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F E B R UA R Y 1 5, 2 0 1 8 V O L . 6 2 I S S U E 20

Chicago Defender becomes a national voice for African Americans

SEE PAGE 4

EVENTS

Calendar Events Upcoming events in your area SEE PAGE 11

SPORTS

New hire Maine East tabs new football coach SEE PAGE 5

BUSINESS Dave Says Needing a co-signer means not ready to buy a house SEE PAGE 7

FORUM SPOTLIGHT

CHICAGO DEFENDER


NEWS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

TRANSPORTATION

Pace narrows down sites for future Dempster Pulse stations Launching Pulse Milwaukee line first up; Pulse Dempster service to follow BY IGOR STUDENKOV Bugle Staff @BugleNewspapers nweditor@buglenewspapers.com

Pace suburban bus transit agency has narrowed down the locations for station stops for its upcoming Pulse Dempster bus service. As previously reported by the Bugle, the service is part of Pace’s effort to speed up bus service along some of its busiest corridors. Pulse Dempster will follow the same path as Route 250, traveling between between O’Hare Airport, Rosemont, Des Plaines, Park Ridge, unincorporated Maine Township, Niles, Morton Grove, Skokie and Evanston. The portion of the route within this newspaper’s coverage area is located almost entirely along Dempster Street. Pulse Dempster buses will only stop at station-style stops built along major intersections and destinations. During the Sept. 12 meeting, the transit agency unveiled several potential platform locations for each stop. Now, it has narrowed it down to preferred locations. On Feb. 6 and 7, it held public workshops to get feedback on those locations. Unless that feedback persuades the agency to change the locations, they will become final. Pulse bus corridors will be known as Arterial Rapid Transit buses. Unlike Bus Rapid Transit corridors, they don’t get their own lanes, but they do get traffic signal priority under certain conditions. Furthermore, because the stationstyle stops are further apart than the current stops, which, with a few exceptions, are spaced about once every two blocks apart, the Pulse buses will stop less, further speeding up service. Pace is currently building the stations and other infrastructure for Pulse Milwaukee service, which is expected to launch later this year. The Pulse Dempter service is next on the list. As with Pulse Milwaukee, Pace plans to keep the regular route

running, but at lower frequencies. The exact schedule was not finalized as of Feb. 11. As previously reported by the Bugle, all stations will have the same basic design: a 12-inch raised platform with tramps leading up in both ends; a vertical station market with a station name and a screen showing real-time bus arrival times information; a bus shelter in the middle of the platform; and trash cans at bike racks positioned near the end of one of the platform’s ramps. There are several features that would be customizable based on the wishes of residents, government entities and other stakeholders at the station locations: bike racks, the paneling of the shelters and station railings, trash cans, and any landscaping around the station. Looking at the stations in Bugle’s coverage area, there are two stations that only had one option from the get-go – Harlem Avenue and Austin Avenue stations. At Harlem Avenue, the westbound platform would be directly in front of Kappy’s American Grill restaurant’s parking lot, while the east platform would be located directly across the street. At the Austin Avenue/Dempster Road intersection in Morton Grove, the platforms would be located roughly where the Route 250 stops are located now – the platforms would simply be longer. For Dee Road interaction, where two of the stops that serve Maine East High School are currently located, Pace decided to put the westbound platform roughly where the current Route 250 stop is located. The eastbound station would be located a little further west from the current stop at the southwest corner, east of the stop that Maine East students usually use. For the station that would serve Advocate Lutheran General Hospital and the shopping plaza on the opposite side of the street, Pace decided to put the eastbound platform at the southwest corner of Western Avenue/Dempster Street intersection – where the eastbound stop closest to the hospital’s main entrance is currently located. The westbound SEE PACE PAGE 10


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

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VILLAGE NEWS >> NILES

Senior housing proposal details revealed Zoning panel sees Alden’s plans for Touhy Avenue site; gives feedback BY IGOR STUDENKOV Bugle Staff @BugleNewspapers nweditor@buglenewspapers.com

