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M AY 16 , 2 0 1 8 V O L . 1 0 I S S U E 36

#jolietbugle

FORUM

Celebrating IL Great Migration brought more than 500K to Illinois SEE PAGE 4

SPORTS

Good news? Porters have shot at playoff run SEE PAGE 7

BUSINESS Dave Says First, lay a solid financial foundation

SEE PAGE 11

JOLIETBUGLE.COM


NEWS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

CITY NEWS

New hotel welcomes visitors to Joliet Holiday Inn and Suites on Houbolt Road and I-80 opened late last month

BY MARNEY SIMON Enterprise Staff @PlainfieldNews news@enterprisepublications.com

The developers of a new hotel in Joliet hope their business becomes a nature-adjacent oasis for those looking to stay in the city. The Holiday Inn and Suites on Houbolt Road and I-80 opened late last month. On May 1, Sejal Patel, a partner with the Hospi-

tality Guru Group, gave a brief presentation to members of the Joliet City Council on the new facility and what it has to offer. Construction began five years ago on the 120-room Holiday in, which sits on an 11-acre lot inside the Rock Run Business Park. The new hotel features suites, a pool, hot tub and sauna, a workout facility, patio, and new restaurant.

Patel said the developers worked with the city to create a relaxing space that fits in with local nature trails. “One of the things we felt really strongly about was creating a nice public space for the community,” Patel said. “Outdoor space is very important to us, and we were able to maintain the outdoor space. This building doesn’t actually have a back, there’s no, sort of, back of the building, so all four sides have been beautified. It turned out really nice and we see a lot of guests spending time out

COUNTY NEWS

Police officers to stake out nearly 300 Dunkin’ Donuts On May 18 area police officers again taking to rooftops to raise funds for Illinois Special Olympics For the 16th year in a row, law enforcement officers from throughout the state will rise to the occasion and support Special Olympics Illinois atop nearly 300 Dunkin’ Donuts rooftops on Friday, May 18, beginning at 5 a.m. until noon. Officers hope to top last year’s donation total of more than $700,000 from 272 rooftops as they go to new heights to raise awareness and donations for the Law Enforcement Torch Run to benefit Special Olympics Illinois. Special Olympics athletes and their families and representatives from Chicago’s major sports teams are among the special guests who will join police officers and show their support. In honor of the Special Olympics athletes and law enforcement participating in the rooftop event, Dunkin’ Donuts will donate $15,000 to the Illinois Law Enforcement Torch Run. In addition, each guest who visits a Cop on a Rooftop location that day and makes a donation to the Torch Run will receive a free donut coupon. Guests donating at least $10 will receive a Law En-

forcement Torch Run travel mug (while supplies last) and a coupon for free medium coffee. Other items, such as Torch Run T-shirts and raffle tickets, will be sold for various donation amounts. Additional activities will vary by Dunkin’ Donuts location. Dunkin’ Donuts also has created a special glazed red and white donut ring depicting Special Olympics Illinois colors. The donut, called “The Champion,” will be available at Dunkin’ Donuts locations in Chicago and suburbs May 18. Detective Robbie Peterson of the West Chicago Police Department says “Cop on a Rooftop is important because it puts the athletes of Special Olympics in the forefront that day across the state of Illinois and gives us, law enforcement officers, an opportunity to interact with our community in a positive manner. My involvement with Special Olym-

pics is truly an honor and another chance to uphold the oath I took when I was hired....to protect and serve.” Special Olympics Athlete Becky Cavanagh of Clarendon Hills adds,” Eating donuts is my favorite part of Cop on a Rooftop. Then I like talking to Detective Robbie and all the nice people who donate.” LOCAL POLICE DEPARTMENTS WILL BE AT THE FOLLOWING DUNKIN’ DONUTS: • 1724 N Plainfield Rd Crest Hill • 4708 Caton Farm Rd Joliet • 3011 Plainfield Rd Joliet • 1350 Houbolt Rd Joliet • 20 S Larkin Ave Joliet • 422 S. Chicago St Joliet • 1069 E 9th St Lockport • 13313 S State Route 59 Plainfield

here… We really wanted to create a facility that connected to nature. In all the public spaces, you have a view of the outside, which we still have some work to beautify, but well get there.” The new hotel also includes the Rock Run Convention Center, a 6,000 square-foot banquet space as well as 2,000 square feet of break-out meeting space. The new hotel also includes a new restaurant, Burger Theory, one of 21 Holiday Inn-owned restaurants in the county. The restaurant opened in late April.

