers. To learn more about the group, or volunteer your time for next year’s program, call 630-783-8292 or visit www. blackhistor yawarenessclub. org.

does not have a Metra station either. Noak said the process with CN Railroad has been lengthy as plans for an adequate pedestrian crossing were worked out.At first, the railroad had requested an underground or tunnel crossing be made. However, such a crossing would add a substantial cost to the project. “Metra was instrumental in coming up with a design that was acceptable, and we now have plans for an at-grade crossing that is in line with our cost,” said Noak. Noak said the first phase of the project should be complete this year, moving into the second phase of design and construction by June 2015. “Especially with Metra coming in, we are not just redeveloping

what is historically considered the downtown area, we are focusing on the entire corridor,” said Noak. “We also are looking to see major work on that intersection (Route 53 and 135th Street) by next year. We’ve seen some early interest and are evaluating the land.” A significant portion of land on that corner is owned by the Diocese of Joliet, which makes up a large portion of that area. Noak said plans would be to revitalize the shopping place on the southeast corner; that the village continues to work with Old World Storage on negotiations; and plans to complete a traffic signal at the entrance of Romeoville High School are still under way. “We anticipate making a few more announcements as time allows,” said Noak.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

FEBRUARY 20 Creating a Gmail Account. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Contact: Adult Services desk   815-886-2030 or dbroz@whiteoaklibrary.org. Need to set up a Gmail account? Want to learn how to use Gmail better? This class will teach you the basics of creating your own Gmail account. Basic computer skills are required prior to taking this class. This is Part One of a two part class which discusses how to work with Gmail.  Attendees are welcome to stick around for Part Two which follows immediately after Part One.  Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. Call, visit, email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab.

FEBRUARY 22 Trivia Craze Fundraiser. 6:30 to 10 p.m. at the Lockport American Legion Hall, 15052 Archer Ave. Presented by the Romeoville Area Chamber of Commerce and Tri County SRA. Trivia Craze is all about fun fun competition where teams battle to see who has the greatest knowledge of crazy trivia. If you love trivia or just like to laugh with your friends, you won’t want to miss this event! RHS Band Boosters Festival Night. 6 p.m. at RHS. Amission is $6 for adults and $3 for students or children 12 and under. More information is available by contacting

Band Boosters President Greg Higgins at greygrowler@ comcast.net or 630-699-3513. Computer Basics Level 2. 11 a.m. to noon at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Contact: Adult Services desk   815-886-2030 or dbroz@whiteoaklibrary.org. Prerequisites: Basic computer skills are needed. For patrons who want to know more about general computer usage beyond the basics. Discusses changing the wallpaper; creating, renaming, deleting, and searching for files; creating and using folders; file types, and keyboard combinations.  Registration is required. Call, visit, email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab.

FEBRUARY 25 Computers for Seniors: Email. 2 to 3 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Contact: Adult Services desk   815-886-2030 or dbroz@whiteoaklibrary. org Computers for Seniors is an exciting new series of computer classes aimed at seniors who want to learn the basics of using a computer.This series of classes will introduce you to computers, the Internet, and e-mail.  No computer experience is required before the first class. Learn how to create and work with an email account.We will teach you how to create a Gmail email address. Afterwards, we’ll teach you how to use your new Gmail account

Calendar or use an e-mail account you already have. . These classes are free to attend, and limited to 12 registered participants. Call, visit, email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab.

information or to make your reservation at 815-886-2076.

ONGOING

Are you a crafter? Do you have handmade items you’d like to sell? Please contact the Romeoville Humane Society, they will be hosting an Easter FEBRUARY 26 Craft Fair fundraising event Code Crew. 4 to 5 p.m. at April 12th, in Romeoville. the Romeoville Branch Library, Email their Fundraising Chair 201 West Normantown Road, @ dlove0825@yahoo.com, Romeoville. Contact: The please indicate Spring Craft Children’s Services Desk   Fair in the subject line and she 815-886-2030 or dkoll@ will give you a call. whiteoaklibrary.org. You already use technology, so why Panic Attack Support not make it too? Come and join Group of Bolingbrook. the Code Crew to learn how Anyone who is dealing with you can program and create panic attacks, anxiety attacks, your own animations, art, or social phobia is welcome games, web pages, and more. to attend this support group. Registration is required for We meet every second and ages 8-14. This program will fourth Thursday of the month meet in the computer lab on from 7 to 9 p.m. Please visit Meetup.com to RSVP http:// the lower level. www.meetup.com/AnxietyFEBRUARY 27 Panic-Attack-Support-GroupCareer Fair. 4 to 6 p.m. at Of-Bolingbrook-Naper/. Rasmussen College,1400 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. American Sign Language Attend the Romeoville/Joliet interpreted Mass is Career Fair at Rasmussen offered at St. Francis of College and connect with Assisi, 1501 W. Boughton Road leading employers in your in Bolingbrook every Sunday at community. This event is open the 8:15 a.m. Mass. to the community at no cost. Learn more at rasmussen.edu/ Power Connection’s LARGE careerfair. FOOD PANTRY. Open on the 2nd and 4th Mondays of the MARCH 6 month from 1 p.m. to 6:45 p.m., Romeoville State of the at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite Village Address 11 a.m. F, Bolingbrook. Enjoy your at Lewis Univeristy, JFK Sports shopping experience. For a Center, One University Parkway. $20 donation you can shop the Luncheon begins at noon. aisles of canned/boxed goods, Reservations are required no drinks, deserts, snacks, breads, later than Feb. 28. Contact fruits & vegetables. You will the Chamber office for more also receive a pre-selected bag

of meat. There is no income verification and ALL residents of Illinois are welcome. The Resale Connection is also open from 9a.m. to 6:45 p.m. on those Mondays. We carry clothing for men/women/children as well as household items, furniture, sundries, toys and so much more! Cleaning out your house? We accepts donations MondayThursday, 9am-4pm. Call (630) 679-6899 or visit www. thepowerconnection.org for more information/services available such as our Extension Food Pantry, Computer Classes, Forklift Classes. Volunteer opportunities also available to serve your community. Power Connection Computer Classes. Classes begin at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F. Bolingbrook. General or Microsoft Word classes are offered. Cost is $30. Call Power Connection at (630) 679-6899, or visit www. thepowerconection.org Power Connection Forklift classes at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. We offer a one week class for forklift certification, you must be able to read/write fluent English. $50 fuel fee due by start of class. Call Power Connection at (630) 679-6899, or visit www.thepowerconection.org. Tween Scene. Tuesdays 4 to 5 p. m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Do you enjoy hanging out at the library? Well, come to Tween Scene! Each >> see CALENDAR | page 18


