Page 1

DECEM B ER 5 , 2 0 1 8 VO L . 1 1 I SSUE 13

#jolietbugle

FORUM

Celebrating IL Illinois boasts a history of beasts and legends SEE PAGE 4

SPORTS

Area’s Best All-Area football team announced SEE PAGE 5

BUSINESS Dave Says Do what’s best for you when purchasing a car

SEE PAGE 6

JOLIETBUGLE.COM

SEE THE FULL SECTION INSIDE


NEWS

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

CITY NEWS

Joliet hosts 42nd annual Festival of Gnomes Actors and actresses of all ages perform in yearly show BY RYAN OSTRY Bugle Staff @RyanOstry_BR18 rostry@buglenewspapers.com

The 42nd “Festival of Gnomes” show premiered last weekend at the Billie Limacher. Bicentennial Park Theatre, attracting hundreds of Gnome advocates from all areas. Auditions occurred in the early weeks of October, culminating in actors and actresses from all different age ranges to perform in the yearly play. Rehearsal took place twice a week until last week, where in the final week of preparation, four meetings were held. “When you get this many performing, what goes unnoticed is the clean up and all the behind the curtain things that take place,” said Reg McReynolds, Director of the play. “Props, costumes, parents driving the kids back and forth and many other factors which sometimes lead to adversity creating a play.”

This play, which lasted 90 minutes with no intermission, that had singing, dancing and background stories about Gnomes, also featured around 40 actors and actresses. Before the play, Gnome paraphernalia was displayed for the visitors, along with musical sessions and more Gnome background fun facts. With the main idea that Gnomes are magical and mystical creatures that bring forth all positive aspects in life, Jan Novotny, also a director, said that she has seen the evolution of the play over the years, which keeps her participating every year. “At first, there were single digits for the amount of people were in the play which obviously isn’t the case at all anymore,” Novotny said. “A lot of these kids who started at a very young age are still coming back and performing each year, as they get older and older and more experienced, they will be taking over our jobs as directors one day.”

Even though that there was countless hours and preparation work in order to deliver a inspiring performance, Novotny added that collaborating on times for rehearsal and getting everybody to practice at once, was a lot harder than it might seem. “The first time we see all the Gnomes on the stage at the same time is the day of the show,” Novotny said. “Every time we have a rehearsal some one can’t make it with people being sick, going on

vacation, etc. When it gets to the day of the show you almost don’t know your lines because you fill in for those in rehearsal when they aren’t present.” Limacher, the park’s namesake, and Georgeann Goodsoon, who facilitated the idea of a Gnome play, had the first play with just seven performers on stage. In the first year of the play in 1977, all of the performers were adults who originated the play getting ready for the holiday season,

not expecting it to transform into what is currently is today. “Starting off with seven people and seeing what it has turned into today, I don’t know if anybody ever expected that,” Novotny said. “My daughter who is the park manager now, found the Gnome show and after she got into it, I did as well. “It has grown where scenes have been taken out, changed scenes, added scenes and so much innovation to make it as wonderful as it is today.” McReynolds also said that this play is so important to him and others, because they want to get the point across of what is truly important in life, which is something that he said needs to be talked about more. “Money is important and we need money, but that should not be the only driving goal,” McReynolds said. “Friendship, family and being successful are all things that we want to bring to the attention of our kids in the play and the audience, because that’s what Gnomes are known for and that’s the point we want to deliver.”

SCHOOL NEWS

Carl Sandburg students receive awards Congratulations to the Carl Sandburg Elementary School students who received awards during the Joliet Public Schools District 86 Board of School Inspectors meeting in November: FIND THE GIFT AWARDS Treston Adams, Jonathan Alvarez, Marcus Bouldin, Devon’tre Baker, Aniyah Donaldson, Ruby Galvan, Teazia Green, Dy’Mere Jones, Cylee Lopez, Rylie Meyer, Dakari Moore, Dev Patel, Aaron Pierce, Layoni Pierce, Jazmin Servin, Rachael Urgero, Dereon Ward, Jada Williams, Jayla Wilson