Council members, asking about hours of the new restaurant, were told that hours could be adjusted based on clientele. Patel said the depending on events, the building could house up to 1,000 people at any given time. Thanked members of the city for their input and working together on the project. “We’ve created a very beautiful and safe structure for the city of Joliet… I think we collectively created something nice,” Patel said.

COUNTY NEWS BRIEFS

Prepare your taste buds for the Forest Preserve’s ‘Food Truck Fridays’ program After a delicious debut in 2017, the Forest Preserve District of Will County’s “Food Truck Fridays” program will cruise into its second year with extra helpings of food and fun. Twelve food truck feasts will take place from 4:30-7 p.m. Fridays, June 1-Aug. 24. The Forest Preserve is scheduling more trucks this year, and the goal is to have three food trucks and one dessert truck at all of the scheduled dates. Four preserves will each host one “Food Truck Fridays” session per month. The food trucks will be on-site at Hammel Woods – Crumby Recreation Area in Shorewood, June 1, July 6 and Aug. 3; Hickory Creek Barrens Nature Preserve in New Lenox,

June 8, July 13 and Aug. 10; Whalon Lake in Naperville, June 15, July 20 and Aug. 17; and Prairie Bluff Preserve in Crest Hill, June 22, July 27 and Aug. 24. Radio personality Kevin Kollins from WJOL-AM will spice things up by broadcasting live from the June 1 program at Hammel Woods. If you want a taste of what’s to come, June’s lineup might just make your mouth water: June 1, Hammel Woods – Crumby Recreation Area: Smokin’ Z BBQ, The Fat Shallot, Lucy’s and Nothing Bundt Cakes. June 8, Hickory Creek Barrens: Grumpy Gaucho, The Fat Shallot and Cupcakes for Courage. June 15, Whalon Lake: Ofrenda Food Truck, Brother George’s BBQ, Lucy’s and Nothing Bundt Cakes. June 22, Prairie Bluff: Grumpy Gaucho, Tacos Maui, Ugly Truckin Sandwiches and Cupcakes for Courage. For more details on each food truck date, visit the Event Calendar at ReconnectWithNature.org.


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NEWS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

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WILL COUNTY

Food Bank hosts opening for new center Supporters of Northern Illinois Food Bank recently joined in a public grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony Nearly 200 community members and supporters of Northern Illinois Food Bank recently joined in a public grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony for the Food Bank’s new South Suburban Center, located on South Larkin Avenue in Joliet. The new center will support 175 local food pantries and feeding programs that currently work with the Food Bank to either receive food deliveries or schedule pickups from the main headquarters located in Geneva. The event included remarks from Northern Illinois Food Bank president and CEO, Julie Yurko; Geneace Williams, Food Bank chairwoman; Joliet Mayor Bob O’DeKirk, Will County Executive Larry Walsh, and Congressman Bill Foster. “We’re thrilled to bring this much-needed resource to the communities of the south suburbs, and humbled by the support we’ve received to make this a reality,” said Yurko. “The South Suburban Center improves access to fresh foods like dairy products and vegetables and helps our partner agencies

get fresh food and other staples to their clients more efficiently, especially in those areas we’ve determined to be high-need.” The South Suburban Center occupies a former Cub Foods location, owned by Harvest Bible Chapel, and made use of existing dock access, refrigeration and freezer walls. In addition to food storage capacity and access for agencies, the warehouse has been configured to provide food sorting/packing space for volunteers, as well as offices for Food Bank staff. With the increased food distribution and volunteer capacity at the South Suburban Center, the Food Bank will be able to provide an additional million meals annually to residents in Will, Grundy, Kendall and Kankakee counties. Right now, the Food Bank supplies more than 14 million meals to nearly 80,000 food insecure residents in those counties; with more than half being children. The Joliet facility is the fourth distribution center operated by Northern Illinois Food Bank, which currently manages three distribution centers: Northwest Center

(Rockford), North Suburban Center (Park City), and West Suburban Center (Geneva). “Fresh food is so essential to what we can provide our clients, and our partnership with Northern

Illinois Food Bank helps us make a difference in their lives every day,” said Dawn MacGregor, Executive Director of St. John Lutheran Church Food Pantry in Joliet. “The new Center means we have in-

creased access to food, helping more of our neighbors who are hungry.” The Food Bank has been raising funds for the fourth distribution center since 2015 and has raised more than $855,000 to date to remodel and build out the facility. Every year, more than half a million people across Northern Illinois visit the Food Bank’s network of 800 food pantries and soup kitchens for groceries or a hot meal. Last year alone, Northern Illinois Food Bank distributed more than 65.5 million meals to people in need across its 13-county service area through programs such as its Mobile Pantry, Senior Grocery, Milk2MyPlate, After School Meals and BackPack programs.