News >> shooting, from page 1 at 12:03 a.m. Feb. 17 at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood. She had been in critical condition since she and her 33-year-old mother were both shot at 7 a.m. Feb. 13 in the 300 block of Emery Avenue, while pulling out of their driveway. Erick M. Maya, 23, of 5600 Park Ave., Cicero, was charged on Feb. 14 with two counts of attempted murder, two counts of aggravated battery with a firearm and one count of unlawful use of a weapon by a felon in connection with the shooting. Bond was set at $5 million. Maya is now being charged with murder. He entered a plea of not guilty via closed circuit television in Tuesday’s bond hearing. A preliminary hearing will be held March 11 at the Will County Courthouse, 14 W. Jefferson St., in Joliet. Court records show that on Dec. 16, 2013, an order of protection was filed by the mother against Maya. Police Chief Mark Turvey said police

determined Maya was the lone shooter and confirmed Maya and Valle had a previous dating relationship, but were no longer dating. A bond hearing for Maya was held Saturday morning, where the judge entered a not guilty plea on his behalf in order to continue the case. Maya made his first appearance via closed circuit television, with no lawyer or family present, simply answering yes or no to the judge. The hearing was held at 1:30 p.m. Feb. 18 at the Will County Courthouse. Meanwhile,Romeoville Police said Sunday they believe they may have found the weapon used in the shootings. They and the Romeoville Emergency Management Agency searched the neighborhood for evidence related to the Feb. 13 shooting. During the search, police say a handgun was located in a yard near the intersection of 135 Street and Hickory Avenue. police believe that this was the gun used in the shooting. At the time of the shooting a subject described as a short

male walked up to the vehicle and shot the daughter in the head and the mother in the neck, Turvey said. The offender fled the area on foot, running westbound along 135 Street. The Valley View School District was contacted, and schools in the area were placed on lockdown. Romeoville Police This unfortunate event (and the emergency response required as a result) are certainly unsettling and we understand the concern that many of our families felt during this time.” -message sent to parents of valley view students

searched the surrounding neighborhood with help from other law enforcement agencies. Authorities initially brought in four persons of interest. They released two, arrested one on an unrelated charge and booked Maya into the Will

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014 County Jail on the charges. During the incident, which took place a block away from Irene King Elementary School, the Valley View School District was contacted and schools in the area were placed on a soft lockdown. Parents first received a message that students enroute to school would be escorted into the building by Valley View personnel and police. A second call, about 30 minutes later, asked parents to keep their children home if they had not already left. Those on school buses were sent to the Romeoville Recreation Center. Once the lockdown was lifted, Valley View students who were re-located to the Romeoville Recreation Center were bused back to school. Some parents questioned why students weren’t told to remain home from the beginning when police knew there was still a suspect on the loose. The Valley View School District issued a message stating that the district continually seeks to refine and improve its emergency procedures and

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response and is in a debriefing process with police and community partners to ensure that it is even better prepared for any future emergency events. “This unfortunate event (and the emergency response required as a result) are certainly unsettling and we understand the concern that many of our families felt during this time,” the message stated. “As we implemented our safety protocol, we adjusted our response as needed based on the direction of law enforcement officials as their investigation was in progress. “Direction given to us by law enforcement officials was based on what was in the best interest of safety for our students, staff, and community. District staff, along with our community partners, worked together to ensure the safety was the highest priority. We are also very proud of our students for their responsible behavior, patience and cooperation. We thank the community for their patience and understanding.”


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

Police Blotter

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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A residential burglary, burglary to motor vehicle and a criminal damage to property was reported in the 200 block of Hemlock at 12:56 p.m. Jan. 18. Unknown person(s) damaged a window and door of the residence. They also took televisions, laptops, game consoles, clothing, tools, car stereo amplifier, credit cards, video games, a radio and several pieces of jewelry. A vehicle at the residence was also ransacked. Estimated value of the items taken and cost to repair damages is $9,601.

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Leticia Nuno-Robles, 38, 417 Haller, was arrested at 2:23 p.m. Jan. 20 and charged with retail theft on the 200 block of S. Weber Road.

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Sean Griffin, 42, 810 Black Road, Joliet, was arrested at 9:43 p.m. Jan. 22 and charged with driving with a suspended license and disobeying a traffic sign near Wesglen Parkway and Arborwood Circle.

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Tracy Westerfield, 19, 22308 W. Odessa Court, Plainfield, was arrested at 1:25 a.m. Jan. 24 and charged with driving with a suspended license, driving without lights near Weslake Parkway east of Budler Road.

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Jonathan Nuckles, 22, 118 Gardner St., Elwood, was arrested at 3:24 a.m. Jan. 25 and charged with DUI, driving with a suspended license and illegal transport of alcohol and possession of cannabis near Route 53 north of Renwick Road.

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Joshua Robinson, 30, 32 Wilson Ave., Joliet, was arrested at 5:59 p.m. Jan. 25 and charged with driving with a suspended license and a failure to reduce speed near Weber and Renwick Roads.

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Francisco Reyes-Benito, 32, 3212 S. Kedvale, Chicago, was arrested at 5:53 a.m. Jan. 26 and charged with no valid

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driver’s license, no insurance, and too fast for conditions near Route 53 and Murphy Drive.

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Michael Wilson, 52, 12601 S. 104th Ave., Palos Park,

was arrested at 9:41 a.m. Jan. 26 and charged with driving with a revoked license and speeding near Romeo Road and Poplar Avenue.

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Bernal Fox, 39, 34 N. Broadway, Joliet, was arrested at 6:41 a.m. Jan. 27 for no valid driver’s license and failure to reduce speed near Route 53 and Airport Road.

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Pedro Hernandez-Alvarado, 44, 3037 S. Trumbull, Chicago, was arrested at 6:36 p.m. Jan. 29 for no valid driver’s license and disobey a traffic signal on Route 53 and Joliet Road.

