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INSIDE

SPORTS Former JJC star now with the Bears Page 13

NEWS Drew Peterson trial underway Page 5

Our Village, Our News

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AUGUST 8, 2012

Vol. 4 No. 49

Joliet teen a rising star After being contacted by an L.A.-based music producer, Lizzy Stone hopes to sign a major label record deal By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

Every Wednesday at 2:30 p.m., Lizzy Stone arrives for her voice lesson at the University of St. Francis. For the last 5 years, Lizzy, a senior at Providence Catholic High School, and voice instructor Jeff Ray, have worked together on her sound. In March, that work garnished unexpected rewards, as Lizzy was approached by music production company Ramone Worldwide. The LosAngeles-based producer first noticed Lizzy because of her YouTube channel, which is filled with videos of her singing her favorite songs. “His assistant messaged me and said, ‘I listened to your YouTube videos, I think your really good, and there’s this producer that wants to work with you,” Lizzy says. “At first I thought it was a scam.”

“The record label is

saying I could be like the next Taylor Swift, but I want to be the first Lizzy Stone.” Lizzy Stone. The call was anything but a scam, and within weeks the Joliet native was on her way to Los Angeles to meet Mark McKinney, the creative mind behind Ramone Worldwide, and put together an artist package for potential record labels. “The first thing obviously is you have to figure out what kind of genre is going to be best hitting for the artist, and sometimes that’s hit and miss as well.” McKinney says of the first things he and Lizzy worked on. “When you have an artist that’s singing

Jonathan Samples/Bugle Staff

Lizzy Stone works with voice instructor Jeff Ray during her weekly voice lesson at the University of St. Francis.

covers that are out by someone else versus what they’re going to be able to pull off, it may be two totally different things.” During that trip, Lizzy recorded five original songs and one music video with McKinney, who has worked with a number of top-

selling artists, including Mariah Carey, Taylor Swift and Hanna Montana. Once a new artist has put together a package,McKinney helps to shop the artist around to interested record labels. And that’s exactly what he did. After that initial trip to L.A., Lizzy

and her mom, Cynthia, were on their way to New York to meet with Atlantic Records. “I had a meeting with them where I sang a little bit and they listened to my songs,” Lizzy says. See LIZZY, page 2


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News

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

Jonathan Samples/Bugle Staff

Lizzy Stone has been working with voice instructor Jeff Ray for five years.

LIZZY Continued from page 1 “They said they really like the popcountry feel. So, they’re looking into signing me. I just have to do more pop-country songs.” Later this month, she will be returning to L.A. to record more songs and a second music video. McKinney is hopeful that the revamped tracks will make Lizzy appealing during the second meeting with Atlantic Records. “The first meeting went very well,” McKinney says. “If they’re not interested, there’s no point in seeing you again. For them to be interested to this extent, I think is a really, really good sign for her.”

Finding Her Voice In many ways, Cynthia was her daughter’s first singing instructor. After singing to Lizzy as an infant, Cynthia recalls a time when her infant daughter began to sing for her father. Cynthia said that even as a child, Lizzy had a talent beyond her young age. “I had inklings when she was in first grade,” Cynthia says.

“In second grade, she changed schools, and they didn’t have a choir. So, she asked to sing at church, and she held her own in the adult choir.” Before long, Lizzy began taking voice lessons. Five years ago, she started to work with University of St. Francis professor Jeff Ray, who says the young singer’s talent has grown tremendously since they began their lessons. “When Lizzy came in she was very shy, hard to believe, and very soft-spoken,” Ray says with a laugh. “But I think underneath that was a real hunger to perform, a real hunger to sing, and that has shown itself.” Together the two have worked on a variety of different music styles, including classical, choral, pop and country. However, Ray said that a combination of pop and country is an area where Lizzy excels. “She’s got a natural comfortability in that style of music,” Ray says. “Nothing sells us more than honesty. When we listen to singers on the radio, if they’re being honest, we respond in a positive way.” Although humble in her demeanor, Lizzy shares her

instructor’s confidence and is hopeful about the opportunity she has been presented. “My dream come true would be to get signed and go on tour,” Lizzy says. “The record label is saying I could be like the next Taylor Swift, but I want to be the first Lizzy Stone.” And despite all the attention, Lizzy has managed to keep herself grounded.The high school senior is already ahead of the curb, having recorded professional tracks and videos before being able to apply for college. And if the trips to New York and L.A. don’t end in a record deal, she’s prepared to take her passion for music down a different path. “I want to go to Belmont University in Nashville,” Lizzy says. “They’re one of the few schools in the nation that does contemporary music, which is what I want to do.” Cynthia shares Lizzy’s confidence, and said, regardless of the outcome, she expects great things for her daughter. “I would love to see her be the super star she wants to be and all the good things that that entails,” Cynthia says. jsamples@buglenewspapers.com


THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

Preserving Our Past

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Gooding House played significant role in local, national history Over the next several weeks, the Bugle will continue to shed light onto the Will County Historic Preservation Commission. Preserving Our Past will journey to a handful of registered Will County historic landmarks, take a closer look into the historic survey process, and introduce readers to members of the commission and the work that they do. By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

The William Gooding House was built in 1845, and like its original owner, its past ties it to Lockport’s local history and the greater antebellum era. Gooding arrived in the area in 1833, and in 1836 he became the chief engineer for the Illinois & Michigan Canal.While there, Gooding oversaw the construction of one of the most important artificial waterways in the country’s history. The home’s identification with Gooding, a significant contributor to the history of Lockport and the nation, is one of the main reasons why the Will County Historic Commission added the William Gooding House to its Register of Historic Places on June 15, 2000. Gooding’s involvement with the I&M Canal is what links him to significant local and national historic narratives. Nationally, the I&M Canal was an important artificial waterway that essentially connected the eastern United States to New Orleans by way of the Great

Lakes and the Mississippi River. Locally, the I&M Canal’s construction precipitated the growth and evolution of Lockport and shaped the area’s economy during the second half of the 19th century. The William Gooding House, by way of its original owner, links directly to these national and local narratives. However, the house also has a historic quality all to its own. Architecturally, the William Gooding House is an example of Greek-revival construction. Its temple-form design was popular during the 1830s and 1840s, giving it a distinct preCivil War character. This historic architecture and the prominence of the home’s original owner are the main reasons why Charles and

Submitted Photo

The William Gooding House was built in 1845 and is representative of Greek-revival architecture.

Beverly Hull, former owners of the William Gooding House, nominated it for the Will County Register in March 2000. Together the couple attempted to have the home placed on the national register in 1977, one year after they purchased the home. However, the attempt was blocked because the home had been moved from its original location on Ninth and Hamilton. In 1957 it was moved to its current location, 403 N. Farrell Road. jsamples@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

ATI Foundation to help physically impaired with downtown celebration By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

This year the ATI Foundation will combine two of its most popular annual events into one very special day. The 10th annual 5K Run, Walk & Roll and ninth annual Cruisin-4Kids Motorcycle Ride will come together on Aug. 25 for the first time in order to raise money for the ATI Foundation.According to Director Terry Williams, the ATI Foundation aids children 18 years old and younger with physical impairments by providing them with medical resources and funding. Williams said the decision to combine the events was simply for scheduling reasons, but the hope is to keep them combined going forward. “We thought we’d put them on the same day and make it a very special day,” Williams said. “Provided the event is as successful as we think it is going to be, the plan is to keep them on the same day.” Williams said the events typically raise between $60,000 and $70,000, but this year

the ATI Foundation has set their fundraising goal at over $100,000. Check-in for the 5K begins at 9:30 a.m. with the race beginning at 10:30 a.m. Williams said the 5K may start a few minutes later because of a pre-race celebration led by Jim Cornelison, who sings the National Anthem for the Chicago Blackhawks. Although the race is open to all levels, Williams said cash prizes of $100, $75 and $50 will be awarded to the top female and male runners. He expects about 1,500 runners to participate in the event. Registration for the 5K is $25 pre-registration and $35 the day of the event. The Cruisin-4-Kids Motor Cycle Ride will be what Williams described as a “poker run.” Participants will follow a southern route to various establishments, where they will have to obtain a playing card. Once they have acquired five cards, they return to the starting point. The team with the best five-card hand wins a $500 prize. The event will begin at 10:30 a.m. and end at 3 p.m. The event is $20 per rider and passenger.

Participants for the 5K can preregister at www.ati5k.com and riders in the Cruisin-4-Kids event can register at www.atic4k.com An Inaugural Charity Bike Show will also entertain guests from 1 to 4 p.m. Williams said the show will allow participants to show off their bikes and win a prize. “The whole entire celebration is open to all of Joliet and the southern communities,” Williams said. “If you don’t want to participate in the 5K, the Crusin4-Kids or the Bike Show, you’re welcome to come down and purchase food and enjoy live music.” In addition to the three main events, guests will be able to enjoy live music, a kids area, and food and drink. The event will take place outside of Harrah’s Casino Joliet, 115 N. Joliet St. Organizers are asking for a $5 donation for attendees not participating in either of the main events. For more information, contact Williams at terry.williams@atipt. com or 630-296-2222 Ext. 7900. jsamples@buglenewspapers.com

Joliet man sentenced to 50 years for attempted murder of his son Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow announced Monday that a Joliet man was sentenced to 50 years in prison for the attempted murder of his then 12-year-old son. In June, a jury deliberated for 35 minutes before convicting Submitted Photo Roderick Tademy, 37, of 1221 Cutter Ave., of attempted Roderick Tademy was senmurder, aggravated battery to tenced to 50 years in prison a child and aggravated battery Monday. with a firearm. Circuit Judge Sarah Jones sentenced Tademy time of the shooting, a claim to 50 years on Monday. the jury quickly rejected at The young boy was sitting the conclusion of a weeklong on his couch and playing trial. video games when his father “Roderick Tademy shot him in the head with a committed an unthinkably .22-caliber handgun on Dec. brutal crime against his own 20, 2010. The boy’s mother son,” Glasgow said. “Instead of testified that after she heard loving and protecting his son the gunfire, Roderick Tademy at all costs, just as every father told her that her son was dead. should, Roderick Tademy She dialed 911 and police inflicted terrible harm on this arrested Tademy at the scene. innocent young boy.” The victim survived the Glasgow credited assistant attack but remains in a long- state’s attorneys Tricia term care facility and requires McKenna and Dan Walsh for a ventilator to breathe. expert trial work that secured Roderick Tademy alleged that this important conviction and he suffered from insanity at the sentence.

