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INSIDE

SPORTS Europe wins Ryder Cup PAGE 13

NEWS Last Laugh Film Fest brings laughs to Joliet

ONLINE More news at buglenewspapers.com

PAGE 4

Our Village, Our News

www.jolietbugle.com

OCTOBER 3, 2012

Vol. 5 No. 5

CELEBRATING 100 YEARS Joliet’s Union Station reaches century mark By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

Submitted Photo/Joe Petric

Rock Island commuter train passes in front of Joliet’s Union Station in 1969.

Joliet’s Union Station turns 100 this month, and despite the building’s uncertain future, the city and local railroad enthusiasts are not letting the milestone pass without celebration. “We decided that this occasion should not go by unremarked because it’s just too significant,” said Bill Molony, President of the local Blackhawk chapter of the National Railway Historical Society. “The station is a part of the history of Joliet. It’s a landmark and a significant building on the landscape of Joliet for the last 100 years.” The Blackhawk chapter is hosting a banquet in honor of the anniversary on Oct. 14 at Union Station, and Molony said the celebration will do more than simply memorialize the completion of the historic building, which celebrated its grand opening

on Oct. 14, 1912. Molony said planners are attempting to have this banquet duplicate that original celebration from beginning to end. “To the extent possible, we’re trying to replicate the original event,” Molony said. “We’re even replicating the original menu.” As a life-long railroad enthusiast and 20year member of the NRHS, Molony has come to appreciate the significant role the station has played in Joliet’s history. The station was built in the early-20th century, and it made possible the consolidation of four separate train stations in downtown Joliet. Molony said this was significant because train traffic peaked at around 120 trains a day in the city. “Slow trains were tying up town and fast trains were running people over,” Molony said of train traffic prior to the station’s See UNION STATION, page 2


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

UNION STATION Continued from page 1 construction. “Finally the city got the railroads to elevate and realign to where they are now, and the railroads decided to build Union Station.” In addition its practical function, the station represents the important role the railroad industry played in the economic and social development of the region. Since the time the first railway rolled into Joliet in 1852, Molony said its presence created employment opportunities, facilitated industrial development and provided transportation. “Union Station has served the

residents of Joliet for 100 years, and it has been a big part of the lives of many people,” said Joliet City Manager Tom Thanas. “It really is an important part of our community.” But with work already underway on the city’s new multimodal transportation center, Union Station sits at a crossroads of its longtime existence. Once completed, the multimodal center will render Union Station obsolete for passenger use. However, city officials are looking for alternative uses, including expanding its current function as a banquet hall and bringing in commercial development to the first floor. Molony and Thanas said they are confident the building will

News survive the transition. “There’s useable space in the station,”Thanas said.“On the first floor, we’re looking at options to attract restaurants and other service-type business.” The city currently owns twothirds owner of the station, and Metra owns one-third. Thanas said the city may look into acquiring full ownership of Union Station once the multimodal facility has been completed, but discussions have not yet taken place. Although a final date has not been set for the station to be taken out of service, Thanas thinks the last passengers are likely to walk through Union Station sometime in 2014. jsamples@buglenewspapers.com

Bugle File Photo

Joliet’s Union Station celebrated it’s grand opening on Oct. 14, 1912. The station turns 100 this month.


THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

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Counseling key to ending domestic violence By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

With little resources or agencies dedicated to counseling services for the youth, a group dedicated to ending the cycle of domestic violence, Bridges to a New Day, is looking for volunteers to help them in their mission. An anti-violence charitable organization, Bridges to a New Day offers local residents assistance programs related to counseling, domestic violence and parenting. In addition, the agency provides Will County residents with free domestic violence counseling. “Each year we are seeing an increase in the services we provide,” said Carolyn Khan, executive director of Bridges to a New Day counseling agency. “Due to the challenging economy, people are in stressful living situations. Our agency has stepped up to meet the needs of the people of northern Will County. We are looking for volunteers to help us make a difference.” The group will be hosting a Volunteer Open House from 10 to 11 a.m. on Thursday at its office, located at 1135 East 9th Street, Lockport. Khan said working with a shoestring budget; the organization

could use any help it can get. The event is designed to be an opportunity for people to come and learn about volunteer opportunities available including clerical volunteer, data entry volunteer, committee volunteer, community ambassador, intake volunteer and online store volunteer. According to the 2006 Will County United Way community assessment report, mental health services are not perceived as meeting the needs in Will County. In 2011, the group provided 967 hours of counseling services for in-school programs, but that number is increasing with 2012 numbers at 1625 hours. Khan explains that based on this pattern, the agency feels the need to expand this component by adding evening hours. In addition, the most dramatic increase in providing services was seen in its free domestic violence services from 2011 to 2012, jumping from 1230 hours of service to 2347 hours. The charitable organization was opened in 2005 with a mission to provide prevention, intervention, and educational services that foster non-violence in the lives of children and adults. Khan explains that in many cases, people are struggling with issues that are affecting them

both in their personal and home life. In order to gage progress in these areas, Khan asks clients to report improvements in their ability to cope with their issues and a reduction in the intensity of their symptoms. With both issues, clients report a 20 percent reduction by their tenth sessions and this reduction improves as session numbers increase. By the tenth session, parents report a 12 percent reduction in school behavior issues. Children are asked to fill out their own questionnaires and the most significant increase is that on average a child reports a 34 percent improvement in their ability to communicate within the family. “We see these families enter our agency nervous, frustrated, confused and stressed but over their sessions that changes,” Khan reports. “Communication between family members improve, school grades improve, coping skills improve and change occurs in the family and the individual.” Another way to show their progress is in their own words. Khan shared the some of those statements from those who have used the organization: “Counseling has helped me so much in so many ways. I now look at myself as a beautiful woman who deserves so much

better;” and “Little did I know that my first day of counseling was the day my life would change.” It is this emotion and progress, that keeps Khan and the agency motivated to provide help to what she calls an underserved community. “We will see anyone who needs help and have people come from all over Will County,” said Khan. “We believe that if we can help children with their problems earlier we have a chance to make a difference. We need to intervene before it becomes a problem. If a child has a problem at a young age and carries it through you do not grow into a happy adult.” Counselors specialize in providing services for issues such as; school behavior problems,divorce,ADHD,couple counseling, family counseling, teen issues, depression, anxiety, grief, blended family issues,

trauma and more. A program is held at Irene King Elementary School in Romeoville to help children with any issues they may have during free periods. In addition, the agency offers “Darlene’s Program, ” funded by donors and one that honors a founding member of the organization. If eligible, clients can receive a reduction in their fees. Community presentations are offered on a variety of issues related to domestic violence and dating violence and educational parenting services are offered through one-on-one parenting consultations as well as through parenting groups. A parenting specialist will work with families to enhance parenting skills and develop an individualized parenting plan. For more information, please contact Bridges to a New Day at (815) 838-2690 or office@ bridgestoanewday.org.


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

Lots of laughs Last Laugh Film Fest brings laughs to Joliet By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter October is a month typically reserved for the thrills and chills of Halloween, but at the Rialto Square Theatre, belly-laughs are on the calendar as venue officials offer up the Last Laugh Comedy Festival. In addition to comedy headliners including Adam Carolla, Kathleen Madigan, and Cheech & Chong, Last Laugh also will feature a film festival screening of the top five comedy films of all time. “We wanted to branch out and make the festival bigger than just comedians,” said Annette Parker, director of marketing and sales at Rialto Square Theatre. They are “Some Like It Hot,” “Tootsie,” “Dr. Strange Love—How I learned

to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb,” “Annie Hall” and “Duck Soup.” The films have been ranked the funniest films of all time by the American Film Institute. The Rialto is partnering with the University of St. Francis to provide an alternate venue for the films, as well as to add a bit of scholarly analysis to the festival. “We want to make this a true film festival experience, where we will have a host who will speak about the films,”Parker said. “Maybe they will speak about the cinematography, the director, the actors and that type of thing.” Several USF faculty and staff will host the festival, relating each film to the specific area of expertise of the films’ hosts. Professors in history and English

will present films five through two, which will screen at the USF campus. Professor emeritus Randy Chilton, Ph.D., will host the number one film, “Some Like It Hot,” at the Rialto on Oct. 26.

Hosted by Randy Chilton, Professor Emeritus at University of St. Francis Chilton will bring his expertise of American and British literature to the forefront during a post-film discussion he will host on this American romantic screwball comedy. Released in 1959, the film’s stars, Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis, are forced to disguise themselves as female band mates of Monroe’s after witnessing a mob hit. And if talking about film doesn’t win over the entire audience, then the mob hits, cross-dressing and Marilyn Monroe are sure to turn on the rest.

#1 “Some Like It Hot” 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26 Rialto Square Theater

#2 “Tootsie” 7 p.m.Thursday, Oct. 25 University of St. Francis, Moser Performing Arts Center, Sexton Auditorium Hosted by Terrance Cottrell, Director of Library Services, University of St. Francis Gender dysphoria is again the theme of the Last Laugh Film Festival’s second film, and the role of gender in society is one reason Cottrell feels “Tootsie” offers a topic of discussion for

many academic fields. The movie stars Dustin Hoffman and Jessica Lange, with a supporting cast that includes Teri Garr, Dabney Coleman, Charles Durning, Geena Davis, Bill Murray, and producer/director Sydney Pollack. In the film, Hoffman disguises himself as a middle-aged woman to land a role opposite Lange, who he ends up falling for romantically. “I use film all the time when I teach,” Cottrell said. “It’s even the subject of my dissertation research.” Cottrell, who goes by “Terry,” said that often when he meets people for the first time, the combination of his genderneutral name and his profession are a source of comedy for him, and another way he relates to the film. “It’s fun to see their reaction,” Cottrell said. “I’d say nine out of 10 times, when people meet me, they never think Terry = Library = Terrance.”