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foruM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy! Just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred. Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

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GuESt coLumn

OUR HOUSE

with Rep. Natalie maNley (D-Joliet) 98th DistRiCt

Reflections on the State of the State WEB LINKS At the very end of January, Education: One of the sound we returned to Springfield for bites we often hear from elected Governor Quinn’s State of the officials is that we need to invest State address. Minutes before the in education. We need to make Governor arrived, those education funding from the Senate and other a priority. A quality state office holders made education should their way the House be affordable and floor. The Governor available to all arrived in traditional children. Yes. Yes. style: Announced by And Yes. There are the doorkeeper at the very few of us who doors of the House, the would disagree Governor was escorted with any of those onto the house floor by Rep. Natalie Manley statements. And yet an honorary bipartisan (D-Joliet) 98th every year, the state group of legislators from District does a less than both chambers until he took his adequate job of “putting their place at the podium to deliver money where their mouth is.” his speech. When will the actions match The speech was mostly the words? Each year, the upbeat, and the Governor urged appropriations committees (Kthe legislature to focus on job 12 education, higher education, creation and education. human services, public safety While I agree with those and general services) go through priorities, my outlook is a bit the long process of determining more critical. So let’s talk about what funding is needed to job creation and education… maintain vital programs. Then, Job Creation: Whether I am in what can only be described talking to people in line at the as a cruel twist of fate, those grocery store or while standing committees are told what money on their porch, I have candid is available. Those two numbers conversations about how they aren’t even close. feel about the state, and how The main culprit keeping jobs decisions by the legislature from being created in Illinois is affect them. I meet so many who the same one keeping us from are struggling to just keep a roof being able to adequately invest over their heads, worried about in education - dollars (and the how they will afford sending people who manage/mismanage their kids to college, and if they them). still have a job, many tell me Simply put, Illinois has been that they are worried about the spending money on things we keeping their jobs and are facing could not afford. Imagine your reduced hours, benefits or pay. own household budget:There are

illustrated opinions

have a question or comment about this column? feel free to send us an email at nmanley@buglenewspapers.com

many things that you want, but the balance in your checkbook does not support that spending. Few of us would write a check we could not cover, and yet, that is what happened in Illinois over decades. This is where we accountants scratch our heads and wonder… Here is what I do know: As a member of a bipartisan House budget committee, I understand money is tight and demand for services is high…but this fiscal crisis is not something we can tax our way out of – the state should generate more revenue by concentrating on improving employment rates, making it easier to do business here, and making it easier for those who are unemployed to find work. This is a more effective way to earn revenue. All of us will need to tighten our belts and work toward the same goal. After all, isn’t creating jobs and funding education our goal? Natalie Manley is the state Representative for Illinois’ 98th House district, which includes parts of Bolingbrook, Crest Hill, Joliet, Plainfield and Romeoville. Natalie cohosts the Lynne, Mary & Natalie radio show, Friday mornings on 1340 AM on WJOL.You can contact Natalie at nmanley@buglenewspapers.com.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

News Briefs Community Christian Church commemorates 25th anniversary with baptism celebrations In celebration of its 25th anniversary, Community Christian Church will be holding baptism celebrations March 1 & 2, 2014 at all of its 14 locations. Community Christian Church was founded in March of 1989 by brothers Dave and Jon Ferguson, Dave’s wife Sue, and three other close friends, who sketched out their vision on a napkin in a restaurant in central Illinois shortly after graduating from college. Initially meeting in the cafeteria of Naperville Central High School, COMMUNITY now has grown to more than 5,600 attenders

and celebrates weekly at 14 locations throughout the Chicagoland area: East Aurora, Chicago Edgewater, Chicago Lincoln Park | Old Town, Chicago Lincoln Square, Glen Ellyn, Lemont, Montgomery, Naperville Yellow Box, Naperville Downtown, Plainfield, Plainfield (Carillon), Romeoville, Shorewood, and Yorkville. COMMUNITY’s mission is and always has been “Helping People Find Their Way Back to God.” One of their core beliefs is that baptism is a pivotal moment in the life of a Christfollower.

“What better way to celebrate 25 years of helping people find their way back to God than by devoting an entire weekend to just that, through baptism? We’re super-excited about what the celebration will bring!” says co-founder Dave Ferguson. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in the celebration. Those interested in being baptized the weekend of March 1 & 2 or interested in learning more about baptism can visit www. communitychristian.org/ baptism.

RHS Band Boosters Festival Night fundraiser is Feb. 22 It takes quite an effort to continue to grow the band program. One of the ways to support the effort is through Festival Night, the annual Romeoville High School Band Boosters winter fundraiser which this year is scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 22. Festival night features a 6

p.m. concert at RHS. Admission is $6 for adults and $3 for students or children 12 and under. Band Boosters fundraisers help defray the costs related to the band’s overall operations. These include, but are not limited to, new instruments, music, miscellaneous

equipment, additional transportation costs and uniforms. More information is available by contacting Band Boosters President Greg Higgins at greygrowler@comcast.net or 630-699-3513.


Take 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Faux-antique decor 11 Nurses 15 Words next to many 22-Down 16 Malaysian Chinese shoe designer Jimmy 17 It’s hard to write with one 19 Cub games setting: Abbr. 20 Hidden Valley competitor 21 “Hah!” 22 Small-screen princess 23 Sing ballads, say 24 Word in a Le Pew address 26 Tab alternative 29 Foe of the fictional spy agency CONTROL 30 Pump parts 32 Authorizing 33 First-aid practitioner, briefly 34 In reality 36 Cutting remark 37 Don’t bother 39 Jard’n occupant 40 They’re built on

Down benches 41 Pretends 43 Yupik craft 45 Thomas who cocreated “Free to Be ... You and Me” 46 Spanish autonomy Castile and __ 47 Astronomy Muse 49 Stick with a spring 50 Brief black-andwhite flash? 53 Hunter’s companion 56 Singer of the children’s album “Camp Lisa” 57 Prevented from getting unruly 58 Minute 59 Biological cooler

1 What collaborators should be in 2 Garment feature that’s sometimes detachable 3 Family title 4 Like some news 5 Stock character? 6 Dweller on the Red Sea 7 Hutch contents 8 European trio in a Christmas song 9 Soc. Sec. supplement 10 Rogers __: Toronto stadium 11 Cheesy stuff 12 “Color me surprised!” 13 Shot glass 14 Bar supply available at the touch of a button 18 Pretentious 22 Check alternatives 23 “Welcome to the human network” tech giant 24 Desert mount 25 “GET FIRED

UP!” candy 26 Passes out 27 Phil Jackson, for most of the ‘70s 28 Early birds? 29 It may wash up onshore 31 Leaving for 34 Toots 35 2010 Western remake that garnered 10 Oscar nominations 38 Presently 40 Success on a mat 42 Haunted house sounds 44 Farm sound 46 Ton o’ 47 Jamaican hybrid fruit 48 Act like a pig, in a way 49 Star of Looney Tunes’ “for Scent-imental Reasons” 50 Fitness brand 51 Ivy League member 52 Cultivated 54 FF’s opposite 55 Bent piece

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

Horoscopes A small act of defiance could upset the even balance in your home or workplace during the upcoming week, but you might be surprised when others show concern instead of aggravation. Stand up for your rights to win new friends.

