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INSIDE

SPORTS Vostry places third at state bowling meet PAGE 11

www.romeovillebugle.com

NEWS CSC offers new housing programs PAGE 4

Our Community, Our News

FEBRUARY 6, 2014

Vol. 8 No. 31

ScHoolS

Parents review child sexual abuse awareness program by laura KatausKas Staff reporter Long considered a headache, proposed changes for I-55 and Weber Road have been in discussion for years and now Phase 1 of a study to redirect traffic is nearly complete with plans for specific improvement to decrease delays by 60 percent underway.

>> See direction | page 5

Valley View School District to implement state-mandated program By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

One in four girls and one in six boys endure child sexual abuse prior to their 18th birthday. Ninety percent of abusers are people that the victims know and trust. These chilling facts point to the >> See progr a m | page 3


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 6, 2014


News

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 6, 2014

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>> program, from page 1 reasoning behind a new statemandated child sexual abuse awareness program for students in pre-school through fifth grade that Valley View School District 365u will begin to implement this week. Parents in two, standing room-only forums sponsored by Valley View, came to hear what the program would entail, some concerned over the content, the majority applauding the program that aims to teach children the importance of speaking up. “We all need to be voices for the voiceless,” Valley View Community Outreach Coordinator Michele Bochnak told the gatherings. Required by new legislation known as“Erin’s Law”the district will provide age-appropriate 45-minute sessions in every preK-5 classroom in the district provided by experts from Guardian Angel Community Services, as well as training for Valley View staff members. The program has begun based on the beliefs of Erin Merryn that emphasizes while society teaches children on bullying intervention, stranger danger, internet safety and drug abuse, it fails to give them a voice if someone is violating them and that the violation continues because of silence. Parents were given an overview by representatives of Guardian Angel, of the program that will be taught to their children in the district. “We went to the experts who advocate for children everyday,” said Bochnak.“It is so important

Submitted Photo

Parents pack the Valley View Administration Building to hear about Valley View School District’s new child sexual abuse awareness program.

that you know the facts given to the staff and that parents are aware of what is being presented to their students. It is our hope that students will feel comfortable to talk to a trusted adult.” Erin Gilmartin, prevention coordinator, pointed out victims rarely come forward and that predators prey on those with low self-esteem and those that have difficulty communicating. One parent questioned bringing up this information with students at too young of an age, wondering if they could handle it. “Children can walk around their entire life with a wellkept secret because they don’t want to talk about it and they are threatened to keep it a secret,” said Gilmartin. “Why are we doing this (the program) because the best way to stop it is to talk about it. We need to teach them that their body belongs to them.” Further disturbing and

telling said Gilmartin is that the majority of predators are people the children know and trust. Own family members may not believe the child if they come forward, possibly placing blame and adding to the child’s shame. One of the most important messages to get across to children is that they can say,“no,” to an adult and that if touches make them feel uncomfortable it is not their fault. Within the programs students will learn the difference between safe and unsafe touches—for instance out of necessity at the doctors’ office or for parents giving a small child a bath. They will be told the difference between safe and unsafe secrets. Safe secrets do not hurt anyone or make them feel bad. Unsafe secrets do and if someone asks them to keep a secret about an unsafe look or touch—the message is do not do it. Presenters also will talk to

the children about ways to say no, how to find a trusted adult and keep telling. Among the questions parents asked: Why is this program just for grades Pre K-5? (Valley View is looking into how to handle similar discussions in grades 6-12. However, 6th graders do begin talking about abuse in health class.) How are the in-school sessions being conducted? (In small ageappropriate groups.) Will boys and girls be separated? (Generally, no. But Valley View officials will take another look at this.) Are teachers and aides being trained? (Yes. All staff is being trained to be alert for physical and emotional indications of child sexual abuse.) Will the children be asked for any type of feedback? (Yes, in 5th grade.) What about the children whose parents elect not to have them go through the training?

(It is the right of any parent to opt their child out of the sessions. Special provisions will be made for those children who do not participate.) Is the awareness program a one-time thing? (No, this will take place every year.) Will sessions with children not fluent in English be conducted in Spanish? (Yes) Special needs children will need extra help in understanding. (Yes, and teachers and principals will be available to reinforce what is said. Also, children with special needs will be grouped by ability, not age.) Gilmartin said Guardian Angels have been doing the program for some time and have rarely had a victim come forward during one of these sessions, but have had others seek out guidance at a later time. “This issue affects so many and I believe it will be so powerful to have this program in the schools so that we can bring attention to it, they can hear it and they will know they have someone to come to if they need it. It is so important for them to be heard.” Information on Valley View’s Erin’s Law program is available by contacting Bochnak at 815886-2700, Ext. 297. In addition, a Stewards of Children Workshop, sponsored by Valley View and Advocate’s Childhood Trauma Treatment Program will be held from 6 to 8:30 p.m. March 28 at the Valley View School District Administration Center, 755 Dalhart Ave., Romeoville.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 6, 2014