PEACE BUILDER AWARDS Camilla Alvarado, Kimberly Alvarez, Sakiyah Brown, Maya Buchanan, Juan Donoso, Crystal Gallegos, Keziah Gaston, Nahelly Irizarry, Kailyn Klein, Paul Kokuro, Bella Lesa, Clauzel Moutima, Jaden Nobles, Precious Okoroafor-Isaac, Joselyn Ramirez, Lonnell Redmond, Ava Reimer, Kaden Stepney, Izaya Vela TOP READER AWARDS Kassidy Barnes, Clauzel Moutima, Komol Ndong, Dev Patal, Taylor Vargas

In addition, the following students at Sator Sanchez Elementary were recognized as October Stu-

dents of the Month: Guillermo Almazan, Alondra Alvarado Almazan, Evelyn Angulo, Fabrisio Astorga,

Mike Betancourt, Annabella Brady King, Eliana Christian, Maximiliano Cortez, Emily Diaz, Josef Esteban Damian, Dylan Garcia, Suleyma Hernandez, Mauricio Heuramo, Venus Lopez Hermosillo, Jocelyn Lozano, Alexa Magana, Kayla Martinez, Vadhir Martinez, Yarel Martinez, Erika Navarro Redler, Nathan Perez Latinas, Sofia Plascencia, Kevin Quintero, Fatima Ramirez, Carlos Rodriguez, Yael Rodriguez Aguirre, Romeo Rojas, Johan Rosales, Jessica Sanjuanico, Brayan Santos Martinez, Cristian Sosme Moyotl, Yexenia Vigil, Jimena Zavalza


INSTAGRAM: Readers, attending a game in your area? Take a photo and tag @buglenewspapers for a chance to be featured!

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

3

VILLAGE NEWS >> SHOREWOOD

Tree lighting ceremony takes place at Towne Center Shorewood as residents watched the 36-foot tree with 3,000 lights illuminate BY RYAN OSTRY Bugle Staff @RyanOstry_BR18 rostry@buglenewspapers.com

Last Tuesday at the Shorewood Towne Center, the annual Shorewood Tree Lighting ceremo-

ny took place. Christmas carols, a surprise visit from Santa and the lighting of the 36-foot tall tree were all displayed for the residents of Shorewood.

“I love the nice cold weather, the beautiful lights and the feeling of joy and singing songs,” said Shorewood resident Renee King. “It’s amazing to see such a tall and majestic tree like that light up, it’s just apart of what Christmas is about and I love coming out every year to support the town that I am a resident of.” The event got underway at 6 p.m. with plenty of residents supporting their town in the 20-degree weather. Kids gravitated around a surprise visit from Santa, who led the way in Christmas carols encouraging everyone to sing along. Shorewood Mayor Rick Chap-

man was at the event, encouraging residents to stick around for the tree lighting, as well as stopping in the Towne Center for more sights of Christmas trees that were lit up. Another resident, Carly Forneris, said that seeing the lit up Christmas tree with 3,000 lights is her and her families way to kick off the start of the holiday season. “We do this every year, it’s a wonderful family tradition that we all enjoy doing,” Forneris said. “It’s actually a neighborhood annual event as well, with all the families and children here it really makes you feel good and truly says what Christmas is all about.”


FORUM

4

We want to hear from you! Send us your feedback at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

COLUMN

CONTACT US

DESIGN

E D I TO R I A L

GENERAL MANAGER, V.P. Advertising & Marketing A N D R E W S A M A A N andrew@voyagermediastudios.com 815.436.2431 ext. 113

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR MARK GREGORY mark@buglenewspapers.com 815.436.2431 ext. 115 STAFF REPORTERS MARNEY SIMON msimon@buglenewspapers.com RYAN OSTRY rostry@buglenewspapers.com EDITORIAL DEADLINES. Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication. sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER SHELLEY HOLMGREN sholmgren@buglenewspapers.com