Health department, state report more West Nile Virus-positive mosquito samples in Will County Mosquito monitoring sites operated by the Will County Health Department and the Illinois Department of Public Health confirmed the presence of West Nile Virus in 12 samples collected during the last two weeks of July. Two Bolingbrook sites operated by Will County Environmental Health generated virus-positive mosquito batches July 30. Additional specimens collected the same day from Will County sites in Homer Glen, Lockport and Crete also yielded virus-positive samples. On July 27, two Health Department monitoring sites in Joliet produced virus-positive samples. Health Department sites have generated 17 WNVpositive mosquito samples since June 20, including at least four from Bolingbrook locations. Northern Will County

monitoring sites operated by the Illinois Department of Public Health, have also been busy. A state site in Bolingbrook has produced three WNV-positive mosquito samples, and a site in Naperville tested two viruspositive mosquito batches. All of the Will County positives originating from IDPH sites were tested between July17-26. Hot, dry weather is considered to be a trigger for mosquitoborne WNV. Illinois is currently experiencing one of the hottest summers ever recorded, with at least 30 days of 90-degree temperatures already on the books. Dry conditions are also prevalent. Local rainfall totals for 2012 are approximately seven inches below normal. No human WNV infections have been reported from Will County, but two cases from

suburban Cook County have been identified. More than 1,500 human WNV infections have been reported in Illinois since 2002. Will County Environmental Health is working with local units of government and municipal authorities to help limit the population of Culex pipiens mosquitoes, the species most frequently identified with WNV transmission to humans. So far this summer, the Health Department has distributed 45 cases of larvicide to 13 local jurisdictions. Larvicide has been provided to Bolingbrook, Channahon, Crete Township, the village of Crete, Homer Township, Lemont, Manhattan, New Lenox Township, Peotone, Plainfield, the Reed Township Mosquito Abatement District, Shorewood and the Will County Highway Department.

The Health Department continues to urge area residents to take precautions against mosquito bites. Protective clothing (long sleeves, long pants, shoes and socks), are strongly advised during trips

outdoors. Insect repellent containing DEET or other chemical compounds that deter mosquitoes are also strongly recommended. Mosquitoes are most active at dawn and early evening.


THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

Prosecution stumbles in opening days of Peterson trial By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

The Drew Peterson murder trial is well underway with prosecutors off to a bumpy start in a tough case of circumstantial evidence. Celebrity-like, Peterson, 58, is charged with the 2004 death of his third wife Kathleen Savio. The disappearance of his fourth wife Stacy Peterson in 2007 brought the case to the national limelight and media frenzy. “But the case is not about Stacy Peterson, it is about Savio and that is where the focus needs to lie,” explains Huma Zia, J.D, director of paralegal studies at Lewis. “The state carries the burden of proof beyond reasonable doubt that he murdered his third wife which is going to be a challenge. We know so much about Stacy that in respect to Kathleen the focus has to be on Savio.”

She points out that the State made a blunder during opening statements when they entered testimony that the judge already said was not permissible. In retaliation, the defense requested a mistrial. The judge admonished the State, but proceeded with the case. The move starts to stack the deck against the prosecutors who are already up against a path of presenting mainly circumstantial evidence, which makes the case difficult to argue and difficult for a jury to rule on, Zia sid. The problem, surmises Zia, is that the death of Savio was originally classified as an accidental drowning and then later the case was reopened as murder. “Years later the case is reopened, and now the crime scene was not processed the same as if it was a murder at the time; the state has changed its mind and has to deal with

a lot of statements that are just hearsay,” said Zia. “This is where the hearsay evidence argument comes into play. Savio is deceased, the defense cannot cross-examine the venacity of her statements.” However, the appellate court ruled that some statements will be allowed and the judge will determine statement by statement which ones will be allowed. “There are a lot of statements that have yet to come out so the jury would not be tainted; we will be hearing a lot more,” Zia said. “Make no mistake, the prosecutors are confident, they wouldn’t have brought charges if they weren’t.” The trial continues to play out. Both the defense and the prosecutors have made their opening statements last week and the State has begun bringing up its witnesses and is making its case in chief See PETERSON, page 8

Denise Winfrey named chair of national employment committee Joliet board member leads efforts to improve workforce development, employee benefits, job opportunities Will County Board Member Denise Winfrey (D-Joliet) has been named the chair of the National Association of Counties Labor and Employment Steering Committee. The announcement came during NACo’s annual conference in Pittsburgh. “Last year, I began serving on this important committee with the mission to help the people of Will County and have worked to advocate for those with a job as well as those without a job,” Winfrey said. “I am honored to take on this new role as chair of the committee, as local governments play a vital part in the planning, management and implementation of labor and employment laws. Together with officials from across the

country, we will ensure the voices of our residents are heard at the national level.” The committee deals with employer-employee relations, including personnel policy and practice; merit systems; equal employment opportunity; collective bargaining; pensions; fringe benefits; occupational safety and health; workers’ compensation and Social Security. In addition, it works on matters pertaining to employment programs and the jobs aspects of welfare reform, including youth employment; public service employment; vocational education; migrant and Native American programs; rural manpower; employment security; and unemployment

insurance. NACo is the only national organization that represents county government in the United States. As a unified voice, NACo has the ability to present issues to federal legislators and make the needs and opinions of counties count at the national level.NACo also works to improve the public’s understanding of the role of county government. It facilitates the sharing of innovative solutions through education, research, and valueadded services to save counties and taxpayers money. Along with the rest of the national committee, Winfrey will be working to develop policy and advance the NACo labor and employment platform. This includes maintaining local authority with respect to labor and employment law, effective workforce development, positive labor-management relations, and affordable and responsive employee benefits.

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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Joliet Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

Police Blotter

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Sarah M. Abrego, 34, 15360 Legendary Drive, Moreno Valley, Calif., was arrested on July 30 at 3:19 p.m. at 2741 Vehicle for leaving a child unattended in a vehicle.

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James A. Pacheco, 25, 321 E. 14th, Lockport, was arrested on July 30 at 2:29 a.m. on Division and State for aggravated fleeing/eluding a police officer and DUI/alcohol.

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Anton Coytex May, 32, 2110 Belmont, Joliet, was arrested on July 30 at 5:26 a.m. at 2305 W. Jefferson for resisting/ obstructing a police officer and robbery.

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T. Blowers, 19, 11 Damian 755 N. Hickory, Joliet, was arrested on July 30 at 9:37 p.m. on Cass and Briggs for resisting/ obstructing a police officer.

Antonio R. Slater, 21, 3210 Price Court, Joliet, was arrested on July 30 at 11:45 a.m. at 150 Wallace for domestic battery.

C.Turner, 35, 419 12 Tammeka N. Bluff, Joliet, was arrested on July 30 at 10 p.m. on Lawton and McKinley for prostitution.

Jonelle R. Carson, 30, 308 Grover, Joliet, was arrested on July 30 at 7:33 p.m. on Chicago and Spruce for criminal damage to property and battery.

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Jason J. Paquette, 28, 133 Elmwood Drive, Naperville, was arrested on July 30 at 2:22 p.m. at 151 N. Joliet for criminal trespass to property.

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Maurice D. Bass, 17, 2703 Fairway, Joliet, was arrested on July 30 at 6:50 p.m. on Woodruff and Dora for delivery of a look alike controlled substance.

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Alfredo Guerrero, 38, 619 N. Hickory, Joliet, was arrested on July 30 at 7:45 p.m. at 619 N. Hickory for domestic battery.

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Steven L. Clark, 39, 503 Bellarmine, Joliet, was arrested on July 30 at 9:29 p.m. at 18 S. Larkin for burglary from a motor vehicle.

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Christine C. Labuda, 52, 417 High St., Joliet, was arrested on July 30 at 8:45 a.m. at 151 N. Joliet for criminal trespass to property.

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Anthony B. Pleasant, 25, 1405 Brown, Joliet, was arrested on July 30 at 12:33 a.m. at 308 Herkimer for criminal trespass to real property and criminal damage to property.

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S. Johnson, 29, 14 Demarcus 1510 Pioneer Road, Crest Hill, was arrested on July 31 at 7:33 a.m. at 508 Second Ave. for armed violence, aggravated unlawful use of a weapon by a felon, aggravated domestic battery, possession of a handgun by a known street gang member, aggravated assault and possession of controlled substance with intent to deliver. Christopher D. Fillmore, 29, 1721 Forest Cove, Mount Prospect, was arrested on July 31 at 9:20 p.m. at 2480 Route 59 for leaving a child unattended in a vehicle.

