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F E B R UA R Y 1 5, 2 0 1 8 V O L . 1 0 I S S U E 12

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EVENTS

Calendar Events Upcoming events in your area SEE PAGE 2

SPORTS

Rivalry game Lisle beats Westmont in playoffs SEE PAGE 5

BUSINESS Dave Says Needing a co-signer means not ready to buy a house SEE PAGE 8

BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

Chicago Defender becomes a national voice for African Americans

SEE PAGE 4

FORUM SPOTLIGHT

CHICAGO DEFENDER


NEWS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

NEWS BRIEFS

Downers Grove South teen is MYSO’s 2018 Concerto Competition winner The Metropolitan Youth Symphony Orchestra (MYSO) is proud to announce Allison Brandt as the winner of the 2018 MYSO Concerto Competition. Her winning performance of Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto Mvmt 1 Allegro in A Major will be performed on March 14 at 7:30 p.m. (Lewis University) and March 18 at 4 p.m. (Joliet Junior College) under the direction of Lawrence Sisk. MYSO’s principal clarinetist Allison Brandt is a senior at Downers Grove South High School and has been studying the clarinet since she was 9 years old. She has studied with Trevor O’Riordan of the Illinois Philharmonic and Kirstin Bowers of the President’s Own. Last year, Brandt was the principal clarinetist in the District and All-State ILMEA orchestras, and this year held second chair in the District Orchestra. She will be studying clarinet performance at Northwestern University next year. She is the recipient of the Essentially Ellington Certificate of Merit, the Michael David Samel Spirit of Music Fund Award, Downers Grove Music Club “Rising Star” Award, the Clarence

Shoemaker Band Scholarship from Downers Grove South High School, the Kowalski Scholarship from the American Wind Band, and the American Music Foundation Award for Outstanding Band Student. “I am truly honored to be given the opportunity to perform the Mozart clarinet concerto with MYSO,” says Brandt. “I have been studying this piece extensively for about a year and a half now, but never with the orchestral accompaniment. I’m very excited to have this experience.” MYSO had several members audition for the Concerto Competition in November, and due to the excellent audition performances, MYSO’s very own Concertmaster Julie Stanwyck of Lemont and principal oboist Mattie Levy of Bolingbrook have also been selected to perform their concerto pieces at the upcoming concerts. “I was delighted by the results of this competition, and am very pleased to be able to feature three talented principal players from our orchestra,” remarks Music Director Lawrence Sisk.

CALENDAR FEBRUARY 16 Wine Tasting. 7 p.m. at Downers Grove Golf Club, 2420 Haddow Ave, Down-

ers Grove. Spend an enjoyable evening at the Clubhouse with friends and the experts at Cellar 406! Sample wine and small plate appetizers while learning about the many varieties of red and white wine. Advance registration is required. www.dgparks.org.

FEBRUARY 18 Boy Scout Troop 512 35th Annual Spaghetti Dinner. 1 p.m. at St. Scho-

lastica Activity Center, 7800 Janes Ave., Woodridge. The dinner includes bread, salad, spaghetti and dessert. Many prizes will also be available through raffles being conducted by the Knights of Columbus Council 5918 during the event. Doors open at 1 p.m. and dinner will be served continuously through 6 p.m. Tickets are $30 for a family, or $10 for individual meal tickets. They can be purchased at the door, or by calling Ruth at 630-235-2248.

Al Capone and the 1933 World’s Fair. 2 p.m. at Woodridge Public Library,

3 Plaza Dr. Woodridge. William Hazelgrove presents the exciting and sprawling history behind the 1933 World’s Fair, the last of the golden age. He reveals the story of the six millionaire businessmen, dubbed The Secret Six, who beat Al Capone at his own game, ending the gangster era as prohibition was repealed. Drawing from his book, “Al Capone and the 1933 World’s Fair: The End of the Gangster Era in Chicago,” author Hazelton will transport listeners to the day when Capone sealed his own fate, February 14, 1929: know as the day of The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre.