The Niles Planning and Zoning Board got its first look at Alden Foundation’s proposal for an affordable senior housing development at 7104 W. Touhy Avenue, on the site of the soon-to-be-demolished public works maintenance garage and the village rain garden, during its Feb. 5 meeting. As previously reported by the Bugle in the fall of 2017, the Village of Niles sent out a Request for Qualifications looking for someone to build an affordable, independent living senior housing development on the site. This was done in response to concerns about the short supply of affordable housing in the village. Alden Foundation responded, and on Dec. 11, 2017, the Village of Niles Board of Trustees voted unanimously to begin nego-

tiations. Since then, Alden submitted a proposal for the building. Because it would require a Planned Unit Development, It must go through the Planning and Zoning Board. During the first of several meetings that have to take place as part of the process, the commissioners got a chance to give feedback and ask questions. As Bruce Silvester, the Niles Senior Planner, explained during the meeting, the PUD application is a complex process made up of three steps. The first step was the Planning and Zoning Board doing a concept review of the original proposal and giving feedback. Using that feedback, the applicant develops a more detailed preliminary plan and brings it back to the board for a hearing. Unlike with the first step, nearby property owners are alerted ahead of time and invited to give their own feedback.

After the hearing is concluded, the board votes on whether to recommend approval and send it up to the village board for review. From there, the applicant submits a more detailed plan based on the board’s feedback, and the board votes on whether to give it a final approval. The plan submitted to the vil-

lage called for a 72-unit, five-story building with 59, one-bedroom apartments and 12, two-room apartments and one, two-bedroom apartment for the building manager. All units will be handicappedaccessible, with eight of the units specifically equipped to accommodate tenants who use wheelchairs

and two units equipped to accommodate tenants who are sight and/ or hearing impaired. The building will include a laundry room, a kitchen that can be used for parties, a community room with a big-screen TV, an exercise room, a SEE HOUSING PAGE 10


FORUM

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We want to hear from you! Send us your feedback at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

GUEST COLUMN

Chicago Defender becomes a national voice for African Americans BY THE CHICAGO DEFENDER On May 5, 1905, Robert Sengstacke Abbott founded the Chicago Defender newspaper in a small kitchen in his landlord’s apartment, with an initial investment of 25 cents and a press run of 300 copies. The Chicago Defender’s first issues were in the form of four-page, six-column handbills, filled with local news items gathered by Abbott and clippings from other newspapers. Five years later, the Chicago Defender began to attract a national audience. By the start of World War I, the Chicago Defender was the nation’s most influential Black weekly newspaper, with more than two thirds of its readership base located outside of Chicago. During World War I, the paper utilized its influence to wage a successful campaign in support of The Great Migration. It published blazing editorials, articles and cartoons lauding the benefits of the North, posted job listings and train schedules to facilitate relocation, and declared on May 15, 1917, as the date of the “Great Northern Drive.” The Chicago Defender’s support of The Great Migration encouraged Southern readers to migrate to the North in record numbers. Between 1916 and 1918, at least 110,000 people migrated to Chicago, nearly tripling the city’s Black population. Following the war, the Defender covered controversial events such as the Red Summer Riots of 1919, a series of race riots in cities across the country. The Chicago Defender campaigned for anti-lynching legislation and for integrated sports. In 1923, the Chicago

Defender introduced the Bud Billiken Page, the first newspaper section just for children. The Chicago Defender, along with the Chicago Defender Charities, is the producer and organizer of the world famous Bud Billiken Day Parade and Picnic. The parade originated in 1929 as a vehicle to showcase children. Today, the Bud Billiken Parade is the largest event of its kind. Columnists at the Defender included Walter White and Langston Hughes. The paper also published the early works by Pulitzer Prize winning poet Gwendolyn Brooks. Heralding itself as the “The World’s Greatest Weekly,” the Defender spoke out against segregation of the armed forces in the early 1940s and actively challenged segregation in the South during the civil rights era. In 1940, John H. H. Sengstacke, Abbott’s nephew and heir, assumed editorial control and continued to champion for equality. In 1956, the Chicago Defender began publishing on a daily basis. In 1965, Stengstacke purchased The Pittsburgh Courier, including it in his Sengstacke Newspaper chain,

along with papers such as the Michigan Chronicle in Detroit and the TriState Defender in Memphis. Sengstacke served as publisher of the Defender until his death in May 1997. The Chicago Defender is the flagship publication of Real Times Inc., a media company that also includes among its holdings the Michigan Chronicle, the Front Page, the New Pittsburgh Courier and the Tri-State Defender. One hundred and four years later, the Chicago Defender won the prestigious John B. Russwurm Award during 2009’s National Newspaper Publishers Association Merit Awards Gala, along with two first place and two third place awards, including the John H. Sengstacke General Excellence Award. Editor’s note: The weekly Illinois Bicentennial series is brought to you by the Illinois Associated Press Media Editors and Illinois Press Association. More than 20 newspapers are creating stories about the state’s history, places and key moments in advance of the Bicentennial on Dec. 3, 2018. Stories published up to this date can be found at 200illinois.com.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