#3 “How I Learned To Stop Worrying & Love The Bomb” 7 p.m.Wednesday, Oct. 24 University of St. Francis,


THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012 Donovan Hall, San Damiano Hall Hosted by David Veenstra, Assistant Professor, History, University of St. Francis Veenstra brings his knowledge of history to this 964 black comedy film which satirizes the nuclear scare. It was directed, produced, and co-written by Stanley Kubrick, starring Peter Sellers and George C. Scott, and featuring Sterling Hayden, Keenan Wynn, and Slim Pickens. The film is loosely based on Peter George’s Cold War thriller novel Red Alert, also known as Two Hours to Doom.

#4 “Annie Hall” 7 p.m.Tuesday, October 23 University of St. Francis, Moser Performing Arts Center, Sexton Auditorium Hosted by Deb Workman, Assistant Professor, History at University of St. Francis As a European historian whose research focuses on women and gender issues, Workman will offer a unique look at this 1977 romantic comedy. The film is directed by Allen and adapted from his screenplay, cowritten with Marshall Brickman, and produced by Charles H. Joffe. Allen co-stars as Alvy Singer, who investigates the reasons for the failure of his relationship with the film’s female lead, played by Diane Keaton. “I am delighted to be hosting Annie Hall, perhaps my favorite

Woody Allen film,”Workman said.

#5 “Duck Soup” 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22. University of St. Francis, Moser Performing Arts Center, Sexton Auditorium Hosted by Kevin Spicer, Assistant Professor, English at University of St. Francis Though his area of expertise is the Middle Ages and French philosophy, Spicer couldn’t be happier to lead the discussion on a film he considers a part of our comedic cultural archive. “Every comedic work of art seems to borrow something from the famous ‘mirror’ scene,” Spicer said. ‘“Family Guy’ did a version, ‘The Simpsons,’ the list goes on and on. It’s the very origin of what’s become a kind of comedic trope.” This Marx Brothers anarchic comedy, written by Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby, as first released theatrically by Paramount Pictures on Nov. 17, 1933. It starred what were then billed as the“Four Marx Brothers”(Groucho,Harpo,Chico, and Zeppo) and also featured Margaret Dumont, Raquel Torres, Louis Calhern and Edgar Kennedy. It was the last Marx Brothers film to feature Zeppo, and the last of five Marx Brothers movies released by Paramount. For more information about screening times and to purchase tickets, visit www. rialtoslastlaugh.com.

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Joliet man gets 85 year for slaying of 14-year-old boy A Joliet man has been sentenced to 85 years in prison for spraying a Lockport Township house with bullets and killing a 14-year-old boy in 2011. Vernon McCormick, 24, was found guilty at the conclusion of a jury trial in July of three counts of first-degree murder for the shooting death of Deont’e Lesley on Jan. 3, 2011. Lesley was inside his house playing video games when he was murdered. Two other youths were wounded when McCormick opened fire on the house. The jury also found him guilty of two counts of aggravated battery with a firearm and one count of aggravated discharge of a firearm in connection with their injuries. McCormick, a gang member with a long criminal history, fired on the house because he believed rival gang members who had killed his friend were inside. Deont’e Lesley, however, was a local athlete and was not involved with street gangs. Evidence at the trial revealed that McCormick went to Lesley’s house and opened fire when he saw people moving inside and after someone opened a window for air. “Deont’e Lesley was an innocent young boy with a bright future who should have been safe in the comfort of his own house,” Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow said. “Instead, he was gunned down by a volatile gangbanger with absolutely no regard for human life. Vernon McCormick shot to

kill when he repeatedly pulled the trigger outside that house with no concern whatsoever for how many people were inside. Today he was sent to prison to spend the rest of his life staring at the walls of his cell.” Will County Sheriff Paul Kaupas said, “I want to thank State’s Attorney Glasgow and his prosecution team as well as my detectives for their hard work in the successful investigation and prosecution of this defendant. This was a highly circumstantial case that involved a high level of cooperation and team work between the Sheriff’s

Submitted Photo

Department and the State’s Attorney’s Office. Today’s sentence reflects our strong commitment to holding these gangbangers accountable for their violent and deadly acts.”


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Joliet Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

Police Blotter

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Joliet

1112 17 16

8

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Ricardo Diaz, 26, 1507 Dickens, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 4:30 a.m. at 95 S. Chicago for obstructing justice.

1

25

4

Georgina A. Klammer, 38, 400 Western, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 5:25 a.m. at the residence for burglary.

14 13

2

10

3

21

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James A. Neagle, 21, 912 N. Joliet, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 11:15 p.m. at 333 Madison for battery.

1

Michelle Frederickson, 21, 2429 Pecan, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 2 p.m. at 3001 Plainfield for retail theft. Charles E. Stevens Jr., 49, 1311 Arthur, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 3:03 p.m. at 150 W.Washington for criminal trespass to real property.

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Nicholas L. Barber, 23, 115 Fourth Ave., Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 6:04 p.m. on Broadway and Spring for criminal trespass to real property, resisting/obstructing a police officer and delivery of cannabis.

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Manuel R. Hernandez, 25, 1309 Demmond, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 6:03 p.m. at 1311 Demmond for dog bite.

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Tiwana L. Norris, 37, 1815 Arbor Lane, Crest Hill, was arrested on Sept. 21 at9:29 p.m. at 555 E. Cass for theft.

9

R. Williams, 43, 905 10 Caren Junie, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 10:03 p.m. at 333 Madison for domestic battery.

11

Nasser M. Abufarha, 18, 2026 Fairfield Drive,

19 31 30

29

4

5

9

6

2

3

Wilbur J. Taylor, 53, 941 Lois, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 9 a.m. at 1004 N. Larkin for criminal trespass to real property.

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7

15

20 28 32

Plainfield, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 10:41 p.m. at 2318 Essington for retail theft. Rafal C. Baniak, 18, 7509 Southworth Circle, Plainfield, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 10:41 p.m. at 2318 Essington for retail theft.

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Reinaldo Oquendo Jr., 30, 356 Second, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 11:52 p.m. on Plainfield and Pennsylvania for possession of controlled substance.

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A. Negron, 35, 357 14 Jose Second, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 11:52 p.m. on Plainfield and Pennsylvania for possession of controlled substance. Veronica Ortiz, 36, 708 Abe, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 21 at 2:26 a.m. at 400 Youngs for criminal damage to property.

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Lloyd R. Robinson, 22, 508 Kungs Way, Joliet was arrested on Sept. 22 at 6 p.m. at 3340 Mall Loop for disorderly conduct.

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M. Cruz, 18, 2113 17 Amaretta Hastings Drive, Plainfield, was arrested on Sept. 22 at 6 p.m. at 3340 Mall Loop for

disorderly conduct. Terion D. Steward, 19, 460 Water, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 22 at 8 o.m. at 210 Eastern for criminal trespass to real property.

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S. Nash,19, 132 19 Devonte Fairmont Ave., Lockport, was arrested on Sept. 22 at 8:45 p.m. on Bluff and Western for criminal trespass to state supported land and resisting/ obstructing a police officer. Gerald A. Green, 40, 515 Ontario, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 22 at 9:48 p.m. at 300 Water for possession of controlled substance with intent to deliver.

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W. Osborne, 22, 3101 21 Blake E. 1942 Road, Ottawa, was arrested on Sept. 22 at 2:51 a.m. at 117 N. Center for battery. Victor A. Martinez, 29, 1806 Larkspur Drive, Plainfield, was arrested on Sept. 23 at 11:08 p.m. on Hastings and Townsend for encouraging the violation of code.

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Scott T. Sanders, 20, 18745 Royal Road, Homewood, was arrested on Sept. 23 at 3:57 a.m. at 2022 Essington for possession of cannabis.

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Riley E. White, 32, 509 S. Joliet, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 23 at 10:02 a.m. at 2201 Marmion for domestic battery.

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Angelo Love, 57, 1212 Luther, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 23 at 2:35 p.m. at 1212 Luther for keeping a kennel.

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Escutia Vazquez-Eva, 61, 3550 Pandola, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 24 at 1:16 p.m. at 1401 S. Route 59 for theft.

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Janet L. Lopez, 49, 540 Ryall St., Marseilles, was arrested on Sept. 24 at 5:20 p.m. at 777 Hollywood for criminal trespass to land.

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Providencia Aquilera, 27, 608 Florence, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 24 at 7:53 p.m. at the residence for loud, unnecessary noise.

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Rafus Williamson Jr., 36, 509 E. Bellarmine, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 24 at 7:30 a.m. on Jefferson and Hickory for possession of controlled substance with intent to deliver and possession of drug equipment.

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Stevens J. Schroll, 27, 100 Redwood, Elwood, was arrested on Sept. 24 at 12:15

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p.m. at 500 Shelby for theft. Thomas W. Russell II, 29, 410 Cherry, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 24 at 12:15 p.m. at 500 Shelby for theft.

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Daniel Franco-Contreras, 61, 4448 Sawyer, Chicago, was arrested on Sept. 24 at 2:33 p.m. on Jackson and Scott for DUI/alcohol.

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Christopher D. Mosley, 21, 114 Reichman, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 24 at 5:06 p.m. at 206 Fouser for resisting/ obstructing a police officer, possession of ammo without a FOID card, possession of firearm by street gang member and aggravated unlawful use of a weapon.

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John G. Plump, 50, 15405 Western, Harvey, was arrested on Sept. 24 at 1:32 a.m. on Jefferson and Eastern for burglary from a motor vehicle and possession of burglary tools.

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Vernon C. McCormick, 49, 304 Lawton, Joliet, was arrested on Sept. 24 at 1:32 a.m. on Jefferson and Eastern for burglary from motor vehicle, resisting/obstructing a police officer and aggravated fleeing/ eluding officers.

