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J U L Y 5 , 2 0 1 8 V O L . 6 2 I S S U E 38

HAVE A HAPPY & SAFE

FORUM

Celebrating IL Grant’s first march to war was from Springfield to Quincy SEE PAGE 3

SPORTS

Living legends Bobby and Donnie Allison come to Joliet SEE PAGE 5

BUSINESS Dave Says Stop playing with metals; pay off debt

SEE PAGE 4


NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

NILES-MAINE LIBRARY BOARD

Board makes cuts for 2019 budget Library will cut back on furniture, consulting expenses during next year BY JEN SHEA For the Bugle @BugleNewspapers sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

The Niles-Maine District Library Board of Trustees passed a smaller budget for 2019 at their June 20 board meeting. They approved $7.3 million total by a vote of five to two, with about $98,530 in cuts from last

CALENDAR

year. Library Administrator Susan Lempke said the library will cut back on furniture and consulting expenses during the next fiscal year. “Promotional, printing,” Lempke said. “Behind-thescenes stuff.” Property taxes provide 95 percent of the library’s fund-

U P CO M I N G E V E N T S I N YO U R A R E A

JULY 6 Concerts at Oak Park. 6:30-8:30

Center, 6140 Dempster St. Community market vending produce, meats, baked goods & more, plus handcrafts from local artisans. mgfarmersmarket.org.

Summer 2018 Concerts in the Park. 8 p.m. at Hodges Park,

JULY 10 Harrer Park Pavilion Concert.

p.m. at Oak Park, Main and Ottawa streets, Niles. Niles Park District presents Motown/R&B sounds of R-Gang.

in front of City Hall, Park Ridge. Sponsored by the Park Ridge Fine Arts Society; performed by the Park Ridge Fine Arts Symphony, Barbara Schubert, music director and conductor. Spanish Soundscape.

JULY 7 Morton Grove Farmers’ Market. 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. at Morton Grove Civic

ing. It operates independently from the Village of Niles. But the Board of Trustees oversees its expenditures. Business Manager Greg Pritz claimed they cut back in response to a request from Board President Karen Dimond. “The board had raised a number of questions,” he said. “We offered to take a look at the level of expenditures across the board. We will be a little more efficient this year.” Dimond said multiple board

6:30 p.m. at 6250 Dempster Street, Morton Grove Food service starts at 6 p.m. Food provided by a different restaurant each week. Jimmy Nick & Don’t Tell Mama, guitar-slinging blues. Restaurant: Savory Crust Gourmet Empanadas.

JULY 13 Concerts at Oak Park. 6:30-8:30

p.m. at Oak Park, Main and Ottawa streets, Niles. Niles Park District presents classic rock, 80s, new wave, reggae, alternative sounds of Soda. Children can explore and sit in one of the many Niles Park District and Village of Niles large vehicles.

Summer 2018 Concerts in the Park. 8 p.m. at Hodges Park,

in front of City Hall, Park Ridge. Sponsored by the Park Ridge Fine Arts Society; performed by the Park Ridge Fine Arts Symphony, Barbara Schubert, music director and conductor. Taste of Tchaikovsky.

members asked for cuts. The two who voted no wanted the budget reduced by about five percent more. “The majority of the board decided to go with the budget,” she said. “I think that the amount that was budgeted was appropriate.” The library’s budget process takes about five months. Pritz said they meet with library supervisors starting in January and February, then present a plan to the Board of Trustees by June.

“This has really been a long process,” Lempke said. “We’ve been discussing it for months now.” The final budget includes a $400,000 capital project to improve the library’s roof and caulk and paint the exterior. They also set aside funds for a security upgrade. “We’re not adding any departments,” Pritz said. “We do have a number of maintenance costs.” The library serves approximately 58,000 district residents.

COMMUNITY

Local talent, volunteers and donations sought for National Night Out National Night Out Against Crime (NNO) which has been scheduled for Tuesday, Aug. 7, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at Dee Park, 9229 Emerson, in unincorporated Maine Township is seeking local talent as well as residents and businesses who wish to volunteer or donate prizes for the event. Designed to promote family fun and neighborhood unity, NNO also educates residents on crime prevention and safety. Sponsored by Maine Township, Neighborhood Watch, Cook County Sheriff’s Police, Golf Maine Park District, North Maine Fire District and other community businesses, the event will also include a poster contest for grammar school age children who live in or attend school in Maine Township.