What Will This Cost Us? DEAR EDITOR: On the surface, this proposal for cheaper water from Evanston sounds like a winner for MG residents. However, who will pay for the millions of dollars this project will cost? How will our water bills be effected by this

expenditure? How will these bonds for payment of expenses be paid off and when? What guarantees are there that Evanston will not raise their rates, possibly eradicating any advantage of this switch from Chicago water sources? It is interesting that the village is now ‘reaching out’ to residents after they have already signed up to spend this money. SHERWIN DUBREN MORTON GROVE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

PAGE 5

FOOTBALL

‘UNCOMMON’

HIRE

Maine East’s new coach is ready to shock the football world — again

BY MARK GREGORY Sports Editor @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com

Success has not been something the state has associated with the Maine East football program the last 40 years. The Blue Demons last winning season was a 6-3 campaign in the 1978-79 season. Since then, East has gone 34-191 with 16 seasons with one win or less, including six winless campaigns. East has not made the playoffs since 1977-78. So, saying Maine East has a shot to make a playoff run is as likely as, say, Northern Illinois University competing in the Orange Bowl. That is exactly what Maine East Steve Schanz is hoping for. Last week, Schanz announced Bob Winkel as the program’s next head football coach. “Coach Winkel brings an extremely high level of skill and knowledge of the game along with compelling energy, high expectations and a clear vision for the future to the Maine East Football program,” Schanz said in a release. “Coach Winkel has developed a detailed action plan to build for the 2018 season - he looks forward to getting started by meeting the team, parents and other members of the Maine East community.” Winkel was a member of the 2013 NIU football team that

Bob Winkel shocked the Bowl Championship Series and earned a berth in the Discover Orange Bowl against Florida State. It is that attitude Winkel will look to bring to Maine East in hopes of turning the program around. “That will feed into it. At Northern, our saying was ‘The Hard Way’ and we always did things the hard way and worked harder than anyone else,” Winkel said. “Our new mantra at Maine East this upcoming season and for the seasons to come is ‘Be Uncommon.’ Being uncommon goes for in the community, in the classroom and on the field. When I SEE HIRE PAGE 6

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Bob Winkel was part of the 2013 NIU football team that played in the Orange Bowl, now he looks to bring that same attitude to Maie East as its newest head football coach.


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SPORTS

HIRE FROM PAGE 5 was at Northern, we really took those three aspects of things – the community, the classroom and on the field – extremely seriously. “I think we became better people, better students first and that was a major piece of us being so successful and making it to the Orange Bowl. That will be a huge piece for me in us becoming successful at Maine East.” Winkel takes over for Scott Smith, who coached Maine East to a 3-33 record over the past four seasons. Winkel becomes the fourth head coach in the last 10 years. He comes from East Aurora where he served as defensive coordinator the past two seasons under Kurt Becker – his former head coach at Marmion Acad-

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM emy. “Kurt Becker, who was my coach when I was in high school and he was nice enough to bring me on his staff when I was doing my student teaching there,” Winkel said. “Then, I was the linebackers coach there for two years and special teams coordinator and JV head coach. Then, after two years, our defensive coordinator got the head job at Burlington Central and I was promoted to defensive coordinator and was defensive coordinator the past two years.” At 26 years old, Winkel is one of the youngest head coaches in the state. “It is exciting. Being a young head coach, and I know there are not too many of us in the state, speaks to coach Becker at East Aurora – he really molded all of us

coaches to become head coaches – and that speaks about him as a coach,” Winkel said. “Maine East is a huge district and I saw that the population is very diverse like East Aurora. Being at Northern Illinois was the same way in terms of football and it is great for me to be able to work with that population. I think sometimes it is easier to step into a situation where the program is winning and a foundation is there. Seeing that they are a program that has been struggling and coming in, this is a program that I have to build from the ground up and build a culture and mold things into the way I want things to go.” Winkel is the second member of the 2013 NIU team to get a head high school job in Illinois this offseason, as former Huskie