TROY COMMUNITY

Orencic gives to childhood cancer research For achieving their goal of raising more than $3,000 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Student Series, students at William B. Orenic Intermediate School in Plainfield got to throw pies in the faces of more than 30 of their principals, teachers and other staff members. The school actually raised a total of $3,756.28 from the fundraiser sponsored by the W.B.O. Honor Society Service Club, which ran throughout the month of March. The club’s sponsors are teachers Chelsea Stoltz and Alison Radek. The students donated through their ninth period classes. The Most Giving Class was

teacher Christopher Giugler’s classroom, which raised $549.12 through donations of pennies and other change. The Second Most Giving Class was Mary Rourke’s, which raised $518.47. Honorable mentions went to Laura Devic’s class, which raised $497.90, and Alison Radek’s class, which raised $336.90. Giugler’s and Rourke’s classes were rewarded by being the piethrowers at the assembly. W.B.O. Intermediate School is a Troy Community School District 30-C school.

Troy Robotics

Clubs win Best Design Award at competition

Two Troy Community School District 30-C Robotics Club teams did well in the recent Will County 4-H Robotics Competition. The PANDAmonium Team of William B. Orenic Intermediate School received Best Overall Robot Design Award at the event. Team members are Aubrey Bernard, Caroline MacGregor, Nina Mayfield, Isabela Molek, Paige Rakes, Kylee Rempel, Riley Streit, Ava Tuider and Erin Winke.

The Troy Smoke Jumpers Team of William B. Orenic Intermediate and Troy Middle Schools took second place overall in the competition. Team members are Matthew Papesh, Ethan Podmolik, Kevin Trizna and Elijah Zelinski. Each team brought robots to the competition that they had

programmed to do tasks particular to the challenge. One robot put out a “wildfire,” another navigated through a forest, and another moved supplies into an emergency kit. The coach of the W.B.O. Robotics Team is Rebekah Tazelaar, and the coach of the T.M.S. Robotics Team is Ruth Juhant.


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We want to hear from you! Send us your feedback at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

GUEST COLUMN

Great Migration brought more than 500,000 to Illinois Victory Bell can still remember the night when he boarded the Illinois Central Railroad BY CHUCK SWEENY OF THE ROCKFORD REGISTER STAR Victory Bell can still remember the night when he boarded the Illinois Central Railroad’s City of New Orleans in Durant, Mississippi, bound for Chicago, then changing trains and ending up in Rockford. It was 1945, at the height of the Jim Crow apartheid in Dixie that purposely kept blacks poor with few rights. Bell, his mother and siblings were headed north to join his father, who had already moved north to get a factory job. “We had been sharecroppers,” the 83-year old Bell remembers working near Durant, 60 miles north of Jackson. The family had eked out a living, but opportunities for advancement just were not there for black folks. “I remember it was in the middle of the night when we boarded the train. We had to sit in the black section. When we got to Illinois, the conductor said we could sit anywhere we liked on the train,” Bell said, “and we no longer had to say ‘sir ‘or ‘ma’am’ to white people, which was new to us.” His uncle and father had come to Rockford in 1943 and 1944 to get jobs that paid better than sharecropping. “The machine tool businesses were very aggressive in hiring at that time, and people were able to come to Illinois and get jobs at various machine companies and make a decent salary,” Bell said. Illinois’ manufacturing industries were working around the clock to turn out planes, tanks, guns and bullets for the armed forces during World War II. The state’s manufacturers continued to boom after the war. Bell is a living embodiment of The Great Migration, the movement from 1916 to 1970 of 6 million to 7 million black Americans from the states of the old Confederacy to the North. More than 500,000 came to Illinois.

They were fleeing legal oppression. They were looking for better lives for their families, and for the rights to vote, to participate in their government, to serve on juries — in other words, to exercise all their rights as U.S. citizens. Yes, these freedoms had been won in the Civil War, but when Reconstruction ended in 1877 and the U.S. Army withdrew from its occupation of the former rebel states, white Democrats reasserted their total control and suppression of the “freedmen,” as slaves were called after the war. From 1900 through the 1920s, whites erected monuments throughout the South in honor of rebel leaders to demonstrate in granite and metal who was back in charge. The Great Migration’s beginnings also coincided with World War I, when immigration from Europe slowed to a trickle and factories were short of workers. Migration to the North slowed during the Great Depression of the 1930s but picked up again during World War II and in post-war years when highways were better and cars were relatively cheap. Although prejudice was not absent in northern Illinois, it wasn’t codified into state laws that were sometimes enforced by night riders in hoods carrying torches. “When I came to Rockford I was 7 or 8 years old. I started school that same year and I had a great homeroom teacher, Mrs. Burns,” Bell said.