ADVERTISING

SALES REPRESENTATIVES CAROL CICHOCKI ccichocki@buglenewspapers.com Downers Grove, Woodridge, Westmont & Lisle 815.436.2431 ext. 107 JAMES CICHOCKI jcichocki@buglenewspapers.com Joliet, Crest Hill, Lockport & Shorewood 815.436.2431 ext. 114 ADVERTISING DEADLINES: Space and copy deadlines for display and classified ads is at noon the Friday before date of insertion. Email classifieds@buglenewspapers. com | Legals, obituaries and happy ads are due at noon Friday. Email announcements@buglenewspapers.com. Email Legals@buglenewspapers.com

ENTERPRISE NEWSPAPERS, INC. 23856 Andrew Road #104 2017 Plainfield, IL 60585 Phone: (815) 436-2431 Fax: (815) 436-2592 MON - FRI: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (USPS 177-160) Published By Enterprise Newspapers, Inc. 23856 W. Andrew Rd. #104, Plainfield, IL 60585

A B O U T

POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to P.O. Box 892, Plainfield, IL 60544. OFFICE HOURS : Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Published every Thursday at 23856 W. Andrew Rd., Plainfield, IL 60585. Enterprise Subscription Rates: $25 per year within Will County and 60540, 60564, 60565, 60566 zip codes; $30 within Illinois; $50 per year elsewhere. Single copy 75 cents. Periodical postage paid at Plainfield, Illinois 60544 and additional mailing offices. No part of The Enterprise, Bugle & Sentinel, including advertisements, stories, photos or captions, may be reproduced without written permission from The Enterprise. Send requests to: The Enterprise P.O. Box 892 Plainfield, IL 60544 © 2018 Enterprise Newspapers, Inc.

BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM facebook.com/thebuglenewspapers twitter.com/buglenewspapers instagram.com/buglenewspapers EDITOR’S NOTE: The opinions expressed in guest columns, editorial cartoons and letters to the editor belong to the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the The Bugle or its staff.

Illinois boasts a history of beasts and legends BY PHIL LUCIANO OF THE JOURNAL STAR, PEORIA Illinois boasts a hair-raising history rife with spine-tingling stories — and that’s just with politics. Otherwise, the state’s heritage brims with tall tales of mythic beasts, spooky legends and ghost stories. A few of the favorites: Old Book: In the earliest years of the 20th century, the Peoria State Hospital in Bartonville was home to a dear, mute man known only as A. Bookbinder. Strong and steady, he would dig graves for asylum funerals, ending each by sobbing hysterically and leaning on a tree that became famously known as The Graveyard Elm. In June 1910, Old Book went the way of all men, and the entire asylum came out for his farewell. Near the end, an apparition appeared at the Graveyard Elm. The Graveyard Elm: Old Book, weeping and moaning as always. But as soon as startled officials cracked open his casket to double-check on the dead man’s whereabouts, the crying ceased and Old Book’s form vanished from the tree. Inside the coffin, onlookers spotted Old Book’s peaceful face. Piasa Bird: The Piasa (pronounced PIE-ah-saw) Bird — actually more like a dragon, with red eyes, menacing beard, scales and lengthy tail — preyed on Native Americans, eating them alive until a local chief, Chief Ouatoga, lured it out of its cave, using himself as bait. When the creature flew out, an ambush of warriors slew it with a volley of poisoned arrows. A mural was said to have been painted (possibly more than 3,000 years ago) as a commemoration of the event. Though the original mural is gone, a new one has taken its place. Cole Hollow Road Monster: In July 1972, an East Peoria teen reported he and friends had spotted a white, hairy, foul-smelling, 12-foot monster around Cole Hollow Road. “It lets out a long screech — like an old steamengine whistle, only more humany,” he said. Soon, as many as 200 armed men combed the area