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Forum What’s on your mind? You are invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to Matt Honold, managing editor, at mhonold@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

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Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

Publisher Rich Masterson publisher@buglenewspapers.com Managing Editor Matt Honold mhonold@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Sherri Dauskurdas Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Robin Ambrosia Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Sports Reporter Mark Gregory mgregory@buglenewspapers.com Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication sweditor@buglenewspapers.com www.buglenewspapers.com

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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

Illustrated Opinions

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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

Schools

Nominating petition forms for Project Infinite Green expands to LTHS District 86 Board of School inspectors seats available Nominating petitions for the Board of School Inspectors for Joliet Public Schools District 86 are available at the J. F. Kennedy Administrative Center located at 420 North Raynor Avenue in

Joliet. Petition forms will be available for pick-up between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The first day to file nominating petitions is 8 a.m. on Dec. 17 and

no later than 5 p.m. on Dec. 24. Three four-year terms and two two-year terms will be open. For more information, contact Board Secretary, Charyll Colstock at 815-740-3196 ext. 221.

Project Infinite Green, a community-based education initiative, is expanding to Lockport Township High School District 205. The program, which was launched in Lemont last year, was designed by community and corporate leaders, teachers and government officials to give students the opportunity to learn about the science and business of both traditional and sustainable energy sources. Project Infinite Green began with a press conference at LTHS Monday in the front entrance of our East Campus, 1333 E. 7th Street, Lockport. Gov. Pat Quinn and Congressman Daniel Lipinski attended. “This is a great opportunity for our students,” LTHS Superintendent Dr. Todd Wernet said. “We are proud to be part of such an innovative

and unique program that will afford our students a hands-on learning experience.” Project Infinite Green was created to promote the ideals of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Coalition, an alliance of more than 500 business, professional, and education organizations that works to raise awareness of STEM education within the government and other organizations. “One thing that makes this program so special is the local involvement; we hope to use our experience and the curriculum we’ve developed to help other communities create similar for their students,” said Catherine Greenspon, a Lemont resident and co-founder of Infinite Project Green. For more information,contact info@projectinfinitegreen.org.


Calendar ONGOING Bingo at St. Mary Nativity Catholic School. Every Friday at 7 p.m. in the school gym. Doors open at 4 p.m. and the kitchen opens at 5 p.m. Pull tabs go on sale at 5:30 p.m. and cards at 6 p.m. First game starts at 7 p.m. All are most welcome to come and play. “Hooks & Needles” Needlecraft Club. Second Wednesday of the month from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Lockport Branch Library, Gaylord Building, 200 W. 8th Street.Bring your needlework or other craft projects to work on, and sit back and enjoy chatting and sharing skills with other “crafters.” Refreshments will be offered! Please register with the Adult Services Desk. To register, or for further information on this program, please contact the Lockport Branch Library at 815838-0755, or check our website at http://www.whiteoaklibrary. org. Serenity on Sunday AlAnon/Adult Child of Alcoholics Women’s Group. Sundays from 1 to 2 p.m. at the Resurrection Lutheran Church, 25050 W. Eames Street, Channahon. The only requirement for membership is that there be a problem of alcoholism in a relative or friend. There are no fees or dues. Each group is self-supporting with voluntary contributions. As a mutual helping group, there is no other affiliation. Feel free to visit www.niafg.org for more information or to leave a message on the Al-Anon line at 815-7739623. Joliet Lupus Support Group Meeting. 6:15 - 8 p.m. at the Provena Physical Rehab & Sports Injury Center, 2132 Jefferson St. (in Marycrest Plaza), Joliet. Anyone with lupus or a family member or friend with lupus is welcome to join this group. Meeting dates for 2012 are on the 4th Wednesdays of odd months: 7/25, 9/26, and 11/28. Contact Tari at (815) 351-2544 or e-mail: tlapurdue82@gmail. com. Go www.lupus.org for more information on lupus. Lunch and Learn. A wonderful way to study the Torah! Thursdays, noon – 1:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per week; please RSVP at 815-741-4600. WomenHeart Support Group. Meetings are on the second Thursday of each

month from 6-8 p.m. in the PSJMC Conference Room A at 333 N. Madison St., Joliet. WomenHeart of Joliet is here for you to provide the support, education and friendships that you need to live well with heart disease. WomenHeart will offer information and support that you may not find with your friends and loved ones. We can share fears, thoughts, and concerns in a relaxed and caring environment. For more information or agenda please call Michele at (815) 7034142. Birth after Cesarean. This group meets the first Monday every month in Romeoville from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Please come for encouragement, support, and information to plan for your natural birth after cesarean. All babes-in-arms are welcome too. Call Melanie at 253-861-5897 or VBACesarean@aol.com with any questions. Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit environmental organization is dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815-834-1611. Are you affected by someone’s drinking? Open meetings are held every third Friday of the month from 7 p.m.8:30 p.m. at 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. Contact Al-anon/Alateen at 815-773-9623 or visit www. niafg.org for more information. Circle of Hope Al-Anon Family Group. Sundays at 1:302:30 p.m. at Joliet Alano Club (back entrance), 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. This on-going support group with no fees or dues is for all families and friends of problem drinkers, especially those who are affected today by growing up in an alcoholic home. For more information contact Al--Anon/Alateen 815773-9623 or visit www.niafg.org for more information Strive 4 Hope. Second and fourth Thursdays from 6-8 p.m. at the Joliet Moose Lodge #300, 25 Springfield Ave., Joliet. This is a support group, which welcomes all cancer survivors, caregivers, family members, and friends. Call Sharon at 815-349-5458 or Carrie at 815-730-0134 for more

information. Breast cancer support group. 7-8:30 p.m. at Joliet Oncology-Hematology Associates, 2614 West Jefferson St., Joliet. The Bosom Buddies Breast Cancer Support Group meets the first and third Tuesdays of each month. For more information call Pattie at 815-436-7640. Pool Classes for Arthritis. Every Tuesday and Thursday in the Willow Falls Recreation Center, 1691 Willow Circle Dr., Crest Hill. Morning and evening classes are available. For details and registration call Valerie Brockman at 815-773-6229. Young Widows Support Group. Meets once a month at varying locations in the Plainfield/Joliet area. Open to those who have lost a partner and are ready to begin healing and moving forward in life by sharing their experiences with others.Children are welcome.For more information please contact Amanda at widowswearstilettos chicagosw@yahoo.com.

OCTOBER 3 The Great Halloween Hands-on Science Demo. 7 to 8 p.m. at Shorewood-Troy Public Library. Do you love science? Do you wonder how the world works? Then put on your lab coats and come join us at the Great Halloween Hands-On Science Demo as we celebrate National Chemistry Week with the Joliet Section of the American Chemical Society! You will experience the wonders of science in our daily lives through hands-on demonstrations of fingerprint and bone analysis, computer reconstruction of the human face, the Magic Pumpkin, and more. It’s fun for all ages, so bring the whole family! Auditions: ‘A Christmas Carol.’ Auditions will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 3, and Thursday, Oct. 4, at 7 p.m. for A Christmas Carol, the beloved holiday tale by Charles Dickens. Auditions will be held at St. Joseph Academy, 51 W. Jackson St. in downtown Joliet. For further information, call Jan Novotny at 815-723-4567.

OCTOBER 4 Auditions: ‘A Christmas Carol.’ Auditions will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 3, and Thursday, Oct. 4, at 7 p.m. for A Christmas Carol, the beloved holiday tale by Charles Dickens. Auditions will

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012 be held at St. Joseph Academy, 51 W. Jackson St. in downtown Joliet. For further information, call Jan Novotny at 815-723-4567.

OCTOBER 5 Blown Glass Show. 7 to 10 p.m. at The Department Restaurant and Liquor Lounge, 205 N. Chicago St., Joliet. Local blown glass artist, Sue Regis, will be doing live blown glass art demonstrations for all to

9

enjoy free of charge. She will be accompanied by a live acoustic performance. Guests are invited out to experience the mystery and individuality of each glass creation. Using a table-mounted torch with specific oxygen and propane mixtures for the differing techniques makes this show mesmerizing. The Department Restaurant, always See CALENDAR, page 10


10

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

CALENDAR Continued from page 9 a proud supporter of the arts, invites all to attend this event free of charge. Find out more at www.thedepartmentjoliet.com.

OCTOBER 6 Nickelodeon World Wide Day of Play. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Inwood Park Tennis courts, 3200

W. Jefferson St., Joliet. Attend a USTA free tennis play day. For more information, visit www. jolietpark.org.

OCTOBER 7 Fall Frenzy. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Bird Haven Greenhouse and Conservatory, 225 N. Gougar Road, Joliet. Costume parade at 1 p.m.. Costume Contest: 0-3 years at 1:15 p.m., 4-7 years at 1:30 p.m., and 8 years and up at 2 p.m. Free Admission.

OCTOBER 11 Visionary Art Workshop. 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Leeza’s Place at Provena Saint Joseph Medical Center, 50 Uno Circle, Joliet. Visionary art is creative painting that doesn’t require you to be an artist. You only need to open your heart and mind and let the energy flow directly through you. Join us for a new experience in painting without brushes and seeing your art from a 360 degree point of view.

Please RSVP to 815-741-0077. No Charge. All supplies provided.