Consistency and reliability will help you make your way through changing situations in the week ahead. You’re life a life raft that other people tend to cling to whenever they get in over their heads.

The least important transactions can run smoothly. You may be better off pursuing hobbies or social activities that brighten your heart but don’t necessarily bring you recognition or monetary rewards in the week to come.

Take pride in home and family. Being proactive in that area of life could bring you good luck elsewhere. You like to feel financially secure, and a glimpse of future comforts can come into sight if you’re willing to work hard.

Ask people what they think and they’ll be happy to tell you. Shake off an inclination to be a homebody and mingle with people from different walks of life in the week ahead. Be your own best friend and toot your own horn.

Circulate for success. It’s perfectly acceptable to listen to opinions that differ from those held by your family or professors. Keep your finger on the pulse of public opinion this week. Find out more about the latest fads and trends.

Life may revolve around friends or small inconsequential things in the week ahead, so you could feel you’re not the center of attention. Remember, however, that other people are watching your example. Cooperation arrives when needed.

If this week were a tarot card, your card could be The Fool. You may think everything is going very well but might be oblivious of problems directly in your path. Be glad for friends who steer you in the right direction.

Social pressures could push you into a corner, but from a corner you can see the whole room. Sitting through lectures or dealing with people you don’t really care for may be necessary to reach your goals this week.

Your feet may be dancing a boogie-woogie to the beat of a very different drummer while your head is engaged in a sedate fox trot. During the week to come, your financial outlook can be affected by group idealism and ethics.

You may radiate friendliness during the week ahead. Pull out all the stops and mingle with groups of people. Explore new places like a museum, join a book club or exercise group, or drag a friend out to a new restaurant.

You can be carried away by inspiration. This week, don’t ignore obligations if sidetracked by romantic ideals and be sure to “do the right thing.” Act according to the rules, even when swept by the urge to break them.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Content Agency 2014

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • ELUDE • WIPED • UPTOWN • OUTING

Answer: What Mom did when her son cut his hand -WOUND THE WOUND

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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014


INSIDE: Spartan basketball team looking toward playoffs,

page 13; Lewis falls to No. 2 Drury, page 14

romeovillebugle.com

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Ex-Raider goes from SIU to Super Bowl By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

On April 27 of last year, it looked as if former Bolingbrook High School football player Kenneth Boatright had achieved his dream when he signed as an undrafted free agent with the Seattle Seahawks. Less than four months later, the 23-year-old suffered a torn labrum in his shoulder that could have threatened his NFL dreams before they even started. And then, four months later, he was hoisting the Vince Lombardi trophy as an NFL champion. “I was injured before preseason, so I thought I was done with, that they would just wipe their hands with me,” Boatright said. “They want me to develop here and they told me I would basically use this as a redshirt year.” While he was on the sidelines, Boatright has not only been rehabilitating his shoulder, he was learning from members of the top defense in the NFL. “It is crazy because they have so many different styles of pass rushers and I get to learn from every one of them,” Boatright said. Courtesy of Kenneth Boatright

Bolingbrook graduate Kenneth Boatright kisses the Lombardi Trophy after the Seahawks won on Feb. 2.

>> see SUPER | page 16


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014


Sports

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

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Spartans looking toward playoffs By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

As the end of the regular season comes to an end and the playoffs are about to start, the Romeoville boys basketball team is looking for a fresh start. The Spartans are a team with a new coach and a new system and have battled this year falling several times in close games. “From a coaches standpoint and you look at it and think we’re all of these close games, if we won a few, we could be on the other side of .500,” said firstyear coach Marc Howard. It has not been effort that has plagued Romeoville, but execution, especially for a complete game. “We have to execute for four quarters and that is something we have to do to win these close games,” Howard said.“That has been our Achilles Heel here this year. If we could put a good four quarters here together, we would be on the victory side

of things. The third quarter has been hurting us. I just don’t understand, we run the same stuff but it seems that we get a little tight. I guess when you are a team that is searching for a win, that little extra pressure thrown on you kind of hurts you.” With the playoffs nearing and all teams getting a fresh start, Howard hopes the Spartans can upset some higher seeds and end the season on a high note. “Playoffs are coming up and hopefully we can have some magic here and late and win some game and give our program and our school something to get excited about,” he said. “We are going to keep hunting here.” There are opposing coaches that see the progress Howard and the Spartans have made this season even if it doesn’t show in the win column. “Marc is doing a great job with those guys and we know it is always going to be a battle,”

Minooka coach Scott Tanaka said after a recent game against Romeoville. “They are well coached and that team always works hard and we know we are always in for a battle. They pressured us and gave us everything they have and I give a lot of credit to Marc and the team. It hasn’t been a great year for them, but they always come out and play hard. Give them a lot of credit.” Howard wants the wins for the seniors, but he also wants a run to help bring the underclassmen along for the future. “Hopefully the kids learn some things from all of this,” he said. “It is a learning process for the kids and the coaching staff. We just have to keep on executing. We have to work on ball handling, work on free throws, work on IQ and decision making and those are some things that are going to take time.” mark@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

James Boyd and the Spartans are getting ready for the playoffs.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

Sports

No. 2 Drury uses early run to beat No. 19 Lewis No. 2 Drury University used a 15-2 run to open the second half and rally from a four-point halftime deficit to claim the 5653 Great Lakes Valley Conference victory over the No. 19 Lewis University men’s basketball team at the O’Reily Family Event Center on Saturday (Feb. 15) afternoon. Drury junior forward Cameron Adams (7 points) and sophomore guard Kameron Bundy (6 points) combined for 13 of the Panthers’ 15 points during that four-minute stretch that put them ahead 36-27 with 15:59 left in the second half. Bundy finished with a game-high 23 points along with five assists, while Adams had a double-double of 13 points and 10 rebounds. “I thought we played very hard, but the game was won and lost in the first five minutes of the second half,” Lewis head men’s basketball coach Scott Trost said. “Bundy is good and he made some plays down the stretch for Drury.