but found nothing. During the search, one man accidentally shot himself trying to bag a deer. The hoopla died down before anyone else got hurt. In 1991, that teen said the report was a hoax. However, that same year, East Peoria police got a call from an anonymous local woman. She said she’d been driving on Cole Hollow Road when an “8-foot-tall hairy beast” grabbed the back of her pickup truck and refused to let go. The “beast” finally relented and let her speed off. That sighting never has been explained. The Enfield Horror: In the 1940s, a leaping monkey-like creature was spotted in Mount Vernon. Thirty years later, a similar beast — though now with three legs and eyes as bright as flashlights — was seen several times in nearby Enfield, including one report from a local radio newsman. What was it? Guesses ranged from an alien to a deformed kangaroo to a chemistry experiment gone bad. (Source: Chicago Tribune) Resurrection Mary: Legend says that in the 1930s, a young woman got into a fight with her boyfriend and left a ballroom on Archer Avenue in Chicago. Down the road, she was struck and killed by a hit-and-run driver who was never caught. Distraught, Mary’s parents laid her body to rest at Resurrection Cemetery, in the same outfit from the night of the dance. Since 1939, people have reported seeing a woman wearing a white dress on the side of the road. Sometimes, she is picked up from the side of the road or given a ride home from a neighborhood dance, but she invariably vanishes when a car passes the cemetery. Lawndale Thunderbird: In July of 1973 in the Logan County village of Lawndale, two massive birds swooped down; one carried off a child, only to drop the lad within seconds. Around that time, other sightings of oversized fowl were reported in central Illinois. Farmer City Monster: The 1970s teemed with monster sightings, but this one — hulking shape, bright yellow eyes — was witnessed by a Farmer City cop. Reports began one July, when three teens encountered it at their campsite in a field near Salt

Creek, and spread to Bloomington, Heyworth and Waynesville. Everyone who saw it noted its glowing eyes, but it was not an aggressive creature. At each encounter, the Farmer City Monster fled as soon as it had been spotted. (Source: Mysterious Heartland) Lake Michigan Sea Serpent: Between 1867 and 1890, Chicago newspapers raved over sightings of a scaled serpent 40 to 50 feet in length, very dark blue, with a grayish-white belly. In 1867, a fisherman gave a very detailed description of the creature, claiming it had come within 20 feet of his boat. It was swimming about a mile and a half off the shore of the south side of Chicago. (Source: thecryptocrew.com) Murphysboro Mud Monster: This hairy, smelly biped (a.k.a. “Big Muddy”) was seen several times in the summer of 1973 lurking near Murphysboro along the banks of the Big Muddy River. Like Peoria’s Cole Hollow Road Monster, the Murphysboro creature was described as being 7 feet tall and covered in matted, white fur. Police officers found several tracks at the scene of the first sighting, and even heard its “inhuman” cry. After a few weeks of intense scrutiny, the Murphysboro Mud Monster disappeared as mysteriously as it arrived. (Source: Mysterious Heartland) Stump Pond Serpent: Between 1879 and 1968, fishermen in Perry County spun yarns about a serpent that dwelled in the murky waters of Stump Pond. The creature was described as having a thick, green body with black fins. It was large enough to rock boats. When the lake was partially drained in 1968, locals discovered catfish that weighed more than 30 pounds, so it is possible that the “Stump Pond Serpent” was a giant catfish. (Source: Mysterious Heartland) PHIL LUCIANO can be reached at pluciano@pjstar.com, facebook.com/ philluciano and (309) 686-3155. Follow him on Twitter at @LucianoPhil. Editor’s note: The weekly Illinois Bicentennial series is brought to you by the Illinois Associated Press Media Editors and Illinois Press Association. More than 20 newspapers are creating stories about the state’s history, places and key moments in advance of the Bicentennial on Dec. 3, 2018. Stories published up to this date can be found at 200illinois.com.