quarterback Jordan Lynch, who was hired to replace Frank Lenti at Mt. Carmel. “Us becoming coaches speaks to the coaches we had in high school and our college coaches. Between coach (Jerry) Kill coming recruiting us and teaching us the hard way and coach (Dave) Doeren coming in and setting the bar high,” Winkel said. “I think we learned a lot about being a coach while we were playing. We learned what the right things to do as a coach and what the wrong things were.” His ties to his background will carry over to Maine East as he will bring in former Romeoville and Northern Illinois University running back Cam Stingily as an offensive coach as well as Andy Windisch, his former offensive coordinator at Marmion Acad-

emy as a quality control coach. Winkel will look to turn around the Blue Demons and he will look to do so by following another NIU alum and coach and current head coach at the University of Minnesota – PJ Fleck. “He was the one that recruited me and convinced me to go to Northern and I would have run through a wall for him,” Winkel said. “I never want to compare myself to coach Fleck, but I use him as an idol and he is an icon because he brings such passion and energy to the game and I try and do that every day and bring it out in my players. (Fleck) is a winner because of the type of energy he brings to the field every day. I think young coaches should emulate that even more because that will help your team be successful.”


BUSINESS + REAL ESTATE

NEWS ABOUT LOCAL BUSINESSES IN YOUR COMMUNITY THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

COLUMN >> DAVE SAYS

Needing a co-signer means not ready to buy a house DEAR DAVE, My sister has bad credit due to a lot of late payments. She has finally started to change her ways and get control of her finances, because she and her fiancé want to make an offer on a house. The bank won’t approve it if she is on the loan, and his income alone isn’t enough to get the amount they need. His parents are well-off, and they have offered to co-sign on the loan. Is this a bad idea? RHONDA DEAR RHONDA, It’s a really bad idea. Those two have no business thinking about a house right now, and his parents are about to make things even worse with their loving, misguided help. If you need a co-signer, you’re nowhere near ready to buy a home. They need to slow down. I mean, they’re just engaged. They don’t even need a house at this point. They should get married, live in a

* Dave Ramsey is CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven best-selling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 13 million listeners each week on 585 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on the web at daveramsey. com and on Twitter at @DaveRamsey.

cheap apartment for a while, and work on paying off their debts. After that, they need to save up an emergency fund of three to six months of expenses, then start setting cash aside for a huge down payment on their first, modest home. These two have a bad case of house fever. And mom and dad need to step back, look at things objectively, and realize they would not be blessing these kids by helping get them into a home they obviously can’t afford! —DAVE

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LEGAL LISTINGS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS; GREEN OAKS EAST CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.; JANET DATCU; LISA SCHNEIDER; ANN DATCU, AKA ANNIE DATCU; MICHELE DATCU; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF DANIEL J. DATCU, DECEASED; JACK LYDON, AS SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE OF DANIEL J. DATCU, DECEASED Defendants, 17 CH 4670 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, March 5, 2018 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 09-14-310-010-1001. Commonly known as 8855 NORTH CHESTER, NILES, IL 60714. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Sales Department at Plaintiff’s Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC, One East Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (614) 220-5611. 17-012045 F2 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3074638 Published 2/1, 2/8, 2/15

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.MOAZ A. KHAN Defendants 2017 CH 12278 8801 N. WASHINGTON STREET UNIT B NILES, IL 60714 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 22, 2017, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 26, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8801 N. WASHINGTON STREET UNIT B, NILES, IL 60714 Property Index No. 09-13-319-156-0000. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale

that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-17-13611. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-17-13611 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 2017 CH 12278 TJSC#: 38-125 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3075944 Published 2/15, 2/22, 3/1

S TAY I N F O R M E D W I T H L E G A L L I S T I N G S THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION; Plaintiff, vs. FURAT DANIEL AND ILENE DANIEL; HARRIS NA NKA BMO HARRIS NA; Defendants, 14 CH 8450 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 09-24-327-011. Commonly known as 8273 N. WASHINGTON ST., NILES, IL 60714. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Mr. Ira T. Nevel at Plaintiff’s Attorney, Law Offices of Ira T. Nevel, 175 North Franklin Street, Chicago, Illinois 60606. (312) 357-1125. Ref. No. 14-01538 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3076359 Published 2/15, 2/22, 3/1