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Justin Z. Alberico, 19, 1940 Connie Drive, Crest Hill, was arrested on July 31 at 10 p.m. on Clover and Clover Lane

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for disorderly conduct. Jessica S. Meas, 20, 116 Fairfield Drive, Romeoville, was arrested on July 31 at 4:15 p.m. at 3340 Mall Loop Drive for theft.

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Christopher J. Schwarz, 21, 310 Eaton Ave., Romeoville, was arrested on Aug. 1 at 1:27 a.m. at 3151 Voyager Lane for battery.

Normita M. Lyman, 48, 3106 Thomas Hickey Ave., Joliet, was arrested on Aug. 1 at 1:22 a.m. at the residence for domestic battery.

Ramone C. Washington, 34, 518 Infantry Drive, Joliet, was arrested on July 31 at 8:50 a.m. at 150 W. Washington for aggravated domestic battery and criminal damage to property.

Antony Y. Petrakis, 32, 10611 S. Parkside, Chicago Ridge, was arrested on Aug. 1 at 1:27 a.m. at 3151 Voyager Lane for battery.

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Reginald D. Rogers Jr., 20, 359 E. First Ave., Joliet, was arrested on Aug. 1 at 9:36 p.m. at the residence for aggravated discharge of a firearm, unlawful possession of a firearm by a street gang member and unlawful use of a weapon by a felon.

Patrick E. Chambers, 41, 414 Morgan, Joliet, was arrested on Aug. 1 at 7:55 p.m. at the residence for aggravated domestic battery and interfering with reporting domestic violence.

Daeviontae D. Pruitte, 18, 523 Chase Ave., Joliet, was arrested on Aug. 2 at 9:03 p.m. at 412 Campbell for unlawful use of a weapon by a felon, possession of a firearm by a street gang member, possession of ammunition without FOID card and obstructing a police officer.

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Dontaylon Jimerson, 53, 509 S. Joliet, was arrested on Aug. 1 at 4:40 p.m. at 807 S. Joliet for possession of controlled substance.

Kenneth R. Butera, 24, 2218 Stonehaven Drive,Plainfield, was arrested on Aug. 2 at 11:12 p.m. at the residence for criminal damage to property.

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Sophia E. Golasky, 19, 24657 W. Kingston, Plainfield, was arrested on Aug. 1 at 2 p.m. at 2240 Mall Loop Drive for retail theft.

Eugene D. Fritz, 48, 15818 S. Collins Drive, Plainfield, was arrested on Aug. 2 at 1:11 p.m. at 3340 Mall Loop Drive for felony retail theft.

Anthony M. Engstrom, 38, 6114 Brookridge Drive, Plainfield, was arrested on Aug. 1 at 4:54 p.m. at 1536 Route 59 for aggravated assault.

Samuel L.Mays,42,415 Parks Ave., Joliet, was arrested on Aug. 2 at 1:58 p.m. at 805 Juniper

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E. Rodriguez, 40, 332 19 Jose Crane, Mundelein, was arrested on July 31 at 4:02 p.m. on Route 6 and Neufairfield for possession of controlled substance with intent. Erasmo Gonzalez-Valensia, 31, 1111 NW Alma Circle, Round Lake, was arrested on July 31 at 4:02 p.m. on Route 6 and Neufairfield for possession of controlled substance with intent.

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Lashawnda L. Hicks, 39, 16 Iowa Ave., Joliet, was arrested on July 31 at 6:32 p.m. at 410 Washington for aggravated assault.

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Michael A. Petway, 27, 222 Union, was arrested on July 31 at 10:17 p.m. at the residence for battery.

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J. Pinnick, 35, 609 23 Courtney W. Jefferson, was arrested on July 31 at 7:05 at the residence for domestic battery.

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Luiz N. Pizano, 63, 402 Grant Ave., Joliet, was arrested on Aug. 1 at 6:25 p.m. at 402 Grant for domestic battery.

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See BLOTTER, page 7


Forum

What’s on your mind?

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

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Illustrated Opinions

You are invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to Matt Honold, managing editor, at mhonold@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy; just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@ buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your Cub Scout run a fundraiser car wash? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred.

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

BLOTTER Publisher Rich Masterson publisher@buglenewspapers.com Managing Editor Matt Honold mhonold@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Sherri Dauskurdas Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Robin Ambrosia Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Sports Reporter Mark Gregory mgregory@buglenewspapers.com Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication Letters to Editor: 9 a.m. Friday www.buglenewspapers.com

sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

Continued from page 6

Vice President of Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com

for criminal trespass to state supported land.

Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Sales sales@buglenewspapers.com Published by Voyager Media Group, Inc. P.O. Box 1613 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 3 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 3 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

Jerry L. Jelks, 34, 210 Fairmont Ave., Lockport, was arrested on Aug. 2 at 1:58 p.m. at 805 Juniper for criminal trespass to state supported land.

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Cosme F.Tapia, 18, 609 Jasper, Joliet, was arrested on Aug. 2 at 12:45 p.m. at 50 W. Washington for arson.

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James Van Ouwerkerk, 50, 941 Bond St., Green Bay,Wis., was arrested on Aug. 2 at 5:26 p.m. for disorderly conduct.

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Stephanie D. Hancock, 18, 2616 Hennepin Drive, Joliet, was arrested on Aug. 2 at 4:16 p.m. at 3340 Mall Loop for retail theft.

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Center for criminal trespass to real property. Aric D. Vandermeir, 22, 2110 Dartmoor Drive, was arrested on Aug. 2 at 1:13 a.m. at 3501 Channahon Road for criminal damage to property.

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Lockport

Darneisha L. Pierce, 26, 110 Fifth Ave., was arrested on Aug. 2 at 12:42 a.m. at 112 N.

Property manager for Habitat for Humanity stated that person(s) unknown entered both homes on July 24 and removed copper piping from the basements.

Rwal A. Allison, 29, 337 N. Center, Joliet, was arrested on Aug.2 at 12:58 a.m.in the 300 block of Grover for domestic battery.

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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

Speed enforcement set for Wednesday on Route 30 By Sherri Dauskurdas Staff Reporter

If you live or work in the Plainfield area, it’s hard to be unaware of the problems on Rt. 30. Accidents along the famed highway are unfortunately common. High speeds, combined with a host of distractions, from cell phone use to alcohol, account for the roadway racking up serious and fatal collisions in the double-digits from Orchard Road to I-55. To that end, the Plainfield Police Department, in a joint effort with a local advocacy organization,

PETERSON Continued from page 5 with testimony that has been “compelling,” said Zia. “The defense’s job is to poke holes into the credibility of the state’s witnesses, and they have been doing their job well, but the State still has the opportunity to come back and redirect,” Zia explained. “They have to prove that they circumstantial evidence but that it is still good enough.” The defense then has the opportunity to bring their

will be spending this Wednesday, August 8, controlling speed on Rt. 30. The police have joined forces with faces4.org (Families Against Chronic Excessive Speeding) in the campaign, which will make use of both education and enforcement, to increase safety and reduce crashes along the Rt. 30 corridor. While all traffic laws are being enforced, special emphasis will be placed that day on speeding vehicles, as well as commercial motor vehicle violations and railroad crossing violations, according to Plainfield Traffic

Sergeant Eric Munson. Plainfield police aren’t the only ones taking part. Police from Crest Hill, Joliet, Montgomery and Oswego are joining the effort along this troublesome highway, as are Illinois State Police, both Kendall and Will County Sheriff’s Police, as well as personnel from all the railroad agencies that serve the area. As of July, 533 people have been killed in vehicle and motorcycle crashes in Illinois, up by nine percent, or 45 fatalities compared to 2010, according to the Illinois Department of Transportation. Will County has seen 26 of those.

witnesses and then the State can redirect questions to them. Odds are the defense will request a motion to dismiss the case which is typical and then the judge will most likely deny the motion, Zia suapects. “Whether or not Peterson will testify is unlikely because a lot of testimony on the witness stand can open up doors to information about Stacy Peterson,” Zia said. If Peterson does take the stand, opportunity for the case to become more sensational comes to play. Zia calls attention to the fact of the national attention of this case

and the fact that a Lifetime movie about Drew Peterson has been aired twice. “I’ve never seen a movie come out before a case has been tried, I don’t know what that says about our society or social media these days,” Zia said. “If it weren’t for the Olympics, this case would be even more sensational. I am glad that it is not and that it can be judged in court and not based on public opinion.” The trial is expected to carry on for the next couple of weeks. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com


Calendar ONGOING Joliet-Area YMCA’s NFL Flag Football League. Open to area students, ages 7-11, this fun-filled program provides children and their families with an opportunity to enjoy the football experience every time they step onto the field. All games will be played on Saturdays from 10-11:30 a.m., at the Galowich Family YMCA, 749 Houbolt Road in Joliet. Practices and games will get underway on September 22, and run through mid-November. Registration closes Sept. 29. Cost is $60 for Full Members and $85 for Program Members. To register, call the Greater Joliet Area YMCA at 815729-9622. Cruise for the Cure Car Cruise Event. 5 to 8 p.m. every Saturday. AACCEL is helping the Pink Heals Tour by raising money to battle cancer in our community. 100% of funds raised will be kept within our community! DJ, drawings, raffles, food, bean bags, horse shoes, fun for the kids, balloons, face painting, bounce house. AACCEL is located at 3500 Mall Loop Dr. Joliet, IL 60431 (Behind the Louis Joliet Mall). For more information call 815-5776193 or e-mail info@aaccel.com Bingo at St. Mary Nativity Catholic School. Every Friday at 7 p.m. in the school gym. Doors open at 4 p.m. and the kitchen opens at 5 p.m. Pull tabs go on sale at 5:30 p.m. and cards at 6 p.m. First game starts at 7 p.m.All are most welcome to come and play. Serenity On Sunday Al-Anon Family Group. Sundays from 1 to 2 p.m. at the Resurrection Lutheran Church, 25050 W. Eames Street, Channahon. The only requirement for membership is that there be a problem of alcoholism in a relative or friend. There are no fees or dues. Each group is self-supporting with voluntary contributions.As a mutual helping group, there is no other affiliation. Feel free to visit www.niafg.org for more information or to leave a message on the Al-Anon line at 815-773-9623. Rockdale Lions Club Weekly Bingo. On Mondays door will open at 4 p.m., the early bird game will start at 6 p.m. and regular games start at 7 p.m. So come on out to our club at 48 Meadow Ave. in Rockdale, IL for an evening of bingo and fun. Contact our club at 815-729-3201 or Lion Steve at 815-791-8282 or Lion Wayne at 708-341-4433.