OCTOBER 13 Incredible Bats. 2 to 3 p.m. at Shorewood-Troy Public Library. Daniel and Sharon Peterson, along with their Egyptian Fruit Bats and African Straw-colored Bats, have been educating people about bats since 1996. They love bats, and with their experience and knowledge they will to dispel

the myths surrounding these misunderstood creatures. All ages welcome. Oktoberfest. 3 to 10 p.m. at St. Joe’s Park, Theodore and Raynor. St. Joseph Academy will be hosting our 3rd annual Oktoberfest. Live music by Jimmy’s Bavarians and Harvest Moon. For additional information, please contact St. Joseph Academy at 815-7234567


Take 5

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

H o ro s c o p e s

Across

1 Beatles film 5 Globetrotter’s need 9 TV choice 14 x, y and z, in math 15 Israel’s Barak 16 Curved moldings 17 Hard to spot 18 Muddy up 19 Chestnut-hued horses 20 Chicken, beef, or fish? 23 Bar order 24 Sweetie 25 Three-time Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film 27 Saw 32 Membership list 33 Slangy morning cup 34 Tabloid exclusive 36 Inferior 39 Director of the last episode of “M*A*S*H” 41 Concerning 43 Hershey’s toffee bar

44 First name in daytime TV 46 Worldweariness 48 Gin maker Whitney 49 Jazz and swing periods 51 Word with crew or key 53 Gridiron call 56 Respectful title 57 French vineyard 58 Expensive bottle of wine? 64 River including Livingstone Falls 66 Major in astronomy? 67 Balm ingredient 68 Milk dispenser 69 Hardly handsome 70 Loads 71 Run for the __: Kentucky Derby 72 Understands 73 Gusto

Down 1 Boaters and bowlers 2 Auditorium sign 3 “Leading With My Chin” author 4 Film with a creepy motel owner 5 Archie’s heartthrob 6 Denny’s competitor 7 Diamonds, but not emeralds 8 Robin Williams forte 9 Tight braid 10 Gone by 11 Shop specializing in Winnie the Pooh merchandise? 12 Lotte who played Rosa Klebb in “From Russia With Love” 13 German steel town 21 Fashion designer Michael 22 Anthem contraction 26 Pontiac muscle cars 27 Slightly cracked

28 Angler’s need 29 Money set aside for garden mazes? 30 Drink brand with a lizard logo 31 Mars pair 35 __ rock 37 Alone 38 Joyce’s homeland 40 Ostentatious behavior 42 “__ With Morrie”: Albom best-seller 45 Salts on the ocean 47 Hip bones 50 Star Wars prog. 52 German sub? 53 Present itself, as a thought 54 Tolkien ringbearer 55 1975 Tonywinning play about a stableboy 59 The munchies, e.g. 60 Cruise stop 61 Dark purple fruit 62 Eternities, seemingly 63 Midterm or final 65 “Golly!”

You can’t change who you are, but you can surely make the best of it. In the week ahead, you might experience a brief period of discontent. Remain true blue to your dreams and they will come true.

Find fulfillment not in what you have, but in what you give. Temporary setbacks in the week to come are simply temporary. That is why you should not lose your composure over minor clashes with others.

The secret of living your life well might lie in finding a balance between holding on and letting go. In the week ahead, be content with what you have, but don’t be afraid to give up on the impossible

Sometimes storm clouds linger without sending any rain. Someone could have a definite change of heart by midweek. Not all problems in the week ahead need solving; let them emerge and dissipate.

Charm them and disarm them. You are capable of inspiring trust and admiration in the week to come. If you wait to make a commitment until all uncertainties are cleared and doubts resolved, it may be too late.

Another day, another dollar. In the week ahead, you may become more aware of your spending habits and may consider new ways to economize. Too much intense concentration can leave you tired out.

Everyone stumbles occasionally. That is why it is good to have someone to hold your hand. In the week ahead, concentrate on strengthening personal relationships and keep your money in your pocket.

Show no disdain for disclosures. When someone offers you confidential information in the upcoming week, it is up to you to handle it well and to honor the trust with which it was given.

Shift from won’t power to will power. In the week ahead, you may be able to use a small financial crisis to your advantage. A minor frustration can turn you into a powerhouse of determination.

Batten down the hatches. An unsettled period early in the week ahead could have you unsure of which way the wind is going to blow. Hold off on making irrevocable decisions until Tuesday.

Make it your personal mission to be as true and blue as possible in the week to come. If you look closely, you may find many examples of loyalty. Remember to be appreciative of support from others.

Set realistic goals. In the week to come, you may be caught up in an obsession with something new. Warning: Don’t spend money on any new passion without thinking things through thoroughly.

SUDOKU

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • FUZZY • CAKED • PURITY • ASYLUM

Answer:

Important for a pinup girl to be this -- STUCK UP

11


12

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

BuGle kids


INSIDE: Isaac returns to form in JCA rout of St. Pat’s, page 14; Herzberger, Indians defend SPC golf titles,

www.buglenewspapers.com

page 16

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

13

Europeans party like U.S. in 1999 By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Coming into Sunday at the Ryder Cup at Medinah Country Club in Medinah, the United States held what appeared to be a strong lead at 10-6 with 12 singles matches left. That just so happened to be the same score the U.S. trailed by in 1999 when they made an improbable comeback to beat the Europeans. The Europeans got one back. Martin Kaymer sunk a sixfoot putt to clinch his match with Steve Stricker and give the Europeans at least a tie, which is good enough to win the cup. They went on to win 14.5-13.5. At one point in time Saturday the score was 10-4 U.S. “It’s a feeling that I’ve never had before,” Kaymer said. “Now I know how it really feels to win the Ryder Cup.” “I am disappointed that I let 11 other players down and the captains,” Stricker said. “I had to get some kind of points and I didn’t, so that’s disappointing.” Europe won the first four matches Sunday to tie the total at 10-10 and the two sides from there went back-and-forth with Europe taking the lead on Sergio Garcia’s come-from-behind win. “Amazing, what a day,” Garcia stated.“It was hard but we knew there was a chance. Obviously everything came right.” “Any Ryder Cup loss is difficult,” U.S. captain Davis Love III said. “Today was not what we expected. We had guys who played well and just got beat. We’re all kind of stunned. We know what it feels like now from the ’99 Ryder Cup. It’s a little bit shocking.” Jim Furyk led Garcia by one going into the 17th hole, but Garcia was able to make a

Mark Gregory/Bugle staff

European’s Greame McDowell, from left, Ian Poulter and Justin Rose celebrate a come-from-behind Ryder Cup win at Medinah.

pair of pars to win both of the final two holes. It was another disappointing loss for Furyk this year, who had the U.S. Open and the Bridgestone Invitational in his grasp and let them both slip away. “It’s been a very difficult year,” Furyk said. “If you had been on this team, I have 11 guys and captains who will pat me on the back and know how I feel. We came here as a team and we wanted to win the Ryder Cup as a team and we didn’t. I’m pretty sure Sergio would tell you I outplayed him today. As far as team vs. individual, this is the lowest point of my year.” Phil Mickelson lost a match earlier in the day with the same

lead as Furyk, but in his case it took two clutch birdies from Justin Rose to beat him. “When Phil made that putt on 16, I thought he did something great for the Ryder Cup,” Love said. “He didn’t lose, he got beat.” “We are in shock,” Rose said. “We wanted to believe, we really did, but we had no illusions of how hard that day was going to be, four shots against a team that has played so well this week.” The hero for the Europeans though was Ian Poulter, who went 4-0 for the tournament. “This was a team performance,” he said. “What the team has done was an unbelievable job today. We just felt we had that

tiny little chance, and the boys proved that today and made history.” Dustin Johnson, Zach Johnson and Jason Dufner were the only U.S. singles winners on the day. Europe got wins from Poulter, Rose, Luke Donald, Rory McIlroy, Kaymer, Garcia, Paul Lawrie and Lee Westwood. Rose and McIlroy also had winning records for the Europeans, both going 3-2. Dustin Johnson went a perfect 3-0 for the Americans, while Keegan Bradley, Dufner, Zach Johnson and Mickelson all went 3-1. Matt Kuchar was 2-1. Stricker was 0-4 for the week, while Tiger Woods was 0-3-1. Peter Hanson and Francesco Molinari were

non-winners for Europe.

CHICAGO SUCCESS Medinah and Chicago passed with glowing success in hosting its first Ryder Cup. The crowds were out in full force and the support was there for the Americans. “The atmosphere was tremendous all week,” Stricker said.“It was so much fun.” Even the Europeans enjoyed the atmosphere. “You know, Chicago has been incredible,” Poulter said. “They have been loud and they have been, you know, supporting their home team, and rightly so.” staylor@buglenewspapers.com


14

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

Sports

Isaac returns to form in Hillmen win By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Welcome to the football season Ty Isaac. While the USC-bound running back came back after only missing one full game following

a shoulder injury suffered in the season opener at Providence, Isaac was not at 100 percent. Although he is still not at full strength, Isaac showed how close he is as he gained 287 yards on 23 carries and scored four consecutive touchdowns as

he led JCA to a 49-13 rout of East Suburban Catholic foe St. Patrick Saturday at Hanson Stadium in Chicago. “This is the first game that I feel I can make the cuts and get up the field the way I want to be,” Isaac said.“Everyone blocked really well.” While Isaac said he felt 90 percent, coach Dan Sharp had him around 60-65 percent of his old self. “When Ty is at 100, watch out,” he said. It appeared as if it would be a long day for the Hilltoppers (4-2, 3-1) when John Dabe returned the opening kick-off 96-yards for a score. JCA answered on a 10-yard touchdown from Michael Ivlow (12 carries, 70 yards). After St. Pat’s (3-3, 1-2) scored on a bubble screen to take the lead, Isaac scored his four scores in a row to put the game away. “Ty is finally back and it makes it easy when the No. 1 player in the nation is back,” Ivlow said. “He takes a lot of load off me and (Tyler) Rietz.” Rietz did not play after the first couples series and it was Ivlow who threw a few huge blocks to spring Isaac’s long runs. “I am a runner, but Ty is the offense and that is the real Ty Isaac,” Ivlow said.“I am proud to be his blocker. They were really good, but with a 100 percent Ty we are unstoppable.” The one silver lining to Isaac’s injury is that it forced Ivlow to jump right into the system after transferring from Minooka, making the offense that much stronger at full strength. “When Ty went down, I had to jump right in and get a lot of carries,” Ivlow said. “Now, I only get maybe 10 carries and that is fine, I just want to win.”

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Ty Isaac returned to form rushing for 287 yards and four TDs.

