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CHECK OUT THESE WINTER ACTIVITIES IN YOUR AREA

INSIDE

JAN 2014

WINTER FUN, EVENTS

Don’t let the winter weather keep you indoors. Check out our Chill Out guide for fun winter events in your area. INSIDE

Winter Wine Jam: 6 to 10 p.m. Prairie Bluff Public Golf Club (Banquet Room). Wine and cheese tasting with great music. Tickets are $25 ($30 at the door) and that will get you 10 tasting tickets, a cheese display and live acoustic music. Ages 21 and over. Call 815838-3621, ext. 0, for tickets.

DON’T LET THAT WINTER WEATHER KEEP YOU INDOORS!

Valentine’s Day Dueling Pianos Dinner Show: 6 to 10 p.m. Prairie Bluff Public Golf Club (Banquet Room). Live dinner show featuring 176 keys dueling pianos. Doors open at 6 p.m. with a cash bar, Plated pot roast dinner to start at 6:30 p.m., and the show is from 8 to 10 p.m. Call 815-838-3621 ext. 0 for tickets. $35 Resident & Non-Resident. Ages 21 and older. Deadline, Feb. 1.

Egg-Streme Night Hunt: 6:30 to 8 p.m. Prairie Bluff Public Golf Club. The night will feature a family entertainer, pizza and drinks, and an egg hunt outside. Don’t forget your flashlight! In the case of inclement weather, the egg hunt will be inside. Pre-registration is required for each person attending. $7 Resident, $9 NonResident. Register by March 21. 815-8383621, ext. 0.

www.romeovillebugle.com

commUnity

SCHOOLS RHS freshman orientation set for Jan. 16

PAGE 8

Our Community, Our News

JANUARY 16, 2014

Vol. 8 No. 28

local

Reform group advocates for immigrants Southwest Suburban Immigrant Project began in 2010 By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

by laura kaTauskas STAFF REPORTER The power Connection has been providing resources for life, dedicated to empowering people to better their lives by coming into touch with literally thousands of individuals who needed support over the past 10 years. SEE ‘TeaCh’ PAGE 9

On a quest to build suburban immigrant power, a local reform group is setting its sights on a successful new year, calling on residents to get involved. The Southwest Suburban Immigrant Project began in 2010 as a means to raise awareness of immigrant reform in the suburbs and is growing stronger each year. The nonprofit organization is committed to community organizing for the rights of immigrants in the southwest See REFORM, page 3


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

News

Submitted Photos

The Ultimate Fitness Challenge and Game Show ended the event, with full-audience participation, on-your-feet games, and challenging team activities.

Romeoville Recreation Open House Nearly 500 residents attended the Romeoville Recreation Center Open House, where more than 35 community organizations and businesses were represented in the exhibit area. Guests were able to work out in the Fit 4 Life Fitness Center

or try a fitness class, experience demonstrations of three different recreation programs (Tumbleweeds Gymnastics, Razzlers Competitive Dance and Isshin-Ryu Karate), make a jump rope or participate in the Ultimate Fitness Challenge Game Show.


News

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

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REFORM

prayer vigils and actions, and helped secure, for the first time, the support from Mayor Roger Claar and Police Chief Continued from page 1 Kevin McCarthy. SB 957 became suburbs through education, reality in Jan. 27, 2013, with the civic engagement and advocacy. support from local state Rep. “As the only such organization Emily McAsey, D-Lockport, state in the suburbs, we feel the Sen. Pat McGuire, D-Joliet, and pressure,but that is why we are so the signature of Gov. Pat Quinn. needed,” said Executive Director Locally, the SSIP began the Jose Vera, a Bolingbrook High Parent Mentor Program in two School grad. “The immigrant local elementary schools in population in the suburbs Bolingbrook. SSIP is one of ten keeps growing. People would community-based organizations have to travel to Chicago to sign in the state partnering with up for ESL classes or to hear local schools to recruit and train about any reform measures. We parents to assist teachers in the want people to feel comfortable classroom. Parent volunteers, in their own referred to as community.” parent mentors, The immigrant The project are assigned population in r e v o l v e s to a classroom the suburbs keeps a r o u n d (not their own growing. People would have to informing child’s) where immigrants of travel to Chicago to sign a teacher works their options up for ESL classes or to hear one-on-one and and services about any reform measures. in small groups available to We want people to feel with children comfortable in their own them, while and mentors community.” also tackling them. Executive Director Jose Vera, a immigration SSIP was able Bolingbrook High School grad r e f o r m to advocate working with in Springfield area legislators to bring about and locally for inclusion of the the change they whole-heartedly program in the state budget. believe in. Now more than 16 parents have Last year alone, the SSIP graduated from the program and conquered various milestones, currently 20 parent volunteers including the passage of SB 957: are working in those schools. The Temporary Visitor’s Drivers “Those parents now feel Licenses for immigrants without welcome in those schools,” a Social Security Number. said Vera. “Many times people SSIP played an important role say that immigrants do not get advocating for this legislation in involved. It is because they Springfield and in the suburbs, are not comfortable. We feel meeting with local legislators that we are the organization to secure passage. that will find that bridge that Vera said the group mobilized can make a difference, make hundreds of people to rallies, them feel comfortable and get

them involved in their own community.” In addition, last year alone, the SSIP sponsored Citizenship days where they partnered with trained personnel to help fill out more than 200 citizenship applications. Vera said the group plans to continue that mission into 2014 and hopes to continue more advocacy work, currently pushing for a new piece of legislation coined the Trust Act, which will allow immigrants who report crimes not to be in fear of deportation. SSIP also will be hosting monthly meetings. The first is set for 3 p.m. Jan. 19 at the Westbrook Community Church. Another meeting will be held at 7 p.m. Jan. 22 at St. Dominic’s Church in Bolingbrook. SSIP is also gearing up for its third annual Day of the Immigrant in July. Last year’s event was held in Romeoville where more than 500

Submitted photos

Various events sponsored by the Southwest Suburban Immigrant Project

celebrated the contributions of immigrants to the suburban community and were joined by U.S. Rep. Bill Foster, D-Naperville, McGuire, state Rep. Natalie Manley, D-Joliet, and Mayor John Noak. For more information about how to get involved, call 630296-6755 or email, info@ ssipchicago.org.

contact info Southwest Suburban Immigrant Project P.O. BOX 208 Bolingbrook, IL 60440 info@ssipchicago.org 630-296-6755


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Calendar

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

JANUARY 16 Creating a Gmail Account. 6:30 to 7 p.m.at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville.  Contact: Adult Services desk at 815-886-2030 askalibrarian@whiteoaklibrary. org.Need to set up an Gmail account? Want to learn how to use Gmail better? This class will teach you the basics of creating your own Gmail account. Basic computer skills are required prior to taking this class.  This is Part One of a two part class which discusses how to work with Gmail. Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. Call, visit, email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab. Using Your Gmail Account. 7 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville.  Contact: Adult Services desk at 815-886-2030 askalibrarian@whiteoaklibrary. org. Already have a Gmail account? Want to learn how to use Gmail better? This class will teach you how to get the most out of your own Gmail account, such as sending and receiving

Romeoville Area Chamber of Commerce Annual Awards Dinner Gala 6 to 9 p.m., Brunswick Zone, 35 Center Boulevard. For more information on tickets or advertising opportunities, call 815-886-2076 or email info@ romeovillechamber.org.

Catholic School Open House. 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., 505 Kingston Drive, Romeoville. Are you looking for a safe and nurturing environment for your child’s education, a school with small class sizes and a challenging curriculum? Stop in to our Open House for some refreshments and tour the school, meet the principal, faculty and students while learning about the benefits of enrolling your child at St. Andrew. Full day preschool (3-5 year olds) and Kindergarten through 8th grade. Before and after school care available. For more information please visit the school’s website at www. andrewcc.org or contact Kathy Lifka, principal at 815.886-5953 Ext. 421.