Bell had never been to an integrated school before because they did not exist under the mandated segregation of Mississippi. “Mrs. Burns was the kindest person and made sure I was comfortable in the school. She never showed prejudice. She had a clear understanding of how to help all the kids learn.” Bell learned well. He got a job as a janitor with the Illinois Bell Telephone Co. and advanced to lineman, installer and then supervisor. Active in Democratic Party politics, Bell became Rockford’s first black alderman in 1971, a post he held for more than 30 years before he retired. “We knew there was a different standard for blacks here, but Illinois was not as openly prejudiced. Mississippi was just a terrible, terrible place to be in if you were black,” Bell said. “We were kept out of school until November to pick cotton.” Looking back, Bell said that boarding that train so many years ago “was the best thing we could have ever done.” Chuck Sweeney of the Rockford Register Star can be reached at csweeny@rrstar.com. Editor’s note: The weekly Illinois Bicentennial series is brought to you by the Illinois Associated Press Media Editors and Illinois Press Association. More than 20 newspapers are creating stories about the state’s history, places and key moments in advance of the Bicentennial on Dec. 3, 2018. Stories published up to this date can be found at 200illinois.com.


METRO

NEWS FROM THE SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

WILL COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Supervisor charged with Criminal Sexual Abuse Wendy’s Restaurant supervisor Phillip W. Buroff, 25, charged Will County Sheriff Mike Kelley is announcing the arrest of Philip W. Buroff, 25, formerly of Orland Park, currently residing in Frankfort with acquaintances. Buroff will appear in court at Monday May 14 for a bond hearing on charges of two counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse/ages 13 to 18 and two counts of aggravated criminal

sexual abuse. In April 2018, Sheriff’s detectives began investigating allegations of sexual misconduct by a Wendy’s Restaurant supervisor, Philip Buroff and an under-age female (victim) employee. The victim stated that she and Buroff worked together at the restaurant in Mokena and became friends. Over a year-long period of time the relationship expanded to inappropriate sexual advancements over cellphone texting and a private social media site and eventually turned into engaging in sex. Sheriff’s detectives brought

Buroff in for questioning on May 7, where he made statements implicating himself and stated that he was aware of the victim being 16 years of age. He was arrested and brought to the Adult Detention Facility. Detectives are asking anyone that may have information about Buroff having any other potential relationships with under-age victims to please call Detective Burket at 727-8574 ext. 4965. Philip Buroff has been a supervisor at several Wendy’s restaurants in the areas of Frankfort, Mokena, Manteno, and Matteson.

WILL COUNTY STATE’S ATTORNEY

Judge hands down max sentence to janitor who recorded girls Ryan Thompson, 28, of Joliet, receives five years for 2017 unauthorized video recording of junior high girls while they were in school locker room Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow announces that a former janitor at a Crest Hill junior high school has been sentenced to five years in prison for making secret video recordings of adolescent girls in a locker room last year. Ryan Thompson, 28, of Joliet, pleaded guilty in January to two counts of Unauthorized Video Recording, a Class 3 Felony that carried a potential penalty ranging from probation to 2-5 years in prison.

Circuit Judge Dave Carlson handed down the maximum sentence, noting that a psycho-sexual evaluation of the defendant conducted after his guilty plea showed he had an above average risk of committing similar offenses in the future. The defendant hid behind the closed door of a utility room and used a cellular telephone to secretly record the female victims between February and March of 2017. The four video recordings did not capture the girls while

they were unclothed. State’s Attorney Glasgow praised his prosecutor, Elizabeth Domagalla, with securing a guilty plea and sentence that takes Thompson off the streets. “Assistant State’s Attorney Domagalla resourcefully utilized an extremely damning psychosexual evaluation to argue that a prison sentence was absolutely necessary in this case, even though the defendant had no criminal record,” State’s Attorney Glasgow said. “Judge Carlson heard her arguments and handed down the maximum sentence, noting that anything less would have deprecated the serious nature of this crime.”