“This is one of the best things to have,” Isaac said of the balanced offense. “Me and Tyler can break them, we can pass and when Ivlow gets the ball, he is going to get four or five yards a pop.” Sharp said Ivlow’s impact on the team is still not as good as it will be. “There is a lot to learn in our offense and he is getting a crash course,” he said. “He still isn’t all the way there yet and as good

as he is doing, when he gets the full grasp of our offense he will really be a force for us.” Sharp said all-in-all, it was nice to be able to put in some of the JCA offense that it was supposed to look like. “It is good to get back running what we run in our offense,” he said.“We still need to get healthy, but we are getting there.” The Hilltoppers host a 3-3 Carmel team that features a potent option offense. Kickoff is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. at Joliet’s Memorial Stadium. mark@buglenewspapers.com

UP NEXT @ Carmel

Gametime:

JCA

7:30 pm Friday

Who to watch: Ty Isaac RB (JCA) Josh Walinski RB (Carmel)


sPorts

7

rs e h c n ru C r e b Num 12 FOOTBALL

FOOTBALL 1. Maine South 2. Bolingbrook 3. JCA 4. Benet 5. Plainfield North 6. Downers North 7. Niles West

TENNIS 1. Benet 2. Downers South 3. Maine South 4. Lockport 5. Plainfield North 6. Downers North 7. Joliet

BOYS SOCCER 1. Benet 2. Maine South 3. Downers North 4. Downers South 5. Notre Dame 6. Joliet Central 7. Plainfield Central

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL 1. Benet 2. JCA 3. Niles West 4. Downers South 5. Lockport 6. Minooka 7. Plainfield North

BOYS CROSS 1. Plainfield South 2. Minooka 3. Plainfield East 4. Maine South 5. Niles West 6. Notre Dame 7. Downers North

GIRLS CROSS 1. Maine South 2. Downers North 3. Downers South 4. Minooka 5. Lockport 6. Plainfield North 7. Plainfield Central Rankings are compiled by Mark Gregory and Scott Taylor.

Passing Matt Alviti, Maine South 1,228 Craig Slowik, JCA 874 Jack Beneventi, Benet 839 Mike McGivern, Niles West 659 Dan Nagode, Notre Dame 646 Ashton McCullough, Joliet West 575 Jake Kotopka, Plainfield East 515 Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North 411 Mike Zebold, Downers South 373 Tommy Galanopoulos, Niles West 268 Anthony DiNardo, Joliet West 262 Rushing Jay Roberts, Plainfield North 1,001 Chris James, Notre Dame 968 Jordan Ellingwood, Plainfield Central 648 Ty Isaac, JCA 570 Tyler Reitz, JCA 524 Christian Lopez, Maine East 509 Matt Alviti, Maine South 425 David Edwards, Downers North 420 Aaron Bailey, Bolingbrook 416 Cullen Rompa, Plainfield East 391 Peter Ontko, Benet 380 Nick McTarnaghan, Benet 369 Anthony Underwood, Niles West 363 Kyle Leto, Downers North 358 Korey Rogers, Joliet West 353 Omar Stover, Bolingbrook 352 Michael Ivlow, JCA 337 Receiving Jordan Jones, JCA 329 Andrew Milhulet, Niles West 288 Billy Hirsch, Notre Dame 284 Jeremiah Jordan, Niles West 260 John Solari, Maine South 236 Jack Euritt, Benet 231 Chris Tschida, JCA 224 Brock Thoms, Plainfield North 222 Ty Isaac, JCA 213 Jordan Brown, Joliet West 208 Adrian Simbulan, Plainfield East 208 Mozell Hargrays, Plainfield East 193 Kameron Hargrove, Joliet West 187 Peter Ontko, Benet 170 Total TD Chris James, Notre Dame 15 Jay Roberts, Plainfield North 12 Ty Isaac, JCA 11 Peter Ontko, Benet 11 Aaron Bailey, Bolingbrook 9 Tyler Reitz, JCA 8 Matt Alviti, Maine South 8 Jordan Ellingwood, Plainfield Central 7

Michael Ivlow, JCA Gino Giarratano, Plainfield Central Jordan Brown, Joliet West ACES Emily Malone, Joliet Central Melanie Vujovich, Niles West Julia Shemaitis, JCA Felicia Phan, Niles West Tessa Griparis, Minooka Aubrey Ficek, Lockport Britney Lange, Joliet Central Kayleigh Harper, Plainfield South Katie Brick, Joliet West Natalie Yard, Minooka Molly Kleppin, Niles West Morgan Reardon, JCA Erin Eulitz, Plainfield Central Kasey Schumacher, Minooka

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

Stats based on coach submiss Don’t see yours? Send to staylor@buglenewspapers 6 6 6 47 41 40 38 32 30 30 28 28 28 28 28 27 26

VOLLEYBALL Assists Katie Brick, Joliet West Emily Malone, Joliet Central Mallory Mangun, JCA Felicia Phan, Niles West Hannah Evatt, Plainfield Central Katie Tabisz, Lockport Kayla Pfeiffer, Lockport Allyson Lindish, Plainfield Central Molly Morello, Niles West Kayleigh Harper, Plainfield South Kelly Clucas, Minooka Allison Bowbin, Plainfield East Kelli Holstine, Minooka Blocks Mallory Mangun, JCA Angela Vera, JCA Katelyn Seeman, JCA Laura Kirkorian, Niles West Lauren Truvillion, Plainfield South Miranda LeJuene, Plainfield South Jane Obradovich, Plainfield Central Claire Hotchkin, Plainfield Central Elizabeth Hyland, Plainfield Central Olivia Rusek, Niles West T’ara Austin, Joliet Central Jalyn Vertin, Joliet West Melanie Vujovich, Niles West Digs Molly Kleppin, Niles West Katie Dugan, Lockport Kelsey Frain, Joliet Central Olivia Rusek, Niles West Sarah Adler, JCA Erin Eulitz, Plainfield Central

15

391 375 338 207 202 192 159 144 141 140 127 120 101 58 51 50 49 48 41 43 39 37 35 34 32 31 215 168 160 159 147 142

Kasey Schumacher, Minooka Taylor Hollow, Joliet West Morgan Reardon, JCA Aubrey Ficek, Lockport T’ara Austin, Joliet Central Julia Shemaitis, JCA Katie Brick, Joliet West Kayla Gustafson, Plainfield Central

139 132 130 128 128 127 125 118

Kills Olivia Rusek, Niles West T’ara Austin, Joliet Central Morgan Reardon, JCA Elizabeth Hyland, Plainfield Central Shannon Hagen, Plainfield Central Skyler Day, Minooka

238 225 196 171 157 140


16

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

Sports

Herzberger, Indians defend title By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

The Minooka girls golf team had one goal in mind heading into the Southwest Prairie Conference season this year – win.

The Indians, and top golfer Rachel Herzberger, were both defending SPC champions and wanted to keep it that way, which they did last week at Inwood Golf Course in Joliet with a 370. “Our girls play the same throughout the season,”

Herzberger said of the conference win. “So it is not that surprising. It is nice knowing that everyone on our team is consistent.”

GIRLS GOLF Plainfield Central finished second with a 385, followed by Plainfield South (387), Plainfield North (410), Plainfield East (412) and Romeoville (429). Oswego East only features individual players and Oswego does not have a team. In the tournament, Herzberger tied for the title with Plainfield South’s Alex Catalano, as each carded an 82, 10 shots ahead of the nearest competitor. “I shot a good score for myself and I had a lot of fun playing, so it was over my expectations today,” Herzberger said. “My goal was to defend my title and I did that. It is a great feeling that I was able to have high expectations and achieve my goals.” Finishing second for the Indians was Ashley Gray, who shot a 95, followed by Gabby Osorio (96) and Deaven Hudson (97). Rebecca Andreano (99), Sarah Lindmark (104), Michelle Olson (107) and Katie Eaton (110) also played for the Indians, but did not score. Aside from tying for the win at the SPC tournament, Herzberger won the overall SPC title with 28.5 cumulative points, 1.5 ahead of Catalano. See TITLE, page 20

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Rachel Herzberger won the SPC title for the second year in a row.


Sports

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

PICK VS. PROS Mike Guglielmucci, WJOL Racer’s Forum Last week: Johnson ( 4th) Total Pts: 2130 Scott Paddock, Pres., Chicagoland Speedway Last week: Johnson ( 4th) Total Pts: 2125 Mark Gregory, Bugle Staff Last week: Gordon (2nd)

THIS WEEK’S PICK: D. Earnhardt Jr.

THIS WEEK’S PICK: Clint Bowyer

THIS WEEK’S PICK: Clint Bowyer

Total Pts.: 2115 Scott Taylor, Bugle Staff Last week: Biffle ( 16th )

THIS WEEK’S PICK: Greg Biffle

Pts.

Diff.

1. Brad Keselowski 2142

0

2. Jimmie Johnson 2137

-5

3. Denny Hamlin

2126

-16

4. Clint Bowyer

2117

-25

5. Tony Stewart

2110

-32

6. Kasey Kahne

2110

-32

7. D. Earnhardt Jr. 2103

-39

8. Martin Truex Jr. 2100

-39

9. Kevin Harvick 2096

-46

10. Jeff Gordon

2094

-48

11. Greg Biffle

2091

-51

12. Matt Kenseth

2070

-72

NATIONWIDE SERIES Driver

Pts.

Diff.

1054

0

2. R. Stenhouse, Jr. 1045

-9

1. Elliot Sadler 3. Austin Dillon

Readers Last week: Harvick (13th) Total Pts: 2086

Totals through 3 Chase race

Total Pts: 2095

Tom Zimmerman, Joliet

Driver

THIS WEEK’S PICK: Jimmie Johnson

1029

-25

4. Sam Hornish, Jr. 994

-60

5. Justin Allgaier

-128

926

17


18

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

Sports

Minooka takes second in SPC By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Minooka entered Wednesday’s Southwest Prairie Conference Tournament at Wedgewood Golf Course in Joliet as the points leader with 14 after going through the regular season unbeaten.

BOYS GOLF However, the Indians finished in the all too familiar position of second place with 24 points after taking third in the tournament with a 321 total. Plainfield North (27 points) repeated as SPC champs after shooting a 314. Plainfield Central shot a 319.