JANUARY 18

ONGOING

Bolingbrook Coffee Shop Stop. 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. at Charlie’s Restaurant at the Bolingbrook Airport located at 130 Clow International Parkway. State Rep. Natalie Manley, D-Joliet will meet with constituents in Bolingbrook. The meeting is open to all residents of the 98th District.

Panic Attack Support Group of Bolingbrook. Anyone who is dealing with panic attacks, anxiety attacks, or social phobia is welcome to attend this support group. We meet every second and fourth Thursday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. Please visit Meetup.com to RSVP http:// www.meetup.com/AnxietyPanic-Attack-Support-GroupOf-Bolingbrook-Naper/.

messages, creating attachments, using filters to find messages in your Gmail, and creating labels (folders) to organize your Gmail. Basic computer skills are required prior to taking this class. Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. Call, visit, email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab.

JANUARY 26 St.

Andrew

the

Apostle

American Sign Language interpreted Mass is offered at St. Francis of Assisi, 1501 W. Boughton Road in Bolingbrook every Sunday at the 8:15 a.m. Mass. Power Connection’s LARGE FOOD PANTRY. Open on the 2nd and 4th Mondays of the month from 1 p.m. to 6:45 p.m., at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. Enjoy your shopping experience. For a $20 donation you can shop the aisles of canned/boxed goods, drinks, deserts, snacks, breads, fruits & vegetables. You will also receive a pre-selected bag of meat. There is no income verification and ALL residents of Illinois are welcome. The Resale Connection is also open from 9a.m. to 6:45 p.m. on those Mondays. We carry clothing for men/women/children as well as household items, furniture, sundries, toys and so much more! Cleaning out your house? We accepts donations Monday-Thursday, 9am-4pm. Call (630) 679-6899 or visit www.thepowerconnection.org for more information/services available such as our Extension Food Pantry, Computer Classes, Forklift Classes. Volunteer

opportunities also available to serve your community. Power Connection Computer Classes. Classes begin at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. General or Microsoft Word classes are offered. Cost is $30. Call Power Connection at (630) 679-6899, or visit www. thepowerconection.org Power Connection Forklift classes at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. We offer a one week class for forklift certification, you must be able to read/write fluent English. $50 fuel fee due by start of class. Call Power Connection at (630) 679-6899, or visit www.thepowerconection.org. Tween Scene. Tuesdays 4 to 5 p. m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Do you enjoy hanging out at the library? Well, come to Tween Scene! Each session we’ll have fun things to do like games, science, anime, manga, and crafts. For children 8-12. Registration is required. Contact the Children’s Services Department for more information.


Calendar Preschool Playtime. 10:30 a.m. on Thursdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Brick Building Club. 4 p.m. on Thursdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Toddler times. 10:30 a.m. on Mondays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Ages 3 to 36 mos. Terrific Ts. 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Ages 2 to 3. Storytimes. 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Wednesdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Ages 3 to 6 years. Pajama-Jam Family storytime. 6 p.m. on Tuesdays

at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. All ages. Wear your pajamas. Family storytime. 7-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the Fountaindale Public Library. On Tuesday evenings, get the family together to hear stories and sing songs in the storytime room. TOPS (Take Pounds Off Sensibly), IL114 Romeoville, meets 5:15 p.m. Mondays at the Romeoville Police Department, 1050 W. Romeo Road. For more information, call 815-886-9252. Golden Age Club. Thursdays noon to 4 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Department. Members must be 50 years and up to join, and may do so by coming to any Thursday meeting. Transportation is available by calling the Recreation Department at 815886-6222 at least 24 hours before the event. For more

information about the club, call Noel Maldonado at the Recreation Center. Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit environmental organization is dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815-834-1611. Bolingbrook Machine Knitting Club. All skill levels are welcome to begin or further their knowledge of knitting with a machine. The group meets the last Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m. There is no charge to attend this group. They meet in the community room of Bolingbrook Fire Station 4, 1111 W. Boughton Road. Please park on the West Side of the building. For more information, contact Rose at 630 739-2784 or Sharon at 630

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014 471-9650. Birth After Cesarean. Meet other moms who are planning their natural birth after cesarean section. Come for encouragement, support and information to plan your next birth. Meetings at noon the first Monday every month in Romeoville. Contact Melanie at 253-861-5897 or VBACesarean@ aol.com Are you affected by someone’s drinking? Open meetings are held every third Friday of the month from 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. Contact Al-anon/ Alateen at 815-773-9623 or visit www.niafg.org for more information. Bolingbrook Amateur Radio Society. The Bolingbrook Amateur Radio Society meets on the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Fire Station #5, 1900 W. Rodeo Drive in Bolingbrook. All ham radio enthusiasts are invited to attend. Meetings

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usually include a presentation and refreshments. VE testing is held prior to each meeting at 6:30 p.m. for those wishing to take any level of license exam. Candidates must bring a photo ID, any pending Certificates of Successful Completion, and the test fee of $15. For more information, visit www.k9bar. org. Fly tying. 7-8:30 p.m. at Outdoor World, 709 Janes Ave., Bolingbrook. Join master fly tier Bob Davenport in the Fly Fishing Department for some great tips on fly tying and to answer any questions or concerns you may have. For more information, call the store at 630-296-2700. Employment. Will County Workforce Services host its free weekly Career Café for job seekers at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday in Room 519 of the JJC Renaissance Center, 214 N. Ottawa St., Joliet. Reserve a spot by calling 815-727-4444, Ext. 122, or emailing bwashington@ willcountyillinois.com.


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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Amber Denson, 20, 305 Continental, Louisville, TX was arrested at 6:28 p.m. Dec. 24 and charged with retail theft on the 300 block of S. Weber Road.

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Derrick Denson, 46, 1154 Manor Court, Crest Hill, was arrested at 6:28 p.m. Dec. 24 and charged with retail theft and resisting an officer on the 300 block of S. Weber Road.

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BridgetTheodore,22,16401 Greenway, Lemont, was arrested at 8:50 p.m. Dec. 27 and charged with disobeying a traffic signal, no insurance, possession of cannabis and drug equipment near Route 53 and Renwick.

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Sergio Cruz, 21, 14120 Buckner Court, Plainfield, was arrested at 3 a.m. Dec. 28 and charged with obstructing an officer on the 1200 block of Normantown Road.

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A residential burglary was reported in the 1800 block of Winding Ridge at 4:55 p.m. Dec. 28. Unknown person(s) entered the residence and took several power tools, gift cards, jewelry, and computing equipment. Estimated cost of the items is $2798.

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Nicholas Ducato, 38, 20842 W. Aspen Court, Plainfield, was arrested at 8:39 a.m. Dec. 29 and charged with driving with a revoked license, no insurance, no front plate and an obscured rear plate near Weber Road and Lakewood Falls.

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Jorge Reyes, 23, 925 Hickory, Joliet, was arrested at 4:36 a.m. Dec. 29 and charged with no valid driver’s license and speeding near Route 53 and Taylor Road.

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Maria Olmo, 21, 1252 Santa Fe, was arrested at 10:44 a.m. Dec. 30 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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Zamudio Torres, 22, 3517 Sumac Drive, Joliet, was

Police Blotter

arrested at 5:31 p.m. Dec. 31 and charged with retail theft on the 200 block of S. Weber Road. Kristie Virgl, 21, 7817 Briarcliff, Plainfield, was arrested at 1:46 a.m. Jan. 1 and charged with DUI, improper lane use near Normantown Road, east of Weber Road.

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Damian Mucha, 26, 299 Shenandoah, was arrested at 4:31 a.m. Jan. 1 and charged with DUI, no insurance, improper lane use and driving too fast for conditions on Weber Road and Grand Boulevard.

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A theft of motor vehicle parts was reported in the 200 block of Normantown Road at 1:48 p.m. Jan. 2. Unknown person(s) removed a catalytic converter from a vehicle that was parked in the business lot. Estimated cost of the auto part is $840.

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Rodriguez, 19, 13 Antonio 1569 Azalea, was arrested at 5:50 p.m. Jan. 2 and charged with possession of drug equipment on the 0-100 block of S. Weber Road.