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SENIORS

NEWS ABOUT ACTIVE SENIORS IN THE COMMUNITY THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM HOUSING FROM PAGE 3 game room, a library and a computer lab. The building is restricted to seniors age 62 and older. Three units would be open to all seniors, while the rest will be restricted to seniors whose income falls within $16,000 - $35,000. The rents range between $338-$975 a month for one-bedrooms and $743-$1,100 a month for two-bedrooms. The exact rent will depend on income, but, in all cases, heat and electricity wouldn’t be included. As Alden staff explained during the meeting, the relatively narrow size of the combined lot and that fact that the project can’t disturb the water reservoir behind it means that the building must be relatively close to the street and there isn’t a lot of room for parking. As the result, they ask for several variances – most notably, they asked to be allowed to only have 70 parking spots. As the staff noted, the building is within walking distance of Pace bus Route 290, which serves Touhy Avenue, Route 270, which serves the nearby Milwaukee Avenue, and Niles Free Bus Route 411, which serves most of the village west of Milwaukee Avenue, the Leaning Tower YMCA and the Village Crossing shopping plaza. As the discussion got underway, some commissioners wondered whether there was actually a demand for affordable senior housing in Niles. Planning and Zoning Board chair Thomas Kanelos wondered what kind of market research the Alden Foundation has done to show that there was a need. Elizabeth Demes, the Foundation’s Executive Director, responded that they looked at existing facilities and the income levels in the village and the area. “Forty-four percent of your households would qualify for this housing,” she said. Kanelos was still skeptical. “If we’re trying to determine benefits to Niles, we need to know how many units are going to be unused,” he said. “How many taxpaying seniors would leave their house and move in?” Demes responded that when they built a similar project in southwest suburban Woodridge the waiting list was already full by the time construction got underway, and all of the seniors on the waiting list were from Woodridge. PACE FROM PAGE 2 platform would be directly across the street, at the northwest corner. For the Cumberland Avenue/Dempster Street intersection, Pace only had one option for the westbound platform location - between the two driveways leading into the Citibank building. For the westbound, Pace considered either the southwest corner, where the current stop is located, of the southeast corner, where the Maryhill Cemetery begins. The transit agency decided to go with the former. The Dempster/Milwaukee intersection was one of the more complicated intersections. Route 250 currently has stops on all four sides; but for Pulse, Pace was only going to have two platforms – the only question was which side would be chosen. It wound up putting the westbound platform at the northeastern corner and the eastbound platform at the southwestern corner. Current plans call for a walkway between the eastbound stop and the Pulse Milwaukee southbound station to be built nearby. At Waukegan Road/Dempster Road intersection, Pace only considered one location for the eastbound platform – on the southeast side of the intersection, at the Bank of America parking lot. With the west-

While there is no way to restrict the building to Niles residents without violating state and federal anti-discrimination laws, Randi Schlossberg-Schullo, president of Alden Management Services said that there was a way the village could make it earlier for Niles residents to get in. “Our [advise to you] is to do what we do in Woodridge,” she said. “You start your own waitlists, you feed us all the residents.” Niles, Schlossberg-Schullo said, can advertise the waitlist on its village newsletter. Commissioner Susan DeBartolo said that, from personal experience, she saw a need for this kind of project. “I absolutely love this building,” she said. “My grandmother was in building such as this in Decatur. She was on a fixed income.” DeBartolo and Commissioner Barbara Nakanishi wondered if Alden could put some landscaping in the parking lot or, at the very least, to put some barrier between the parking lot and the sidewalk. The staff responded that the barriers were “unsightly” and there was simply no room for any landscaping. Commissioner Morgan Dubiel, a former Bugle columnist, wondered if the foundation could put the parking garage under the apartments. “You’re taking away the rain garden, you’re asking for a lot of landscaping allowances,” he said. “And we have to prove to our Niles residents that this is [good] thing for them.” Architect Robert Kim responded that, given the building’s footprint and the fact that, unlike with the surface parking lot, they would need to put in columns to support the floors above, there would simply be no room to put in 70 parking spaces. Kim also noted that, when it came to building design, he and the other architects took cues from the Niles South Milwaukee Corridor Plan. Kanelos said that, while he would ideally prefer more parking and landsaping, he could see where the foundation was coming from. “Clearly, you have a lot of pride [in the project],” he said. “I’m sure you’d put in more landscaping if you could.”