“I’m proud of the way we hung in there.” With the win, Drury improves to 22-1 overall and 14-1 in GLVC action, while the Flyers fall to 19-4 on the campaign and 11-4 in conference play. Lewis sophomore forward Kyle Nelson (St. Charles, Ill./St. Charles North) topped the Flyers in both points (14) and rebounds (7). Lewis’ leading scorers Ryan Jackson (Bolingbrook, Ill./ Riverside-Brookfield) and Julian Lewis (Flossmoor, Ill./HomewoodFlossmoor) were held to six points apiece, while starting point guard Jeff Jarosz (Lyons, Ill./Morton) missed the contest with an injury. Despite Drury’s nine-point lead with 16 minutes left in the game, the Flyers would not go away without a fight.The Panthers held a 50-42 lead following a Bundy lay-up with 5:52 remaining in the contest. Lewis answered with a 9-2 run over the next four minutes to

cut Drury’s lead to 52-51 with 1:51 left in the game. Junior forward David Niggins (Naperville, Ill./ Naperville Central) scored five of his eight points during that run, including his second three-pointer of the afternoon. Adams extended that lead to 54-51 on Drury’s next possession on a jumper with 1:29 left. Both teams would trade possessions, before Lewis drew a foul with 37 seconds left on the clock. Lewis hit both of his free throw attempts to cut Drury’s advantage to 54-53. The Flyers fouled Drury junior guard Wendell Pierre with 31 ticks left on the clock. Pierre managed to split his free throws, pushing the Panthers ahead, 5553. On the Flyers’ next possession, Lewis drove to the baseline, but his attempt to kick the ball back to the top of the key went array and was whistled for a backcourt violation with five seconds left in the game.


Sports

Season ends at Moline Sectional for bowling duo By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

MOLINE – Bolingbrook’s season came to an end Saturday, Feb. 15 at the Moline Sectional at Highland Park Bowl. Junior Felicia Montecinos shot a 1,077, while sophomore Megan Neverouski had a 1,053. “Considering what my games were, it was decent,” Neverouski said. “It could’ve been better. But it is what it is. It really helped to have Felicia there supporting me. I kept my head up and kept smiling.” “I’m not really happy with it but I tried my hardest,” Montecinos Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff said. “I did do bad, but I tried to tough it out. I switched balls Bolingbrook’s Felicia Montecinos (right) ended her career at Saturand I switched my spot and did day’s Moline sectional. the best I can. I did way better in the end than the morning. I good experience to go to other “We’re going to try our wasn’t confident and got down bowling alleys,” Montecinos hardest,” Montecinos said. “I will on myself. I tried too hard.” added. “It gets you ready for all and I know Megan will, too.” Overall though it was a good the other bowling alleys you are “I’m very happy with the experience in an environment going to experience like this. I season,” Neverouski said. “The not seen much during the really did learn from this.” season was great, especially regular season. It was a successful season having your friends there helping “It was crazy but it was fun,” for the Raiders and with both you. I’m hoping for bigger things Neverouski stated.“It is definitely sectional qualifiers returning next year.” something to build off of.” next year, the future could be Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@buglenewspapers.com “It was crazy but a really even brighter.

Brooks seventh graders place fourth in state A massive second half comeback by Wirth Middle School of Cahokia gave Brooks Middle School’s 7th grade boys basketball team a 50-36 loss in the third place game at the Illinois Elementary School Association Class 7-4A state championships Thursday evening. The Bulldogs (20-3) raced to a 13-7 lead after a quarter and a 23-17 advantage at halftime. But Wirth (22-1) went on a 15-4 run in the third quarter to take the lead and never looked back. Tyler Cochran led Brooks scorers with 12 points. Quentin Pringle added eight, Damari Grant seven, Anthony Thompson six (on two 3-pointers), Marquise Ratcliffe

two, and Elijah Armstrong one. Other Bulldogs team members include Isiah Burd, Cameron Mitchell, Darius Little, Cedric Ross, Tayveun Williams, Jeremiah James, and Xiaver Tang. Coaches are Patrick Meginniss and Michael Sedor.

ROMEOVILLE CHRISTIAN It was a clash of the Kingsmen as Romeoville Christian took on NICAC and IACS rival Kingsmen of Berean Baptist of Rockford. RCA poured in 33 second half points to defeat Berean 5122 and improve to 14-1. Senior Lauren Johnson scored 16 points followed by freshman Jessie Perez with 11 points (8 rebounds). Leading rebounder Erica Ware tallied 10 rebound

to bring her average to 11.2 per game. A game earlier RCA beat LaSalle-Peru Christian. After a back and forth first quarter the Kingsmen outscoed the Soldiers 21-3 in the second en route to a 55-26 win improving to 13-1 on the season. The Kingsmen were led by Ware who put in 17 points along with 12 rebounds. Angelina Byers (5 steals) and Perez (8 rebounds, 6 assists) added another 12 points each. Seventh grader Aleah Brown pulled down 10 rebounds. • The Kingsmen got beat 5941 by Quentin Road Christian School. RCA enior Jake Janson led all scorers with 18 points.

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

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sPorts

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

BOYS BBALL Points Per Game Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East George Sargeant, Maine South Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Corey Evers, Plainfield South Jalen Jackson, JCA Grover Anderson, Lockport Andrew Palucki, Maine South Evan Hines, Niles West Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Romeo Magliore, Niles West John Campbell, Lockport Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Jake Nowak, Plainfield North Devin Blake, Downers North Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Ray Greco, Downers North Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Rebounds Per Game Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Devin Blake, Downers North Zach Trussell, Lisle Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North George Sargeant, Maine South

24.0 19.3 16.8 16.6 16.2 15.2 14.3 14.2 13.7 13.3 13.1 12.8 12.6 12.4 12.1 12.0 11.6 11.6 11.2 11.1 11.1 9.5 9.0 8.6 7.4 7.2 7.1 7.0 7.0

>> supeR, from page 11 “Michael Bennett is that inside and outside rusher that has the inside, but can take a bigger guy off the edge, then there is Chris Clemons has an angry rush,it is like he has no respect for the offensive lineman and he has so many moves he tries to use, then Cliff Avril has a lot of speed and can hit you with power at times. They are all so different, but what it teaches is you always have to be aggressive. It is about being relentless. I have learned so much from those guys.” Boatright also knows that he would not have the opportunity to join his fellow defensive ends on the field if he didn’t get me back from his injury. “I will be cleared soon, hopefully within a month,” he said.“(The fact that the Seahawks kept me) gave me a lot of confidence to come back. I know I can’t try and make this team next year injured again. I knew I had to not only get back, I had to be healthy and do it all right. I wanted to be healthy for the team workouts and be 100 percent coming into those workouts. “It was a crazy experience and it fires you up to get ready for next year. Our motto is ‘What’s Next,” we won the game and it is over now and now it is time to move on. Offseason work starts in April. Coaches have told us, this offseason has to be one of the best ever. In order for us to even have a chance to do it again, we have to make it the best because everyone