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Christopher Walker, 21, 298 Columbine Lane, was arrested at 7:24 p.m. Jan. 2 and charged with the possession of drug equipment and cannabis on the 200 block of Columbine.

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Sergio Medina, 26, 231 Healy, was arrested at 10:03 a.m. Jan. 3 and charged with no valid driver’s license, suspended registration, in-state warrant and driving too fast for conditions on Route 53 south of Airport Road.

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Roger Dally, 62, 247 Zinnia, was arrested at 1:36 p.m. Jan. 3 and charged with an instate warrant on the 1200 block of Lakeview Drive.

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Chelsie Wiggins, 19, 213 Fremont, was arrested at 11:47 a.m.Jan.4 and charged with driving with a suspended license, no insurance, and an expired registration near Normantown Road and Kingston Drive.

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Garrett Mingilino,18,14055 Danbury Drive, Plainfield, was arrested at 4:11 p.m. Jan. 4 and charged with forgery on the

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300 block of N. Weber Road. Makayla Nance, 19, 8234 Brickstone Drive, Frankfort, was arrested at 7:09 p.m. Jan. 4 and charged with retail theft on the 200 block of S. Weber Road.

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Nestor Paredes-Soto,27,544 Frieh, was arrested at 7:13 p.m. Jan. 4 and charged with no valid driver’s license, disobeying a stop sign and unlawful use of a wireless phone near Frieh and Grand Boulevard.

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Gladis Queil,25,233 Cassidy Ave., Joliet, was arrested at

1:02 a.m. Jan. 5 and charged with no valid driver’s license and no insurance near Spangler Road and Arlington Drive. Ortiz-Sanchez, 22 Manual 27, 521 White Oak St., Bolingbrook, was arrested at 1:36 p.m. Jan. 5 and charged with no valid driver’s license, improper backing and driving too fast for conditions on the 600 block of N. Independence. Jorge Diaz, 29, 447 Bruce, Lockport, was arrested at 6:01 p.m. Jan. 5 and charged with no valid driver’s license and

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driving too fast for conditions near Weber Road north of Renwick. Juan Galvan, 21, 16143 Weber Road, Crest Hill, was arrested at noon Jan. 6 and charged with no valid driver’s license, no insurance and driving too fast for conditions near Weber Road and Renwick Road.

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Wade Manno, 54, 1407 Coral Bell Drive, Joliet, was arrested at 10:20 a.m. Jan. 8 and charged with an in-state warrant on the 1000 block of Romeo Road.

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ForuM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy! Just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred. Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

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Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Enterprise Newspapers, Inc. 23856 Andrew Road #104 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication sweditor@buglenewspapers.com www.buglenewspapers.com Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 12 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 12 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

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Schools

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

romeoville high school

RHS incoming freshmen orientation night is Jan. 16 Evening will begin at 5:30 p.m. with an optional overview of student life and activities in the field house Romeoville High School will welcome members of the Class of 2018 at the school’s annual Incoming Freshmen Orientation Night Thursday, Jan. 16. The evening will begin at 5:30 p.m. with an optional overview of student life and activities in the field house. Parents and students alike will be able to visit various tables to receive information on electives, clubs, sports and other co-curricular activities offered at the school.Attendees may also visit classrooms and labs to explore opportunities in a variety of areas. At 6 p.m., the RHS Jazz Band will kick off the formal portion of the evening in the David F. Carlson Auditorium. Presentations on the high school curriculum and the

registration process will follow a 6:30 p.m. RHS guidance counselors and department heads will be available for individual conversations.School tours will also be conducted. The entire program will last several hours. More information is available by contacting individual guidance counselors listed in packets that have been mailed to each incoming freshman’s family.

Manley Commemorating Martin Luther King Jr. Day State Rep. Natalie Manley, D-Joliet, is honoring the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. by

volunteering in the community on his commemoration day, Monday, Jan. 20. “Dr. King serves as an ongoing inspiration to all of us involved in public service,” Manley said. “His messages of justice, peace, and equality are still relevant today.” The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. rose to prominence as an instrumental force in the Civil Rights Movement through events including the Montgomery Bus Boycott and alongside other activists like Rosa Parks. Dr. King Jr. was arrested 30 times for his participation in civil rights activities and was tragically shot and killed in 1968. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was officially designated a federal holiday in 1983, and in 1994, Congress designated it as a National Day of Service. Manley will spend her day volunteering through the Community Service Council of Will County’s “A Day On, Not a

Day Off” program. She will be spending time with senior citizens in an assisted living facility. Last year, Manley participated through volunteering at United Cerebral Palsy of Illinois Prairieland’s Joliet school disinfecting tables, chairs, and equipment so that students, faculty and physical therapists could continue interacting in an environment that was safe and free of harmful germs. “I encourage others to use this day off from school or work to join me in volunteering in your community, or helping out in your neighborhood,” Manley said. “It is equally important to spend some time reflecting on the teachings of Dr. King and reaching out to collaborate on how we can continually improve our area.” For more information, or to sign up to volunteer through the Community Service Council of Will County, please call 815-7241142, or you may reach Manley’s full-time constituent service office at 815-725-2741 or by email at RepManley@gmail.com.

Military News Air Force Airman Michael M.

Tichacek Jr. graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.Tichacek is the son of Michael Tichacek Sr. of Romeoville, and Sarah Tichacek of Morris. He is a 2010 graduate of Romeoville High School. Army Pvt. Geovany Lucero has graduated from the Infantryman One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga. The training consists of Basic Infantry Training and Advanced Individual Training. During the nine weeks of basic combat training, the soldier received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons employment, map reading, tactics, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid skills, and Army history.


News TEACH Continued from page 1 Birthed out of the Living Water Community Church in August 2003, Jerry Basel, who was a pastor there at the time, saw a long line of people needing continual assistance. Often times it was because of the absence of proper training needed to apply for jobs that would support their families. It was then that the idea for a training center came to be. Basel wanted to allow individuals an opportunity to gain control over their circumstance and exit the cycle of need. Power Connection’s mission is to “Empower People for Life,” and their goal is to offer people the job skills, educational training and the resources for life. Power is an acronym for “Providing Opportunities for Work, Education and Retraining.” After 10 years of serving Bolingbrook and the surrounding communities, the organization has provided training for more than 1,800 individuals and food for more than 3,000 individuals a month. But the mission doesn’t end there. Basel still has a dream of expanding; creating a center that would house several social agencies under one roof, so that an individual could receive training, food, clothing, mortgage help and even housing. “I can’t believe that we’ve been open this long already and things have moved along so fast over the years with us growing exponentially,” said Basel. “We first started with a computer class, then the food pantry and I remember we started to receive a semi truck load of food. It was hard to unload and we needed a forklift. We got the forklift and then thought, why not use it to teach.” And now the organization offers not only computer classes, but also forklift classes and commercial driver’s license classes at a minimal cost, and runs a large food pantry twice a month and a smaller food pantry three times a week in addition to a resale shop. “We want to empower people—to be able to teach them and give them the educational resources for living,” said Basel. “We used to just give people the fish, now we learned to teach them how to fish.” All classes are taught by volunteers, which keeps the cost down. Supporting the organization are about 35 regular

full-time volunteers and 20 oncea-month volunteers. Most food is donated from companies and local food drives. But as a faithbased, not-for-profit group, it is supported solely by private donations and is hosting an upcoming fundraiser to help sustain the organization. The group will be presenting “10 Years in the Making, Time to Celebrate,” its 10th annual dinner auction, at 6 p.m. Jan. 24 at the Bolingbrook Golf Club, 2001 Rodeo Drive. The semiformalattire event will include a silent auction, Chinese auction, live auction, raffles, games with prizes, dinner and dancing. Ticket prices are $45 each or $80 per couple. Purchase nine tickets, and get one free. Tickets can be purchased online at www. thepowerconnection.org or call 630-679-6899. “I see firsthand their ‘good works’ in Bolingbrook,” said Carol Penning. “Jerry Basel, his wife Trudy, their staff and

more info ... The Power Connection is located at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F. For more information about any of the programs, call 630679-6899.