bound platform, it considered putting it either west or east of the driveway into the Prairie View Community Center. The transit agency chose the former. As previously reported by the Bugle, Pace considered something that would spell a major change for riders using the Dempster-Skokie Yellow Line ‘L’ station. All of the Pace and CTA buses that serve it currently pull into the Park-and-Ride, creating a convenient connections to the ‘L’ trains and the buses. But as Ryan Ruehte, a Pace Rapid Transit Corridor Planner, previously told the Bugle, the issue that pulling in and back out added extra 6-7 minutes to the trip. That is why Pace considered putting the platforms on Dempster Street. The transit agency would up recommending that option, putting the eastbound platform between where the ‘L’ track dead-ends and the bike path, while putting the westbound platform across the street from the Park-n-Ride entrance. For the eastbound riders, the bike path would still provide a convenient connection to the trains, and the buses are within walking distance. However, westbound riders would be required to cross Dempster Street. Pace still needs to consider environmental impact and engineering issues before fully finalizing the platform locations. The transit agency is expecting to wrap that up before the end of this year.


NEWS FOR ACTIVE SENIORS IN THE COMMUNITY

SENIORS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

CALENDAR Through MARCH 25 Asia in Bloom: The Orchid Show. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Chi-

cago Botanical Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe. Look for sun-lit orchids under colorful handmade parasols, listen for the trickle of water from a bamboo spout, and take in a Japanese-style dry garden surrounded by burnt cedar in the shou sugi ban tradition. The Chicago Botanic Garden’s Orchid Show is an homage to the rich culture of Asia and its stunning array of native orchids. See 10,000 orchids in bloom. chicagobotanic.org.

FEBRUARY 15 Hot Ticket: Dunkirk. 2 and 6 p.m. at Morton Grove Public Library, 6140 Lincoln Ave. In Dunkirk (2017, PG-13, 1 hr 45 min), Allied soldiers from Belgium, the British Empire and France are surrounded by the German Army, and evacuated during a fierce battle in World War II. Cast: Fionn Whitehead, Barry Keoghan. For more information about this event, visit www.mgpl.org or call 847-965-4220.

FEBRUARY 17 Creative Coloring for Adults. 2

p.m. at Morton Grove Public Library, 6140 Lincoln. Tap into your creativity and relieve stress in this coloring program just for adults. We will provide unique coloring pages for all skill levels, as well as markers and colored pencils: you provide the imagination. Must be 18 or older to attend. To register for this event, visit www.mgpl.org or call 847-9654220. Ave.

FEBRUARY 18 Performance: A New Birth of Freedom. 2 p.m. at Morton Grove

Public Library, 6140 Lincoln Ave. Portrayed by Kevin Wood, President Abraham Lincoln speaks about his own life and history of the USA from our independence in 1776 through the Civil War. For more information about this event, visit www.mgpl.org or call 847-965-4220.

FEBRUARY 20 Movies, Munchies & More: Film: Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,

11:30 a.m. at Morton Grove Public

RO G Norma M. Rog, nee Raeder, 97, beloved wife of the late Leon; loving mother of Antonia (Jim) Jennings, Genevieve (Ken) Rarey, Kathlyne Rog, Michael (Peggy) Rog, Mary (Mike) Hoenig, Therese Rog, and Geraldine (Mark) Manieri,; dear grandmother of William, Kristen, Anthony, Annie, Michael, Tim, Holly, Robert, Jessica, Stetson, Patrick, Steven, Nicholas, and the late Matthew;

U P CO M I N G E V E N T S I N YO U R A R E A

Library, 6140 Lincoln Ave. Every Tuesday at 11:30 a.m., enjoy movies or presentations with a cup of coffee and a cookie. Enjoy watching “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” (1939, NR, 2 hr 9 min). Jefferson Smith is appointed to fill a vacancy in the United States Senate. His plans promptly collide with political corruption, and he decides to stand up to his peers by taking his case to the Senate floor. Cast: James Stewart, Jean Arthur, Claude Rains. For more information about this event, visit www.mgpl.org or call 847-965-4220.