Joliet Lupus Support Group Meeting. 6:15 - 8 p.m. at the Provena Physical Rehab & Sports Injury Center, 2132 Jefferson St. (in Marycrest Plaza), Joliet. Anyone with lupus or a family member or friend with lupus is welcome to join this group. Meeting dates for 2012 are on the 4th Wednesdays of odd months: 7/25, 9/26, and 11/28. Contact Tari at (815) 351-2544 or e-mail: tlapurdue82@gmail. com. Go www.lupus.org for more information on lupus. WomenHeart Support Group. Meetings are on the second Thursday of each month from 6-8 p.m. in the PSJMC Conference Room A at 333 N. Madison St., Joliet. WomenHeart of Joliet is here for you to provide the support, education and friendships that you need to live well with heart disease. WomenHeart will offer information and support that you may not find with your friends and loved ones. We can share fears, thoughts, and concerns in a relaxed and caring environment. For more information or agenda please call Michele at (815) 7034142. Birth after Cesarean. This group meets the first Monday every month in Romeoville from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Please come for encouragement, support, and information to plan for your natural birth after cesarean. All babes-in-arms are welcome too. Call Melanie at 253-861-5897 or VBACesarean@aol.com with any questions. Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit environmental organization is dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815-834-1611. Circle of Hope Al-Anon Family Group. Sundays at 1:302:30 p.m. at Joliet Alano Club (back entrance), 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. This on-going support group with no fees or dues is for all families and friends of problem drinkers, especially those who are affected today by growing up in an alcoholic home. For more information contact Al--Anon/Alateen 815773-9623 or visit www.niafg.org for more information

Strive 4 Hope. Second and fourth Thursdays from 6-8 p.m. at the Joliet Moose Lodge #300, 25 Springfield Ave., Joliet. This is a support group, which welcomes all cancer survivors, caregivers, family members, and friends. Call Sharon at 815-349-5458 or Carrie at 815-730-0134 for more information. Need a Job or GED Classes? Education Service Network NFP Inc.’s Career Seekers GED/ Workforce program, a program of the Regional Office of Education is located at 179 North Chicago St. Joliet, Illinois 60432. We offer GED classes/resume preparation/ job placement for participants between the ages of 16 and 21. Classes meet Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon; Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 1 to 3 p.m. We also offer GED classes at our satellite site at the Friendship Centre at HighPoint, 175 South HighPoint Drive, Romeoville on Monday and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information call 815-7748902 or 815-774-8922. Breast cancer support group. 7-8:30 p.m. at Joliet Oncology-Hematology Associates, 2614 West Jefferson St., Joliet. The Bosom Buddies Breast Cancer Support Group meets the first and third Tuesdays of each month. For more information call Pattie at 815-436-7640. Diabetes Support Group. 7 p.m. at Provena Saint Joseph Medical Center, 333 N. Madison St., Joliet. Support Group for adults with diabetes, support person welcome. Different topics will be discussed each month. Share your experiences and learn as you work towards achieving control over your diabetes. Meetings on the 4th Wednesday of each month. Call 815-725-7133 ext. 3224 for more info. Wii Gaming Afternoons. Tuesdays and Thursdays at 2 p.m. at the Shorewood Public Library. Stop by to use the library’s Wii, set up in the Young Adult area. No early registration required, just sign up on the day at the reference desk for 30-minute slots. Bring your friends for multiplayer, or sign up on your own. Ages 1318 only. Pool Classes for Arthritis. Every Tuesday and Thursday in the Willow Falls Recreation Center, 1691 Willow Circle Dr., Crest Hill. Morning and evening classes

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012 are available. For details and registration call Valerie Brockman at 815-773-6229. Young Widows Support Group. Meets once a month at varying locations in the Plainfield/ Joliet area.Open to those who have lost a partner and are ready to begin healing and moving forward in life by sharing their experiences with others. Children are welcome. For more information please contact Amanda at widowswearstilettos chicagosw@yahoo.com.

AUGUST 8 Dare to Care. 6 p.m. at Provena Saint Joseph Medical Center, 333 Madison St. Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a serious condition that affects millions of Americans. A common symptom is pain or numbness in the legs. PVD is often a sign that you have narrowed arteries in the heart and brain, which can lead to a heart attack or stroke. Early detection for PVD can literally save your life.We offer a FREE lecture & screening. You may qualify if you meet the risk criteria and are not under the care of a cardiologist. This free event begins with the lecture on the first day and the screening on the next day. Call Provena Health Connections at 815-725-9438 to register.

9

AUGUST 9 Joliet Chamber Back to School Night. 7:05 p.m. at Silver Cross Field. Come out to see the Joliet Slammers take on the London Rippers. Game time is 7:05 p.m. Tickets are on sale for 1/2 price, $5.00 and are available at the Chamber office.The first 10 businesses to purchase 25 tickets or more will have a table at the event to display materials pertaining to their business. We are looking for businesses to purchase tickets to be donated to area organizations and given out to underprivileged children so that they may attend the game.There will also be a post game concert featuring the band Maggie Speaks.

AUGUST 10 American Cancer Society’s Pink Tea. 2 to 4 p.m. at Harrah’s Hotel & Casino, 151 North Joliet Street, Joliet. The purpose of the event is to celebrate survivors and raise awareness of advances in early detection and treatment of breast cancer. Anybody interested in attending can go register online at www.pinkteajoliet.com. $25.00 to attend. Movie in the Park—Puss in Boots. 7 p.m. at Inwood Park. See CALENDAR, page 12


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

Bugle Kids


Take 5

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

H o ro s c o p e s

Across

1 Big Harley, in slang 5 “MarchingAlong” autobiographer 10 “Mamma Mia!” group 14 Soap Box Derby state 15 Hearth debris 16 Off-peak period 17 Meat used in place of a puck? 19 Untidy type 20 John Williams quintet? 21 Fridge sound 22 ‘70s Olympics name 23 Fab Four member 24 Prepare beans, Mexican-style 26 Scary fly 30 Place for care instructions 33 Mouse catchers 36 Expected 37 Professor’s goal 38 Corrida cry 39 Surcharge for a cab ride? 41 English __ 42 Drum heard in Westerns

44 Actress Basinger 45 Bar brews 46 Mar. parade celeb 47 Presario PC brand 49 Significant period 51 Comfortably rewarding 55 Dinner and a movie, say 57 D-backs, on scoreboards 59 Gillette razor named for its blade count 60 One with a password 61 Davy Jones at an abbey? 63 Gimlet garnish 64 Game show host 65 Throw in a chip 66 SoCal force 67 Country singer Rimes 68 Tabloid loch

Down

1 Hostess snack cakes 2 “__ of golden daffodils”: Wordsworth 3 Neopagan religion 4 Some Soap Box Derby entrants 5 Articulates 6 __Kosh B’Gosh 7 “Rats!” 8 Out of harm’s way 9 Invitation on a rep’s button 10 Losing candidate 11 Intimidator on the bovine playground? 12 Online journal 13 Jessica of “Sin City” 18 Slips up 25 Show off one’s muscles 27 Dutch cheese 28 Prom duds 29 Bulova competitor 31 14-Across’s Great Lake 32 Tennis net

grazers 33 Summer cabin beds 34 Boatloads 35 Short-term Arizona State employee? 37 Pack (down) 39 Four-legged Oz visitor 40 Comical Conway 43 Like a pencil point 45 Sea-dwelling superhero 47 Car trim 48 Farmland division 50 Skating maneuver 52 Teatime snack 53 Help for the clueless 54 “Omigosh!” 55 Boring 56 Where most people live 58 Bygone Peruvian 59 Not-so-little kid 62 Barbie’s guy

©2012 TRIBUNE SERVICES, INC.

Stick your toe in and test the waters first. A temporary lack of funds may keep you from satisfying all your desires in the beginning of the week. You will achieve a happy medium near the middle of the week.

Love is the only fourletter word you manage to utter. During the upcoming week, your kindness and sensitivity toward others are demonstrated with an air of refinement and delicacy that everyone admires.

Gentle and fun-loving Venus is in your sign for a few more days. You might find that expressing your love of the most beautiful things and perhaps investing in them might be the safest route as the week unfolds.

Reveal some initiative behind the scenes. Your outlook might improve greatly when Venus enters your sign midweek and offers you more opportunities for happy social interactions. Expect more romance.

You gotta have friends. In the week to come, your circle of friends, your clubs or other groups might take up more of your time than usual. You know how to edge your way to the top by being especially friendly.

Be proud and persevere. Your financial predicament will appear much rosier by the middle of the week. Spending habits may be reexamined; a special someone will be happy to give you the benefit of the doubt.

Time for the tried and true. In the week ahead, you may be adept at finding coupons to cut costs and finding other ways to get the best value. You might be most at home with old friends who stick by you through thick and thin.