WEB LINKS www.thepowerconnection.org/ community volunteers have done an excellent job keeping the Power Connection open through the years. Their mission to help people in need through their food and clothes pantries and the programs they offer is truly appreciated. Through my position as Village Clerk and as President of the Community Service Council, I have enjoyed working with Power Connection and referred residents to them, those who are facing challenging times with our economy.” Basel said he never imagined himself running an organization of this size without any business background to speak of but draws on his faith to keep it successful. “I realize that anything is possible with God, and it is possible that we can continue to grow, offer more help, grow even

Submitted photos

Dedicated to empowering people, the Power connection offers a variety of training and support, including computer classes, forklift training, the Food Connection and resale shop.

bigger and realize our dream,” said Basel. The Extension Food Connection is open Monday (except 2nd and 4th Monday. See large food extension), Tuesday and Thursday from 10 a.m. to noon; and Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m. The pantry asks for a $10 donation and patrons can choose from produce, vegetables, fruit, baked goods, breads, sweets and more, walking away with at $70 worth of food. The large food extension is open the second and fourth Monday of the month from 1 to 6:45 p.m. For a $20 donation fill a grocery cart worth between $250 and $275 worth of frozen meat and goods. The group also partners with Smart Choice Food program, where food can be purchased online at cost. Visit www. thepowerconnection.org. In addition, the clothing resale shop offers all types of items from furniture to shoes. All items have a suggested donation attached. The Power Connection also is a resource for churches, schools, and other community organizations. Those individuals who are referred because of an urgent need will be able to receive whatever items could assist them. The Power Connection is located at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F. For more information about any of the programs, call 630-679-6899.

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

9


10

Take 5

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Manages (for oneself) 6 Snuck 11 __ Moines, Iowa 14 Native Alaskan 15 Cowboy singer Gene 16 “That’s nasty!” 17 Criticize gas and electric companies? 19 The Beatles’ “__ Loves You” 20 Sunrise direction 21 One of a D.C. 100 22 Russian capital 24 Roy G __: rainbow mnemonic 26 Piebald horse 27 Criticize a modeling shoot array? 30 It replaced the French franc 33 Pass out 35 Mudville number 36 Complete, as a scene 37 Tropicana and Minute Maid, briefly

Down 38 Cheesy sandwiches 39 Grounded jet 40 Sworn statement 42 Isaac’s eldest 43 Wranglers with wheels 45 Folk music’s Kingston __ 46 Criticize stage shows? 48 Former Bears head coach Smith 50 Be in debt 51 Sea near Stockholm 53 Prefix with pass 55 Become enraged 59 World Cup cheer 60 Criticize awards? 63 Gen-__: boomer’s kid, probably 64 Invalidate 65 On one’s toes 66 Fist pumper’s word 67 Trotsky and Uris 68 Pack animals

1 Lose color in the wash 2 “On the Waterfront” director Kazan 3 Loch with a monster 4 Brit’s trash can 5 Sault __ Marie 6 Batman’s hideout 7 Wreck completely 8 And so on: Abbr. 9 Vacate the __: eviction notice phrase 10 Big name in chicken 11 Criticize college subjects? 12 Bounce in a 6-Down 13 Depict unfairly 18 Invitation letters 23 Bouillabaisse, e.g. 25 Practitioner: Suff. 26 Kept in, as hostility 27 Criticize farmers? 28 Bodysuit for a tiny tot 29 “__ Marner”: Eliot work 31 Speak with a

grating voice 32 Chooses 33 12 inches 34 Open a bit 38 Doctor’s profession 41 Owl’s cry 43 A boxer may have a glass one 44 They’re attractive to look at 47 “Footloose” costar Singer 49 “Myra Breckinridge” author Gore 51 Like the Honda Element 52 Away from the wind 53 Really surprise 54 Web addresses, briefly 56 Beehive State natives 57 Little more than 58 Repair co. proposals 61 __-cone 62 Sheep’s call

Horoscopes Like Goldilocks, your complaints might be “this one is too big and this one is too small” in the week ahead. Loved ones might remind you to focus on saving money, especially when you brashly act on competitive impulses.

Focus your attention on the people who love you unconditionally, not just those who only love you when the conditions are just right. During the upcoming week, you may be thrifty and unwilling to accept less than the best.

There is definitely a law of attraction. In the week ahead, you’ll learn that like attracts like, so sometimes someone at odds with you will seem familiar. You can’t however blame yourself if you’re a victim of someone else’s agenda.

Get real. You can realign your perspective this week if you acknowledge and accept responsibility for your judgments. You’re faking it if you pretend they don’t exist or that you always maintain a nonjudgmental attitude.

Events in the week ahead may remind you that you attract what you put forth. For instance, if you do your best at every facet of your job or watch your diet you’ll enjoy peace of mind when all the minor details are in place.

In the week ahead, concentrate on relocating your thoughts from the abstract to the tangible. You can take practical steps for further development of your creative talents. If you’re passionate about something, move forward.

When you’re confident of your worth, it’s not necessary to struggle to prove your value to others. In the week ahead, don’t get carried away by self-doubts. Your success depends on selfdiscipline not self-sacrifice.

You might aspire to become proficient in some aspect of teaching or entertainment in the week ahead. Your passion for some idea or learning project can make you a leader or earn some unexpected recognition.

Be honest in situations in which previously you maintained silence. There may be times this week when you’re tempted to tell a white lie because the facts are embarrassing, but only through the truth can you eradicate awkwardness.

Arguments fade when confronted by abundance. Your life is filled with opportunities and possibilities, so your biggest challenge is to choose which one to embrace. In the week ahead, apply logic to make wise choices.

As the week unfolds, you may realize that some problems you’ve been dealing with at work or with your health are due to matters outside your control. Other problems, however, are within your control if you persevere.

While each person possesses a gift, some have refined and polished their abilities. Facing aggressiveness or defensiveness from others can improve your talents in the week to come. Like a pearl, it takes abrasions to shine.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Content Agency 2014

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • FORAY • SYNOD • BANTER • CHALET

Answer:

What she did when she told a joke to the sewing circle -- LOST THE “THREAD” OF IT


INSIDE: Mistwood renovation earns praise from GOLF Magazine, page 12; Spartans fall to Plainfield North, page 14

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

11

Spartans win SPC bowling title By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

The Romeoville boys bowling team became just the second program at Romeoville to win a Southwest Prairie Conference title after holding off Minooka Saturday, Jan. 11 at Town and Country Lanes in Joliet. While the Spartans finished behind Minooka on the day (5,986-5,952), they finished with more total points for the year, 102-98. “I’m really happy we won,” said Dakota Vostry, a four-year varsity starter. “The freshmen and sophomores don’t know what happened the past three years (taking second). We pulled it out finally and I’m just happy we did. We came up short three years in a row and it feels good to finally get a win.” “It feels amazing,” fellow fouryear starter Kyle Zaremba said. “We worked hard all year. We finally got it. I think we were a lot closer as a team this year. Minooka gave us a tough battle today and all year.” They can thank a strong regular season, where they built a 58-50 advantage heading into

the tournament, along with the top series in the morning. “It feels good to get the first conference championship,” Romeoville junior Cody Surges said. “This is the best feeling in the world. We were a little nervous and knew that Minooka could put up a fight.We had a lot of consistency this year.” Vostry took the overall individual title having entered the day with the highest average and his fifth-place score of 1,238 was good enough to hold on to it. Surges won the tournament with a 1,288, Kyle Zaremba had a 1,200 and Jacob Hubbs shot a 1,154. All were on the 12-man All-SPC team. Stephen Vaughn added a 1,112. “This was my first year on varsity, so it feels really good,” Surges said. “(The key was) not freaking out and picking up spares. I had to stay calm the whole time.” Now the Spartans will gear up for the Sandburg Regional at Orland Bowl Saturday, Jan. 18. “We have five strong bowlers and today showed that,” Vostry See TITLE, page 13

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Romeoville’s Cody Surges won the SPC tournament Saturday with a 1,288.