FEBRUARY 24, Winter Telemetry Scavenger Hunt. Noon-1:30 p.m. at Lyman Woods, 901

31st St, Downers Grove. Winter in the woods can be cold and snowy, but it isn’t without life and adventure! Track animals through the woods using radio tracking equipment, find winter animal habitats, travel through the snow and finish with hot chocolate around a toasty campfire. Come dressed to be outdoors. www.dgparks.org.


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NEWS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

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SCHOOL NEWS >> DOWNERS GROVE

Expansion plans for school reviewed BY MEGANN HORSTEAD For the Bugle @BugleNewspapers sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

To help advance plans for a school addition to Lester School, the Downers Grove Village Council examined the project at its Feb. 6 regular meeting. The request seeks a 3,400 square-foot expansion for the building of three new classrooms necessary to accommodate Downers Grove Grade School District 58’s full-day kindergarten program. “They’re not anticipating this to increase enrollment overall,” Community Development Director Stan Popovich said. Renderings on display at the meeting show that the petitioner is looking to make some landscape improvements with the new entrance to the school and add a ramp. In a related development, Downers Grove Grade School District 58 is seeking a zoning map amendment. It is the petitioner’s desire to reclassify the properties in question from R-4 residential detached house to INP-2 campus-scale institutional and public district to enable conformance

to the Village’s comprehensive plan. The site in question is located at 236 Indianapolis Ave. on the Village’s east side. Notice was provided to those who live within 250 feet of the project. To date, two residents have included their concerns as part of the public record. Downers Grove’s Plan Commission reviewed the project at a recent meeting, at which point a positive recommendation was passed to the Village Council. The Village Council will take action on the petitioner’s requests at its Feb. 13 regular meeting.

Special use request for automobile dealership examined Also at the meeting, commissioners took time to review a proposed plan for an automobile dealership. The project requires a special use to enable the construction of a new 8,500-square-foot building located at 2410 Ogden Ave. Previous to the Village Council’s review of the proposal, a restaurant

was housed on site and is currently vacant. The plan, presented to the commissioners, conforms to the Village’s comprehensive plan, so long as aesthetic, site and screening improvements are in the works. The site is currently zoned as B-3 general services and highway business, which allows for an automobile dealership with the council’s approval of a special use. Renderings of the building on display at the meeting show that primarily metal panels are proposed for the exterior. No residents spoke during a recent public hearing regarding the special use request. Following that, two Plan Commission members had concerns for traffic, light glare and the general number of automobile dealerships in Village limits. As such, Village staff explained the proposal including the site plan, traffic study, landscaping/screening and photometric plans. The completion of a traffic study suggested that the petitioners work toward removing an eastern curb cut to allow for full access onto Ogden Avenue, as well as allowing for future inclusion of a sidewalk

and providing for improvements to an eastern curb cut along Ogden Avenue. Officials are anticipated to consider the special use request at the Village Council’s Feb. 13 regular meeting.

Round up A brief recap of action and discussion from the Downers Grove Village Council’s Feb. 6 regular meeting: A motion was passed to approve an agreement of $185,000 to American Fire Training Systems for the construction of a fire department training facility. Officials authorized a contract extension valued at $1,534.50, or a two-percent increase, to KLF Enterprises for debris hauling services through the year’s end. The total project’s cost is $78,259.50. The commissioners secured an agreement between the Village and the Illinois Department of Transportation for Main Street road resurfacing between Ogden Avenue and Franklin Street. It stipulates that Downers Grove will allot $270,000, or 30 percent, toward the Village’s local share of the project cost.

VILLAGE NEWS BRIEFS

Knights of Columbus 3738 boost programs for developmentally disabled Local organizations serving persons with developmental disabilities are benefiting from gifts of the Westmont St. John Council #3738 of the Knights of Columbus (http:// kofc3738.org/). The gifts were made possible by the Council’s annual September Intellectual Disabilities Fund Drive in September. Knights and other volunteers of Council 3738 raised $18,000 by distributing Tootsie Rolls® for donations at area intersections, stores, churches, and train stations—part of a statewide drive that raises nearly $2 million annually. “These gifts benefit organizations providing educational, recreational, residential, respite, and therapy services,” said Joe Moffa, Grand Knight of Council 3738. “All proceeds from this drive are earmarked for 501(c)3 organizations serving persons with intellectual disabilities.” RECEIVING GIFTS FROM COUNCIL 3738 WERE: • Community Support Services, Inc. (http://www. communitysupportservices.org/), of Brookfield, which provides adult and residential services, supported employment, • respite, and other services to persons with developmental disabilities and their families. • Elite Stars Athletics (http://elitestars.org/), of Schaumburg, which provides specialized training for individuals with developmental and physical limitations. • Gigi’s Playhouse of Hoffman Estates (http://gigisplayhouse.org/hoffmanestates/), which provides specialized teaching, resources, and other support