News local

Community Service Council offers new housing programs Money Smart week kicks off April 5 By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Backed by grant money and a desire to educate residents on home ownership, the Community Service Council of Northern Will County is embarking on a few new upcoming programs. The CSC has announced a series of homebuyer expos to bring information and resources to the public regarding buying a home. A total of three events have been announced for February, March, and April. These events are free to the public and will include information on the “Your Home” pre-purchase counseling program offered at CSC. Additionally, representatives from lenders, Realtors, and other real estate professionals will be in attendance. Money Smart week kicks off April 5. In cooperation with BMO Harris Bank and the Fountaindale Public Library, CSC will host a series of events each evening that week focused on being prepared to buy a home. The CSC also received a $60,000 grant from the Federal Home Loan Bank to provide down payment assistance for low-income homebuyers. The

grant application was submitted in partnership with BMO Harris, one of the Federal Home Loan Banks member organizations. “Our goal at CSC with our “Your Home” program is to educate home buyers to be home owners,” said Executive Director Robert Kalnicky. “We are trying to help people avoid the pitfalls that caused the foreclosure crisis. Through education and some down payment assistance we are looking to help people become homeowners. The new “Your Home” counseling program is aimed at educating potential homeowners on budget, credit repair, and home ownership skills. This grant award will provide down payment assistance of $6,000 per client for a total of 10 homebuyers who have completed the “Your Home” program at CSC. Applicants must be low income and in a position to qualify for a mortgage with BMO Harris. A CSC Housing Counselor will be able to help determine if you qualify for this program. For more information, call 815886-5000. The CSC was founded in 1973 as a social service agency to serve residents of Bolingbrook, Romeoville and surrounding communities. CSC was incorporated as a 501c3 non-profit agency in 1978 and

- February 22nd, 10 a.m. to Noon, Plainfield Village Hall, 24401 Lockport St. Plainfield - March 8, 10 a.m. to Noon, Romeoville Recreation Center, 900 W. Romeo Road, Romeoville - April 5, 10 a.m. to Noon, Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook

its main office is located at 440 Quadrangle Drive, Suite C. In addition to offering housing assistance, services for family and marital counseling are provided by licensed professional counselors on an affordable fee schedule. The staff of 16 is experienced in a full range of counseling, such as marital, depression, divorce, parent-child relations, blended marriage concerns, and other problems at a fraction of the cost. The agency offers Anger Management groups for both adults and teens and a court-approved Domestic Violence program. Licensed CADC counselors conduct DUI evaluations and drug assessments. For additional information visit the CSC at their website at www.thecsc.org.

news briefs ComEd construction ComEd will be working on the towers on the North side of Belmont Drive, between Beverly J. Griffin Drive and Montrose Drive in Romeoville beginning Jan. 29 through March 7.

Support the Troops Care Package Drive Organized by the Knights of Columbus Bishop L. Kaffer Assembly #3232, the drive will be held through Feb. 2. Items can be

dropped off at Romeoville Village Hall, Romeoville Recreation Center, Fire Station No. 1 and at St. Andrew the Apostle Church. Items our troops need are: General Hygiene Items, insect repellent, eye drops, men’s and women’s deodorant, shampoo, toothpaste, razors, chap stick, wet wipes. Also needed are canned food items such as soup, tuna, chili, ravioli, stew, dried fruits and nuts, ground coffee, pre-sweetened powdered drink mixes, beef jerky, beef sticks, batteries, cookies, granola

bars, protein bars, gloves, hand warmers, stamps, work or tube socks, white or tan t-shirts. Hand made items are welcome such as scarves, no-sew fleece blankets and quilts. Each box costs $12.35 just for shipping of a single care package, so donations for postage are needed as well. All donations are tax deductible.To have a package sent to a specific service man or woman serving overseas, or for more information on how you can help, please contact Dan at 815-886-6623.


News WILL COUNTY

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Local dentists offer free dental care “Give Kids a Smile” program is designed to provide free dental services to children in need By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Local dentists are teaming up to offer free dental care and help kids share the smile they deserve. A national program started by the American Dental Association, the “Give Kids a Smile” program is designed to provide free dental services to children in need. Children of Will County, kindergarten through 5th grade, who cannot otherwise afford dental care, may receive free dental care at participating volunteer dental offices. “Proper dental care throughout your life is so important,” said Janna Penhale of Associated Orthodontics. “Kids suffer with cavities, gingivitis and other painful ailments that can be avoided with proper dental care. Every child, regardless of income, should have the opportunity to go to a dentist and maintain a healthy smile. This program allows the dentists of Will County to give back to their community and offer this service to those who are in need.” Seven dentists throughout Will County are participating in the program and will do as much work as they can in a one-hour appointment time, including cleanings, fillings, etc. For more information or to sign up for the program, contact Maureen at the Will County Dental Society at (815) 901-

appointment opportunities Feb. 1, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. - Carillon Family Dental 450 N. Weber Road, RomeovillE Feb. 7, 12:30 to 3 p.m. Gianno Dental 15724 S. Route 59, Plainfield Feb. 7, 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. - Zale, Foster and Ruginis 856 N. State Street, Lockport Feb. 7, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thomas Streitz, D.D.S. 1711 Campbell Street, Joliet Feb. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Valley View Dental 441 N. Weber Road, Romeoville ALL Feb., by Appt. Plainfield Pediatric Dentistry 24023 W. Lockport St., Plainfield Throughout Feb., by Appt. Zale Family Dentistry 2081 Calistoga Drive, New Lenox

3436. A registration form must be completed and an appointment must be made. The following dentists are participating in the program. The American Dental Association began the Give Kids A Smile program in 2003 as a way for dentists to join with others in the community to provide dental services to underserved children. The program initially began as a one-day event in February, but has since grown to local and national events yearround.