“We are pretty disappointed with second because we came in undefeated,” Jason Chobar said. “It is what it is. I think we finished in second place four our sixth straight year. It’s definitely my third year straight, so that kind of hurts. Eventually we will grab first.” Chobar was the only nonPlainfield top eight finisher in total SPC points, finishing with 21 to take second in the conference to Central’s Mitch Young, who shot a 71 and finished with 24 conference points. “I’m pretty happy with it,” Chobar said.“I played pretty well today, so I was able to grab some more points. Mitch played really good today. I needed to get two points back on him and we both

played well today. My main goal next year is to win the MVP.” Chobar was able to feed off of the strong round recorded by Young as they were playing in the same group. “It always helps to play against another player who is good,” Chobar stated. “Then you can stick with him and try to beat him.” Jake Hogen added an 80 for the Indians, while Ryan Johnson shot an 83 and Grant Barker had an 84. • Joliet Catholic’s Dyllan Mattea was fifth at the East Suburban Catholic Tournament with an 81 at Old Orchard Country Club in Mount Prospect. The Hilltoppers finish eighth with a 355. Joliet Catholic won the 2A crown at the LaSalle-Peru Invitational with a 317. Ottawa was one shot back. Brandon Newsome (75) finished third to lead the Hilltoppers.

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL Joliet Catholic defeated Wheaton St. Francis 25-17, 2325, 25-17 Saturday at the Asics Challenge at Mother McAuley in what is a rematch of sectional play from the last few years. The Angels (17-2) finished fifth in the tournament, beating Pius XI 15-25, 25-13, 25-18. JCA opened the tournament with wins on Friday over Downers Grove North (25-14, 25-12) and Berkeley Prep (25-20, 25-23). Kentucky’s  Assumption, the eventual champion, beat JCA early Saturday 25-23, 25-18. In the final match, Morgan Reardon finished with 18 kills and four blocks, while Katelyn Seeman added 10 kills, Maddie Naal six kills, Mangun 35 assists and Dana Nowaczyk 10 digs. In ESCC play, JCA beat Nazareth 25-13, 25-16. Mallory Mangun had 15 assists and eight service points to lead host Joliet Catholic, while Julia Shemaitis added eight digs and seven kills. • Plainfield North defeated Minooka 25-13, 26-24: Skyler Day tallied six kills to lead Minooka (9-6, 5-3). • Joliet West (9-14) defeated Lake Forest 25-20, 15-25, 25-16 in the championship match of the Lake Forest Tournament. Elexis Coleman totaled 40 kills and 36 digs over five matches and was named to the all-tournament team. Katie Brick added 86 assists

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Jason Chobar led Minooka at the SCP meet.

and 34 digs for West. • Sandburg defeated Lockport 24-26, 25-6, 25-16 in SWSC Blue play. • Lincoln-Way East defeated Joliet Central 25-19, 25-18.

BOYS X COUNTRY Joey Santillo posted a time of 16 minutes, 5 seconds to finish fifth for Minooka (6th, 164) to a sixth-place showing in the 32-team Loyola Invitational at Montrose Beach. Cam Knudsen (11th, 16:14) and Alex Pierce (20th, 16:32) also scored for Minooka.

GIRLS X COUNTRY Minooka (78) won the 34team Loyola Invitational. Theresa Connelly (5th, 19:12) paced the Indians, followed by Caleigh Beverly (14th, 19:38). • Lockport (118) was 18th in the 31-team Wheaton North Flight Invitational. The Porters were led by Bianca Wiemeyer (9th, 18:16.4).

GIRLS GOLF Maddy Troha shot a 9 to lead Joliet Catholic (380), which finished seventh at the Rosary Invitational. Joliet Catholic (391) finished in seventh place at the East Suburban Catholic Tournament. Claire O’Connor led the Angels with a 92.

BOYS SOCCER • Lincoln-Way East defeated Joliet Central 3-1. • Plainfield Central defeated Minooka 3-1. • Lincoln-Way East defeated Joliet West 2-0.

GIRLS TENNIS Hana Khatib and HaleyTisoncek won three of four matches at No. 3 doubles, as Lockport finished second to Edwardsville in its own tournament. Brit Kupiec added three wins in both singles and doubles for the Porters.


Sports

Ryder Cup 2012 a memorable event The 2012 Ryder Cup will be remembered for many things. There was the incredible p a s s i o n displayed by both teams and their fan bases, the marvelous shots that were made and the surreal comeback made by the Europeans. I, for one, will remember all of those things for a long time. It was unbelievable to be so close to the action and see the players get fired up more than ever before. Then there was the booing done by the gallery, which never occurs during a regular tournament. They were heckling Ian Poulter (who got the last laugh with a 4-0 record) by yelling for him to just hit the ball and booing him when he wouldn’t concede a putt. But like other major sporting events I watch from home, I will remember how I felt when Europe made the comeback

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

that drove a stake through the Americans’ hearts. After moving from the fifth hole to the 14th, I was still cautiously optimistic that the Americans would come out on top. But as the day moved on the nerves came up more and more. I was expecting for Europe to make a comeback with its stacked lineup at the top, but I didn’t think it would score five of the first six points to tie it up. I still liked who the Americans had coming up, but when Phil Mickelson lost his match after having a late lead, I was officially concerned. When Matt Kuchar got three down on Lee Westwood, it was a straight out panic. I stayed all the way through the players on the 14th and when Martin Kaymer and Francesco Molinari beat Steve Stricker and Tiger Woods on the hole, I knew it would come down to Jim Furyk holding off Sergio Garcia on the 18th to preserve the America win. See TAKE, page 20

19

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Jim Furyk hits a bunker shot on the 14th hole at Mediniah.


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

TAKE Continued from page 19 Walking back to the 18th, I saw the video board and watched Furyk miss the putt that gave Europe the lead and I knew it was over, even with Woods and Stricker still alive. While the outcome wasn’t what I wanted, it was still a great weekend and I’ll remember the European celebration on the bridge by the first tee box.

SECOND-GUESSING There will always be second guessing for captains when you lose.When the United States lost there were several questions as to what U.S. captain Davis Love III could have done differently.

TITLE Continued from page 16 Hudson tied for ninth in the SPC with 10 points. As important as it was to Herzberger and the Indians to

Sports U.S. RESURGENCE?

One of those was sitting out Keegan Bradley and Phil Mickelson Saturday afternoon after winning their first three matches in dominating fashion. Mickelson stood up for his captain right away. “On the 10th hole (Saturday morning) I went up to Davis and told him he was seeing our best and you can’t put us in in the afternoon,” Mickelson stated. “We emotionally and mentally aren’t prepared for it.”We had other guys dying to go out there. You can’t put down him. If anything, it was me because I said that to him.” I would also stick up for Love in this situation and in general for the lineup that he put out there. The one thing I disagreed with was having Stricker play at all Saturday, and even in the afternoon Friday.

He was clearly off his game and even though that seems to be the only guy Tiger Woods plays with in these events, putting in Brandt Snedeker at least Saturday afternoon would have been a better option. In fact, the Europeans sat both Martin Kaymer and Peter Hanson Saturday and played Justin Rose and Rory McIlroy all four doubles matches and it appeared to pay off. I also didn’t like Stricker or Jim Furyk as captains picks to begin with. With all the young talent out there, fresh, exciting players with little Ryder Cup experience is better than aging players with mostly negative experiences. Stricker went 0-4 for the week, so I might as well have been a captains pick because I couldn’t have done any worse.

Speaking of a youth movement, the future does look bright for the Americans. The 2000s was generally a struggle for U.S. golf. Even the winning Ryder Cup team in 2008 had an interesting range of players. This year’s team had a good balance of youth and veterans. And, everyone has proven itself on the PGA Tour over the years and the only possible one year wonder is Jason Dufner, who, based on his Ryder Cup performance, appears to be here to stay. Look at the players who didn’t make the Ryder Cup team this year (Bill Hass, Rickie Fowler and Hunter Mahan) and compare it to some of the players who did make the team in the 2000s: Boo Weekley (2

win the SPC crown, she knows now is when it counts more. Minooka now travels to LaSalle for the LaSalle-Peru IHSA Class AA Regional.They are matched with teams from Bradley-Bourbonnias, Galesburg, LaSalle-Peru, Metamora, Moline, Rock Island and Sterling and individuals from

Dunlap and Richwoods. The top three teams and the top 10 individuals not on qualifying teams will advance to the Normal University Sectional. “This is when it is big,” Herzberger said. “We have to try and keep our regional title and hopefully we can get out

to sectional as a team and my individual goal is to get to state.” She said she has never played Senica’s Oak Ridge Golf Course, but she says that doesn’t matter. “I enjoy playing on a course that I haven’t played before,” Herzberger said.“I think going in not knowing the course makes

career PGA Tour wins), J.B. Holmes (2 Tour wins), Vaughn Taylor (2 Tour wins), J.J. Henry (2 Tour wins), Brett Wetterich (2 Tour wins) and Chris Riley (1 Tour win). Several other players struck little fear in Europe. There was even a time where Tiger Woods and Jonathan Byrd were the only Americans in their 20s with multiple Tour wins. Now, there are several in their 20s with multiple wins. Dustin Johnson, Simpson and Bradley are the future of U.S. golf, along with Mahan and Fowler. That’s not to say that the U.S. will dominate the Ryder Cup now as there are plenty of talented members of Europe still, as was evident Sunday. However, expect the U.S. to be much more competitive in the foreseeable future. staylor@buglenewspapers.com

me a better player.” Whatever the case, Herzberger says the team has the right formula for success. “We have been close as a team and we have really got along and practiced hard together,” she said. mark@buglenewspapers.com


14 www.buglenewspapers.com/football

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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 3, 2012

21

Alviti’s big first half propells Hawks By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