to individuals with Down syndrome and their families. Hanson Center of Burr Ridge, a Ray Graham Association (https://ray-graham.org/services-programs/) community learning center that offers a range of programs for adults with disabilities and recreational programs for children and adults with and without disabilities. Little Friends, Inc. (http://littlefriendsinc.org/), of Naperville, operating alternative schools, family support and consultation services, vocational training programs, and community-based residential services for individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. Marklund at Mill Creek (http://www.marklund. org/), of Geneva, which provides residential services for persons with profound developmental disabilities and special health-care needs. Misericordia Home (https://www.misericordia. com/), of Chicago, which offers a variety of residential and other services for persons with mild to profound disabilities Ready Set Ride (http://www.readysetride.org/), of Plainfield, which offers therapeutic equine recreation activities to persons with special needs School Association for Special Education in DuPage County (http://www.sased.org/) Transition Center, of Westmont, which offers post-secondary and vocational services to students with developmental disabilities. Soaring Eagle Academy (http://soaringeagleacademy.org/index.php), of Lombard, a therapeutic day school for K-12 students with autism. The South East Association for Special Parks and Recreation (http://www.seaspar.org/), of Downers Grove, providing recreation programs and services

for area residents with disabilities. Special Camps for Special Citizens (http://www.specialcamps.org/), of Winfield, which provides overnight camps that help persons with developmental disabilities increase their independence and selfesteem. Religious Education Apostolate for the Christian Handicapped(REACH) program at Holy Trinity Parish in Westmont, and the Christos program at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish in Darien.

“With the continued help and support of the K of C, the Elite Stars can continue to provide top notch coaching, facilities, services and opportunities to individuals with special needs,” said Mike Jones, Elite Stars Foundation president. “The K of C has been passionate about our mission and has walked our journey with us since day one. We are forever grateful.” “Little Friends relies on the kindness and generosity of civic organizations like the Knights of Columbus to help us empower children and adults with special challenges, and their families, to live, learn, work, and thrive in our community,” said Renee Miklosik, vice president for Agency Advancement at Little Friends, Inc. “We greatly appreciate the efforts of the Knights and value their many years of service and generosity to our agency.” In addition to local gifts determined by each council, 10 percent of proceeds of drives among all Illinois councils go to statewide programs such as Special Olympics (https:// www.soill.org/knights-of-columbus/). The Knights of Columbus (http://www.kofc.org), incorporated in 1882, is the world’s largest Catholic family fraternal service organization, with 1.9 million members in more than 15,000 councils. Council #3738, founded in 1953, includes more than 300 men in Westmont and neighboring communities.


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GUEST COLUMN

Chicago Defender becomes a national voice for African Americans BY THE CHICAGO DEFENDER On May 5, 1905, Robert Sengstacke Abbott founded the Chicago Defender newspaper in a small kitchen in his landlord’s apartment, with an initial investment of 25 cents and a press run of 300 copies. The Chicago Defender’s first issues were in the form of four-page, sixcolumn handbills, filled with local news items gathered by Abbott and clippings from other newspapers. Five years later, the Chicago Defender began to attract a national audience. By the start of World War I, the Chicago Defender was the nation’s most influential Black weekly newspaper, with more than two thirds of its readership base located outside of Chicago. During World War I, the paper utilized its influence to wage a successful campaign in support of The Great Migration. It published blazing editorials, articles and cartoons lauding the benefits of the North, posted job listings and train schedules to facilitate relocation, and declared on May 15, 1917, as the date of the “Great Northern Drive.” The Chicago Defender’s support of The Great Migration encouraged Southern readers to migrate to the North in record numbers. Between 1916 and 1918, at least 110,000 people migrated to Chicago, nearly tripling the city’s Black population. Following the war, the Defender covered controversial events such as the Red Summer Riots of 1919, a series of race riots in cities across the country. The Chicago Defender campaigned for anti-lynching legislation and for integrated sports. In 1923, the Chicago Defender introduced the Bud Billiken Page, the first newspaper section just for children. The Chicago Defender, along with the Chicago Defender Charities, is the producer and organizer of the world famous Bud Billiken Day Parade and Picnic. The parade originated in 1929 as a vehicle to showcase children. Today, the Bud Billiken Parade is