>> DIRECTION, from page 1

The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) is conducting the project. Representatives from Will County, the Village of Bolingbrook, and the Village of Romeoville have been invited to take part in the stakeholder involvement process on this section of road that sees 150,000 vehicles per day. The study area encompasses two miles of Weber Road starting at 119th Street continuing south past and including the I-55 interchange to 135th Street. Bolingbrook Mayor Roger Claar said decisions regarding the Weber Road bridge interchange should begin soon based on the last successful public hearing held late last year. IDOT has since awarded $10 million in contracts for the next phase of the project which entails preparation of the contract plans to small and minority businesses, Knight E/A, Inc. and Thomas Engineering Group. The total construction cost for the I-55 and Weber Road improvement project is estimated at $97 million. “When and if funding becomes available, construction might begin on the bridge along with the widening of Weber Road from 115th Street in Bolingbrook, south to 135th Street in Romeoville. State Rep.Natalie Manley,D-Joliet, recently passed a bill aiming to

cut some of the red tape holding back the proposed Interstate 55 and Weber Road Interchange and is continually advocating to move the project forward. According to IDOT plans, Phase 1 of the study determined an alternative to the current traffic pattern,showing a reconfiguration of the interchange at I-55 to a Diverging Diamond Interchange (DDI) that will be designed to improve operations, capacity and safety. It is anticipated that this new innovative interchange will reduce congestion by providing free-flow turning movements onto the freeway (both left and right-turns). It improves safety by eliminating left-turn movement conflicts. Capacity could be increased by as much as 20 percent and delay decreased by as much as 60 percent. Plans show when driving the Diverging Diamond Interchange that when approaching the traffic signal, Weber Road will curve to the left. Cars will be guided through the intersection and crossed to the left side of the road with opposing traffic on the right side. Entering onto I-55 will be a “free flow” left turn, meaning no need to stop. Through traffic will pass the next signal and shift back to the right side. Opposing traffic will now be on the left side.Traffic exiting I-55 will be controlled with a traffic signal. Left-turns onto Weber Road will be similar to

turning left onto a one-way street. Right turns to and from Weber Road and the I-55 ramp in either direction will be similar to the exiting interchange. IDOT reports that the interchange provides access to a fast growing area that has doubled in population over the past 20 years, supporting Bolingbrook and Romeoville employment trends in freight transportationdependent sectors accounting for approximately 24 to 28 percent of all jobs in each community. “The construction and the widening will be a terrible inconvenience since there aren’t any good alternative roads during construction but we hope to see construction in three years and be driving it in five years,” said Claar. Phase II engineering, land acquisition, construction and engineering for this project is included in IDOT’s fiscal year 20142019 Multi-Modal Transportation Improvement Program but is contingent upon the sale of approximately 200 acres of unused property currently owned by the Illinois Department of Corrections. Former state representative Brent Hassert worked to outline that the sale proceeds of the vacant Statesville property be used to fund the project. The sale of the property has yet to materialize.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 6, 2014

Police Blotter

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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A residential burglary, burglary to motor vehicle and a criminal damage to property was reported in the 200 block of Hemlock at 12:56 p.m. Jan. 18. Unknown person(s) damaged a window and door of the residence. They also took televisions, laptops, game consoles, clothing, tools, car stereo amplifier, credit cards, video games, a radio and several pieces of jewelry. A vehicle at the residence was also ransacked. Estimated value of the items taken and cost to repair damages is $9,601.

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Leticia Nuno-Robles, 38, 417 Haller, was arrested at 2:23 p.m. Jan. 20 and charged with retail theft on the 200 block of S. Weber Road.

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Sean Griffin, 42, 810 Black Road, Joliet, was arrested at 9:43 p.m. Jan. 22 and charged with driving with a suspended license and disobeying a traffic sign near Wesglen Parkway and Arborwood Circle.

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Tracy Westerfield, 19, 22308 W. Odessa Court, Plainfield, was arrested at 1:25 a.m. Jan. 24 and charged with driving with a suspended license, driving without lights near Weslake Parkway east of Budler Road.

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Jonathan Nuckles, 22, 118 Gardner St., Elwood, was arrested at 3:24 a.m. Jan. 25 and charged with DUI, driving with a suspended license and illegal transport of alcohol and possession of cannabis on Route 53 north of Renwick Road.

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Joshua Robinson, 30, 32 Wilson Ave., Joliet, was arrested at 5:59 p.m. Jan. 25 and charged with driving with a suspended license and a failure to reduce speed near Weber and Renwick Roads.

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Francisco Reyes-Benito,32, 3212 S. Kedvale, Chicago, was arrested at 5:53 a.m. Jan. 26 and charged with no valid

driver’s license, no insurance, and too fast for conditions near Route 53 and Murphy Drive.