FEBRUARY 21 Discover Garfield Park Conservatory. 1 p.m. at the Chicago

Botanical Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe. New! The Garfield Park Conservatory on the west side of Chicago was the concept of Prairie School landscape architect Jens Jensen. At the time of its completion in 1908, the conservatory was considered revolutionary for the presentation of the plant collection and specifically themed rooms. This class will focus on the history as well as the current and future usage of the conservatory and Garfield Park.

FEBRUARY 24 Winter Wine and Whiskey Fest. 4 to 8 p.m. at Brookfield Zoo,

8400 31st Street, Brookfield. Come out of your winter hibernation and warm up at Brookfield Zoo’s first ever Winter Wine and Whiskey Fest! Enjoy wine and whiskey samples, hors d’oeuvres, live music, and meet and greets with Animal Ambassadors! https://www.czs.org/ WinterWineandWhiskey.

FEBRUARY 25 Critic’s Choice: Beatriz at Dinner. 2 .m. at Morton Grove Public

Library, 6140 Lincoln Ave. A selection of critically acclaimed independent and foreign films. Beatriz at Dinner (2017, R, English, 1 hr 20 min) shows a Mexican immigrant gets into an argument with a real-estate tycoon at a posh dinner party. For more information about this event, visit www.mgpl.org or call 847-9654220.

great grandmother of 12; greatgreat grandmother of 1. She was a member of the St. John Brebeuf Catholic Women’s Club, the GLADD Program, and the 41st Division (through her spouse). Visitation was Feb. 5 at the Skaja Terrace Funeral Home 7812 N. Milwaukee Ave. Niles. Funeral Mass was February 6 at St. John Brebeuf Church. Interment Maryhill Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital appreciated. Funeral info: 847-966-7302 or www. skajafuneralhomes.com

FEBRUARY 27 Movies, Munchies & More: Film: Ray. 11:30 a.m. at Morton Grove

Public Library

6140 Lincoln Ave. Enjoy the story of legendary rhythm and blues musician Ray Charles in Ray (2004, PG-13, 1 hr 51 min), from his humble beginnings in the South, where he went blind at the age of seven, to his rise to fame during the 1950s and 1960s. Cast: Jamie Foxx, Regina King, Kerry Washington. For more information about this event, visit www.mgpl.org or call 847-965-4220. MARCH 1 A Tale of Two Japanese Gardens. 6:30 p.m. at the Chicago

Botanical Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe. New! Northern Illinois has the distinction of having two highly acclaimed Japanese gardens overseen by equally acclaimed horticulturists. Join us as they discuss the harmony and symmetry of what makes each garden unique and what elements make them similar.

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PAGE 1 2 | T HUR SDAY , F EBR UARY 15, 2018 | B UGL EN EWSPAPERS.CO M TA K E 5 M I N U T E S FOR YOURSELF!

ARIES

MARCH 21 TO APRIL 20

You might prefer to be a trail blazer and doer of daring deeds but in the week ahead you are more likely to earn disapproval for your efforts. Maintain a low profile and steer clear of disputes.

GEMINI

M AY 2 2 T O J U N E 2 1

Don’t hide the truth or obscure the facts. Overcome obstacles and objections by holding honest discussions. Emphasize the mutual benefits rather than pointing out the weaknesses this week.

LEO

J U LY 2 3 T O A U G U S T 2 1

Don’t fall prey to wishful thinking as this week unfolds. Don’t ignore the people who support and appreciate you even if you think you can do better elsewhere. Be romantic, not gullible.

ACROSS 1 PREPARES TO STRIKE, IN A WAY 6 WHERE MANY LEADING MALES MAY BE SEEN? 15 NOCTURNAL PROBLEM, USUALLY 16 SOURCE OF SOME SAUCE 17 LETS 18 HELP 19 CHIC MODIFIER 20 ADVERTISERS SAY IT SELLS 21 MOTHER OF HUEY, DEWEY AND LOUIE 22 SERVICE PROVIDERS 24 HALL OF FAME NHL COACH ROGER 26 SMALL POWER SOURCE 27 PARAGON 28 TOOK A SHOT AT 29 STICKS 33 GOOGLE GOAL 34 “SEMPER FIDELIS” COMPOSER 35 “I LIKE THAT!” 36 ENCOURAGEMENT BEFORE A SHOT 39 MILLIONS CAN PLAY IT AT ONCE 41 FREQUENT GREENSTREET COSTAR 42 OLYMPICS COMPETITOR SINCE 1896 43 TO THE EXTENT THAT 46 QUAINT INN ROOM UPRIGHT 47 ADJUST ONE’S SIGHTS 48 GET EVEN WITH 49 PIC SANS NOM, PAR EXEMPLE 50 PET IDENTIFICATION AID 53 COME UP WITH __ 54 RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH FEATURE 55 “CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE”