12

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

Sports

Mistwood earns praise from GOLF Magazine After two years of course construction that resulted in a substantial face-lift, owner Jim McWethy looks upon Mistwood Golf Club in suburban Chicago with satisfaction and pride because the golf world has noticed. GOLF Magazine has awarded Mistwood with its “Best U.S. Renovation You Can Play” honors for 2013. The recognition comes as part of GOLF Magazine’s annual Best New Courses 2013, which is published in the January 2014 issue. The article features the top new courses and renovations both in the U.S. and internationally. “It is a tremendous honor to be selected as the Best

U.S. Renovation You Can Play by GOLF Magazine and to be recognized alongside so many great courses,” McWethy said. “We wanted to elevate Mistwood into the ranks of the best courses in the Midwest, and this award is a testament to the vision and quality of work that architect Ray Hearn and our team performed on this project. I could not be more proud of what we have accomplished.” GOLF Magazine concurred in its appraisal with the selection. “The result? Mission accomplished. Mistwood may have been young for a facelift, but this beauty is ready for its close-up,” the magazine reported. The magazine also talked

about Hearn winning the same renovation award for his work at Chicago’s historic Flossmoor Country Club in 2009. Hearn, who has a strong reputation for his course and renovation work,first completed the Mistwood project in 1998. Thirteen years later the course was ready for some upgrades and improvements. “We fine-tuned and polished a gem,” Hearn said. Renovation work was performed on every one of Mistwood’s 18-holes, with a focus on improving shot value and strategy. The most noticeable was at the par-5 third hole where the green has been See MISTWOOD, page 13

File Photo

Mistwood’s third hole has turned into one of the signature holes after the renovation.


Sports TITLE Continued from page 11 said.“We’re confident in what we can do and we’re pretty sure we can win a state title. We bowled really good over there the last time we were there.” “It’s going to be tough,” Surges

MISTWOOD Continued from page 12 relocated to create space for a future clubhouse and a double fairway for risk-reward. The creek that used to be in front of the green is now behind it, and it has been expanded with a pond guarding the entire right side of the hole. Mistwood’s renovation also included the addition of 20 stacked sod-wall bunkers, a trademark hazard for courses in Scotland and Ireland, and now a signature feature at Mistwood. Many of the courses’ lakes and bodies of water were

said. “We have Lockport in our regional, but this gives us a lot of confidence.” The top four teams and 10 individuals advance to the sectional, which will be at the same location, hosted by Andrew. “All four years it has been about state,” Zaremba said. “We haven’t been there since sophomore year.

This year we want to take the hardware home. Lockport took it home last year and we share a bowling alley with them, so we want to show them we can do it too. Minooka and Bolingbrook are good, so it will be tough to get down there, but it will help us for state.”

also expanded making them a strategic factor on several holes. In addition, new beautiful Lannon stone walls were added along holes 3, 7, 8, 9 14, 15 and 16 to add some stunning visuals for golfers to experience. Other improvements included repositioning tee boxes and bunkers, adding new high quality bunker sand, lengthening the course to 7,040 yards, and adding fescue grasses throughout the course. “I am extremely proud of my redesign work at Mistwood,” Hearn said. “In my 27-year career I would definitely rank this project as one of my favorites and owner, Jim

McWethy, as one of the most passionate individuals I have worked with.” McWethy has made extraordinary major facility improvements since taking ownership in 2004. In addition to the work on the course, the creation of the new Performance Center, with its indoor-outdoor hitting bays, elite swing technology, and custom club fitting, has been the talk of Chicago area golf. “A big part of this renovation and expansion was due to my love of the game,” McWethy said. “Mistwood is now truly a must-see, must-play golf course and stands among the elite golf courses in the Midwest.”

Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

13


14

Sports

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

Spartans fall to Plainfield North By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

With both teams coming off long breaks, the game between Plainfield North and Romeoville Friday night in Romeoville didn’t always have a smooth flow to it. However, the Tigers were able to shake off a slow start and cruised to a 69-41 win. “We looked a little rusty out there,” said Romeoville coach Marc Howard, whose team had 11 days in between games. “The interesting thing was we had a couple of good practices leading up to the game. It didn’t transition onto the court tonight.” North got off to a slow start and it was 3-2 Spartans when North coach Bob Krahulik called timeout. “We came out pretty aggressively and made them call timeout,” Howard said. “Somewhere after that we couldn’t be consistent, whether it was ball handling, passing,

making free throws or layups. Against a good team like North, you have to make those to stay in the game because they score in bunches.” The Tigers responded with 15 straight points and took a 19-5 lead after the first quarter. That lead was built to 39-14 at the half as Romeoville committed 10 turnovers. “The kids saw North respond to our game plan and put the pressure on us and take away some of our drives,” Howard said. “They contested our shots and made it harder for us to score and we kind of got in a rush. We never recovered from that. We’re going to have to go back to the drawing board.” North struggled holding onto the ball, committing 11 third quarter turnovers against the Romeoville press. “That was the most turnovers we’ve had in a quarter all year,” See FALL, page 15

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Romeoville’s Dwayne Griffin defends Trevor Stumpe in the Spartans’ loss Friday.