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Michael Wilson, 52, 12601 S. 104th Ave., Palos Park, was arrested at 9:41 a.m. Jan. 26

and charged with driving with a revoked license and speeding near Romeo Road and Poplar Avenue.

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Bernal Fox, 39, 34 N. Broadway, Joliet, was

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arrested at 6:41 a.m. Jan. 27 and charged with no valid driver’s license and failure to reduce speed near Route 53 and Airport Road.

Pedro HernandezAlvarado, 44, 3037 S. Trumbull, Chicago, was arrested at 6:36 p.m. Jan. 29 and charged with no valid driver’s license and disobey a traffic signal near Route 53 and Joliet Road.

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ForuM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

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GUEST colUMn

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 6, 2014

OUR HOUSE

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WitH rep. natalie manley (d-Joliet) 98tH diStrict

Manley shares some lessons WeB learned as freshman legislator LinKs

On Jan. 9, 2013, I was sworn in shortage of financial experts seated Have a question or comment about this column? as the state Representative of the in the General Assembly… and it Feel free to send us an email at 98th House District. I was one shows. We may not be an exciting nmanley@buglenewspapers.com of large group of new, bunch, but have a skill incoming freshmen that set that Illinois needs took the oath of office desperately. the truth. that day. In the blink of F r e q u e n t l y, One day, a well-respected an eye a year has gone legislation starts off local businessman and I had by, and as I reflect on as an idea, a story, or an impromptu conversation as what has transpired, I a thought in passing we found ourselves ushered think about some of that someone shares into the basement of a banquet the things I learned. as you talk to them hall while tornado sirens were These are some of my at their door or at a sounding above. After sharing observations. There are Rep. Natalie Manley town hall meeting. some concerns with the state, he plenty more that I will (D-Joliet) 98th The legislator is the reassured me, “Just do the right share over time, but for District messenger. Several thing, and everything will work now, here are just a few – in no bills I carried, now law, came from out OK.” I was surprised, though particular order: people right here in Will County. that has always been my modus People don’t differ along party Springfield is an unusual place. operandi, that hearing it from lines as often as they do by region. It is chaotic, it’s loud, and it’s someone else would leave such Wait a minute … I thought all not Will County. In an effort to an impression. the Democrats and Republicans remain grounded and connected Compromise and bipartisanship are warring factions and literally to real life, I often make phone are how things get done. While spend all day screaming and calls to constituents while I’m in in many ways, Springfield is yelling at each other? Turns out Springfield. So, don’t be surprised gridlocked, it has not been my the “D” or the “R” matters less than if I call you. experience in every situation. the longitude and latitude of your Being a legislator is a full-time Some of my bills were chief district. job, that is, if you want to represent co-sponsored by Republicans That being said, the Democrats your constituents properly. I because it was an important and and Republicans vote unanimously spend half the year in Springfield positive piece of legislation for on many pieces of legislation. and the other half getting to know Illinois. It helps, if you leave your Turns out that our constituents the people in the district, and ego at the door and do things for have a lot of the same needs. understanding their issues. Any the right reasons (see #8). Accountants look at things legislator that has ever said this Government can work. I’ve differently from other people. is a part time job … wasn’t doing seen it. It isn’t always pretty, but if There are a lot of lawyers in the their job. you try hard, and do things for the General Assembly, and though Truth and transparency are right reason, you can really help they are great at dissecting laws paramount. That is what people people… and that’s what this job and mincing words, not all of want, but sometimes they get mad is all about. them understand how numbers when you tell them what they Next time: My thoughts on the work. Accountants do. We have a don’t want to hear… even if it is State of the State Address.

illustrated opinions


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 6, 2014


Take 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 One who’s always on the go? 6 Pear that’s good for poaching 10 Glass sheet 14 Superior to 15 Member of the opposition 16 One on a pedestal 17 Pick-me-up 18 Governor’s pet projects? 20 Like one who forgot the Dramamine 22 Exposed 23 Nutritionist’s recommendation 25 Causes to quail 29 Utensil that gives you ideas? 32 Take to task 34 Cock or bull 35 Blues-rocker Chris 36 Clothes 37 Alex Haley classic 39 Abarth automaker 40 Coffee hour item 41 Talent 42 Precipitation

Down 43 Bully’s secret shame? 47 Day spa offering 48 First name in fashion 49 Pundit’s piece 51 Olympic Airways founder 56 Say “Come in, Orson!” e.g.? 60 Empty room population? 61 Poetic lowland 62 Iroquoian people 63 Compass direcci-n 64 Rep on the street 65 “Law & Order” org. 66 Composer Bruckner

1 Expos, since 2005 2 High wind 3 Pulitzer poet Van Duyn 4 Budget alternative 5 Ruled 6 Hoops score 7 London’s prov. 8 Shot in the dark 9 Fortresses 10 Find one’s voice 11 Stir 12 Eur. kingdom 13 Antlered bugler 19 Take out 21 “Charlie Wilson’s War” org. 24 Recipient of two New Testament epistles 26 Without a downside 27 Pet’s reward 28 Use the rink 29 After-dinner drink 30 Jekyll creator’s initials 31 Distillery vessel 32 Things 33 Chick of jazz 37 Winchester wielders 38 Frequently, in

verse 39 Hardy’s “__ From the Madding Crowd” 41 Freak out 42 Liturgical shout of praise 44 Was revolting? 45 Brought to mind 46 Place for a widescreen TV 50 Fishing boat 52 In short order 53 Spreadsheet function 54 Liking quite a bit 55 Not hidden 56 Home shopping channel 57 Nasser’s confed. 58 Cry for a picador 59 Fashionable jeans feature

Tribune Content Agency 2014

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 6, 2014

Horoscopes Feel free to explore new age ideas or to follow technological progress, but don’t go out of your way to shock people or try to change their minds this week. A sterling example could set the stage, so the world may change for the better.