John Campbell, Lockport Shane Murray, Lisle Joe Butler, Minooka Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Assists Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Grover Anderson, Lockport Logiurato, Westmont Sean Maloney, Maine South Andrew Palucki, Maine South Jonny Butler, Minooka Myles Ward, Plainfield East Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Little, Westmont Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Steals Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Grover Anderson, Lockport John Campbell, Lockport Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Logiurato, Westmont Andrew Palucki, Maine South Romeo Magliore, Niles West Jon Arenas, Maine South Ralph Blakney, Lockport Jonny Butler, Minooka Neal Tyrell, Minooka Corey Evers, Plainfield South Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North

7.0 6.8 6.3 6.0 80 75 66 61 59 57 57 56 55 53 51 46 45 42 40 37 36 34 33 31 29 28 28 28 27 27

will be gunning for us.” The 6-foot, 4-inch, 253-pound former SIU Saluki joins a list of four other locals who have won Super Bowls. Boatright joins his former Bolingbrook coach and Plainfield High School graduate John Ivlow, who won in 1998 as a member of the San Francisco 49ers. Other locals to win are Joliet Catholic graduates Mike Alstott (2002, Buccaneers) and Tom Thayer (1985, Bears) and Joliet Junior College graduate Kelvin Hayden (2006, Colts). “There is no way I could have even imagined this could have happened,” Boatright said. “There is no way you could ever think that your first year in the league you will win the Super Bowl.” Because of his injury, Boatright was forced to watch most games from a skybox suite, but he was allowed on the sideline for the Super Bowl. He said from the first safety of the game, the Seattle faithful were electric. “These fans are ridiculous,” he said. “They came to the Super Bowl and they caused that safety because they couldn’t hear. We got two points off the fans. It’s like getting free points.” Boatright watched the Seahawks score 20 more points and hold a 22-0 lead on Denver at halftime, but he said the coaches and players did not let down. “We didn’t just stop playing at halftime,” he said. “We were still

Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Joe Butler, Minooka Nick Novak, Plainfield East D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Deiondre Taylor, Lockport Field Goal % Shane Murray, Lisle Tristin Esker, Plainfield East George Sargeant, Maine South Julian Torres, Bolingbrook Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Tristin Esker, Plainfield East Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Matt Hund, Plainfield Central Devin Blake, Downers North Free Throw % Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Odi Audisho, Niles West Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East George Sargeant, Maine South Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Andrew Palucki, Maine South Emin Ademi, Niles West Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Grover Anderson, Lockport Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Connor Bielat, Lisle Romeo Magliore, Niles West

26 26 24 24 22 22 .667 .658 .640 .630 .602 .595 .590 .577 .573 .570 .550 .543 .980 .833 .824 .820 .820 .790 .778 .773 .771 .770 .760 .757

playing like it was 0-0.” However, just seconds into the second half, Boatright knew the game was in the bag. “When Percy Harvin ran that one back after halftime, we knew they were not coming back,” he said. He was able to watch the defense dominate and win 43-8. But, he said, the defense was not happy allowing Denver’s score. “Even though the score was what it was, the coaches and players were upset we allowed those eight points,” Boatright said. While he hopes to get back from his injury, join the Legion of Boom defense on the field and win another ring, nothing is certain in the NFL. But Boatright will always have his memories of the Super Bowl celebration in Seattle. “The parade was like in a movie,” he said. “There was like 700 or 800 thousand people there.There was one time where you look up in the sky and the whole sky is filled with confetti and you can’t see where it is coming from. You are in the middle of the street and all you see is confetti and it was like a movie scene. “I was thinking, one year ago, I’m at Southern Illinois, a broke college student playing the game of football and then I come here, win the Super Bowl in my first year and have 800,000 people cheering you on. At SIU, we could barely get 10,000 for a game.” mark@buglenewspapers.com

Cappel, Minooka Brodric Thomas, Bolingbrook Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Torrens, Westmont 3-pointers Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Jalen Jackson, JCA Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Nick Novak, Plainfield East Evan Hines, Niles West Shane Ritter, Plainfield South Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Andrew Palucki, Maine South Johnny Kostelz, Plainfield Central Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Ray Greco, Downers North Neal Tyrell, Minooka Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Jojo Rios, Niles West GIRLS BBALL Points Per Game Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Jaida Green, Downers North Emily Schramek, Benet Emily Eshoo, Benet Erin Heide, Minooka Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Chantell Mack, Joliet Central Sarah Costello, Downers North Tyler Everett, Plainfield South

.750 .742 .740 .720 48 41 37 32 31 26 25 25 25 25 24 23 23 21 21 18.5 15.8 15.1 14.8 14.3 13.8 12.5 12.3 12.5 12.2

Peyton Winters, Downers North Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Monica Barefield, Joliet West Elanta Slowik, Maine East Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Kathleen Doyle, Benet Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Rebounds Per Game Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Sarah Costello, Downers North Assists Sarah Costello, Downers North Jaida Green, Downers North Bre Sobotka, Resurrection Juatece McNear, Joliet Central Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Kelly Kons, Maine South Steals Sarah Costello, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Kianna Campbell, Lockport Jaida Green, Downers North Destiny Hollins, Lockport Bre Sobotka, Resurrection Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Jnaya Walker, JCA Kailey Foster, Joliet West Naomi Mayes, Lockport

11.8 11.3 11.0 10.6 10.6 10.8 10.5 10.2 12.0 9.7 9.5 120 76 72 70 69 62 82 62 54 53 50 49 43 41 41 40 40 40

Courtesy of Kenneth boatright

Kenneth Boatright had his jersey in his locker prior to the Super Bowl.


buglenewspapers.com/basketball

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Joliet West takes down Sandburg in overtime By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

What wins in basketball is not always what shows up in the box score or on a stat sheet. That was the case Friday night when Joliet West held off Sandburg 59-57 in overtime in SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue Division play. Late in the game and in overtime, it was the rebounding and scrappy play of Jeff Washington that saved several possessions for the Tigers, allowing them to hang in the game. “Jeff has been that way all year for us,” said Joliet West coach Nick DiForti. “He is a kid that doesn’t typically start, but he is the kid that we want playing down the stretch.That is his role and that is the type of player he is for us.” As a team,West was able to use its athletic advantage to earn the win. “Down the stretch, it does help to have a little more athleticism and be able to fly around and get some loose balls and get some easy ones from it,” DiForti said. Washington did get on the stat sheet with 10 points to go along with doing the dirty work. “I just try and play my role and hustle as much as I can to help the team as much as I can,” he said. “It was a real good win. We stuck together and it was a confidence booster and it will help us down the way. When we play together as a team and we get up and down the floor, we can be good.” The two teams battled from the tip with the Tigers holding a 27-24 advantage at the break, thanks to D’Anthony Wright scoring 10 of his team-best 19 points in the first half. “I had to step up tonight,” he said. “Most of the time, Allias (Roberts-Burnett) is leading our team and everything is put on his shoulders and I felt that we had to relieve some stress off him tonight. Coach told me

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Jeff Washington was a key contributor in Joliet West’s 59-57 win over Sandburg Friday.