The power of love outshines the love of power. In the week to come, you might find that romantic outings are just as thrilling and satisfying as making headway in the boardroom. Give it your all.

Creative ideas ache to be expressed in the week to come. Your imaginative ideas can blossom into reality - but first you must acquire necessary tools and experience. You might find a masterful mentor.

Those who are detailoriented might take center stage in the week ahead. Offer a pat on the back to those who demonstrate selflessness and be generous with your own time and talent. Set a good example.

Be well equipped to offer a quip. Your social circle could expand during the week ahead, so stock up on some small talk and keep a few jokes on hand to entertain an audience. The love boat might sail.

A kiss is just a kiss. You might like you are floating on cloud nine in the week to come if you meet up with a hot new romantic prospect. Remember to keep in touch with old friends as well as new ones.

SUDOKU

MEDIA

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • TOPAZ • BELIE • ADAGIO • PEOPLE

Answer:

A good way to get in the last word -- APOLOGIZE

11


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

CALENDAR Continued from page 9 Grab your blanket and snacks and come out to this family friendly FREE event. Movies will be shown on a giant inflatable movie screen. Events will take place starting at 7 pm with games, contests, and concessions. Movies will be shown at dusk. In case of inclement weather, the movie will be cancelled. Movie titles subject to change.

AUGUST 11 Nowell Park Back to School Festival. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Joliet Park District’s Nowell Park. Bring the whole family out for a day of fun. Celebrate the end of summer with us! The park is located at 5 Mills Rd. in Joliet. There will be games and contests as well as lunch being served starting at noon – all free! This year we will be offering a 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament at 12:30 p.m.with registration taking place from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. For more information, please call Hartman Recreation Center at 815-7417296 or visit us at jolietpark.org.

Open Door Music Fest. 5 p.m. at First United Methodist Church of Lockport, 1000 S. Washington St.The free Open Door Music Fest will feature the music of talented local musicians.The music starts at 5 p.m. See you all there! Visit our website at www.1umclockport. org or call 815-838-1017, for more information. Child Safety Seat Checkpoint. 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Advanced Auto Parts, 310 Summit, Lockport. The Lockport Police Department will have officers who are certified as technicians available to provide free hands-on child safety seat inspections and advice. For questions or concerns regarding this event please contact officer Jeren Szmergalski either at 815-838-2132 ext. 2275 or jszmergalski@lockportpolice. info. Back-to-School Community Barbecue. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at St. Joseph Academy, 51 W. Jackson St. St. Joseph Academy, Joliet’s private, independent school in downtown Joliet, is hosting a Back-to-School Community Barbecue. Vendors will be on hand selling different kinds of

food, treats, and crafts. There will be free activities for the children. Families and other teams will be invited to participate in a City Center Scavenger Hunt between the hours of 10 a.m. and noon, sponsored by Tom Csepregi Productions. For further information call Jan Novotny, Head of School, at 815-723-4567.

AUGUST 12 Create Your Own Electricity Via Solar Presentation. 1 to 3 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, SW corner of Bruce and Briggs, Lockport. Join us and learn how you break your dependency from major industries like ComEd.  Bill Lorch, a Joliet homeowner will explain how he converted his home to ‘solar.’ This solar conversion has paid for itself and he now sells his excess power to ComEd. He also raises honey bees and bakes his own bread in his outdoor brick oven!  This is a free community outreach presentation. For more information, contact: Citizens Against Ruining the Environment – CARE - 815.834.1611 a nonprofit organization. Holy Cross Parish Picnic.

Noon until 9 p.m. at St. Joseph Park, Raynor and Theodore St., Joliet. The picnic festivities begin with a Polka Mass at 9 a.m. at Holy Cross Church and a Polish Mass on Sunday Aug 12 at 10:30 a.m. at the grotto in St. Joseph Cemetery followed by a great day of fun at St. Joseph Park.  There will be plenty of great food, refreshments, bingo, children’s games and music by the Gora Band from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. and Downtown Sound from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Annual Celebration Dinner. At the Jacob Henry Mansion. The Joliet Jewish Congregation is proud to announce that they will hold their Annual Celebration Dinner. This year’s well-deserved honorees are Judy & Mike Block and Dianne & Fran Parker.  For invitation information please call Mark Turk at 815-922-4065. Up, Up & Away Event. At Brent Hassert Park on Renwick Road in Crest Hill. The Lockport Township Park District is hosting this free event, which includes an acrobatic act by Forms in Motion, a professional kite flying demo, weather permitting, and you can enjoy a chair swing or

get adventurous on the zipline. Concessions will be available for sale. For more information call 815-838-3621, ext. 0.

AUGUST 13 Getting Ready for a Garage Sale. 7 to 8 p.m. at the Lockport Brach Library/The Gaylord Building, 200 W. Eighth St. Do you want your next Garage Sale to be your best? Beth Randall of Joe Organizer LLC will share her best tips and ideas for making your Garage Sale successful. You will learn how to price and display your items, and more! To register, or for further information on this program, please contact the Lockport Branch Library at 815838-0755, or check our website at http://www.whiteoaklibrary. org.

AUGUST 14 Joliet Area Community Hospice Annual Golf Classic. 8 a.m. registration/9:30 shotgun start at the Joliet Country Club, 1009 Spencer Road. The event is $125 per golfer and $500 per foursome. Register online at www.joliethospice.org. For more information, contact Jodi Wulff at 815-531-3553.


INSIDE: St. Francis adds extra football game to schedule, page 14; Visit www.buglenewspapers.com for football camp videos

www.buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

13

Ex-JJC star at home with Bears By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Most Chicago Bears fans remember Kelvin Hayden, cornerback for the Indianapolis Colts, for his interception of Rex Grossman with 13 minutes, 38 seconds left in Superbowl XLI. It was Hayden’s first NFL interception and he returned it 56 yards for a touchdown, ending the scoring at 29-17 and taking the wind out of the Bears’ sails. Hayden, who grew up a Bears fan in Chicago, hopes to make more memories in his hometown orange and blue. “It feels good to be home,” he said. “Last year (as a member of the Atlanta Falcons) was my first year out of the Midwest and it was different. It is the journey of the NFL, but it feels good to be back home. My family is able to get out here every day and see me working, so that is always good. But also, growing up a Bears fan and playing for the hometown team is even better. I am just trying to make the best of the opportunity.” See HOME, page 17

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Bears defensive back Kelvin Hayden (24) squares up on rookie receiver Alshon Jeffery at camp in Bourbonnias.


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

Sports

USF adds extra game, more players The University of St. Francis has added an 11th game to its 2012 football schedule, Athletic Director Dave Laketa announced Saturday. USF will entertain Menlo College, an NAIA independent out of Atherton, Calif., Saturday, Nov. 3 at 6 p.m. The addition of Menlo, which posted a 5-5 mark a year ago, gives the Saints six home games this coming season. In a close vote of the league’s head coaches, the University of St. Francis emerged as the top pick in the 2012 Mid-States Football Association Midwest League preseason poll. USF received four first place votes and 42 total points, edging William Penn University’s 40 points (two first place votes), Grand View University’s 38 (one first place vote) and St. Ambrose College’s 33. St. Francis and Grand View shared the MSFA Midwest League title a year ago with 6-1 marks in conference play. Olivet Nazarene University (22 points),Trinity International University (14) and Waldorf College (7) rounded out the Midwest League preseason ranking. In the MSFA Mideast League, defending national champion Saint Xavier University topped the poll with 33 points (three first place votes), followed by Marian University with 31 (two first place votes). The champions of the MSFA Midwest and Mideast leagues earn an automatic berth to the NAIA playoffs. Ranked seventh in the 2012 NAIA preseason poll, St. Francis won a school-record 10 games (10-3) and reached the Elite Eight of the NAIA Football Championship Series last fall. The Saints kick off their 2012 campaign Saturday, Aug. 25 against Concordia (Mich.) University. The Saints also signed several players to letters of intent. • University of St. Francis has added another inside presence at the linebacker spot with the signing of Joliet Catholic Academy’s Mike Passo (Plainfield, Ill.) to a letter of intent. Passo earned both all-East Suburban Catholic Conference and Joliet Herald News all-area honors for the Class 5A state

runnerup Hilltoppers this past fall after totaling 84 tackles, including 49 of the solo variety. The 6-1, 180-lb. product also had three sacks, one fumble recovery and one interception for head coach Dan Sharp’s 11-3 squad. “Mike will keep the great tradition of the linebacker

position going here at St. Francis,” said USF head coach Joe Curry. “He comes from a great program and has a great attitude and work ethic that we want so that we can be successful on defense. “We look forward to watching Mike grow into an all-conferencetype linebacker for us.”

Passo is looking to major in business at St. Francis. • A record-setting runningback in high school, University of St. Francis first-year head coach Joe Curry is hopeful that former Homewood-Flossmoor High School standout Malik Norman (Homewood, Ill.) can rewrite the record books as a Fighting

Saint after Curry announced the signing of the Grand Rapids (Mich.) Community College transfer to a letter of intent. Norman (5-8/185 lbs.) obliterated the old touchdown record at Homewood-Flossmoor with his 40 scores in 2010, or 17 See USF, page 16


Sports

Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images

Jeff Gordon avoided a late crash to break his winless streak and claim the win at Pocono.