The theme for this year is Lights On Mean Lights Out for Crime. Winners of the poster contest will be announced at the event where prizes will be awarded. National Night Out is called America’s Night Out Against Crime and has grown from 2.5 million participants in its first year to over 30 million in 10,000+ communities and in unincorporated areas such as Maine Township. Over the years our NNO has become one of the premier celebrations of the National Night Out Against Crime, according to Laura J. Morask, Township Supervisor. “I am so pleased to have helped grow and sponsor this event. Our local kids love it, particularly the partnership with schools for the poster contest,” she said.


THURSDAY, JULY 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

Grant’s first march to war was from Springfield to Quincy Approximately 1,000 men of the 21st Illinois marched about 8 miles the first day before setting up camp

GENERAL MANAGER, V.P. Advertising & Marketing A N D R E W S A M A A N andrew@voyagermediastudios.com 815.436.2431 ext. 113 MANAGING EDITOR GRACE TUCKER gtucker@buglenewspapers.com 815.436.2431 ext. 110 SPORTS EDITOR MARK GREGORY mark@buglenewspapers.com 815.436.2431 ext. 115 STAFF REPORTERS LAURA KATAUSKAS katauskas@buglenewspapers.com MARNEY SIMON msimon@buglenewspapers.com

“I well remember that 4th of July as I watched Grant and his regiment go in camp just across the road from my father’s home … on the head of the Mauvaisterre (Creek),” Corrington wrote. “Another reason that I remember it so distinctly was I had my pockets full of firecrackers; had been celebrating the 4th, when by some means, the crackers got on fire, and before I could get them out, they had burned a hole in my new cotton trousers; and as I was standing in front of Grant’s tent that evening, he said, ‘Son, what’s the matter with your pants?’ My answer was: ‘I had firecrackers in my pocket, and they got on fire,’ He laughed and said: ‘I bet you are a Union man,’ and I said, ‘Yes, sir.’ I was all through the camp, and the soldiers gave me several little keepsakes I prized very highly. They were a tired, footsore lot.” On July 5, the 21st Illinois broke camp and headed west to Jacksonville. The regiment passed through Jacksonville on State Street late on the morning of July 5. As the soldiers passed the Joshua Moore family home on West State Street, 15-year-old Ensley Moore asked what regiment it was. “The reply was ‘the 21st Illinois.’ And to the question who is your colonel, the reply was ‘Grant.’ Grant! I had never heard of him, and probably no other citizen of Jacksonville had,” Moore said years later. “But there he was, riding along up the street, his horse moving at a slow walk, an officer on each side of the colonel.” The 21st Illinois made its way to the Morgan County Fairgrounds just west of Jacksonville and rested. During the Civil War, the fairgrounds was called Camp Duncan and was used for drilling soldiers. In 1910, A.Y. Hart of Mattoon, who served in the 21st Illinois, remembered the regiment’s brief stay at the

fairgrounds. “Col. Grant stationed himself at the gate at the fairgrounds and examined our canteens for whiskey,” Hart said. “One man of my company bought a coffee boiler, stopped the passage between the boiler and spout with wax, filled the boiler with whiskey and the spout with milk, and Col. Grant passed him in.” After resting at the fairgrounds, the 21st Illinois marched southwest to Allinson’s Grove, about 7 miles from Jacksonville. The soldiers camped there the night of July 5. The next day, Grant and his command covered about 15 miles, marching from Allinson’s Grove, through Exeter in Scott County and camping that night on the northern edge of Naples, near the east bank of the Illinois River. On July 8, the regiment was ferried across the river and then marched west on the Perry and Naples Road. Grant later received orders to return to the west bank of the Illinois River and wait for a steamboat that would carry them to St. Louis. From there the regiment was to board a train for Ironton, Mo. Grant and the regiment waited for the steamboat, but it never arrived because it got hung up on a sandbar downstream. On July 10, the 21st Illinois crossed the Illinois River and caught a train for Quincy. Grant’s men then went to Missouri to reinforce Union troops who were under attack from secessionist guerrillas. Grant left the 21st Illinois in August 1861, when he was promoted to brigadier general. He would later lead all Union forces in the war. Members of the 21st regiment, most of whom were from eastern Illinois, later participated in the battles of Murfreesboro, Tenn., and Chickamauga, Ga., where they suffered many casualties. Greg Olson of the Jacksonville Journal-Courier can be reached at golson@ civitasmedia.com.