T e m p o r a r y unpleasantness can trigger tensions with others. Trouble may plague new endeavors, so try not to put crucial plans into motion during the week ahead. You’ll be able to appear carefree even in the worst situations.

Past experiences don’t deserve to be repeated. Focus on improving the future rather than dwelling on hurts and transgressions this week. Spend a little extra to get the best quality and you’ll be glad you did.

Even if the upcoming week is not very good for making changes or starting anything new, you may have ample opportunity to impress people with your personal charm and knowledge. Keep on doing whatever you do best.

You could be too busy bailing out the boat to see the whirlpool ahead. Things can easily pile up in the week ahead, so it’s important to be organized and efficient. Don’t be distracted by one problem to the point that you overlook others.

Keep your options open. Don’t ignore opportunities that appear put of the blue this week, but don’t spring into action right way. Delay taking the first official step for a few weeks if something quite acceptable comes along,

Sweeping changes may take center stage in the week ahead. People may do and say things unexpectedly, without asking your advice or giving advance notice of their attention. Cultivate a sense of humor to adapt to unstable conditions.

Bias and control issues could cause you problems in the week ahead. Make it a top priority to do your job to the best of your ability, avoid controversy and honor your commitments, but don’t initiate anything new.

Situations might evolve into a series of minor foulups that dominate your routine. This is a particularly poor week to make irrevocable decisions about financial matters. Remain flexible about entertainment plans.

The path may be rocky, but not everything is set in stone. Keep an observant eye on alterations outside your control that you may turn to your advantage in the future. Hold off on new business starts or contracts this week.

Stick to your guns without shooting off your mouth. Refuse to jump to conclusions, but at the same time refuse to offend anyone, and things will work out to your advantage. Remain attentive to obligations this week.

You may get your fair share of publicity in the week to come. Use it to your advantage by networking or advertising your skills or talents. Put off the beginning of major undertakings until conditions are better suited for success.

Sudoku

Jumble

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • WEARY • TWEET • ASTHMA • EXTENT

Answer: A good electrician knows this -- WHAT’S WATT

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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 6, 2014


INSIDE: Rydberg finishes second in the nation, page 12; Spartan wrestlers building with young wrestlers, page 13

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 6, 2014

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Vostry places third at state meet By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Dakota Vostry completed his high school career Saturday at St. Clair Bowl in O’Fallon by confirming his legacy as one of the most successful athletes in recent school history. The senior placed third in the state with a 2,841 total over 12 games, good for a 236.8 average and All-State honors, which went to the top 12 bowlers. “Overall I’m really happy with how I bowled this weekend,” Vostry said. “Third place is fine with me. I just wish my team could have come down with me.” Lincoln-Way West’s Josh Glover won with a 2,967, while Jacobs’ Brandon Biondo was second with a 2,878. Vostry was consistent throughout the tournament, breaking the 200 mark every game, which helped him work his way up the leaderboard. “I just focused on hitting my mark,” Vostry said. “I had a little bit of room on the lane, I was just hoping to kick the 10-pin out once in a while. I had to stay within myself. I couldn’t get my emotions all worked up this weekend. I did that and stayed consistent with my arm swing.”

He opened the tournament Friday in the middle of the pack with games of 216, 233 and 226 for a 675 series. However, he lit it up in the afternoon with games of 249, 278 and 225 for a 752 series and a 1,427 total, good for fourth after the first day. His second day started with games of 237, 275 and 221 for a 733 morning series and added games of 247, 222 and 211 in the afternoon for a 681 series. Vostry finishes his career as a three-time state qualifier (twice as a team) and an All-State bowler. “These past four years have been a blast,” Vostry said. “I made it down to state three of four years. We won a conference and a regional title.We took second at sectionals two years. Bowling at Romeoville has been fun the past four years.” Despite the impressive state performances, he will remember the sectional his freshman year the most. “My freshman year of sectionals, those last two games was my favorite part of my high school career,” Vostry stated. “We came back from 300 pins down in those final two games to make it down to state.That was pretty cool.” • Bolingbrook sat in third place after the morning session Friday

at the state meet at St. Clair Bowl in O’Fallon and were in prime position to challenge the leaders. However, the Raiders struggled in the afternoon and finished the day in unlucky 13th place with a 6,073 total. The top 12 schools advanced to Saturday. The Raiders were still represented Saturday as senior Eric Kramer was one of the top 30 individuals not on qualifying teams after he rolled a 1,296. Kramer was consistent throughout the first day, throwing a 676 in the morning and a 620 in the afternoon. On Saturday Kramer shot a 641 in the morning and through a 648 in the afternoon, fueled by a 279, for a 2,585 total, good for 27th overall. “It was just about being consistent and picking up spares,” Kramer said. “I left a lot of 10pins and I only missed one. I am pretty proud because I’m a senior and to make it that far is an accomplishment for me. I was hoping to stick with the team the whole time. While that didn’t happen, they all came out and supported me Saturday.” As a team the Raiders put up >> see THIRD | page 16