Gordon wins rain shortened Pocono Jeff Gordon, one of NASCAR racing’s biggest rainmakers, got a shower just when he needed it in Sunday’s Pennsylvania 400. Gordon didn’t lead a lap under the green flag, but he notched a critically important victory at Pocono Raceway, thanks to an opportunistic move to the front after a restart on Lap 91 of a scheduled 160. Coincidentally, it was a mistake by Jimmie Johnson, Gordon’s Hendrick Motorsports teammate, that enabled Gordon to celebrate in Victory Lane, and, more important, to resurrect his prospects for the Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup. The victory was Gordon’s first of the season and the 86th of his career. It was his sixth win at Pocono and the second there in a rain-shortened race. Gordon took the checkered flag after 106 laps when rain halted the June 2007 event at the 2.5-mile triangular track. On Sunday, NASCAR parked the cars on Lap 98, after they ran seven laps under caution as rain moved into the area. When what started as a light rain became a torrent, NASCAR called the race. Gordon surged into the lead See POCONO, page 18

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

Sports

IOC a lot like IHSA in its rulings Last week I was made aware of a ruling that has been around for several years in the Olympics, but one that I just heard about. I n gymnastics, only two members from a country can qualify for the all-around competition. That ended up hurting the United States’ Jordan Wieber, who had one of the top all-around scores, but fell victim to the rule as two of her teammates scored better. Now,I understand why there is a two competitor max per country in events. The International Olympic Committee does not want to have all finalists from one country. So, you can only have two competitors in events such as swimming, table tennis and track and field. I get it. A swimming finals of all eight Americans is pretty silly. However, gymnastics is a different breed. There are only five members to a team and at

the most there are only four who could technically compete in the all-around, and in most cases three if the fifth teammate competes in at least one event. So, out of the 24 qualifiers, only three or four max would be from one country, which seems very reasonable. In addition, unlike in the other sports, gymnastics actually allows more than two individuals to attempt to qualify for the finals. Other sports only have two entries period. If you are scoring/timing more than two athletes, how can you keep them out of the finals if they proved they deserved to be there by making the mark to qualify while at the Olympics? That makes no sense and isn’t very fair to me. When did the Olympics become about equal opportunity rather than about the best win? Wieber just won the world allaround in 2011, so it is hard to see her not being in the running for at least a medal. When I was thinking about the injustice,I couldn’t help comparing the Olympic committee to the Illinois High School Association. The IHSA is all about getting mutual representation from different regions rather than

allowing the best teams in the state to meet in the finals. A good case was the Class 4A girls basketball state playoffs, where powers Bolingbrook and Whitney Young met in the supersectional after meeting up at state in previous years. A great comparison though is found in bowling where, like gymnastics, scores are used. Almost every year individuals are left home with higher scores than other at-large candidates. In this case there are two teams and two individuals from each sectional who head to state. In addition, there are six at-large qualifiers. However, the at-large qualifiers don’t go by the highest score.They go by pins behind the second qualifier. So, if a sectional is really bad and have several close to each other, they could send three or four at-large qualifiers, despite being 100 pins lower than other individuals. While I’m not happy that the equal representation has been hitting the high school scene for some years, I am even more discouraged that it is hitting the largest stage in the world. I thought as a team you are competing with each other and

USF

special. “We look forward to seeing the ball in his hands this fall.” Other honors accorded Norman included an invitation to pay in the Illinois Shrine AllStar Game the summer after his senior season, twice being named his team’s mvp and also earning the squad’s iron worker

award. He is undecided on the major he will pursue at St. Francis. USF set a school record with its 10 wins this past fall, while also recording the program’s first-ever NAIA Football Championship Series victory when it knocked off NAIA No. 6-ranked Morningside

Continued from page 14 more than the previous mark. He also rushed for a schoolrecord 2,035 yards his senior year. Those numbers led to Norman earning all-state distinction and Pepsi-Cola Athlete of the Year accolades in 2010 and repeating both as an all-area and all-Southwest Suburban Conference Blue selection. “Malik excelled for a very good program at Grand Rapids Community College last year and is no stranger to the area having played at HomewoodFlossmoor,” said Curry. “He provides great athleticism and a playmaking ability that is very

not against each other? While the gymnasts were trying to qualify as a team for finals, they were battling each other to see who would get the top two slots in the individual competition. While they overcame this to win gold, it sure wasn’t easy for them that night.

I’m not sure that’s fair for those athletes involved or the tone we want to set for the younger generations. Championships, at all levels, should be reserved for the best. Otherwise, what is the point of an incomplete championship? staylor@buglenewspapers.com


Sports HOME Continued from page 13 The Bears were in the running to sign Hayden last season after a six-year stint with the Colts, but the two couldn’t come to terms. “Unfortunately, it didn’t happen last year, but things happen for a reason,” Hayden said. “I am glad to be here and be part of a good team that has the opportunity to do some things.” Hayden said the goal of this year’s Bears team is simple. “Our goal is not to win the division, not make the playoff, not to make the Superbowl, but to win the Superbowl,” he said. “That is our mindset.” A four-year starter at Chicago’s Hubbard High School, Hayden was a cornerback as a freshman and had 10 interceptions, second most in the state. As a sophomore, he switched to quarterback where he passed for 21 touchdowns and ran for seven more. His junior season, Hayden switched again, this time to running back, where he posted 2,135 yards and 33 scores, His fourth position change in as many years, Hayden switched to wide receiver his senior year, where despite missing seven games totaled 792 yards. Hayden played his first two years out of high school at Joliet Junior College, where in two years as a receiver, he posted 115 receptions for 1,839 yards and 17 touchdowns. As a sophomore in 2002, Hayden was the NJCAA National Offensive National Player of the Year, won first team Junior College All-America accolades and was named the Conference Player of the Year after catching 72 balls for 1,297 yards 13 scores. He was also named the MVP of the 2002 NCAA National Championship game, which Joliet won 24-14 over Georgia Military College. He then transferred to Illinois, where in 2003, Hayden led the Illini with 52 receptions for 592 yards. He then went back to cornerback in 2004 where he started all 11 games and had 71 tackles and four interceptions. Hayden never would have thought that just 10 years after winning a national title, JJC would be without a program. “It is rough. It is sad to hear,” Hayden said. “Personally, I wish I would have found out sooner

and I would have tried the best I could to keep it. For guys like myself, it gave me that second chance. There are less and less junior college teams in Illinois and guys have to go out of state and teams only keep so many out-of-state players.” Hayden said no matter how far he has gone in his career, he will never forget that Wolves team. He said he stays in touch with quite a few of his teammates and some even came to see him in Bourbonnais. “A couple guys came out here on the first day of training camp and that is motivation for me,” he said. “It makes me work harder because not everyone can get this far and I am one of the fortunate ones. I just want to show those guys I am grateful and I want to make the best of

the opportunity.” Hayden isn’t the only member of the NJCAA champion team in the NFL, as he is joined by former Lincoln-Way Central and current New England Patriot linebacker Rob Ninkovich. “Every time I see Rob Ninkovich the memories come back of that day to day grind of a bunch of kids with a dream,” Hayden said. “We are the ones that are still lucky enough to be playing this kids game.” Hayden said he also sees member of the Georgia Military College team who are in the NFL. “We see those guys and still talk about that game,” he said.“It is good to have the memories of junior college - It is something that I will never forget.” mark@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

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18

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

Sports

PICK VS. PROS Mark Gregory, Bugle Staff Last wk: Bowyer (8th) Total Pts (21 races): 653 Mike Guglielmucci, WJOL Racer’s Forum Last wk: Hamlin (29th) Total Pts (21 races): 639 Readers Last wk: Harvick (16th) Total Pts (21 races): 635 Scott Paddock, Pres., Chicagoland Speedway Last wk: Hamlin (1st) Total Pts (20 races): 581 Scott Taylor, Bugle Staff Last wk: Martin (12th) Total Pts (21 races): 528

THIS WEEK’S PICK: Marcos Ambrose

THIS WEEK’S PICK: Juan Montoya THIS WEEK’S PICK: Joey Logano THIS WEEK’S PICK: Jeff Gordon

THIS WEEK’S PICK: Boris Said

POCONO Continued from page 15 Driver

Pts.

Diff.

1. D. Earnhardt Jr. 744

0

2. Matt Kenseth

739

-5

3. Greg Biffle

738

-6

4. Jimmie Johnson 736

-8

5. Martin Truex Jr. 694

-50

6. Tony Stewart

691

-53

7. Brad Keselowski 690

-54

8. Denny Hamlin

683

-61

9. Kevin Harvick

681

-63

10. Clint Bowyer

679

-65

11. Kasey Kahne

622

-122

12. Carl Edwards

619

-125

13. Jeff Gordon

611

-133

14. Ryan Newman

611

-133

15. Kyle Busch

599

-145

16 Paul Menard

597

-147

17. Joey Logano

575

-169

18. Marcos Ambrose 553

-191

19. Jamie McMurray 536

-208

20. Jeff Burton

-217

527

To make your pick, email the driver’s name, reader’s name and hometown to mark@ buglenewspapers.com. Picks must be made by noon Monday for the following week’s race. One email will be selected at random to represent the readers.

Totals through 21 of 36 races

when Johnson got loose in Turn 1 on lap 91 and knocked Matt Kenseth’s Ford into the outside wall. Gordon, who had restarted sixth, saw an opening, dodged a handful of cars wrecking around him and took the lead. “I’ve never seen the seas part like that,” said Gordon, who moved to 13th in the series standings and the second wildcard position for the Chase. “I got a good restart, so I really got up to fifth as we were getting into the braking zone going into (Turn) 1. I don’t know what happened to the 48. I just saw he got loose, and when he got loose, it took everybody that was in front of us up the race track or into the wall.