I had to get some more arch on my shot so I went out there with some confidence and my shot was going in and I had to take some stress off Allias.” Roberts-Burnett had only one field goal in each of the four quarters, but came up big in the extra frame, hitting five of six free throws. “They were on me so I had some room to find the open guy,” he said. “The free throws at the end are al about hard work in practice and a lot of focus.” Eight Tigers registered in the

scoring column, something that makes them a tough team to beat. “Our team is designed so that when no one is scoring 30 and more guys are in the teens and everyone is scoring some and we don’t rely on one guy, we win,” Wright said.“We all have to chip in and that is what we did tonight.” “We share the ball. We don’t really have any set plays for any one person,” DiForti said. “Our offense runs through a lot of different guys. If someone has

hot hand, we want to find them and we have been playing a lot more unselfish since the middle of January and we have played better because of it.” Not only did the Tigers score, they played solid defense, limiting the Sandburg shooters chances to beat them. “We really put pressure on their point guard,” DiForti said. “We had to upset their rhythm because they not only have shooters, they have shooters off the bench.” Wright said it was all about

trust. “We preach defense and we go after every loose ball,” he said. “Coach tells us all the time to communicate and we were out there calling out screens and shooters and we were trusting that guys had our backs.” Without a game Tuesday, the win was big for the Tigers for playoff seeding. “Not only was it a conference win, but it was a sectional win since we don’t play Tuesday before the seeding,” DiForti said. mark@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

Real Estate & Business

dave says

Getting credit card companies to back off The more mailing lists you get on, the more your mailbox will fill up with junk mail Dear Dave, How can I get credit card companies to stop sending us preapproved offers? My wife continues to sign up for these, and now we have $40,000 in credit card debt. Dan Dear Dan, Chances are you’ll never get credit card companies to stop sending stuff, but there a few things you can do that might help slow things down. Access your credit bureau report, and opt out of marketing offers. You can also freeze your credit report, and send direct requests to the credit card companies to take you off their mailing lists. I’ve been telling people not to use credit cards for 20 years and, believe it or not, even I get offers in the mail. The

more mailing lists you get on, the more your mailbox will fill up with junk mail. If you have magazine subscriptions and things like that, your contact information is circulating all over the place. The next thing I’m going to say may sound cruel, but I really don’t mean it that way. You don’t have a junk mail problem, Dan. You have a relationship problem. You two are not on the same page about money. Either she doesn’t feel like you two have enough money, and she’s resorting to credit cards for this reason, or she does this because she’s a spoiled brat who thinks she should always have what she wants when she wants it.

>> CALENDAR, from page 4

Storytimes. 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Wednesdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Ages 3 to 6 years.

session we’ll have fun things to do like games, science, anime, manga, and crafts. For children 8-12. Registration is required. Contact the Children’s Services Department for more information. Preschool Playtime. 10:30 a.m. on Thursdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Brick Building Club. 4 p.m. on Thursdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Toddler times. 10:30 a.m. on Mondays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Ages 3 to 36 mos. Terrific Ts. 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Ages 2 to 3.

Pajama-Jam Family storytime. 6 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. All ages. Wear your pajamas. Family storytime. 7-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the Fountaindale Public Library. On Tuesday evenings, get the family together to hear stories and sing songs in the storytime room. TOPS (Take Pounds Off Sensibly), IL114 Romeoville, meets 5:15 p.m. Mondays at the Romeoville Police Department, 1050 W. Romeo Road. For more information, call 815-886-9252. Golden Age Club. Thursdays noon to 4 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Department. Members must be 50 years and up to join, and may do so

Her behavior is destroying your financial lives and driving a wedge between you. My advice would be to sit down and have a gentle, loving talk with her about all this. Try to find out why she feels the need to have all these credit cards, and explain that you’re worried about what it’s doing to your marriage and your finances. That may mean having to spend some time with a marriage counselor, but that’s okay, too. There’s no reason to be ashamed of something like that. The truth is, most of us who have been married more than 20 minutes could use a little help in that area of our lives! —Dave

Balance transfers don’t do much Dear Dave, I’m trying to pay off my credit card and get out of debt.

by coming to any Thursday meeting. Transportation is available by calling the Recreation Department at 815886-6222 at least 24 hours before the event. For more information about the club, call Noel Maldonado at the Recreation Center. Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit environmental organization is dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815-834-1611. Bolingbrook Machine Knitting Club. All skill levels are welcome to begin or further their knowledge of knitting with a machine. The group meets the last Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m. There is no charge to attend this group. They meet in the community room of Bolingbrook Fire Station 4, 1111 W. Boughton

You can also freeze your credit report, and send direct requests to the credit card companies to take you off their mailing lists.

Do you think I should transfer the balance to one with a lower interest rate while I do this? Kelsey Dear Kelsey, I’m not against this idea, as long as you understand that you’re not really accomplishing much. All you’re doing is moving money around, and maybe saving a tiny bit on interest. If you were planning on keeping the debt around for 30 years it would become a big deal. But if you’re talking about a few months, just until you get it paid off, it’s not that much money. The problem with balance transfers is that you feel like you took a big step forward when you really didn’t. Lots of times this causes people to lose focus on other things

they can do to get out of debt, like picking up an extra job or selling a bunch a crap they don’t want or need. That kind of stuff, along with living on rice and beans and a strict written budget, is 98 percent of the battle when it comes to getting out of debt! —Dave

Road. Please park on the West Side of the building. For more information, contact Rose at 630 739-2784 or Sharon at 630 471-9650.

enthusiasts are invited to attend. Meetings usually include a presentation and refreshments. VE testing is held prior to each meeting at 6:30 p.m. for those wishing to take any level of license exam. Candidates must bring a photo ID, any pending Certificates of Successful Completion, and the test fee of $15. For more information, visit www.k9bar.org.