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Romeoville’s Dakota Vostry placed third in the state.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 6, 2014

Sports

Valley View’s Rydberg places second in nation By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Valley View School District and Plainfield resident Paige Rydberg has had a good deal of success in recent years. But the 14-year old took things to the next level Jan. 5-6 when she placed second in the Novice Ladies Division in the U.S. Figure Skating Championships in Boston, MA. It was her second time

competing in the national championships and her best finish after taking fifth last year. Her experience last year helped her this time around. “I moved up a level and definitely had a better year overall,” Rydberg said. “This year was a little harder, but it was fun to watch all the others skate. Last year’s experience definitely did help.” “It absolutely helped,”Rydberg’s

coach, Mary Alice Antensteiner said. “She got taller and was physically and mentally much more in control this year.” Rydberg was in first place after the short program with a score of 45.16. In the long program she was third with 80.50 points for a total of 125.66. Vivian Le of Dallas won with a 138.06 total. “I was in the lead after the short >> see RYDBERG | page 16

Submitted Photo

Valley View’s Paige Rydberg placed second in the nation in the Novice Ladies Division at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships.


Sports

Young Spartans learning lessons By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

While Romeoville is in the midst of a rebuilding season, the Spartans are growing each and every match. That was on display again Saturday at the Southwest Prairie Conference meet at Oswego High School. The Spartans only had one medalist on the day and that came in the form of sophomore Dan Carreno at 160 pounds. Carreno defeated Minooka’s Armani Zuniga 7-5 in the thirdplace match to earn the medal. “Dan Carreno did a good job,” said Romeoville coach Bill Normand. “He hurt his ankle in the first match and wrestled back all the way.” Carreno almost battled back within the match after falling behind early. “I had a slip in the first round,” he said.“I let a guy get five points on me in the first period and I couldn’t come back from that. I >> see YOUNG | page 15

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Romeoville’s Dan Careno slams Armani Zuniga in the third-place match at the SPC meet.

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Sports >> YOUNG, from page 13 knew I would have to work hard to come back and I am proud of myself and did it. I really took that loss to heart and I did it, I came back.” Carreno knows wrestling is not all about size, speed and strength. “You have to have mental toughness,” Carreno said. “Coach always told me that wrestling is 50 percent physical and 50 percent mental, but I think it leans more toward mental.” Normand was proud of how he came back. “It is great for his mental approach and that is another great lesson he learned as a sophomore,” he said. The Spartans also placed junior Evan Stingily in the thirdplace match, but he fell 4-3 to Minooka’s Josh Bouie. Earlier in the tournament, he fell to Plainfield East’s Jake Mayon via pin in the final seconds of the match.

“I lost to two guys I could have beat,” Stingily said.“But I will see them again and I just have to come out more aggressive next time. Everyone I lost to, I will see in regionals and sectional. I know what I need to work on for next week.” Normand has confidence Stingily can bounce back. “Evan Stingily wrestled his heart out.That is a tough bracket,” he said. “They were lessons learned. He had a couple of takedowns at the end of periods in both of his losses and if we clean that up, we will be fine.” The Spartans also had two other wrestlers earn a win in the tournament, as Pacholo Jubas (126) won his first match, while Damian Vasquez won in the wrestlebacks after losing in the opening match. As a team, Romeoville was eighth out of the eight teams with 27 points. Plainfield South won the SPC with, while Plainfield Central had 148.

Minooka placed third with 128,while Plainfield East was fourth with 126.5 and Oswego was fifth 112.5. Oswego East (60) was sixth and Plainfield North (50.5) seventh. “This is a really, really, really tough conference,” Normand said. “I was telling one of my assistants that I have been around 10 years and this is the toughest I have seen it all the way through. We have a lot of sophomores and juniors in their first year of varsity experience and they are out there competing. They are not winning yet, but they are competing.”

GIRLS BOWLING The Spartans finished in sixth place overall in the SPC with 24 points. Minooka won with 104. Romeoville shot a 4,884 on the day at the tournament and were paced by Jenny Zaremba (1,056), Kaitlyn Maquera (1,034) and Erin Cosner (1,005). mark@buglenewspapers.com

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>> THIRD, from page 11 games of 1,072, 1,142 and 1,063 for a 3,277 total to put themselves in third place. An afternoon injury to senior Matt Rycraft,who won the regional individual title, led the team at the >> RYDBERG, from page 12 program, but that doesn’t mean much,” Rydberg said. “It definitely helps though. There were some

Sports

sectional and had a team-best 698 score in the morning, seemed to get Bolingbrook off its game as it could only shoot scores of 943, 903 and 950 in the afternoon. “I thought we were looking good in practice for the afternoon,” Kramer said. “Then we missed a

couple spares early and Rycraft slipped on the approach and got hurt. From there, the chemistry started going down. Me and Gio (Montecinos) tried to keep the guys heads up. We were all pretty down about it. I wouldn’t rather go out there with any other team.