The showdown between the CSL South’s two 5-0 football teams, Maine South and upstart Niles West, didn’t last long Friday night. Matt Alviti and the Hawks saw to that. Alviti needed only one half of work to accumulate 208 yards through the air, pass for two touchdowns and run for two more as the Hawks took a commanding 44-7 first-half lead en route to a 51-14 homecoming rout of the Wolves. Wolves head coach Scott Baum has seen Alviti, a Northwestern recruit, work his magic for three years, and marveled at the senior’s effort Friday. “It’s like you’re playing in Canada (Canadian football) when you play against this kid,” Baum said. “The field seems so big. I like (Northwestern coach) Pat Fitzgerald a lot and I think he’s getting a helluva player. He’s a competitor; he kind of willed them to go today.” Alviti got Maine South rolling with a 2-yard TD run on the Hawks’ first offensive series. The Hawks (6-0, 2-0) picked up two more points when a Niles West snap on a punt sailed into the end zone for a safety. Maine South reached the end zone again following the safety. Anthony Mitchell scooted up the middle for a 27-yard score to give the Hawks a 16-0 lead. Then, defensive back Alberto Rossi picked off a pass and ran it back to the Niles West 10-yard line with 2:48 left in the first quarter. That set up Alviti’s 6-yard

scoring pass to Daly Guzaldo. “We were really fired up,”Alviti said.“We prepared well all week. We knew that with a 5-0 team we couldn’t joke around, so we focused all week and prepared.” Niles West went three-and-out on its ensuing offensive series, and a short punt put Maine South in business at the Wolves’ 27-yard line. Mitchell’s second TD run of the quarter, this a 5-yarder, opened up a 30-0 advantage. In the second quarter, the Wolves (5-1, 1-1) marched down to the Hawks’23-yard line on Mike McGivern-to-Jeremiah Jordan pass that covered 13 yards. But John Cerniglia cut the Wolves’ drive short by intercepting a pass at the 3-yard line. Seven plays later, Alviti, while scrambling near mid-field, found Frank Perrone in the end zone and threw a 44-yard bomb to the wideout with 5:18 remaining before halftime. “It was a broken play and you’ve always got to be ready with Matt,” said Perrone, who caught four passes for 95 yards. “I saw that I could get open. I pointed to Matt and showed him where to throw it and he’s going to put it on the money every time.” The Wolves got on the board late in the first half after McGivern, who shared quarterback duties with Tommy Galanopoulos, flipped a 2-yard TD pass to Galanopoulos. But the Hawks responded on Alviti’s 4-yard run with 21 seconds left. Galanopoulos hit Jordan (six catches, 67 yards) for an 11-yard touchdown in the third quarter. The Hawks’ final TD of the night also occurred in the third

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Niles West quarterback Tommy Galanopoulos is wrapped up by two Maine South defenders during Friday night’s 51-14 Hawks victory.

when Trent Orr blocked a punt. Anthony Perrone picked up the loose ball at the Niles West 31 and ran it in. The Hawks, who have seven

starters injured, are expecting defensive end Mike Klein and tight end John Solari to return to the lineup for their game at Evanston next week.

“Guys have been stepping up and filling roles and we’ll be that much stronger for it,” said Maine South head coach Dave Inserra. mike@buglenewspapers.com

PLAYER OF THE WEEK Nominees

Last week’s results

Ty Isaac, JCA 287 rush yards, 4 TDs Mike Smiles, Plainfield C. 7-of-10, 138 yards, 3 TDs Robert Baker, Plainfield N. 18 carries, 196 yards, 2 TDs Jack Beneventi, Benet 200 pass yards, TD Go to buglenewspapers.com to vote for your winner!

Aaron Bailey Bolingbrook

36%

Dave Edwards Downers North

29%

John Kosirog Plainfield South

29%

Chris James Notre Dame

7%


22

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

Travel

Finding great art in Europe’s smaller museums By Rick Steves Tribune Media Services

For many travelers, a visit to one of the great treasurechest museums - Paris’ Louvre, London’s British Museum,Rome’s Vatican - is the highlight of a European trip. But sometimes a march through endless galleries dense with other tourists can be a mood killer, as you battle the throngs to scratch yet another biggie off your to-do list. At the start of a trip, I’ll seek out every great painting and cathedral I can.After two months, I find myself “seeing” cathedrals with a sweep of my head from the doorway, and I probably wouldn’t cross the street for another Rembrandt. I’m not saying that you should skip the Mona Lisa; but Europe’s great museums can be hard work, and I am rarely good for more than two or three hours at a time. Luckily,not all art masterpieces are kept in the powerhouse museums. Europe is filled with many fine little museums that amply reward those who venture beyond the monumental sights. Smaller places have their own superstar attractions, and because their collections are rarely encyclopedic, you can see everything in one visit and still feel fresh. Take, for example, Paris’ Marmottan and Orangerie museums. Fans of Monet and Impressionism gravitate toward the Orsay Museum, with its impressive collection - and inevitable crowds. But savvy sightseers know they can get their Monet fix - with less

competition - elsewhere. Monet himself designed the setting for his great Water Lily paintings at Paris’ Orangerie, where French royalty once grew orange trees for its palaces. Perched on the edge of Paris and fronted by a lovely park, the Marmottan owns one of the best collections anywhere of works by Monet, including the painting that gave Impressionism its name (Impression: Sunrise).After a pleasant stroll through the galleries, you’ll still have enough energy to enjoy the museum’s park and to wander along nearby Rue de Passy, one of Paris’ most pleasant and upscale shopping streets. Europe’s cultural wonders often hide out in fascinating buildings that were never meant to be museums. For instance, one of Michelangelo’s Pietas lives in Milan’s Sforza Castle, itself a Renaissance palace where Leonardo da Vinci was the inhouse genius to the mighty Sforza dukes. The exquisite and famous Lady and the Unicorn tapestries are among the medieval treasures in Paris’ gem-like Cluny Museum, once the mansion of an important church leader. London’s Wallace Collection features fine 17th-century Dutch Masters and 18thcentury French Rococo pieces inside a sumptuously furnished townhouse. From the rough and intimate Dutch lifescapes of Jan Steen to the pink-cheeked Rococo fantasies of Francois Boucher, a wander through this little-visited mansion makes you nostalgic for the days of the empire (and it’s free). I love

Submitted Photo/Rick Steves

The Vatican doesn’t have all the good art in Rome: Bernini’s exquisite Apollo and Daphne belongs to the Borghese Gallery.

these cultural “two-fers” - great art surrounded and deepened by authentic bits of history. My favorite small-scale museum is Rome’s Borghese Gallery, featuring world-class sculptures by the Baroque virtuoso Bernini and dazzling paintings by Caravaggio, Raphael, Titian, and Rubens, all displayed within a 17th-century building that gets my vote for the best interior of

any palace in Europe.And best of all, there’s no chance that you’ll be overcome by museum fatigue. Visits are strictly limited to two hours. (Admission requires a reservation - easy to get by telephone or online). The wealthy Cardinal Scipione Borghese richly decorated every inch of the place in the overthe-top Baroque style, then filled it with classical, Renaissance,

and Baroque masterworks. In the cardinal’s age, the rich and powerful employed renowned artists to spiff up their homes. As the pope’s nephew, the cardinal was well-connected and could easily afford the tab. This is a place where - regardless of whether you learn a thing - you can sit back and enjoy the sheer beauty of the palace and its art. But the Borghese is more than just a wonderful museum. The beautiful villa is set in the lushly green Borghese Gardens, Rome’s version of Central Park. The sprawling open space is perfect for relaxing, unwinding, and letting the kids run wild. After you’ve finished your circuit of the museum, saunter out through the park to the viewpoint over the Piazza del Popolo for prime people-watching, or rent a bike for a spin around the leafy gardens. Even the trip to the museum is fun, especially if you ride the little “elettrico” bus, which winds silently through the narrow lanes of Rome’s medieval core up to the park. As I’ve discovered over a lifetime of visits, it pays to sightsee smartly and selectively. Europe’s many wonderful little museums may be less visited than the biggies, but they are no less rewarding. (Rick Steves (www.ricksteves.com) writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and public radio. Email him at rick@ricksteves.com and follow his blog on Facebook.)

(c)2012 RICK STEVES DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.


Business & Real Estate

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

23

Want a promotion? Make mistakes Q. I have a job where the same thing never happens twice. I end up making a lot of mistakes. My boss says mistakes are just part of the learning curve, but I get so upset I shake when I realize I messed up. How can I develop more self-confidence? A. You will develop more selfconfidence by learning how to make mistakes with enthusiasm and grace. Your boss has been trying to tell you that, in any industry, you have to make mistakes to know anything worth paying you for. The difference between people who get promoted and people that stay at the bottom of the workplace food chain is that the people who get promoted take risks, make mistakes gracefully, and get really good at their jobs. People who don’t get promoted make mistakes, freak out, and can’t think clearly enough to find solutions. The people who are most

likely to be thrown off the horse by mistakes are bright, competent w o r k e r s who are perfectionists. I r o n i c a l l y, employees who don’t care as much also don’t get as upset - and tend to be able to think about how to fix a problem. Notice what you tell yourself the next time you make a mistake. You may find you talk more critically and rudely to yourself than you would talk to anyone else. We often don’t notice these silent dialogues going on inside our head, but they do make us feel awful. If you find you’re ranting internally about what an idiot you are, no wonder you lose the ability to solve problems. Notice that the real problem isn’t that

you made a mistake. It’s that you treat yourself so badly that you’ve lost your ability to fix anything. Consider how you’d talk to friends you love dearly when they make a mistake. Now next time you screw up, attempt to take a deep breath, and then give yourself the same pep talk. Give yourself the room to know that it’s normal to be embarrassed when you make a mistake.If you are a perfectionist, be comforted in knowing that no one in the room is being as hard on you as you are being right now on yourself. People who end up with brilliant careers make as many mistakes as anyone else. One of the favorite themes in movies and books is the underdog who goes on to succeed. When you make a mistake at work, you are the underdog. If you keep your wits about you, what you do next may just make you the top dog

Picking the right trustee Dear Dave, I’m going through a divorce, and I’m about to buy a $600,000 life insurance policy. My 9-year-old daughter would be the beneficiary. I need a trustee, but how do I pick a good one? Marie Dear Marie, First, your daughter wouldn’t be the beneficiary. You would leave it in a trust for her benefit. And I’m not sure I’d depend on an ex-husband to handle something that requires this much integrity. You’d be better off hiring a good attorney to execute the trust upon your death, or you can look for a bank that has a trust department. Once you decide on a trustee, you must remember to clearly and specifically state what you want done with the money. Don’t say to invest the money appropriately, because what a banker views as an appropriate investment and what I view as an appropriate invest are usually very different. A banker might put the money in CDs, or certificates of deposit, while I’d probably look at something like mutual funds, which have a much better rate of return. In many cases, a trust for a child

is put in place to pay for their first car, a medical situation or their college education, but this is completely up to you. The balance of the money might go to them when they reach age 21, while they receive a monthly stipend for food and other essentials while they’re younger. I’m proud of you for thinking ahead, Marie. I know divorce is hard, but your little girl is lucky to have such a good and caring mom on her side! —Dave

Dave’s thoughts about online banks Dear Dave, How do you feel about using an online bank for your emergency fund? Jared Dear Jared, I don’t think that’s a problem

at all in most situations. Just make sure you do a little research. Know who you’re dealing with and that they’ve got some strength. A bank that is known as a “click and mortar”—one that has a physical location as well as online—would be my preference. Some of them have great debit card programs that includes debit card rewards and high-interest checking accounts, too. When it comes to an emergency fund, I like the idea of keeping it in a separate money market account. That way you get money market rates, plus you can attach check writing privileges to the account. Then when an emergency comes along, you don’t have to worry about shuffling money around. You can just write a check out of the account. Problem solved! —Dave * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 5 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.

at work.