PAGE 5

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

ALL-AREA FOOTBALL

HOLLYWOOD

ENDING JCA’s Keenan Hailey is Voyager Media 2018 Football Player of the Year BY MARK GREGORY Editorial Director @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com

Mike Alstott, JR Zwierzynski and Ty Isaac are just some of the names on the long list of historic running backs to wear the brown and white of Joliet Catholic. After this season, however, they are all looking up at a new name atop the list of single-season rushing leaders. While current players talk of Mike Ivlow, Josh Ferguson and Michael Johnson, future generations will be talking about – and chasing – Keenan Hailey. The 5-foot, 9-inch, 185-pound wingback had a record-setting season, racking up 2,637 yards, passing Isaac atop the single-season list. “I never thought this would happen,” Hailey said. “Passing up one of my favorite people that ever came out of JCA, that is just a great feeling. That I can I be one of those legends, hopefully people will think that of me when I leave, is just a good feeling.” Hailey added 120 receiving yards and a pair of scores to his gawdy rushing totals. For his efforts, Hailey is the 2018 Voyager Media Football Player of the Year. This season he is an Illinois High School Football Coaches Association Class 5A All-State selection, as well as East Suburban Catholic Conference Offensive Player of the Year, WJOL Offensive Player of the Year and member of the 20th an-

nual EdgyTim.com All-State team. Hailey led JCA to its state record 14th IHSA state title, a 35-27 win over Montini Catholic, coming back in the game to score the eventual final touchdown after an injury knocked him out early in the first half. It was the yardage on that final run that put him past Isaac for the single season record, giving Hailey the ultimate Hollywood ending to his JCA career. “It was special for Keenan to be able to cap off his senior season like that,” JCA coach Jake Jaworski said of the final touchdown of the game. “Talking to him on the sideline when it didn’t look like he would be able to return, to lead us here and then be out would have been a terrible way to go out. He is the ultimate warrior, I had a feeling he would suck it up for a few carries.” When Hailey went out of the game, he was still shy of Isaac’s record and it was the man he would eventually pass on the list that was one of his biggest voices of inspiration on the sidelines. “It was awesome to have another voice in my ear to keep going,” Hailey said. “He was telling me, ‘be a man, this is what you were trained for. This is our legacy. This is our tradition – we are hard here. He was a big confidence booster for me.” While Hailey has the state championship ring and the record, he is waiting his chance to give back to the future Hillmen. “There are young running backs

that I see potential in and that I think can be the next thing,” Hailey said. “I will be waiting for the day when I can go back to state and cheer on my high school team. It will be a great time and I am waiting for it.” Local players on the All-Area team are: PATRICK BANICH, NOTRE DAME Offensive guard for state semifinalists in Class 6A. Led an offensive line that produced more than 4,000 rushing on the season. JACK BENISH, BENET Led the Redwings with 80 tackles, including 17 for loss to go with a team-best 6.5 sacks. PATRICK CARDEN, NOTRE DAME Linebacker led the team with 78

tackles and posted five sacks and 12 tackles for loss on a defense that allowed 10 points per game and advanced to the 5A state semifinals. DREW CASSENS, DOWNERS NORTH Senior quarterback tallied 1,700 all-purpose yards, 1,200 on the ground. He scored 10 rushing touchdowns and two passing touchdowns. COLIN COX, JCA The 6-foot, 2-inch, 295-pound left tackle helped the Hillmen rush for more than 5,000 yards rushing this season. KEVON DORRIS, JOLIET WEST One of the best athletes in the area, Dorris posted 547 receiving yards and seven touchdowns this season.

COLE DOW, MAINE SOUTH Stepped in and took over the quarterback role for the Hawks when starter Bobby Inserra went down with injury. He finished the season 1,449 yards and an areabest 14 passing touchdowns. SCOTT FOSEN, JCA Senior defensive end tallied 30 tackles, including 12 sacks on the season. He forced a pair of fumbles and recovered one. TY GAVIN, NOTRE DAME Senior led the Dons to the IHSA Class 6A state semifinals after an ankle injury forced him to miss the final game of the regular season and play at less than 100 percent most of the playoffs. From his running back position, Gavin SEE ALL-AREA PAGE 6


With the help of The Enterprise, Bugle and Sentinel Newspapers, St. Mary Immaculate second-grade students tell Santa Claus what they want for Christmas this year. This holiday season, Voyager Media Publications began a tradition of publishing a special section of children’s letters to Santa Claus. Students were encourage to handwrite their letters to Santa and turn them in to be published on the pages of Santa’s favorite newspapers as well as his favorite web sites, where all of the letters can viewed at https:// buglenewspapers.com/santa.