They are my team. It was a fun time.” Losing Rycraft was a big loss, but the Raiders were in a position to overcome the adversity, but couldn’t get over the hump. “There’s no excuses to drop all the way to 13th,” Kramer said.

“That’s why they call it a team.We shouldn’t drop 10 places because of one bowler, that is why it is a team sport. If one guy goes down, we have to pick him up.” Montecinos shot a 1,248 and Matt Strzechowski added a 1,218 in six games Friday.

more nerves and more and less pressure, because I did have a little advantage. “I did everything clean and I didn’t make any mistakes. I had to

more triple jumps this year, but I have been doing them all season.” “She did fantastic,”Antensteiner said. “She was all business from the moment we walked in. Her

practices were flawless. She had two great programs and it was a huge accomplishment.” There are no more competitions until the summer from Rydberg, but she will be traveling for ice shows in New York and Wyoming. When she does return to the ice, she will be moving up a class once again, this time to the junior division, for likely the next two years. “I am working on some new, harder jumps,” she said. “I want to do the same thing as this year and keep consistent and get good scores. I have two years of juniors, so this year will help for next year.” While in her break time, Ryberg will focus on the skating at the Winter Olympics.

While in her break time, Ryberg will focus on the skating at the Winter Olympics. “I will be rooting for everyone,” Rydberg said.“They are all so good, I will be watching and seeing the jumps they do.” Antensteiner believes people could be watching Rydberg in the Olympics in either four or eight years. “It is every skater’s dreams,” Antensteiner said. “I don’t know if she will be ready for the next Olympics. She’s halfway there and her performance this year put her in a good spot.” Rydberg will be honored for accomplishments by Valley View on Feb. 10. Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@buglenewspapers.com


buglenewspapers.com/basketball

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Bengals rally in fourth, top Cougars By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

It was a tough weekend for the Plainfield South boys basketball team and a conversely great one for Plainfield East. After being atop the Southwest Prairie Conference for a few weeks, the Cougars dropped a pair of games to in-town rivals, including a 60-57 loss Saturday at Plainfield East, which saw the Bengals rally back from double digits in the fourth quarter. The Bengals now sit at 7-2 in league play and are atop the SPC. South is 6-3 and one game back. “I give South a lot of credit, they had a tough loss last night to North and we had a good win and I thought they came in with good energy,” said East coach Branden Adkins. “They are a scrappy team. They have been in first place for a few weeks and no one really talks about it. I give (South coach) Tim (Boe) a lot of credit for what he has done.” East used a 14-0 run midway through the fourth quarter to rally back and take the lead in the closing seconds. The Bengals were not celebrating just yet, as South has made a living on dramatic end-of-game shots this year. In fact, Shane Ritter has four game-winning, three point buzzer beaters on his resume this year and East made sure he was not going to get a chance to tie the game. “I told Nick (Novak) it’s basically like you are asking him for a date,” Adkins said. “I told him to stay on him and not let him touch the basketball.”

“We saw the tape on North from a couple months ago and coach told me to get all over him,” Novak said. “I had to get in his chest and not let him get a shot.” Corey Evers did get off a clean look at a three, but it rimmed out, giving East its fourth-straight win. “Four in a row and 13 wins and from where we were three weeks ago, I don’t know I would have said we would be here,” Adkins said. “We were really in a funk and games like this we wouldn’t have pulled out. This conference on any given night someone can win.” Before holding Ritter from getting off the final shot, Novak had a bigger impact on the comeback, both on and off the floor. He answered an Evers basket with a layup that put East up for good at 58-57. He was fouled on the play and missed the free throw, but chased down the loose ball rebound which led to Jordan Reed’s two free throws with 15 seconds left to put East up three. However, even before he got his game going, Novak was leading the team. “Nick came in at halftime and gave the team a bit of a butt chewing and that is a leader,” Adkins said. “At halftime he did it with his voice and then in the fourth quarter with his actions.” Adkins had his own words for the team in the huddle. “It seemed like for three quarters no bounce went our way, so I challenged them at the start of the fourth quarter and told them they had to find a way

Mark Gregory/Enterprise Staff

Plainfield East’s Aaron Jordan goes up over Plainfield South’s Myles Snowden in East’s 60-57 win.

to get it done,” he said. Part of that was getting junior Aaron Jordan, an Illinois recruit, going. Jordan had two fouls in the first quarter and sat the entire second period. He had only two of his team-high 15 points in the first half. “I thought we had him frustrated a little bit,” Boe said. “Our goal was to keep him under

20 and we did that.” Joshua Smith had 14 points for East, as did Myles Ward, while Novak had 10, eight in the fourth quarter. Ritter had game-high honors with 18 points, while Miles Snowden had 14 and Evers added 12. The Cougars will now look to rebound and get back atop the

SPC standings. “If we take care of the things we can control (we will win games),” Boe said. “You can control your effort, your defense, your rebounding and sometime the ball goes in, sometime it doesn’t. I feel good about our effort, I just wish we would have executed a little better.” mark@buglenewspapers.com