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

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SOFTBALL

GOOD NEWS,

MAYBE Porters beat No. 1 seed LincolnWay Central - need to find a way past Lincoln-Way East BY RANDY WHALEN For the Bugle www.buglenewspapers.com

When the postseason opens next week, the good news for the Lockport Township softball team is that its done very well against the No. 1 seeded team in the Class 4A Joliet West Sectional. That’s Lincoln-Way Central, which the Porters pounded out 18 hits against and defeated 8-2 on Tuesday, May 8 in New Lenox. That was their fourth victory in three seasons over Central, including an 11-5 win in the semifinals of the Class 4A Minooka Sectional last year. So if Lockport (24-5 through May 12) matches up with the the Knights (24-3 through May 12) again, they would be trending well. There is an issue for the Porters, however. If they win the regional, which they host next week, they would likely

face Lincoln-Way East (21-1 through May 12) in a sectional semifinal. On Monday, May 7 in Frankfort, East clubbed the Porters 10-2. It was the 11th straight victory for the Griffins over Lockport. That streak started with an 11-5 loss on June 5, 2014 in in the semifinals of the Class 4A Andrew Sectional. It’s encompassed two other postseason games, including a 5-0 East win in the title game of the Minooka Sectional last year, and hasn’t stopped since. So if it gets to that point, how do the Porters stop the losing streak? “We all need to just go stick with the game plan at the plate,” Lockport senior first baseman Tara McElligott said of facing East. “[East ace] Alex Storako is a great pitcher. But we can’t just go out and swing at her rise ball. We have to let SEE PORTERS PAGE 8

PHOTO BY MATT EVANS/FOR THE BUGLE

Taylor Herschbach and the Porters pounded out 18 hits and eight runs against No. 1 seed LincolnWay Central.


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8 SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

PHOTO BY MATT EVANS/FOR THE BUGLE

Lockport needs to find a way past Lincoln-Way East to make a deep playoff run. PORTERS FROM PAGE 7 her do the work.” In her latest game, Storko made short work of the Porters. Although she surrendered six hits, she struck out 14 and was just as dominant at the plate. There she had a 3-for-3 performance, four RBI game that included a pair of doubles and a solo home run to right in the sixth. McElligott did hit her 13th home run of the season in the game. At the conclusion of last week McElligott was batting .404 with 39 RBI. But rather than focus on what they did wrong against East, the Porters focused on what went right the next day against Central. After all, that’s what got them positive results. “We told the kids that hits

are going to happen,” Lockport coach Marissa Chovanec said after the Central win. “But we made the plays that we should, and we played errorless ball [against the Knight]. That’s what we’re striving for. Putting all three pieces together is what we’re looking to do at the end of the season. Getting back focused and enjoying this game has got us back on track.” Taylor Herschbach (3-for-4, HR, RBI) also had a big game against Central. As of May 12 the senior center fielder was batting .455 with 18 extra base hits and 28 RBI. “We just came with a different mind set,” Herschbach said of the Central game compared to the day before against East. We just have to have each others backs and keep it going.” The whole Porter outfield has kept it going at the plate, as they have been hitting the ball all over the place. Senior Taylor Shingler finished last week with a .511 average with 16 RBI, and junior Lauren Johnson has been on fire all season, batting .541 with 25 RBI. Four Porter pitchers have split time in the circle. But the leading one has been Erin Kleffman, who fired a complete

game against the Knights to get the win and improve to 8-1 on the season. The junior right-hander scattered 11 hits, walked three and struck out three. “I’ve never been a strikeout pitcher, and I rely on my defense, so this season I’ve worked on trusting my defense,” Kleffman said. after the Central victory. “I think this will be a confidence-booster and show that we can play a clean game, and also hit the ball like we know that we can. I like how much we pick each other up.” Lockport, which is seeded third behind Central and East in the Joliet West Sectional opens the postseason on Tuesday, May 22 at 4:30 p.m. by hosting the winner of No. 19 seed Thornton at No. 14 seeded Crete-Monee from the day before. If the Porters win that one, they will advance to the regional title game, which will be held on Saturday, May 26 at 11 a.m. There they would face the winner of No. 6 Lincoln-Way West against No. 11 Bolingbrook, which is scheduled for Wednesday, May 23 at 4:30 p.m. at the Lockport softball field.


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SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

ST. FRANCIS

USF tennis brings in four CCAC awards The University of St. Francis women’s tennis team brought in four awards from the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference. Sofia Scholl (Korntal, Germany) and Eva Lopez (Zaragoza, Spain) were both all-conference selections, while Scholl was also named the coCCAC Freshman of the Year. USF was also one of three CCAC Champions of Character Team Award recipients. An all-conference selection in both singles and doubles, Scholl jumped right into the top of the lineup for the Saints as a freshman. She posted an 11-3 mark at No. 1 singles and a 9-7 record at No. 1 doubles. In the final regular-season match of the spring, she earned her first victory over a ranked opponent with a 3-6, 6-4, 10-8 win over No. 31 Antonia Elze of Cardinal Stritch University. Overall, she was 15-6 in singles action and 14-10 in doubles play. Lopez was named all-CCAC in doubles, finishing the year with a team-leading 16 victories in doubles action this season. She went 11-9 at the top spot, including an 8-3 victory over No. 23 Victoria Monakhova/Anna Kuechenberg from Olivet Nazarene University in the CCAC Tournament. Lopez and Scholl also paced the Saints in conference play, leading the squad with 5-1 records in singles and teaming up for a 4-2 mark in doubles. The Saints were also named a recipient of the CCAC’s