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ADVERTISING

BY GREG OLSON OF THE JACKSONVILLE JOURNAL-COURIER Col. Ulysses S. Grant passed up a chance to have his soldiers ride in train cars. Instead, he thought it best that they march to war. So, on July 3, 1861, Grant mounted a horse and led his first Civil War command out of Camp Yates in Springfield, en route to Quincy. The 39-year-old Grant had molded his somewhat unruly troops — members of the 21st Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment — into a disciplined fighting force. “There was direct railroad communication between Springfield and Quincy, but I thought it would be good preparation for the troops to march,” Grant wrote in his “Memoirs.” The approximately 1,000 men of the 21st Illinois marched about 8 miles the first day before setting up camp just west of present-day Riddle Hill near what is known today as the Old Jacksonville Road in Sangamon County. On the Fourth of July, Grant led his men to Island Grove in western Sangamon County, where they stopped for a while at the home of Capt. James N. Brown, a wealthy farmer and Shorthorn cattle raiser. “My father, Capt. Brown, sent (my brother), William Brown, out to meet Col. Grant and tell him the people wished him to stop and the troops could rest and enjoy the day with them,” wrote Benjamin Warfield Brown in 1927. “The exercises soon began and Col. Grant and a great many of the soldiers listened very intently to the exercises. Hon. David A. Brown read the Declaration of Independence and the Rev. Peter Cartwright delivered the main address.” The march on the Fourth covered about 17 miles and ended on the Corrington farm, 9 miles east of Jacksonville. Years later, William Corrington recalled the soldiers’ encampment on his father’s farm.

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BUSINESS + REAL ESTATE

NEWS ABOUT LOCAL BUSINESSES IN YOUR COMMUNITY THURSDAY, JULY 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

COLUMN >> DAVE SAYS

Stop playing with metals; pay off debt DEAR DAVE, I make about $240,000 annually, and I will be maxing out my 401(k) contributions this year. I have $60,000 in student loan debt I’m trying to pay off, a small amount left on my home mortgage, plus I’ve been investing in a lot of gold and silver. Those investments are worth about $30,000 right now. In addition to this, I’ve got $10,000 in cash just sitting in a savings account for emergencies. Should I stop the gold and silver investing, and focus on paying off the loans,

or keep splitting my money between them? ADAM DEAR ADAM, I’d stop investing in gold and silver completely. I don’t put money in precious metals at all, because they have a lousy longterm track record. My advice would be to cash out every bit of your gold and silver, and put the money toward paying off your student loans. That would instantly cut your student loan debt in half. Then, with your salary, you should be able to pay

off the rest in just a few months. The key will be to start living on a very strict budget. Don’t spend on anything that’s not absolutely

necessary. I also want you to temporarily stop contributing to your 401(k). Do this just until you get the student loan debt wiped out, then pick it up again like before. If you want to put even more toward retirement, you could check with a quality investment professional — one with the heart of a teacher — to see if you’re eligible for a back-door Roth IRA. When it’s all said and done, Adam, I want you to have 15 percent of your yearly income going toward retirement. You already know the value of

LEGAL LISTINGS PATEK Roger Patek, 73; born June 30,

1945 in Niles. Passed June 20, 2018 in New Mexico. Beloved son of the late Margaret and Walter Patek, beloved brother of Walter Patek Jr. Patricia Usyakand (Patek) twin brother of Rosemary

Patek. Attended Niles Township High School and then served his county in Vietnam. Services were out of state. Sweet sleep and heavenly peace.

saving and investing. With your income, once you knock out your debt and begin investing again, you have the very real potential to become a millionaire in just a few years! —DAVE * Dave Ramsey is CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven best-selling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 14 million listeners each week on 585 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on the web at daveramsey.com and on Twitter at @ DaveRamsey.

S TAY I N F O R M E D W I T H L E G A L L I S T I N G S THURSDAY, JULY 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ASSET TRUST 2006-6, MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-6 Plaintiff, -v.ROWENA REYES, METROPOLITAN CREDIT UNION, CARYLE COURT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Defendants 15 CH 12206 9625 LARAMIE AVENUE Skokie, IL 60077 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 6, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 1, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9625 LARAMIE AVENUE, Skokie, IL 60077 Property Index No. 10-09-312-036-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $403,543.34. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the

purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: POTESTIVO & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 223 WEST JACKSON BLVD, STE 610, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 263-0003 Please refer to file number C1522607- #113263. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. POTESTIVO & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 223 WEST JACKSON BLVD, STE 610 Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 263-0003 E-Mail: ilpleadings@potestivolaw.com Attorney File No. C15-22607- #113263 Attorney Code. 43932 Case Number: 15 CH 12206 TJSC#: 38-2171 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3090406