sPorts

BOYS BBALL Points Per Game

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

15

D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West

9.8

Little, Westmont

5.2

Jonah Coble, Joliet Central

21

Shane Ritter, Plainfield South

14

Jacob Buchner, Plainfield South

9.8

Grover Anderson, Lockport

5.2

Deiondre Taylor, Lockport

21

Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central

14

Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North

25.2

Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West

9.4

Matt Mahlke, Downers North

5.2

Jonny Butler, Minooka

20

D’Vonta Jones, Joliet West

13

Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East

20.7

Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle

9.4

Brad Hund, Plainfield Central

5.2

Nick Novak, Plainfield East

19

Neal Tyrell, Minooka

13

Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook

17.6

Elliot Fizer, Joliet West

9.4

Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East

5.1

Steals

Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West

13

George Sargeant, Maine South

16.6

Ralph Blakney, Lockport

9.2

Elliot Fizer, Joliet West

5.1

Logiurato, Westmont

30

Doll, Westmont

13

Jonah Coble, Joliet Central

15.6

Kevin Krieger, Plainfield North

9.2

Kevin Krieger, Plainfield North

5.0

Grover Anderson, Lockport

27

Brodric Thomas, Bolingbrook

13

Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central

14.4

Robbie Brooks, Plainfield Central

9.1

Tristin Esker, Plainfield East

5.0

Corey Evers, Plainfield South

27

Jon Arenas, Maine South

13

Corey Evers, Plainfield South

14.3

Logiurato, Westmont

8.9

Romeo Magliore, Niles West

5.0

Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North

27

Andrew Palucki, Maine South

12

Andrew Palucki, Maine South

14.0

Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook

8.7

Assists

Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook

26

Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East

12

Grover Anderson, Lockport

13.9

Adam Alexander, Minooka

8.5

Caleb deMarigny, Maine South

69

John Campbell, Lockport

25

D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West

10

Gage Davis, Bolingbrook

13.4

Joe Butler, Minooka

8.5

Logiurato, Westmont

50

Ralph Blakney, Lockport

24

Jake Smith, Minooka

10

Romeo Magliore, Niles West

13.1

Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook

8.2

Grover Anderson, Lockport

47

Caleb deMarigny, Maine South

19

Field Goal %

Evan Hines, Niles West

13.1

Rebounds Per Game

CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook

39

Romeo Magliore, Niles West

18

George Sargeant, Maine South

.690

Miles Snowden, Plainfield South

12.1

Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central

9.7

Little, Westmont

38

Deiondre Taylor, Lockport

16

Shane Murray, Lisle

.667

John Campbell, Lockport

11.8

Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle

9.0

Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central

36

Little, Westmont

15

Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook

.655

Jake Nowak, Plainfield North

11.8

Miles Snowden, Plainfield South

8.6

Isaiah Webster, Plainfield North

35

Gage Davis, Bolingbrook

15

Jake Smith, Minooka

11.6

Greg Pietrzak, Westmont

8.1

Myles Ward, Plainfield East

30

CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook

15

Devin Blake, Downers North

11.6

Josh Smith, Plainfield East

8.0

Ralph Blakney, Lockport

30

Nick Novak, Plainfield East

11.4

Joe Butler, Minooka

7.6

Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook

30

Ahmad Gibson, Niles West

11.2

Devin Blake, Downers North

7.4

Kelly, Westmont

29

Ray Greco, Downers North

11.1

Zach Trussell, Lisle

7.2

Corey Evers, Plainfield South

28

Caleb deMarigny, Maine South

11.1

John Campbell, Lockport

7.2

Jake Pedrelli, Maine South

27

Greg Pietrzak, Westmont

10.7

Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North

7.0

Ahmad Gibson, Niles West

25

Little, Westmont

10.7

Shane Murray, Lisle

6.8

Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North

25

Shane Murray, Lisle

10.5

Kelly, Westmont

6.8

Jon Arenas, Maine South

24

Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South

10.5

George Sargeant, Maine South

6.8

Gage Davis, Bolingbrook

24

Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central

10.5

Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook

6.5

Tim Doll, Westmont

23

Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West

10.2

Jonah Coble, Joliet Central

5.7

John Campbell, Lockport

23

Kelly, Westmont

10.1

Logiurato, Westmont

5.7

Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South

23

Jojo Rios, Niles West

10.0

Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South

5.5

Sean Maloney, Maine South

22

Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook

5.5

Jared Whitacre, Downers North

22

Shane Ritter, Plainfield South

9.9

Fall Continued from page 14 Krahulik said.“When we play like that we’re not very good.” “It looked like they had to pull starters out of the game and they got a little fatigued when we applied the pressure,” Howard said.“We just have to be consistent with that pressure.We play intense, but it isn’t consistent for four quarters. There isn’t a team we’ve played who we haven’t harassed when we play with our defensive intensity.” However, the Spartans weren’t able to trim much off the deficit as they trailed 50-30 after three. “We have to stay consistent with our attack,” Howard stated.

“There were times where we were attacking and getting to the basket and put their big guy in foul trouble. But then we settled for some threes and bailout shots. I like to play inside out. I don’t think we did a good job of that for the most part.” Trevor Stumpe had a gamehigh 17 points to lead the Tigers. Jake Nowak chipped in with 14 points. “It was pretty tough in the first quarter and the beginning of the second half to get going,” Stumpe said. “I think it was a good experience to get this game out of our system and get ready for Oswego Tuesday.” “We were excited to come back out and play,” Nowak said. “We had a good week of practice and it felt good to play. Once we

got into it, it was alright.” Dwayne Griffin’s seven points paced the Spartans, who shot just 36 percent from the floor (15-41), was 0-for-9 from long range and 11-of-27 (40 percent) from the foul line. North outrebounded Romeoville 38-24. The Spartans will look to bounce back as they play four games in eight days, which began Tuesday against Plainfield East. “We’re loaded up, the schedule is pretty intense,” Howard said.“It is the second half of the season. We’re looking forward to it. We just need to put together a little run and I’m looking for us to play some more consistent basketball down the stretch. Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@buglenewspapers.com