Champions of Character Team Award, sharing the honor with Holy Cross College and Olivet Nazarene. The award honors the team or teams that best exemplify the NAIA’s five core values of integrity, respect, responsibility, sportsmanship and servant leadership. USF finished its season with an 8-13 overall record and a 5-2 mark in CCAC play.

SOFTBALL University of St. Francis pitcher Morghan Dieringer (New Lenox, Ill./Lincoln-Way West) has been named a College Division Academic All-District selection by the College Sports Information Directors of America for the second time. For more information on the Academic All-District program, click here. The nursing major has been one of the best pitchers in the NAIA this season, leading USF (38-7) to Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference regular-season and tournament titles. She was recently named the CCAC Tournament MVP. After USF lost its first-round game, the Saints won six games in a span of just over 40 hours to claim the championship. Dieringer pitched in five of those six victories, recording a 3-0 record and a pair of saves. She threw 26.1 total innings in the tournament, allowing just 16 hits and four walks while striking out 30. In the championship game, she kept a 2-1 lead intact by tossing

three perfect innings in relief. This season, Dieringer is among the top-25 pitchers in the NAIA in wins (22), ERA (1.25), opponents’ batting average (.196) and saves (four). She also led the CCAC in most statistical categories on her way to being named the CCAC Pitcher of the Year. Dieringer and the Saints travel to Oregon for the 2018 NAIA National Championship Opening Round. USF will face Northwestern College (Iowa) in the first round at 11:00 a.m. Pacific time on Monday, May 14.

BASEBALL The University of St. Francis baseball team’s season came to a close after a 19-10 loss to Saint Xavier University in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Tournament. The wild slugfest included 29 runs and 32 hits between the two ball clubs. At one point, the Saints (27-27) found themselves down 16-1. However, USF did not go quietly, putting a ninespot up in the top of the fifth to pull within six. The Cougars (25-28) were able to hold on to take the victory. St. Francis put the first run on the board in the opening frame. With the bases loaded and two away, a pitch hit Anthony Faron (New Lenox, Ill./St. Rita) to force in Shawn Harper (Plainfield, Ill./Providence Catholic). SEE USF PAGE 10

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SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM USF FROM PAGE 9 Saint Xavier knotted the score in the bottom of the first and then scored 15 more runs over the next three frames to go ahead 16-1. The Saints showed resiliency, immediately answering with a nine-run top of the fifth. Kevin Mampe (New Lenox, Ill./Lincoln-Way Central)hit a two-run homer to get the rally started. Nick Dabrowski (Plainfield, Ill./Oswego East), Travis Schoonover (Braidwood, Ill./ Reed-Custer), Harper and Pat Michalak (New Lenox, Ill./Lincoln-Way Central) all recorded RBIs later in the frame. When the third out was recorded, USF had hit for the cycle and sent 16 batters to the plate in the inning against three Saint Xavier pitchers. The Cougars quickly added a trio of runs and kept the Saints in check to advance with a 19-

10 win. Michalak went 3 for 3 with a double, a triple, three walks, two runs scored and a pair driven in. Dabrowski and Michael Quiram (Shorewood, Ill./Joliet Catholic) added three hits each while Mampe had a couple of RBIs. Eight different Saints scored at least one of USF’s 10 runs. Mitch Zack (Romeoville, Ill./ Romeoville) tossed 2.1 scoreless innings in relief for USF. Quiram, St. Francis’ starting pitcher, took the loss. Cameron Powell was one of six Cougars to drive in multiple runs. He paced the squad with five. SXU’s Anthony Chimera was the beneficiary of the Cougars’ potent offensive attack, improving to 3-2 on the season. The Saints round out their season with a 27-27 record. USF won 11 of its final 12 conference contests this season to post a 20-10 mark in the CCAC.