“I just made it right to the bottom, stood in the gas and drove ou...and we were leading.” For Gordon, who has experienced more than his share of bad luck this season, the victory was a welcome reversal of fortune. “It’s nice to know that things can still go our way,” Gordon said.“The way our year has gone, we’ll definitely take it like this. I tell you what, with all the things that have gone wrong for us this year, I’m hoping that this is the one that makes up for it all.” Kasey Kahne finished second, followed by Martin Truex Jr., Brad Keselowski and Tony Stewart. Despite a broken transmission, Dale Earnhardt Jr. came home 32nd and kept his lead in the standings by five points over Kenseth (23rd Sunday), six over Greg Biffle (15th) and eight over Johnson (14th).


www.buglenewspapers.com/outdoors

THE BUGLE AUGUST 8, 2012

19

Beat the summer heat with bullfrog hunting By Dan Stefanich

As the sun settled down behind the horizon, not far from the DesPlaines River, we heard our first “Barooomp, baroomp” echoing across the lilypad laden backwaters. Before jumping out of the truck I ran through my checklist— bug spray, cooler, knife, flashlight, and gig. Gig? Yep, a long wooden pole with barbed spear forming a trident-like tool known as a frog gig. We weren’t out for night fishing, but bullfrog hunting. I met up with my buddies Cody Kowalczyk and Nico Soave for a few hours of prime bullfrog hunting. With the hot weather and slow fishing, what better way to still enjoy an evening in the outdoors. Bullfrog hunting or “gigging” season in Illinois runs from June 15 through August 31. Our method of stalking down some of these tasty little critters was fairly simple. “We’re gonna ease into the water and work these banks,” explains Cody. Hmmm, simple enough, I thought. As we fire up the flashlights and get in the murky soup, Nico chimes in, “If you feel something bite your legs, it will only hurt for a little while.” Huh? Great. As we moved along through the lily pads, we spot a big set of gold eyes staring at us down the shoreline.“There’s one,” whispers Cody,“Go get him.” I eased my way up to the frog while Cody and Nico kept the light in his eyes.With a quick stab into the mud, I had my first bully of the season. Bullfrogs usually sit tight along the waters edge, or work their way through the lily pads and downed timber. Which makes backwaters

Submitted Photo

Frog hunting season is still open until Aug. 31.

of rivers and creeks perfect places to hunt frogs. Rivers and creeks also hold frogs, but they prefer very slow current or better yet no current. Ponds are also fantastic frog hunting spots.When hunting frogs, the best method is to come at them from the water to get a clear shot without spooking them. In our case, we were able to wade most of the shoreline in about one to three feet of water. If hunting ponds or lakes with a shoreline that drops offs steeply, the best bet is to use a boat to cruise the

shoreline looking for frogs. With either method, one key to success is to approach slowly, especially if the frog is in the water. A fast approach will cause ripples in the water and spook the frog, which can sense the vibrations. Another tip is to always keep the light in their eyes. Downed underwater trees, logs, slime-covered rocks and backwater muck all made the trek a little more than a stroll along the bank. In about two and a half hours, we had 19 frogs on the

stringer. The legal limit is 8 frogs per person per night.And anyone who has tasted frog legs might agree that all this is worth it. Frog legs area a common delicacy in many fine restaurants. So if you’re not afraid of trudging through the swamps at night, getting bitten on the legs by unseen creatures, and getting extremely muddy and nasty, then frog gigging is for you. But before you go, be prepared. Frog gigging season is recognized by the State of Illinois DNR, so you need a

valid fishing license. Also, make sure you have permission before entering the land or waterway. It’s also a good idea to go with a buddy or two. If something were to happen, you have some backup. And most importantly, be prepared. Bring bug spray, waders or old shoes, a stringer, and a good flashlight. I also like to float a small cooler behind me in the water so I can ice down the bullies right after the catch. For more information and recipes, visit www.danstefoutdoors.com


20

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

Health & Fitness

The “manly” side of skin care products QUESTION: Hey Sondra, my husband has been using my skin care products. Are a woman’s skin care products okay to use on a man? ANSWER: The truth of the matter is, as long as the skin care product is of good quality it can be used by both man or woman. The main problem with your husband using your skin care products is whether or not you share the same skin type. Although a man’s skin differs from a woman’s, by the mere fact a man’s skin is thicker than a woman’s, men have larger pores, and because of the male hormone androgen, produce more oil than a woman’s skin. With all the physical differences, it’s the difference in the skin type that could lead to problems. If your skin tends to be dry, your skin care products would be much too moisturizing if your husband

has oily skin, thus possibly leading to problems with acne. My advice is your husband needs to develop his own personal skin care routine. Over the past decade, skin care lines for men have become a booming business. More and more men are forgoing the ease of reaching for that bar of bathroom soap to wash and shave their face. Bathroom bar soap is much too alkaline to use on the face causing stripping of the skin, and irritation after shaving. When considering a good skin care routine for your husband, the key word is simplicity. The following is a standard formula for a good skin care routine for

a man. CLEANSING: use an appropriate skin type cleanser. Avoid harsh ingredients such as alcohol, and highly fragrant soaps. These ingredients can cause razor irritation. EXFOLIATING: exfoliating is an important way to keep skin young looking. What exfoliating does is remove the dead skin cells off the skin, causing new skin cells to generate. Exfoliating generally needs to be done twice a week, and on a man needs to be done before shaving, it actually helps with a better shave. No need to buy an expensive exfoliation product, simply use a quarter size amount of baking soda. Place in the palm of hand, add water to make a grainy paste. Gently rub over face in a circular motion, then rinse well. Gentle is the keyword, you do not want to over-exfoliate. Skin should look refreshed after, not red and

irritated. SHAVING: An important factor in shaving is finding a good razor that works well on your skin. A fresh blade works the best. Do not use the same blade more than twice. To cut down on shaving irritation do not dry shave or use bar soap. Gel shaving cream offers an emollient barrier that helps protect skin from irritation. Do not shave against the direction of the hair growth, and minimize using the same shaving strokes. Don’t shave too hard or too fast. AFTERSHAVE: A good aftershave is an important way to cut down on in-grown hairs, and razor irritation. Choose an aftershave, or colognes that do not contain alcohol. MOISTURIZE: Because of the constant shaving ritual, men tend to have more sensitive skin than women. Shaving every day is constantly stripping the skin

of natural oils.Therefore it’s very important to replenish these oils with a light skin-type appropriate (no frills needed) moisturizer. SPF: A larger percentage of men develop skin cancer than women, therefore it is vital for men to take a common sense approach to tanning, and wear SPF on a daily basis. Good skin care knows no gender.We are a generation, both men and women, who are taking a proactive approach at staying healthy and looking young as long as possible. Taking good care of your skin, by staying out of the sun, a healthy stance to food and exercise, and a good skin care routine will lessen the effects of time.

Sondra Graton Licensed Cosmetologist and Esthetician. All skin care advice is given within the scope of my field. No medical advice will be given.

Don’t read this column sitting down Are you sitting down?  If  so, you may be standing by the time you finish  reading this column. I have frequently written about the importance of exercise  to health.  No one doubts this relationship, but it  usually focuses on the importance of actual exercise.  Could the importance of exercise to health be so powerful that even variations in posture could make a difference? Dr. Alpa Patel is a medical researcher interested in exercise, obesity and cancer risks.  She recently published a study which found that women who

sit longer than six hours per day have a 37% greater risk of premature death  than women who sit less than three hours per day.  The conclusion of the study is that the simple act of sitting is dangerous to your health.  The reason for this effect is not well understood.  It is being studied at several  research  institutions

including the Cornell Ergonomics Labs.  It seems that sitting changes the way your body metabolizes fat. This effect is also independent of actual exercise.  In other words, even if you exercise before or after work there is a deleterious effect  if you are seated more than six hours per day.   This matter is being taken very seriously in several industries where sitting at work is pervasive.  Silicon Valley computer industry  companies  are undergoing  a movement towards changing from sitting to standing desks at work. 

There are also several web sites catering to standing office equipment. So should chairs now come with a sign  stating, “Warning:  sitting may be hazardous to your health,” just like packs of cigarettes?  Not so fast.  Before you put your desk up on cinder blocks you might like to consider other factors.  What standing does to aid fat metabolism may be offset by its effect on blood vessels.  Varicose veins have long been the bane of any standing profession (just ask any surgeon),  but unsuspected vascular problems have been identified as well.  The rate of

arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) has been found to accelerate in standing professions. The rate of carotid arteriosclerosis (the major artery to the brain) may be nine times greater when standing for a living. Also, fine motor skills have been shown often to suffer when performed standing.  I know that my own keyboarding is worse when I do it standing. The verdict on arthritis and low back pain with standing work is still out and may likely be neutral.