The last word(s) Q.There is a group of people at work who enjoy sitting around snickering and making judgmental comments about everybody else. Are people still this petty after high school? A. Yes, petty gossip is the tranquilizer of an immature soul. (Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive

coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2012 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012


your life well might lie in finding a balance between holding on and letting go. In the week ahead, be content with what you have, but don’t be afraid to give up on the impossible

clouds linger without sending any rain. Someone could have a definite change of heart by midweek. Not all problems in the week ahead need solving; let them emerge and dissipate.

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

Across 1 Beatles film 5 Globetrotter’s need 9 TV choice 14 x, y and z, in math 15 Israel’s Barak 16 Curved moldings 17 Hard to spot 18 Muddy up 19 Chestnut-hued horses 20 Chicken, beef, or fish? 23 Bar order 24 Sweetie 25 Three-time Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film 27 Saw 32 Membership list 33 Slangy morning cup 34 Tabloid exclusive 36 Inferior 39 Director of the last episode of “M*A*S*H” 41 Concerning 43 Hershey’s toffee bar

Down 44 First name in daytime TV 46 Worldweariness 48 Gin maker Whitney 49 Jazz and swing periods 51 Word with crew or key 53 Gridiron call 56 Respectful title 57 French vineyard 58 Expensive bottle of wine? 64 River including Livingstone Falls 66 Major in astronomy? 67 Balm ingredient 68 Milk dispenser 69 Hardly handsome 70 Loads 71 Run for the __: Kentucky Derby 72 Understands 73 Gusto

1 Boaters and bowlers 2 Auditorium sign 3 “Leading With My Chin” author 4 Film with a creepy motel owner 5 Archie’s heartthrob 6 Denny’s competitor 7 Diamonds, but not emeralds 8 Robin Williams forte 9 Tight braid 10 Gone by 11 Shop specializing in Winnie the Pooh merchandise? 12 Lotte who played Rosa Klebb in “From Russia With Love” 13 German steel town 21 Fashion designer Michael 22 Anthem contraction 26 Pontiac muscle cars 27 Slightly cracked

28 Angler’s need 29 Money set aside for garden mazes? 30 Drink brand with a lizard logo 31 Mars pair 35 __ rock 37 Alone 38 Joyce’s homeland 40 Ostentatious behavior 42 “__ With Morrie”: Albom best-seller 45 Salts on the ocean 47 Hip bones 50 Star Wars prog. 52 German sub? 53 Present itself, as a thought 54 Tolkien ringbearer 55 1975 Tonywinning play about a stableboy 59 The munchies, e.g. 60 Cruise stop 61 Dark purple fruit 62 Eternities, seemingly 63 Midterm or final 65 “Golly!”

Charm them and disarm them. You are capable of inspiring trust and admiration in the week to come. If you wait to make a commitment until all uncertainties are cleared and doubts resolved, it may be too late.

Another day, another dollar. In the week ahead, you may become more aware of your spending habits and may consider new ways to economize. Too much intense concentration can leave you tired out.

Everyone stumbles occasionally. That is why it is good to have someone to hold your hand. In the week ahead, concentrate on strengthening personal relationships and keep your money in your pocket.

Show no disdain for disclosures. When someone offers you confidential information in the upcoming week, it is up to you to handle it well and to honor the trust with which it was given.

Shift from won’t power to will power. In the week ahead, you may be able to use a small financial crisis to your advantage. A minor frustration can turn you into a powerhouse of determination.

Batten down the hatches. An unsettled period early in the week ahead could have you unsure of which way the wind is going to blow. Hold off on making irrevocable decisions until Tuesday.

Make it your personal mission to be as true and blue as possible in the week to come. If you look closely, you may find many examples of loyalty. Remember to be appreciative of support from others.

Set realistic goals. In the week to come, you may be caught up in an obsession with something new. Warning: Don’t spend money on any new passion without thinking things through thoroughly.

25

SUDOKU

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Jumbles: • FUZZY • CAKED • PURITY • ASYLUM

Answer:

Important for a pinup girl to be this -- STUCK UP

TOP POP ALBUMS September 16 through September 22 TITLE

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Tornado Blown Away Tailgates & Tanlines Uncaged Chief Hunter Hayes My Kinda Party Welcome to the Fishbowl Declaration of Independence New to This Town

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Paramount Pictures Marvel’s The Avengers Universal Pictures Universal Pictures Screen Gems Warner Bros. Lionsgate Lionsgate Paramount Pictures Universal Pictures


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012


THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012

27

Board approves cost saving initiatives ahead of budget work The Will County Board has approved a voluntary furlough program for the fourth consecutive year and signed off on the purchase of an office building in an effort to cut expenses and save taxpayer dollars. “Both the voluntary furlough program and the purchase of additional office space represent this Board’s ongoing efforts to practice the highest level of fiscal responsibility,” said Chairman Jim Moustis.“We are thankful to the many county employees that participated

in the furlough program in previous years and those that will do so in 2013. As the county has grown, we have had to lease additional office space. The purchase of this real estate will decrease lease expenses and pay for itself in only a few years.” The furlough program is completely voluntary and some employees have found the program beneficial in allowing additional time off to care for a child as opposed to arranging and paying for childcare. Additionally, others simply

City of Joliet election petitions for candidacy available Petitions for candidacy for three, full-term (four years) AtLarge City Council positions are available in the City Clerk’s Office at the Joliet Municipal Building, 150 W. Jefferson St. To qualify as a candidate, applicants must be a qualified elector of the city of Joliet and have resided within the corporate limits of the city for at least one year preceding the April 9, 2013, Consolidated Election. Illinois law imposes other qualifications to be eligible to submit a petition for candidacy and to serve as an elected official of the city of Joliet. Candidates should review Illinois law and other related codes to determine whether they meet the required qualifications. Compliance with the applicable law in having the petitions for candidacy signed, and submitting them along with other required documents, is the sole responsibility of the candidate and not the city of

Joliet or any of its employees. Neither the City Clerk nor any other city employee will be responsible for reviewing petitions that are filed during the filing period to determine whether they are in compliance with the law. Candidacy petitions must be filed with the Joliet City Clerk’s Office between Monday, Dec. 17, 2012, and Monday, Dec, 24, 2012, during normal business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Joliet City Clerk’s Office will remain open until 5 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 24, 2012, to accept petitions for candidacy. Please Note: State Legislature may change this date. For more information regarding obtaining a petition for candidacy, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at 815-724-3780 or cityclerk@ jolietcity.org. Please note the City Clerk’s Office will not be able to provide advice or directions on how to circulate petitions or submit them.

enjoyed taking an extended vacation. Since fiscal year 2010, approximately 340 employees have taken part in voluntary furloughs. Last year the county saved $127,494. “As we enter the time when tough budget decisions need to be made, everyone plays an important role in holding the line and being fiscally responsible while continuing to provide a high level of service,” said Minority Leader Walter Adamic (D-Joliet). “Everyone is working together now to arrive at a balanced budget that is best

for the citizens of Will County.” The board approved the purchase of the former Social Security Administration building at 158 Scott St. in Joliet because it will reduce lease expenses and pay for itself within several years. The Board plans to move the land use department into the building and save approximately $230,000 annually in lease expenses. The 12,000-squarefoot building is being purchased for $850,000 and paid from cash reserves. The county executive

submitted his 2013 budget proposal to the board last week. The board will now work on analyzing and potentially making adjustments to the budget ahead of approving it in November. “Transparency and public input are two critical keys in drafting a responsible budget,” said Ed Kusta,Jr.(R-Bolingbrook), finance committee chairman. “Will County practices and encourages both, and this year is no different. We must be prudent and wise with every taxpayer dollar.”

Will County Drug Court graduates 11 Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow announced that the Will County Drug Court graduated 11 people who have completed the program and are living drug-free lives. The Drug Court held a graduation ceremony on Thursday at the Will County Office Building, 302 N. Chicago St., Joliet.The public was invited to attend. Graduates are from Joliet, Plainfield, Homer Glen, Mokena, Manhattan, Downers Grove and Lemont. They join nearly 300 others who have graduated from Drug Court since 1999. In Drug Court, prosecutors and defense attorneys work with the judge and treatment providers to help abusers who have committed non-violent offenses battle their addictions. Those allowed into the program are carefully screened and must remain drug free, submit to random drug tests, find

employment, follow through with treatment and attend weekly Drug Court sessions. Glasgow spearheaded the creation of the program in the late 1990s. Circuit Judge Carla Alessio Policandriotes presides over Drug Court. “Drug Court enabled today’s graduates to take control of their lives and remove themselves

from the cycle of addiction,” Glasgow said. “Every dollar spent on a prevention program like Drug Court saves ten times the money for taxpayers when the alternative is to imprison non-violent offenders.” For information on Drug Court,visit www.willcountysao. com and click on Special Courts.


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL OCTOBER 3, 2012


Joliet 10-3-12