BUSINESS + REAL ESTATE

NEWS ABOUT LOCAL BUSINESSES IN YOUR COMMUNITY WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

COLUMN >> DAVE SAYS

First, lay a solid financial foundation

For Information Please Contact: Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC One East Wacker Suite 1250 Chicago, IL 60601 P: 1-614-220-5611 F: PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

You’ve laid a solid, financial foundation for your life once you’re debt free DEAR DAVE, When is it okay to have a little fun, and buy things you want, when you’re following the Baby Steps plan? KAITLIN DEAR KAITLIN, The time for a little fun is after you’ve completed the first three Baby Steps. Baby Step 1 is saving $1,000 for a beginner emergency fund. Baby Step 2 is paying off all debt, except for your home. And Baby Step 3 means you go back and add to your emergency fund until you have three to six months of expenses set aside. Once you’re debt-free except for your home — and you have your emergency fund completed — you’ve laid a solid, financial foundation for your life. That’s when you can have a little fun and spend some money on a vacation, new furniture, or something like that. Children think about their immediate wants and do what feels good. Adults, on the other hand, devise smart, logical plans, and stick to them. I want you to have a great life, but you have to put in some hard work and say “no” to yourself sometimes in order to attain that great life! —DAVE DEAR DAVE, I’ll be receiving my income tax refund soon. It will be enough to completely pay off my two smallest debts, or get my starter emergency fund of $1,000 for Baby Step 1 in place.

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Published 5/10, 5/17, 5/24

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE of 1306 BROWN AVENUE, JOLIET, IL 60432 (SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENCE). On the 31st day of May, 2018 to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: TCF NATIONAL BANK Plaintiff V. JANICE A. SPALLIERO; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant.

What should I do? BRANDY DEAR BRANDY, I love that you’re excited about using your refund to start the Baby Steps, and begin gaining control of your finances. But we call the beginner’s emergency fund Baby Step 1 for a reason. Bad things can happen while you’re working to get out of debt. That’s why I want people to get a little money set aside before they start Baby Step 2, which is the debt snowball. What if the alternator on your car goes out, or your refrigerator dies? Life happens, and things go wrong. When this kind of stuff pops up, and you don’t have any money set aside, you’re likely to quit the plan and wind up going even deeper into debt. I know you want to get out of debt. I want you to get out of debt, too. But I want you to stick with the plan, and actually get out of debt, instead of falling off the wagon the first time you hit a bump in the road! —DAVE * Dave Ramsey is CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven best-selling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 13 million listeners each week on 585 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on the web at daveramsey.com and on Twitter at @DaveRamsey.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE of 1220 NORTH PRAIRIE AVENUE, JOLIET, IL 60435 (Brown brick, one story single family home, detached two car garage). On the 24th day of May, 2018 to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: LAKEVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff V. ALEJANDRO MENDEZ, Defendant.

P: 312-346-9088 F:

Case No. 17 CH 1075 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Published 5/3, 5/10, 5/17

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is $141,006.33 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE of 1524 Baltz Court, Joliet, IL 60431 (Single Family). On the 31st day of May, 2018 to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff V. Kevin D. Farmer; Sherron L. Farmer; Legacy Pointe Community Association Inc. Defendant. Case No. 17 CH 1315 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

For Information Please Contact:

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

PIERCE AND ASSOCIATES 1 N. Dearborn Suite 1300 Chicago, Illinois 60602

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall

Case No. 17 CH 1623 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: DAVID T. COHEN AND ASSOCIATES, LTD. 10729 W. 159th St. Orland Park, Illinois 60467 P: 708-460-7711 F: 708-460-3426 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 5/10, 5/17, 5/24


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

PHONE: 815.436.2431 >> Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. FAX: 815.439.2548 EMAIL: classifieds@enterprisepublications.com IN PERSON: Enterprise Publications >> 23856 Andrew Rd. >> Plainfield, IL


DEADLINE FOR CLASSIFIEDS: FRIDAY AT NOON WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM BUSINESS & PRIVATE PARTY CLASSIFIED ADS: $16 PER WEEK, 20 WORDS OR LESS. WEDDINGS, BIRTHS & ENGAGEMENTS: BLACK & WHITE - $25, COLOR - $35. OBITUARIES: $35.

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PHONE: 815.436.2431 WEB: buglenewspapers.com/classifieds EMAIL: classifieds@buglenewspapers.com


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LEGAL LISTINGS

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

LAKEVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff,

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff,

TCF NATIONAL BANK Plaintiff,

vs.

vs.

vs.