“Dear Santa, for Christmas I want a new karaoke. I also want a puppie. There is one more thing. I want a squishy. I hope your sled works. I will be puting out cookies for you. I hope all you rain Dears can fly. I hope you get me those things. ”

- Love, Tess

“Dear Santa, I want a Scruff-aluve. I want a lot more. I want more Hatchimals, a Scruff-a-Lufe, a normal Hatchybaby. Santa I want a American Girl Doll motorcyle and the American Girl Doll that goes with it. That is what I want for Christmas. ”

Love, Abby

“Dear Santa, please don’t get me more than ... about 12 things. but what I want this huge gint big sloth at Walmart for 19.99 dollars. Here are some of the that I want slime kits, squishies, crafts, clothes, stuffed animals, and the huge gint big sloth. Please get me some of this stuff I have been nice.”

- From Giana

“Dear Santa, I hope you give me some good presents. I think that I’ve met you before. We will PROBABLY lay out Christmas cookies. Can you get me baseball cards please? I also like arts and craft stuff. This holiday is my second favorite holiday. My house has reddish bricks and my house only has one or two gates. I hope you have a Merry Christmas!”

- Your friend/pal Joseph P.


“Dear Santa, for Christmas I want a couple of things you don’t have to get me all of them. Here’s a list of stuff I want for Christmas: Hatchamals, Pokemon cards, 2DS XL, video games for wii, American Girl Doll kayak set, An American Girl Doll, Squishies, 2DS XL games. I hope you have safe travels to every house! Can’t wait till Christmas!”

- Love, Lily your a good person!

“Dear Santa Claus, could you please get me a unicorn.”

Love, Brianna M.

“Dear Santa, you are nice, kind, and genoris. Santa I have been trying to stay on the nice list for Chrismas I really want a violin.”

Love, Julia.

“Dear Santa, Please tell me if you a real. Also, I would like a Nintendo Switch. I am really excited!”

- Love, Jonathan

Want to see more Santa Letters? Go to buglenewspapers. com


“Dear Santa Claus, I have a question. Am I on the good list?”

Love, Jack G.

“Dear Santa, for Christmas I want L.O.L dolls and pick me pops and a toy claw machine. Merry Christmas.”

- Your friend, Lauren G.

“Dear Santa, you and your raindeer are the best. Can you bring me 2 nerf guns for me and my brother and a electric scooter and a electric car. I want a electric nerfgun and a crazy cart. I wont baseball cards and a new hockey stick and more stuff animals. I want new chest protector and a new bat and a new fish for me.”

Keegan T.


6

BUSINESS + REAL ESTATE

ALL-AREA FROM PAGE 5 rushed for 1,421 yards and 22 touchdowns. He also caught eight passes for 131 yards and a pair of scores. As a defensive back, Gavin posted 51 tackles, broke up five passes, posted four interceptions and returned two for touchdowns. COLIN GILLESPIE, BENET Redwing junior passed for 1,461 yards and 10 touchdowns on the season. CONNOR HALL, PLAINFIELD SOUTH Cougar Inside linebacker was voted co-defensive player of the year in the Southwest Prairie Conference and was team’s leading tackler with 84 tackles to go along with 17 tackles for loss, six sacks and three forced fumbles. NICK IANNATONE, JCA Senior put the Hillmen on his back when Hailey went out of the state championship game and carried the ball a Class 4A title game record 40 times for 318 yards and three touchdowns. On the season, he finished with 1,615 yards on 191 carries, while scoring 17 touchdowns. DEMO KELLIE, LISLE Jay McGrath’s top target, he posted 604 yards receiving and four touchdowns. SETH LEHR, MINOOKA Junior quarterback was team offensive MVP and named to the Southwest Prairie All Conference first team. Completed 94 of 162 passes and threw for 12 touchdowns and only two interceptions. On the ground, he carried the ball 69 times for 197 yards and seven scores. JAY MCGRATH, LISLE Mr. Do-it-All for the Lions finished the season as the area’s leader in pass yards with 1,571 and added 10 passing touchdowns. He completed 92 of his 158 passes for a 58.2 completion percentage. He led the team in rushing with 5698 yards on 142 carries and 14 touchdowns. McGrath was third in the area in scoring with 141 points. As a defensive back, he posted 48 tackles and led the team with five interceptions. He also handled SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE of 142 Akin Avenue, Joliet , IL 60433 (Single Family ). On the 27th day of December, 2018 to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: NEW PENN FINANCIAL, LLC D/B/A SHELLPOINT MORTGAGE SERVICING Plaintiff V. JENNIFER WILLIAMS AS INDEPENDENT ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL L. SCHEIDT; JENNIFER WILLIAMS, INDIVIDUALLY; SRP 2012-4, LLC; UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY, AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. Case No. 18 CH 1110 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