NOVELIST 56 GOT BACK TO ONE’S OFFICE? 57 THREW WIDE, SAY

DOWN 1 COURSES AROUND COURSES 2 BELLINI’S “CASTA DIVA,” FOR ONE 3 METROPOLITAN AREA 4 MUSER’S WORDS 5 NORDIC CARRIER 6 AGRICULTURAL UNITS 7 CULMINATION 8 MD’S EMPLOYEE 9 GEORGE WASHINGTON RECEIVED AN HONORARY ONE FROM HARVARD U. 10 PREPARED 11 PLAY THAT INSPIRED AN OPERA 12 GRUELING GRILLINGS 13 __ PARK, CALIF. 14 IMPALA, E.G. 20 SUBJ. OF SOME “BOSSYPANTS” CHAPTERS 23 LIKE SOME TIMERS? 24 OMINOUS OATER

SYMBOL 25 “HAIRSPRAY” MOM 27 LOGITECH PRODUCT 29 TRANSVAAL SETTLERS 30 IT MAY HAVE A BELL ON IT 31 BAG LADY? 32 CUT 34 SHOT CONTENTS 37 MAKER OF AGEDEFY PRODUCTS 38 INSULIN, FOR ONE 39 PRECEDED 40 THEORETICALLY 42 LAWYER’S CHARGE 43 DEFENSIVE COVERING 44 IT FLOWS THROUGH TROYES AND MELUN 45 PRIMA __: SELFEVIDENT 46 OSTRICH, FOR EXAMPLE 48 IPHONE DISPLAY 51 AGCY. CONCERNED WITH DRUG-RESISTANT BACTERIA 52 IN 53 EQUALS

LIBRA

SEPTEMBER 24 TO OCTOBER 23

Friends and co-workers can be a great resource for financial advice in the week ahead. Make purchases that require good taste in the next two days. Avoid disagreements later in the week.

SAGITTARIUS

NOVEMBER 23 TO DECEMBER 22

Use every opportunity to clear the air and put relationships on track in the first part of the week. By the end of the week people may easily misunderstand your motives or intentions.

AQUARIUS

JANUARY 21 TO FEBRUARY 19

Sweet dreams are made of this. You may become more romantic and preoccupied by your inner fantasies as this week unfolds. Use your imagination when purchasing tasteful household decor.

SUDOKU

TAURUS

A P R I L 2 1 T O M AY 2 1

Speak calmly and clearly and then people will listen to what you say. During the week ahead you can improve your reputation and engender good will by encouraging teamwork.

CANCER

J U N E 2 2 T O J U LY 2 2

You might take pride in good heart-keeping rather than good housekeeping in the week ahead. Put your best efforts into mending fences and head off misunderstandings in advance.

VIRGO

AUGUST 22 TO SEPTEMBER 23

Your artistic and creative side might begin to bloom during the week ahead. Your job might entail some handicrafts or using your imagination. Learn to do something that is inspiring.

SCORPIO

OCTOBER 24 TO NOVEMBER 22

The upcoming week provides numerous opportunities to be creative or create lasting relationships. Make major purchases and sign agreements as early in the week as possible.

CAPRICORN

DECEMBER 23 TO JANUARY 20

Be honest with yourself as well as others in the week to come. Don’t beat around the bush or cover up financial expenditures. Make key decisions as soon as possible or next week.

PISCES

FEBRUARY 20 TO MARCH 20

Embrace what is offered. Someone could offer you an incentive to begin a new study, to join a team sports program or to travel early this week. Every opportunity contains a hidden benefit.

JUMBLE

Tribune Content Agency, LLC. 2018

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

JUMBLES:

• ACUTE • ICING • SURVEY • PURSUE

ANSWER:

TO LEARN ABOUT THE COSMOS, CARL SAGAN ATTENDED A -- “UNIVERSE-ITY”

Niles 2-15-18  
Niles 2-15-18  
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