ALEJANDRO MENDEZ, Defendant. No. 17 CH 1075

Kevin D. Farmer; Sherron L. Farmer; Legacy Pointe Community Association Inc. Defendant. No. 17 CH 1315

JANICE A. SPALLIERO; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. No. 17 CH 1623

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 20th day of February, 2018, MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 24th day of May, 2018 , commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 110 IN BON AIR, A SUBDIVISION OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 4 AND THE EAST 330 FEET OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 5, IN TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 19, PAGES 36 AND 37, IN WILL COUNTY ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1220 NORTH PRAIRIE AVENUE, JOLIET, IL 60435 Description of Improvements: Brown brick, one story single family home, detached two car garage P.I.N.: 30-07-05-231-005-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is $141,006.33 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE AND ASSOCIATES 1 N. Dearborn Suite 1300 Chicago, Illinois 60602 P: 312-346-9088 F: MIKE KELLEY Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 5/3, 5/10, 5/17

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 26th day of May, 2018, MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 31st day of May, 2018 , commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: Lot 3, in Legacy Pointe Subdivision Unit One, a subdivision of part of the West 1/2 of the Northeast Fractional Quarter of Section 6, Township 35 North, Range 9 East of the Third Principal Meridian according to the plat thereof recorded August 8, 2004 as Document Number R2004-146522 in Will County, Illinois. Commonly known as: 1524 Baltz Court, Joliet, IL 60431 Description of Improvements: Single Family P.I.N.: 05-06-06-206-008-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC One East Wacker Suite 1250 Chicago, IL 60601 P: 1-614-220-5611 F: MIKE KELLEY Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 5/10, 5/17, 5/24

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 23rd day of January, 2018, MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 31st day of May, 2018 , commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 87 IN GEORGE H. MUNROE’S ADDITION TO RIDGEWOOD, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER AND OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 11, IN TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 20, 1889 IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 48 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 152683, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1306 BROWN AVENUE, JOLIET, IL 60432 Description of Improvements: S I N GLE-FAMILY RESIDENCE P.I.N.: 30-07-11-404-015-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: DAVID T. COHEN AND ASSOCIATES, LTD. 10729 W. 159th St. Orland Park, Illinois 60467 P: 708-460-7711 F: 708-460-3426 MIKE KELLEY Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 5/10, 5/17, 5/24

S TAY I N F O R M E D W I T H L E G A L L I S T I N G S WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM


SENIORS CALENDAR MAY 21 Low Cost Pet Vaccine Clinic.

5-8 p.m. at Karens Grooming and Boarding, 309 Republic Ave., Joliet. Cat and dog owners are welcome to walk in

to receive quality care for their pets including annual vaccinations, micro-chipping, heartworm testing, and more. Call (630) 961-8000 for more information.

MAY 22 Healthy Eating. 2-3 p.m. at 710 W.

Black Rd., Shorewood. Alden Courts and Estates of Shorewood are hosting a special presentation on how to eat more healthfully. Light refreshments will be served. An RSVP is required. Please call 815-230-8700 or register online at www.AldenCourtsofShorewood.com/spring.

UPCOMING EVENTS IN YOUR AREA WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

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U P CO M I N G E V E N T S I N YO U R A R E A

Low Cost Pet Vaccine Clinic.

5-8 p.m. at 2 Paws 4 U Pet Bakery & Treats at 1504. Essington Rd., Joliet. Cat and dog owners are welcome to walk in. to receive quality care for their pets including annual vaccinations, micro-chipping, heartworm testing, and more. Call (630) 9618000 for more information.

MAY 26 Jeric’s Skate Contest. Noon-

4 p.m. at Bott Park, 24550 W. Renwick Rd., Plainfield. All contestants will be guaranteed (1) qualifier 1-minute run to show off their best tricks for the crowd and judges. Top scorers from the first run will then skate in a second and deciding final run. On-site registration will start at 11a with the contest starting at noon. Rain make-up is June 2. Day of event registration. plainfieldparkdistrict.com

MAY 30 Meet the Counselors Night: Summer Camp. 6:30 p.m. at Boy Scout Park 23729 W. Ottawa St., Plainfield. All parents and campers registered for the Plainfield Park District’s summer camps are strongly encouraged to attend. plainfieldparkdistrict.com

JUNE 3 Plainfield Farmers Market.

Noon – 4 p.m. behind the Plainfield Library 15025 S Illinois St, Plainfield. For more information 630-608-7344.

JUNE 8 JBO Golf Outing Fundraiser.

Wedgewood Golf Course, 3001 Caton Farm Road, Plainfield. The Joliet Basketball Officials host a golf outing scramble each year and donates 100 percent of the profits to a local charity. All are welcome to attend. Contact Paul Novak 773-

405-8149 or Troy Boardman with any questions 708-522-7534.

For more information 630-608-7344.

JUNE 10 Plainfield Farmers Market.

Noon – 4 p.m. behind the Plainfield Library 15025 S Illinois St, Plainfield. For more information 630-608-7344.

Noon – 4 p.m. behind the Plainfield Library 15025 S Illinois St, Plainfield.

JUNE 17 Plainfield Farmers Market.


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