See MEDICAL, page 26


Business & Real Estate

Getting colleagues to love your ideas Q. I’m excellent at my job and find that my colleagues are threatened by my competency. When I make suggestions, they often tell me, “We don’t do it that way around here.” How do I get people to quit being upset when I point out how they could do their jobs better? A. If you don’t want people to be upset when you show them how to build their mousetrap better, you have to see why people are threatened by your “helpful” suggestions. People are hired because they are competent. People are fired because they are incompetent. Your intentions may be entirely benevolent, but the effect of pointing out improvements is to make other people insecure about their competency. I know you do not intend to get anyone fired, but you need to realize that they are worried first and foremost about their incomes. Think of human nature in the workplace as a series of buried emotional land mines that you have to be aware of or risk your foot being blown off.If you blithely waltz around at work unconcerned about these powerful emotional

currents, you’ll badly compromise your future success. Fear is one of the most powerful motivators on the planet. Anxiety about survival is one of the most powerful fears, and nothing brings it up like having your job threatened. You can now see that people are notthreatenedbyyourcompetency - they are threatened by their fears about unemployment. If you make suggestions that confirm your coworkers’ value and proficiency, you’ll cease to have a problem. Next time you want to make a suggestion try something like this, “I know that you have considered (insert your idea here), and I’m wondering what your thoughts are.” Your colleague can now run with your improvement without any fear of appearing inept. Other ways of making suggestions can include inquiring whether a colleague had mentioned (insert your idea) in the past, that a conversation with that person made you think of (insert your idea), or that you imagine he or she had a plan for (insert your idea). If you do not want to trigger your coworkers’ survival fears, you have to find a way to help them feel competent. Most of us know that none of us can see all solutions to workplace problems all the time. However, when someone loudly points out what we have missed,

most of us most of the time will be more interested in saving our job than effectiveness. I know for some readers it may seem wrong not to get credit for every brilliant idea that they have. I encourage my readers to take and get credit for their work. Because you are superb at your job,consider that you have enough brilliant ideas to share credit once in a while. People will be aware that when you are in the room, everyone is somehow smarter. That is the best credit of all.

The last word(s) Q. My boss has terrible manners. Is there a way to correct him without offending him? A. No. It has been said that a closed mouth gathers no foot, and you’d be putting your worst foot forward to police the manners of your boss. (Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2012 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

21

Making the right choice Dear Dave, I’m a landlord in New York, and I’ve always felt it’s not a good idea to rely entirely on previous landlords for referrals on prospective tenants. Do you have any tips for selecting good renters? Jean Dear Jean, I think you’re on the right track. Most landlords aren’t thorough enough with the screening process. You can’t get to know someone without spending some time with them and digging into their personalities and backgrounds a little. I have several rental properties, and here are a few tricks that work well for me. I always pull a credit bureau report on prospective renters. I also get a big deposit up front. I spend quite a bit of time talking to them one on one, as well, so with all this they’d have to be a pretty good con artist to get past me. Another thing I do is to drive by the place they’re currently living. I like to see what condition the house is in, and if they keep the yard maintained. To me, this is a great indication of how

responsible they are and how they would treat my property. It’s not a bad idea to get some proof of them having made previousrental payments on time, either. In some ways it’s a leap of faith any time you sign an agreement with a new tenant. But there are things you can do in order to make a more informed decision as to whom you’re doing business with. And who knows? Lots of renters appreciate knowing they have a landlord who handles things in a professional manner. Maybe these suggestions will help you both feel a little more at ease. Good luck, Jean! —Dave

What the law will allow Dear Dave, A debt collector has been See MONEY, page 26


22

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012


THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

23


24

Venus is in your sign for a few more days. You might find that expressing your love of the most beautiful things and perhaps investing in them might be the safest route as the week unfolds.

behind the scenes. Your outlook might improve greatly when Venus enters your sign midweek and offers you more opportunities for happy social interactions. Expect more romance.

You gotta have friends. In the week to come, your circle of friends, your clubs or other groups might take up more of your time than usual. You know how to edge your way to the top by being especially friendly.

Be proud and persevere. Your financial predicament will appear much rosier by the middle of the week. Spending habits may be reexamined; a special someone will be happy to give you the benefit of the doubt.

Time for the tried and true. In the week ahead, you may be adept at finding coupons to cut costs and finding other ways to get the best value. You might be most at home with old friends who stick by you through thick and thin.

The power of love outshines the love of power. In the week to come, you might find that romantic outings are just as thrilling and satisfying as making headway in the boardroom. Give it your all.

Creative ideas ache to be expressed in the week to come. Your imaginative ideas can blossom into reality - but first you must acquire necessary tools and experience. You might find a masterful mentor.

Those who are detailoriented might take center stage in the week ahead. Offer a pat on the back to those who demonstrate selflessness and be generous with your own time and talent. Set a good example.

Be well equipped to offer a quip. Your social circle could expand during the week ahead, so stock up on some small talk and keep a few jokes on hand to entertain an audience. The love boat might sail.

A kiss is just a kiss. You might like you are floating on cloud nine in the week to come if you meet up with a hot new romantic prospect. Remember to keep in touch with old friends as well as new ones.

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

Across 1 Big Harley, in slang 5 “MarchingAlong” autobiographer 10 “Mamma Mia!” group 14 Soap Box Derby state 15 Hearth debris 16 Off-peak period 17 Meat used in place of a puck? 19 Untidy type 20 John Williams quintet? 21 Fridge sound 22 ‘70s Olympics name 23 Fab Four member 24 Prepare beans, Mexican-style 26 Scary fly 30 Place for care instructions 33 Mouse catchers 36 Expected 37 Professor’s goal 38 Corrida cry 39 Surcharge for a cab ride? 41 English __ 42 Drum heard in Westerns

Down 44 Actress Basinger 45 Bar brews 46 Mar. parade celeb 47 Presario PC brand 49 Significant period 51 Comfortably rewarding 55 Dinner and a movie, say 57 D-backs, on scoreboards 59 Gillette razor named for its blade count 60 One with a password 61 Davy Jones at an abbey? 63 Gimlet garnish 64 Game show host 65 Throw in a chip 66 SoCal force 67 Country singer Rimes 68 Tabloid loch

1 Hostess snack cakes 2 “__ of golden daffodils”: Wordsworth 3 Neopagan religion 4 Some Soap Box Derby entrants 5 Articulates 6 __Kosh B’Gosh 7 “Rats!” 8 Out of harm’s way 9 Invitation on a rep’s button 10 Losing candidate 11 Intimidator on the bovine playground? 12 Online journal 13 Jessica of “Sin City” 18 Slips up 25 Show off one’s muscles 27 Dutch cheese 28 Prom duds 29 Bulova competitor 31 14-Across’s Great Lake 32 Tennis net

grazers 33 Summer cabin beds 34 Boatloads 35 Short-term Arizona State employee? 37 Pack (down) 39 Four-legged Oz visitor 40 Comical Conway 43 Like a pencil point 45 Sea-dwelling superhero 47 Car trim 48 Farmland division 50 Skating maneuver 52 Teatime snack 53 Help for the clueless 54 “Omigosh!” 55 Boring 56 Where most people live 58 Bygone Peruvian 59 Not-so-little kid 62 Barbie’s guy

©2012 TRIBUNE SERVICES, INC.

SUDOKU

MEDIA

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Jumbles: • TOPAZ • BELIE • ADAGIO • PEOPLE

Answer:

A good way to get in the last word -- APOLOGIZE

TOP POP ALBUMS July 22 through July 28 TITLE

Life is Good Uncaged Kidz Bop 22 channel ORANGE Believe ...Hits Up All Night The Dark Knight Rises 21 Overexposed

TOP DVD RENTALS July 22 through July 28

TOP COUNTRY ALBUMS July 22 through July 28 ARTIST

Nas Zac Brown Band Kidz Bop Kids Frank Ocean Justin Bieber Phil Collins One Direction Soundtrack Adele Maroon 5

TITLE

Uncaged Welcome to the Fishbowl Tailgates & Tanlines Carry Me Back Blown Away Chief My Kinda Party Old School New Rules You Get What You Give Tuskegee

ARTIST

Zac Brown Band Kenny Chesney Luke Bryan Old Crow Medicine Carrie Underwood Eric Church Jason Aldean Hank Williams Jr. Zac Brown Band Lionel Richie

TITLE

21 Jump Street American Reunion The Three Stooges Mirror Mirror Wrath of the Titans

LABEL

MGM Universal Pictures 20th Century Fox Relativity Media Warner Bros. Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows Warner Bros. Safe House Universal Pictures Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance Sony Pictures Journey 2: The Mysterious Island Warner Bros. John Carter Walt Disney Picturesv


THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012

MEDICAL

MONEY

Continued from page 20

Continued from page 21

Doctor’s Rx:  There may be a way out of this predicament. The key may be  to not sit continuously.  Some ergonomic researchers have suggested not to sit longer than twenty minutes.  If you can, stand up and move around at least three times every hour.  Walk to a co-workers desk rather than calling  on the telephone or intercom. Go make the copies needed yourself.  Finally,  get your own coffee. These changes in your daily routine may help save your life.

calling members of my family to get information on me. She has identified herself as collector, and I want to pay what I owe, but is it legal for them to do this? If not, what can I do to make them stop? Katherine

  Dr. Christopher Rose, MD is a physician and author based in Niles, Illinois. The advice contained in this column is for informational purposes only. Readers should consult with their own physician to evaluate any illness or medical condition. Contact Dr. Rose at: (847) 9653200 or view his web site at: www. cancercenterschicago.com 

Dear Katherine, No, it isn’t legal. If she identified herself in any way as a debt collector, and spoke with anyone but you about your debt, she has broken federal law. This is a violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. You need to file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) against this collector and her company. I would also advise recording the conversation the next time they call. Just tell them at the beginning that you’ll be taping any interaction you have with

them from that point forward, and tell your relatives to do the same thing.That way, you’ll have proof of their misbehavior to hand over to the FTC or the attorney general. You might even be able to get this crooked collector shut down. Don’t get me wrong. It’s perfectly okay to collect a debt. If you’re a creditor or collector, it’s simply money that’s owed to you, and you deserve it. But you must do it within the confines of the law, and you should do it within the confines of good taste. If you owe money, you should be honorable enough to pay what you owe. But this kind of behavior is just harassment and intimidation. Don’t let them get away with it, Katherine! —Dave Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 5 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL AUGUST 8, 2012


Joliet 8-8-12