Birth After Cesarean. Meet other moms who are planning their natural birth after cesarean section.Come for encouragement, support and information to plan your next birth. Meetings at noon the first Monday every month in Romeoville. Contact Melanie at 253-861-5897 or VBACesarean@ aol.com Are you affected by someone’s drinking? Open meetings are held every third Friday of the month from 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. Contact Al-anon/ Alateen at 815-773-9623 or visit www.niafg.org for more information. BolingbrookAmateur Radio Society. The Bolingbrook Amateur Radio Society meets on the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Fire Station #5, 1900 W. Rodeo Drive in Bolingbrook. All ham radio

*Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Ramsey on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.

Fly tying. 7-8:30 p.m. at Outdoor World, 709 Janes Ave., Bolingbrook. Join master fly tier Bob Davenport in the Fly Fishing Department for some great tips on fly tying and to answer any questions or concerns you may have. For more information, call the store at 630-296-2700. Employment. Will County Workforce Services host its free weekly Career Café for job seekers at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday in Room 519 of the JJC Renaissance Center, 214 N. Ottawa St., Joliet. Reserve a spot by calling 815-727-4444, Ext. 122, or emailing bwashington@ willcountyillinois.com.


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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1040 MONTEGO BAY COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 604464140 (FRAME TOWNHOUSE ATTACHED 2 CAR). On the 20th day of March, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff V. NATHAN L. MASON Defendant.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 405 Garland Avenue Romeoville, Illinois 60446 (SIngle Family). On the 6th day of March, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Nationstar Mortgage LLC Plaintiff V. Juan F. Gonzalez Jr. aka Juan Francisco J. Gonzalez Jr.; Bertha Alicia Gonzalez M.; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendant.

Case No. 10 CH 5030 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Case No. 12 CH 5384 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 203,280.63 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact:

PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax)

Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg, LLC Att: Mr. Anthony Porto 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (Fax) For bidding instructions visit: www.fal-illinois.com

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published 2/20, 2/27, 3/6

Published 2/6, 2/13, 2/20

For Information Please Contact:


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Nationstar Mortgage LLC Plaintiff, vs. Juan F. Gonzalez Jr. aka Juan Francisco J. Gonzalez Jr.; Bertha Alicia Gonzalez M.; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendant. No. 12 CH 5384 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 23rd day of January, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 6th day of March, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 19 IN BLOCK 9, IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF SECTION 33, AND THE WEST 1/2 OF SECTION 34, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 3, 1959, IN PLAT BOOK 31 PAGES 55 AND 56, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 872683, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 405 Garland Avenue Romeoville, Illinois 60446 Description of Improvements: SIngle Family P.I.N.: 02-33-408-019-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg, LLC Att: Mr. Anthony Porto 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (Fax) For bidding instructions visit: www.falillinois.com PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/6, 2/13, 2/20

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. NATHAN L. MASON Defendant. No. 10 CH 5030 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 21st day of February, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 20th day of March, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: PARCEL 1: UNIT M3001 IN THE LANDINGS AT MALIBU BAY CONDOMINIUM, AS DELINEATED ON A PLAT OF SURVEY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND: CERTAIN LOTS IN MALIBU BAY TOWNHOMES, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, (P.U.D.), BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF ALL OF LOT 190, IN MALIBU BAY SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JULY 2, 1999 AS DOCUMENT R1999-83523, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS, WHICH PLAT OF SURVEY IS ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT “A” TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED MAY 31, 2000 AS DOCUMENT R2000057273, AND AS AMENDED BY AMENDMENT TO THE DECLARATION RECORDED JUNE 28, 2001 AS DOCUMENT R2001082885 AND AS AMENDED FROM TIME TO TIME; TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS. PARCEL 2: A PERPETUAL EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS PURPOSES FOR THE BENEFIT OF PARCEL I, OVER AND ACROSS LOT 40, IN MALIBU BAY Commonly known as: 1040 MONTEGO BAY COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 604464140 Description of Improvements: FRAME TOWNHOUSE ATTACHED 2 CAR P.I.N.: 11-04-05-215-040-1 001 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 203,280.63 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/20, 2/27, 3/6


Seniors retire smart

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Tax season is here: tax prep time Child and Dependent Care Credit

160 million wage-earning American have already seen an increase in their taxes: employees’ contributions to the Social Security program By Jill Schlesinger Tribune Content Agency

The 2013 tax filing season opened on January 31st, a little later than usual, due to the government shutdown. For a few years, things were status quo with the tax code, but Congress' Fiscal Cliff deal of January 1, 2013 introduced some big changes and extended some valuable credits, including: Social Security (FICA) taxes: 160 million wage-earning American have already seen an increase in their taxes: employees' contributions to the Social Security program returned to the pre-recession level of 6.2 percent, from 4.2 percent, on earnings up to $113,700 in 2013.

New tax brackets Individuals who earn more than $400,000 and couples who make more than $450,000 are now in the 39.6 percent tax bracket, their capital gains and dividends increased to 20 percent from 15 percent and the Affordable Care Act levied an additional "net investment income tax" of 3.8 percent on capital gains. Reinstated Phaseouts The Personal Exemption Phaseout (PEP) and the itemized deduction limits were reinstated for single taxpayers who earn $250,000 and $300,000 for joint filers. These rules are meant to reduce or eliminate the value of personal exemptions for taxpayers earning more than the

income threshold. The effect of the reinstatement of the limits amounts increases taxes by just over 1 percent to the top tax rate as well as on capital gains rates.

"patch" that would allow millions to escape AMT. Without it, the AMT would have hit 31 million taxpayers this year, reaching deeply into the middle class.

Alternative Minimum Tax

The Child Tax Credit

AMT was created in 1969 to ensure that wealthy taxpayers pay at least some minimum amount of federal income tax, regardless of deductions, credits or exemptions. In essence, it is a flat tax with two brackets, 26 percent and 28 percent. Congress created a permanent inflation

Up to $1,000 for each qualifying child who was under the age of 17 at the end of 2013.This credit can be claimed in addition to the credit for child and dependent care expenses, but phases out for married couples earning over $110,000 ($75,000 for singles). (IRS Publication 972.)

Available if you pay someone to care for your dependent that is under age 13, so that you can work or look for a job.The credit is 20 to 35 percent of your childcare expenses up to $6,000 - the size of your credit depends on your income. (IRS Publication 503.)

Earned Income Tax Credit A refundable credit for married couples with 2013 earned income under $51,567 and singles who made less than $46,227. The more children you have, the more money you receive.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 20, 2014

Romeoville 02-20-14  

Romeoville 02-20-14

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