See STATS, page 16


16

Sports

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

STATS

Grover Anderson, Lockport

.500

Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA

17.4

Rachel Sutphin, Plainfield South

5.4

Destiny Hollins, Lockport

29

Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West

.500

Jaida Green, Downers North

16.8

Ty Battle, JCA

5.3

Lauren Porcelli, Downers North

29

Monica Barefield, Joliet West

15.7

Laurel Kucharski, Lockport

5.2

Jnaya Walker, JCA

27

Free Throw %

Continued from page 15

Caleb deMarigny, Maine South

.970

Nicole Ekhomu, JCA

15.4

Jaida Green, Downers North

5.1

Christina Ekhomu, JCA

25

Jeff Washington, Joliet West

.640

Gage Davis, Bolingbrook

.840

Chavon Banks, Joliet Central

14.6

Ally Fink, Plainfield South

5.0

Tyler Everett, Plainfield South

24

Greg Pietrzak, Westmont

.634

Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East

.816

Erin Heide, Minooka

14.5

Kailey Foster, Joliet West

5.0

Naomi Mayes, Lockport

24

Jake Pedrelli, Maine South

.630

Neal Tyrell, Minooka

.810

Sarah Costello, Downers North

12.7

Jamie Hopper, Romeoville

4.9

Kailey Foster, Joliet West

24

Julian Torres, Bolingbrook

.623

Odi Audisho, Niles West

.810

Kelly Carnagio, Minooka

12.5

Cherish Smith, Romeoville

4.8

Chavon Banks, Joliet Central

20

Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook

.610

Andrew Palucki, Maine South

.800

Chantell Mack, Joliet Central

12.3

Faith Heitman, Romeoville

4.6

Nina Anderson, Maine South

20

Tristin Esker, Plainfield East

.577

George Sargeant, Maine South

.800

Tyler Everett, Plainfield South

12.0

Assists

Jamari McAfee, Lockport

20

Devin Blake, Downers North

.543

Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West

.800

Peyton Winters, Downers North

11.7

Sarah Costello, Downers North

79

Kelly Kons, Maine South

19

Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central .540

Jake Pedrelli, Maine South

.790

Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka

11.3

Jaida Green, Downers North

52

Jenae Rowe, Joliet West

19

Ray Greco, Downers North

.539

Romeo Magliore, Niles West

.786

Destiny Hollins, Lockport

10.6

Bre Sobotka, Resurrection

51

Kianna Campbell, Lockport

18

Romeo Magliore, Niles West

.535

Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook

.783

Lexi Marin, Romeoville

10.4

Taylor Farrell, Resurrection

43

Kate Moriarty, Resurrection

18

Bowen Marks, Downers North

.533

Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West

.770

Kate Moriarty, Resurrection

10.1

Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka

41

Laurel Kucharski, Lockport

17

Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook

.528

Connor Bielat, Lisle

.760

Juatece McNear, Joliet Central

10.0

Kelly Kons, Maine South

37

Field Goal %

Evan Hines, Niles West

.522

Elliot Fizer, Joliet West

.760

Taylor Farrell, Resurrection

10.0

Nicole Ekhomu, JCA

31

Ty Battle, JCA

.632

Jaylandt Gilmer, Lockport

.520

Emin Ademi, Niles West

.750

Naomi Mayes, Lockport

9.9

Sydney Arlis, Minooka

30

Kyla Creal, Lockport

.580

Andrew Palucki, Maine South

.510

Robbie Brooks, Plainfield Central

.730

Valencia Chandler, Joliet West

9.8

Erin Heide, Minooka

27

Peyton Winters, Downers North

.530

Kelly, Westmont

.505

Grover Anderson, Lockport

.730

Hailey Schoenman, Maine South

9.0

Gabriella Galassini, Resurrection

27

Taylor Farrell, Resurrection

.500

D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West

.720

Valencia Chandler, Joliet West

8.8

Monica Barefield, Joliet West

27

Emilie McGuire, Maine South

.500

Nina Anderson, Maine South

8.6

Lauren Porcelli, Downers North

26

Adriana Acosta, JCA

.490 .470

3-pointers Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook

28

Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South

8.6

Sam Fagenholz, Maine South

25

Nicole Ekhomu, JCA

Shane Ritter, Plainfield South

26

Jamie Hopper, Romeoville

8.3

Lexi Marin, Romeoville

24

Free Throw %

Ray Greco, Downers North

23

Rebounds Per Game

Bethany Bachmann, Minooka

24

Kailey Foster, Joliet West

.810

Evan Hines, Niles West

21

Chavon Banks, Joliet Central

Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA

23

Nicole Ekhomu, JCA

.775

Johnny Kostelz, Plainfield Central

19

Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA

9.3

Jnaya Walker, JCA

20

Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka

.770

Nick Novak, Plainfield East

18

Sarah Costello, Downers North

8.3

Peyton Winters, Downers North

20

Faith Heitman, Romeoville

.758

Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East

17

Chantell Mack, Joliet Central

8.0

Christina Ekhomu, JCA

20

Destiny Hollins, Lockport

.730

Gage Davis, Bolingbrook

16

Peyton Winters, Downers North

7.9

Chavon Banks, Joliet Central

20

Sam Fagenholz, Maine South

.720

Jake Smith, Minooka

14

Kelly Carnagio, Minooka

6.8

Giahanna Martorano, Resurrection

19

Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA

.720

Caleb deMarigny, Maine South

14

Kate Moriarty, Resurrection

6.8

Steals

Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South

.719

Andrew Palucki, Maine South

12

Hailey Schoenman, Maine South

6.7

Sarah Costello, Downers North

57

Kelly Kons, Maine South

.710

Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West

11

Jenae Rowe, Joliet West

6.7

Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA

39

Naomi Mayes, Lockport

.700

Jojo Rios, Niles West

11

Valencia Chandler, Joliet West

6.6

Nicole Ekhomu, JCA

39

3-pointers

Corey Evers, Plainfield South

11

Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South

6.5

Jaida Green, Downers North

36

Jaida Green, Downers North

30

Sydney Arlis, Minooka

5.7

Bre Sobotka, Resurrection

33

Taylor Farrell, Resurrection

27

Kyla Creal, Lockport

5.4

Taylor Farrell, Resurrection

31

Erin Heide, Minooka

26

GIRLS BBALL Points Per Game

11.0


buglenewspapers.com/basketball

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

17

Winters puts spring into DGN’s offense By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

Senior guard Sarah Costello and junior guard Jaida Green are considered the Trojans’ go-to players on offense, but if Peyton Winters continues to have games like she did Saturday night at York, she’ll make an already formidable Downers North team even more dangerous. Winters, the Trojans’ 6-2 forward, scored 16 of her gamehigh 20 points in the first half to lift Downers North past the Dukes, 54-41, in DGN’s first West Suburban Silver contest since Dec. 20. “We want to get her actively involved in our offense, absolutely,” said DGN head coach Stephan Bolt, whose team has won three in a row and 10 of its last 11. “When you can go inside to her, and have a presence in the lane like Peyton is doing now, it makes things a lot easier in the perimeter and I think the kids did a great job. It may have been our best job all year looking inside constantly throughout the game.” The Trojans were doing such a good job of getting the ball to Winters inside that the junior collected 12 points in the first quarter alone. “I thought it was a really good game for us as a team offensively, and I think when we have more of an insideoutside game it definitely helps us get better shots,” Winters said.“If I’m having a good game and they (teammates) feed me (inside) it works out well for us. If I’m not having a good game, then I can kick it out and they get shots.” Meanwhile, DGN stormed out to an 18-0 lead following a Lauren Porcelli layup, and the Dukes didn’t scored their first points until six minutes had elapsed in the period. The Trojans held a commanding 22-4 advantage at quarter’s end. “I think it was one of the

best first quarters we’ve had all season,” Bolt said. “I think defensively we were solid and we moved the ball and didn’t turn it over.” York never got closer than 12 points the rest of the game. DGN led 30-15 at half time and 45-24 after three quarters. “I think we were just really ready to play today,” Winters said. “We were really focusing on getting stops on defense before we go and try to make something happen on offense.” Green added 15 points for the Trojans, but what’s interesting is that DGN’s offense remained effective despite Costello sitting out half of both the second and third quarters due to foul trouble. Costello ended up with seven points. “It’s nice to have plenty of options for scoring,” Winters said. “We have people on our team who can score if someone’s in foul trouble so that’s been a big help.” Earlier last week, the Trojans faced non-conference opponent Glenbrook South in their first matchup since competing in the Wheaton North Bill Neibch Falcon Classic, where they placed third. DGN won the game, 46-38, with Green scoring 14 and Costello 12. Costello also had seven rebound and six steals, and Winters registered eight points, 10 rebounds and four blocked shots. The Trojans went up against two conference teams, Hinsdale Central and Lyons Township, during the Neibch tourney. They knocked off the Lions for third place, but lost to the Red Devils—a club they defeated in WSS action on Dec. 14. “It was nice to win our last game (in the Neibch tournament),” Bolt said. “We were disappointed to lose against Hinsdale but we’ll see them again (Jan. 31) and if anything else, it gives us an attitude that we need to get after it for conference in the second half (of the season).”

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Lauren Porcelli goes to the basket in Downers North’s 54-41 win over York.

The Trojans (14-2, 5-0) are off until Saturday when they host Hinsdale South at the DGN Winter Classic. The two squads tip off at 11:30 a.m. “I think we have to continue

to get better,” Bolt said. “We can’t have stretches where we continue to give up offensive rebounds like we did and turn over the ball like we did (in the third quarter vs. York). Great

teams don’t do that, but I think if we continually get better and keep working, we’ll still be even better by the end of the season.” mike@buglenewspapers.com


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Real Estate & Business

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dave says

When to consider using your emergency fund My wife and I are working the Baby Steps, and we have our budget in place. Sometimes the budget gets busted because of home improvements and various other things. I think we should take money from our emergency fund when this happens, but she says it should come out of our restaurant and fun money. What do you think? Joshua Dear Joshua, I hate to break this to you, but overspending is not an emergency. So, I’m siding with your wife on this one. If you budget a set amount in one category and you go over that amount, you’ve got to have something you reduce or cut out completely to stay within your budget for the month. You’d be surprised at what some people call an“emergency.”

But here’s the deal: If something happens on a pretty regular basis, it’s a predictable event. That means you need to budget a larger amount for home improvements or whatever the problem area may be. Overall, on a month-tomonth basis, if you find you have $200 budgeted for car repairs and the repair turns out to be $250, I’d rather you cut back on eating out to make up the difference. That’s the way my wife and I did it back in the day.We never touched the emergency fund for anything except big, unexpected, scary stuff. —Dave

Can’t afford student loans Dear Dave, I have a lot of student loan debt, and I can’t afford the

payments right now. Should I send them what I can, even if it’s not the minimum payment, or should I not send anything at all? Tina Dear Tina, They’re not going to stop bothering you no matter which option you choose. The benefit of sending them $5, even if the minimum payment is $50, is that you’re forcing yourself to start living on a budget and do all you can to honor your commitment. That’s the moral, spiritual and legal thing to do in this situation. Lots of times when people say they can’t afford something, what they really mean is they don’t want to give up other stuff in order to honor their obligations. If that’s the case, I’m not going to be on your team. You accepted this responsibility, and if that means you don’t eat out or go on vacation until the debt is paid off, then that’s the

I hate to break this to you, but overspending is not an emergency. So, I’m siding with your wife on this one. If you budget a set amount in one category and you go over that amount, you’ve got to have something you reduce or cut out completely to stay within your budget for the month. way it is. But if you’re already living on a beans-and-rice, scorched-earth budget and $5 is all you can squeeze out, then give them $5 and let them know with a clear conscience it’s all you can afford. All you can do is all you can do. There’s a bright spot in all this though. If you’re scrimping and saving and paying all the money that you have first toward running your household, then secondly toward your creditors, you’ll start finding ways to stretch your dollars even

further. Not only will that help you clean up your student loan mess, but it will enable you to have a little bit better life in the process! *Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Ramsey on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.

interpersonal edge

Bring workplace ‘flakes’ into line by penalties Q. I have several customers and coworkers who are last-minute change artists. They are constantly changing meetings, projects and plans at the last minute and expect me to just adapt. My job is becoming chaotic and stressful because of their changes. What can I do? A.You can ask yourself if you’ve created any concrete downsides for your annoying last-minute change artists. You can always count on people to do what is in their perceived best interest. If people around you keep changing plans it is because they don’t see a downside to their flakey behavior. The business world has become chaotic and fast paced enough that many people end up just chasing the latest shiny bauble. People often don’t look at the long-range consequence of changing their minds and plans every five seconds to run after what they just saw. They

certainly don’t consider the fallout to other people! Social scientists have even proposed that Americans seem to have cultural Attention Deficit Disorder where we can’t focus on the same thing for one minute. You will need to make it clear that if people around you keep changing their minds, they will miss out on something valuable with you. Make a list of behavior you’d like to see from customers or coworkers on the left side of a paper. Make a list of consequences you could bring to bear if people don’t keep commitments to you on the right. Brainstorm consequences such as: if they don’t show up at a meeting, then you can’t include them in an important project; if they cancel a meeting last minute, then you won’t be available for another two weeks. Remember if these flakey folks don’t have any pain in changing their minds, you will get no