kicking duties for Lisle. McGrath was a member of the Illinois High School Football Coaches Association Class 3A All-State team. MUNDO MEYER JOLIET CATHOLIC Posted 72 tackles, 10 pass break ups and intercepted three passes from the defensive backfield. Offensively, he had a pair of catches, one going for a score. CAMERON MITCHELL BOLINGBROOK Defensive back tallied 32 total tackles, 18 of which were solo. Mitchell intercepted three passes, forced two fumbles, recovered and blocked one kick. ADRIEL MONTEMAYOR PLAINFIELD SOUTH The top defensive lineman on the Cougar defense. Drew opponent double teams and posted 46.5 tackles on the season. Had 13 tackles for loss and a team-best eight sacks. TY O’JANOVAC, JCA The 6-foot, 4-inch, 270-pound offensive left guard helped pave the way for Hailey, Iannantone and company this season. Also added 19 tackles and 1 sack on defense. JOE PASSARELLI, DOWNERS NORTH Trojan linebacker posted an area-best 125 tackles, 22 for loss, to go along with five sacks and forced two fumbles. Luke Preston, Maine South Senior linebacker was the CSL co-defensive player of the year. He led the Hawks with 81 tackles and posted 14 tackles for loss, eight sacks and one interception. QUENTIN PRINGLE, BOLINGBROOK Senior running back carried the ball 105 times for 1,112 yards and a team-best 18 touchdowns on the season. JAKE SHIPLA, MINOOKA Junior defensive tackle was the team defensive MVP and named to the Southwest Prairie All Conference first team. Posted 84 tackles, including 21 tackles for loss and 10 sacks. He also started as an offensive guard. DANNY SIMON, NOTRE Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other

NEWS ABOUT LOCAL BUSINESSES IN YOUR COMMUNITY WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

DAME Kicker scored 60 points for the Dons this season and was a weapon in the arsenal for Notre Dame’s state semifinal run. PETER SKORONSKI, MAINE SOUTH Junior lineman was the unanimous CSL South lineman of the year. This season, the 6-foot, 4-inch, 285-pound tackle/nose guard had 56 pancake blocks this season. On the defensive side of the ball, he tallied 22 tackles, two sacks and four tackles for loss. MICHAEL THOMPSON, WESTMONT On offense, he posted 23 catches for 472 yards, a 20.5 yards per catch average, to go along with seven touchdowns. Defensively,

than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Thompson tallied 84 tackles, 37 solos and three tackles for loss. TONY TRABOLD, JOLIET CATHOLIC Huge weapon for the state champion Hilltoppers this season, scoring 68 points, connecting on all three of his field goal attempts. Handled all kicking duties for JCA, placekicking, punting and kickoffs. KURT WEIS, JCA Defensive back is a member of the IHSA Class 5A Illinois High School Football Coaches Association All-State team and leader of a defense that rose to occasion in the playoffs en route to a state title. He posted 127 tackles and seven interceptions on the season. Offensively, he had 5 receptions for 62 yards and one score.