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Real Estate & Business

dave says

Protect yourself, your accounts from debt collectors Never, under any circumstances, give debt collectors electronic access to your account Dear Dave, I’ve heard you say to never give collectors access to your checking account. Does that include payments with a debit card too? Susan Dear Susan, Absolutely! If you’re doing something like scheduling utility payments to come through your debit card or out of your personal checking account, that’s perfectly fine. But collectors are looking to get as much as they can on a bad, late debt. Never, under any circumstances, give them electronic access to your account. I’ve been doing financial counseling for a long time now, and I’ve seen numerous situations

where collectors have taken more than the agreed-upon amount from someone’s account once they gained access. This sleazy move left people without the money to pay their rent, the electric bill or even groceries. In fairness, the collection business does have a few good people in it, but it also has a high percentage of people who are scum—especially on the credit card side of collections. Some of them will lie and even make threats. It’s a huge problem. There are other, much safer ways to handle these kinds of situations. Send a money order overnight or wire the cash to them. You can also send a cashier’s check. Some folks have even used a pre-paid debit card

that isn’t attached to any of your accounts. This isn’t my favorite way to handle things, but it’s better than giving them the opportunity to clean you out and mess you over! —Dave

Diversification and risk Dear Dave, I’m a little worried about investing in the market due to volatility. Are there safer investments? Matt Dear Matt, You’re right; the market is volatile. It’s not a volatile as some things, but you have to remember that anywhere there’s money to be made—including long-term investing—there are ups and downs. For instance,I like real estate.It’s not as volatile as the stock market,

I’ve been doing financial counseling for a long time now, and I’ve seen numerous situations where collectors have taken more than the agreed-upon amount from someone’s account once they gained access. This sleazy move left people without the money to pay their rent, the electric bill or even groceries.

but there are no guarantees. We experienced that big dip over the last few years, and it was probably one of largest dips ever in the real estate market, except for the Great Depression. Aside from real estate, I also like mutual funds. When it comes to these, one way to smooth out the volatility of the market is through diversification. That means you spread your money around instead of investing in one or two things. That’s how I handle my mutual funds, and I recommend others do the same. Spread your investments across these four types of mutual funds: growth,

growth and income, aggressive growth and international. I can’t say it enough, Matt. There are no guarantees when it comes to long-term investing. But diversification can help make the ride a little bit smoother! —Dave *Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Ramsey on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.


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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 405 Garland Avenue Romeoville, Illinois 60446 (SIngle Family). On the 6th day of March, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Nationstar Mortgage LLC Plaintiff V. Juan F. Gonzalez Jr. aka Juan Francisco J. Gonzalez Jr.; Bertha Alicia Gonzalez M.; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 5384 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg, LLC Att: Mr. Anthony Porto 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (Fax) For bidding instructions visit: www. fal-illinois.com PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/6, 2/13, 2/20

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 783 Pine Trail Drive, Romeoville, Illinois 60446 (SINGLE FAMILY). On the 27th day of February, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: US Bank National Association, as Trustee for Credit Suisse First Boston Mortgage Securities Corp., CSFB Mortgage Pass-Thru Certificates, Series 2005-9 Plaintiff V. Melanie Scanlan; Michael Scanlan; Bank of America, N.A.; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 1616 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg, LLC Att: Mr. Anthony Porto 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (Fax) For bidding instructions visit: www.fal-illinois.com PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 1/30, 2/6, 2/13


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LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

US Bank National Association, as Trustee for Credit Suisse First Boston Mortgage Securities Corp., CSFB Mortgage Pass-Thru Certificates, Series 2005-9 Plaintiff,

Nationstar Mortgage LLC Plaintiff,

vs. Melanie Scanlan; Michael Scanlan; Bank of America, N.A.; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendant. No. 12 CH 1616

vs. Juan F. Gonzalez Jr. aka Juan Francisco J. Gonzalez Jr.; Bertha Alicia Gonzalez M.; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendant. No. 12 CH 5384

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 19th day of November, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 27th day of February, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 9, IN PINE TRAILS, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 27, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN DUPAGE TOWNSHIP, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JANUARY 20, 1988 AS DOCUMENT NO. R88-02542, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 783 Pine Trail Drive, Romeoville, Illinois 60446 Description of Improvements: SINGLE FAMILY P.I.N.: 02-27-315-019

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 23rd day of January, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 6th day of March, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 19 IN BLOCK 9, IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF SECTION 33, AND THE WEST 1/2 OF SECTION 34, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 3, 1959, IN PLAT BOOK 31 PAGES 55 AND 56, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 872683, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 405 Garland Avenue Romeoville, Illinois 60446 Description of Improvements: SIngle Family P.I.N.: 02-33-408-019-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg, LLC Att: Mr. Anthony Porto 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (Fax) For bidding instructions visit: www.falillinois.com PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg, LLC Att: Mr. Anthony Porto 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (Fax) For bidding instructions visit: www.falillinois.com PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Published 1/30, 2/6, 2/13

Published 2/6, 2/13, 2/20


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Romeoville 02-06-14