Published 6/21, 6/28, 7/5


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THURSDAY, JULY 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

NASCAR

LEGENDARY

VISIT

NASCAR legends Bobby and Donnie Allison visit Joliet’s Race Fan Rally ahead of the annual race

BY MARK GREGORY Sports Editor @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com

While several thousand people filled the streets surrounding the Rialto Square Theater in downtown Joliet for the 18th annual Race Fan Rally ahead of the yearly NASCAR weekend, there were two men whose credentials outweighed anyone else there. Brothers Bobby and Donnie Allison, a pair of NASCAR legends, made a repeat appearance to the rally to sign autographs, take pictures with fans and participate in an on-stage question and answer session with WJOL’s Mike Guglielmucci. Outside of being known for their superb driving skills and for being two-thirds of racing’s ‘Alabama Gang,’ the Allison’s were part of an event that put NASCAR on the map. At the end of the 1979 Daytona 500, the first live televised NASCAR race, Donnie was involved in a final-lap crash with Cale Yarborough. Donnie was leading the race on the final and as Yarborough attempted his signature slingshot pass at the end of the backstretch, Allison attempted to block him but Yarborough refused to give ground. As he pulled alongside Allison, his left side tires left the pavement and

went into the wet and muddy infield grass. Yarborough lost control, hit Donnie’s car and as the two battled for position and control, they crashed into the outside wall in turn three. The two argued and after it appeared they had settled it, brother Bobby Allison, who was lapped at that point, pulled over and began to defend his brother, resulting in a fist-fight that kept fans coming back for more – ultimately launching the sport into the mainstream. As Bobby told fans during the on-stage event, “Cale kept beating his face on my fist, and that’s my story.” Other than the fight, one thing Donnie, now 78-years-old, remembers of the day was that he was leading the race and had a chance to win the Daytona 500, a race he joked with fans that he has not won — yet. Bobby did win at Daytona three times and officially posted 84 career Cup wins – tied for fourth all-time with Darrell Waltrip. The racing legends have enjoyed their trips to Joliet. “We have enjoyed it every time we have been here and I ran some of the short tracks in the area,” said Bobby, now 80 years-old. “I never got to run Chicagoland, but I know I would

PHOTO BY MARK GREGORY

Parish Plantin of Romeoville gets autographs from NASCAR legends Donnie (left) and Bobby Allison at Joliet’s Race Fan Rally. have liked it. “We have enjoyed our careers. He and I have done a lot of things along the way and helped people and given them a hand if they needed. It has been special to do it with my brother.” If it is up to the brothers, they may not be done attending events in Joliet. “I enjoy this a whole lot,” Donnie said of Race Fan Rally.

“It is very well organized and a lot of great people and I will definitely be back if I’m asked. “We never get tired of meeting the fans. This never gets old. This is why we raced as hard as we raced all of our lives – because of fans like this and we are still 100 percent racers. We don’t get rich off this, but we have a chance to sell some memorabilia to the

fans and let them have a part of what was so special to us.” Something else that is special for the Allison family this year was the announcement that Davey Allison, Bobby’s eldest son, will be inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame in 2019. He will be joined by Jeff Gordon, Alan Kulwicki, Roger PenSEE VISIT PAGE 6


TWITTER: For up -to-the-minute coverage of upcoming local sport events going on in your area, follow @VoyagerSport

6 SPORTS

THURSDAY, JULY 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

PHOTO BY MARK GREGORY

An estimated 8,000 fans enjoyed Joliet’s 18th annual Race Fan Rally. VISIT FROM PAGE 7 ske and Jack Roush in the 10th class of the Hall of Fame. Davey competed in NASCAR from 1985 to 1993 when he lost his life in a helicopter crash at the age of 32. Davey earned a pair of wins, five poles and nine top-five fin-

ishes in his first full-season and was named 1987 premier series rookie of the year. He won 19 races and 14 poles, including the 1992 Daytona 500, before his tragic death. Davey finished second to his father in the 1988 Daytona 500, as the pair became the first and only father-son duo to finish 1-2

in the ‘Great American Race.’ Davey joins his father in the Hall of Fame, as Bobby was inducted in the second class in 2011. “He had a great career even though it was cut short,” Bobby said. “I am very proud and now we have to get (Donnie) in next year.”


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