WEB LINKS www.interpersonaledge.com

gain in them changing their behavior. Many of my clients like to argue at this point that it isn’t right that people don’t keep commitments. They then brood over deep questions like what the world is coming to and why people have no integrity. Pondering these sorts of abstract questions is philosophically interesting but of no practical use. Get creative in communicating the consequences to people neutrally in both conversation and writing. Skip the part where you let them know how rude and inconsiderate they are if you want change. Stick to the part where you point out factually what they will lose if they don’t keep future commitments. Put all that energy you could use venting into making it more likely people around you will be

Make a list of behavior you’d like to see from customers or coworkers on the left side of a paper. Make a list of consequences you could bring to bear if people don’t keep commitments to you on the right. thoughtful and you’ll be much happier. Remember, the goal here isn’t to wait until the entire world changes for you to be well. The goal is to change the world around you so you can have a peaceful less stressful work life now. As Janice Joplin so accurately observed, “Freedom is just another word for nothing left to lose.” Make it clear that people you deal with must balance their desire for complete freedom with the goodies they get from commitments they make to you. Then, sit back and watch these former flakes follow through.

The last word(s) Q. Why do people get so mad at each other at work? Don’t they realize these same people will just get even with them?

A. Yes, but the luxury of immediately expressing their rage tends to win over longterm benefits of feeling angry and acting effectively. Impulse control over anger in the workplace is rare.

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2013 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 517 GARDINER COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (ONE STORY TOWNHOUSE. ONE CAR ATTACHED GARAGE.). On the 30th day of January, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: HOMEWARD RESIDENTIAL, INC. F/K/A AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE SERVICING, INC. Plaintiff V. BERNABE GONZALEZ Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 6573 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twentyfour (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 141,522.73 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax)

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 713 SAYBROOK COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (2 STORY HOME WITH 1 CAR GARAGE). On the 6th day of February, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff V. CARMELA I. COOPER Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 1487 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 178,175.54 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax)

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published 1/2, 1/9, 1/16

Published 1/9, 1/16, 1/23


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS HOMEWARD RESIDENTIAL, INC. F/K/A AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE SERVICING, INC. Plaintiff, vs. BERNABE GONZALEZ Defendant. No. 10 CH 6573 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 15th day of October, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 30th day of January, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 2-10-2 IN HONEYTREE SUBDIVISION UNIT TWO, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 27, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 29, 1973, AS DOCUMENT NO. R73-26479, AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED MARCH 28, 1974, AS DOCUMENT NO. R74-6856, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 517 GARDINER COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: ONE STORY TOWNHOUSE. ONE CAR ATTACHED GARAGE. P.I.N.: 12-02-27-109-003 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 141,522.73 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 1/2, 1/9, 1/16

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. CARMELA I. COOPER Defendant. No. 11 CH 1487 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 4th day of October, 2011, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 6th day of February, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: PARCEL 1: UNIT 3-20-3 (EXCEPT THE EAST 7.20 FEET) AND THE EAST 2.70 FEET OF UNIT 3-20-4 IN HONEYTREE SUBDIVISION UNIT THREE, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 29, 1973 AS DOCUMENT NO. R73-26480, ALL IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS.PARCEL 2: EASEMENTS FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS APPURTENANT TO PARCEL 1 AS SET FORTH IN DECLARATION OF EASEMENTS, RESTRICTIONS, COVENANTS AND CONDITIONS RECORDED DECEMBER 21, 1972 AS DOCUMENT NO. R72-37074, AS AMENDED, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 713 SAYBROOK COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: 2 STORY HOME WITH 1 CAR GARAGE P.I.N.: 02-27-124-049 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 178,175.54 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 1/9, 1/16, 1/23


Seniors retire smart

financial resolution: Do something In the new year, focus on setting and accomplishing secure financial goals By Jill Schlesinger Tribune Content Agency

Who wants to remember bad milestones? Do we really need to go back five years, when the S&P 500 closed out the disastrous 2008 at 903.25? Most of us would prefer to focus on the fact that the index has more than doubled since those dark days. Still, it can be instructive to be mindful of the lessons from that painful period. According to Allianz Life Insurance Company’s 5th annual New Year’s Resolution Survey, “many Americans seem to have forgotten the trauma it [the financial crisis] caused to their portfolios and may now have a false sense of security about their current financial wellbeing.” This is human nature and behavioral economists even have a name for it: “recency bias,” which means that what has occurred in the near past tends to inform how we feel and what we do today. The problem with recency bias is that it can push us into making emotional decisions at the wrong time. So at the depths of market lows in 2008, we feel scared and sell everything and vow to take better care of our financial lives. Then five years later, with the economy and markets in recovery, the Allianz survey shows that only 16 percent of respondents said they would include financial planning in their resolutions for 2014. Whether you call it a resolution or a plan, here’s what I have learned after being in the business for 25 years: It’s easier to reach a financial goal when you articulate it and create a plan of action to achieve it. The problem is that simply thinking about a financial plan, let alone running the numbers that are necessary to complete it, can be

The problem with recency bias is that it can push us into making emotional decisions at the wrong time. So at the depths of market lows in 2008, we feel scared and sell everything and vow to take better care of our financial lives. daunting. For many, conquering the Big Three will require some time and energy. The process may even call for you to (gasp) figure out where your money is going. The easiest way to do that is to track your expenses for three months. After doing so, you may

THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014

23

a simple way to start is to address what I like to call “The Big Three Financial Goals”: 1. Zero consumer debt (credit card, auto loans) 2. Adequate emergency reserve funds (6-12 month’s worth of expenses; 12-24 months for retirees) 3. Maximization of retirement contributions ($17,500 for 401(k), 403(b) and 457 plans, with an additional $5,500 catch up contribution available if you are over the age of 50; and $5,500 for IRAs, with an additional $5,500 catch up contribution). This step includes ensuring that you have a properly diversified portfolio which is consistent with your risk tolerance level.

find that there’s extra money available to help your efforts. Once you have these covered the Big Three, it’s time for the nuts and bolts of financial security: drafting/updating wills and other estate documents and reviewing insurance coverage (life, disability, long-term care and property and casualty). These are not sexy topics, like investing can be, but without them, your financial security could be at risk. With those basic steps covered, now comes the hard part: time to prioritize what comes next. Do you want to buy a house in the next year or two? If so, you may need to channel all available cash flow

into a down payment fund. Are you ready to set aside some of your precious free cash flow for your kids in a Section 529 Plan or would you prefer to aim for early retirement? Do you need to think about caring for your aging parents? If so, have you had the tough talk with them to see what their wishes are? These are just some of the questions that you need to think about in order to properly plan for your financial future. No wonder so many people would rather put their heads in the sand than deal with this stuff! Of course, all of the planning in the world can’t prevent the fact that sometimes a bad financial event can happen to

you, but it certainly puts you in a stronger position than doing nothing. So maybe the best New Year’s resolution is, “I’m going to start doing SOMETHING to better my financial life!” (Jill Schlesinger, CFP, is the Emmynominated CBS News Business Analyst. A former options trader and CIO of an investment advisory firm, Jill covers the economy, markets, investing and anything else with a dollar sign on TV, radio (including her nationally syndicated radio show), the web and her blog, “Jill on Money.” She welcomes comments and questions at askjill@moneywatch. com. Check her website at www. jillonmoney.com)

(c) 2014 TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 16, 2014


Romeoville 01-16-14  

Romeoville 01-16-14

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