For Information Please Contact: KLUEVER AND PLATT, LLC. 150 N. Michigan Ave. Suite 2600 Chicago, Illinois 60601 P: 312-201-6765 F: 312-236-0514 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published 12/6, 12/13, 12/20

DAVE SAYS

Do what’s best for you when purchasing a car DEAR DAVE, I’ll be graduating from college with no debt in a couple of weeks, and I have a good job waiting for me in January. During the last few years, I’ve managed to save almost $25,000 from my part-time jobs while in school. My car is pretty beaten up and old, so I’ve been shopping at a couple of car dealerships recently. Every time I talk to a salesperson, they tell me I should finance something new instead of paying cash for a used car. What should I do? ETHAN DEAR ETHAN, I hope you’ll keep one very important thing in mind. This is your purchase, not theirs. The only reason they want you to finance something is so they’ll make a lot more money off the deal. Forget what they want. You need to do what’s best for you. You’ve been a hard-working, smart guy over the last few years. The fact that you’ve been able to save nearly $25,000 is proof of that. I don’t think you want to throw a big chunk of your savings — or your new income — into something that’s going to go down in value like a rock. New cars lose about 60 percent of their value during the first four years of ownership. That means a $28,000 car would be worth around $11,000 after that period. That’s not a smart investment. If I were you, I’d shop around and pay cash for a nice, slightly used $10,000 car. You can get a great automobile for that kind of money, plus you’ll still have the majority of your savings. Congratulations, young man. You’ve done a great job! —DAVE * Dave Ramsey is CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven best-selling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 13 million listeners each week on 585 radio


DEADLINE FOR CLASSIFIEDS: FRIDAY AT NOON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

BUSINESS & PRIVATE PARTY CLASSIFIED ADS: $21 PER WEEK, 20 WORDS OR LESS. WEDDINGS, BIRTHS & ENGAGEMENTS: BLACK & WHITE - $45, COLOR - $55. OBITUARIES: START AT $45.

7

PHONE: 815.436.2431 WEB: buglenewspapers.com/classifieds EMAIL: classifieds@buglenewspapers.com TA K E 5 M I N U T E S FOR YOURSELF!


8

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

PHONE: 815.436.2431 >> Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. FAX: 815.439.2548 EMAIL: classifieds@enterprisepublications.com IN PERSON: Enterprise Publications >> 23856 Andrew Rd. >> Plainfield, IL


LEGAL LISTINGS PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL ) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS NEW PENN FINANCIAL, LLC D/B/A SHELLPOINT MORTGAGE SERVICING Plaintiff, vs. JENNIFER WILLIAMS AS INDEPENDENT ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL L. SCHEIDT; JENNIFER WILLIAMS, INDIVIDUALLY; SRP 2012-4, LLC; UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY, AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. No. 18 CH 1110 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 20th day of September, 2018, MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 27th day of December, 2018 , commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 17 IN BLOCK 8 IN AKIN’S SUBDIVISION OF THAT PART OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, LYING SOUTH OF THE HIGHWAY BEING THE EXTENSION OF WASHINGTON STREET, IN THE CITY OF JOLIET, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JULY 19, 1872 IN PLAT BOOK 1, (PART 1), PAGE 77, AS DOCUMENT NO. 852666, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Commonly known as: 142 Akin Avenue, Joliet , IL 60433 Description of Improvements: Single Family P.I.N.: 30-07-15-217-023-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: KLUEVER AND PLATT, LLC. 150 N. Michigan Ave. Suite 2600 Chicago, Illinois 60601 P: 312-201-6765 F: 312-236-0514 MIKE KELLEY Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Published 12/6, 12/13, 12/20

S TAY I N F O R M E D W I T H L E G A L L I S T I N G S WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

9


PAGE 1 0 | W EDNESDAY , DEC EMBER 5, 20 18 | BUGL ENEWSPAPERS.COM

Joliet 12-5-18  
Joliet 12-5-18  
Advertisement