the largest event of its kind. Columnists at the Defender included Walter White and Langston Hughes. The paper also published the early works by Pulitzer Prize winning poet Gwendolyn Brooks. Heralding itself as the “The World’s Greatest Weekly,” the Defender spoke out against segregation of the armed forces in the early 1940s and actively challenged segregation in the South during the civil rights era. In 1940, John H. H. Sengstacke, Abbott’s nephew and heir, assumed editorial control and continued to champion for equality. In 1956, the Chicago Defender began publishing on a daily basis. In 1965, Stengstacke purchased The Pittsburgh Courier, including it in his Sengstacke Newspaper chain, along with papers such as the Michigan Chronicle in Detroit and the Tri-State Defender in Memphis. Sengstacke served as publisher of the Defender until his death in May 1997.

The Chicago Defender is the flagship publication of Real Times Inc., a media company that also includes among its holdings the Michigan Chronicle, the Front Page, the New Pittsburgh Courier and the Tri-State Defender. One hundred and four years later, the Chicago Defender won the prestigious John B. Russwurm Award during 2009’s National Newspaper Publishers Association Merit Awards Gala, along with two first place and two third place awards, including the John H. Sengstacke General Excellence Award. Editor’s note: The weekly Illinois Bicentennial series is brought to you by the Illinois Associated Press Media Editors and Illinois Press Association. More than 20 newspapers are creating stories about the state’s history, places and key moments in advance of the Bicentennial on Dec. 3, 2018. Stories published up to this date can be found at 200illinois.com.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

PAGE 5

BASKETBALL

RIVAL

REMATCH Lisle beats Westmont in IHSA Class 2A regional semifinal

BY MARK GREGORY Sports Editor @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com

When two rivals meet in the regular season of any sport – adrenaline gets amped up on for both teams. When that happens in the postseason, it is amplified even more. That was what happened when Lisle and Westmont met in the semifinal of the IHSA Class 2A Timothy Christian Regional. “I was excited. Westmont is a rival and we get really hyped up for them and we came out strong,” said Lisle senior Natalie Takahashi. “I get the nervous butterflies. They walked in and I got jittery, I am not going to lie, but it is just basketball and I just went out and left it all on the floor.” While the game was between the Lions and Sentinels, the game within the game saw Takahashi and Westmont senior Sydney Pardy combined for 52 of the 80 total points scored in the Lions 45-35 win. Takahashi tied a career-high with 30 points in the win. “I have to give so much credit to (Takahashi). We started in a diamond and one and went to a triangle and two at one point and

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POINTS FOR LISLE’S NATALIE TAKAHASHI

then we went to man and whatever we did, she had an answer,” said Westmont coach Rich Panitch. “It was just a tremendous effort by her.” Lisle coach Nick Balaban had his own praises for Pardy. “She is one of the best players in the conference and as good as she is, Natalie was just a little better tonight and that is not a knock on Pardy, Takahashi just had a helluva performance for us,” Balban said. “Her senior leadership and skill set helped us with the win. Neither of them wanted their institution to go down and we just made a few more plays.” Panitch said Pardy is one of the best players he has ever coached. “She is awesome. I have coached for 40 years now and I coached two AAU national championship teams,” Panitch said. “I had a girl named Olga Gvozdenovic, who got a full ride to Duke, and Sydney is one of the best players I have coached. She is so versatile, she can play every position, she is a smart player and she is just all around terrific.” The loss ended a 9-17 season for

SEE RIVAL | PAGE 6

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POINTS FOR WESTMONT’S SYDNEY PARDY

PHOTO BY MARK GREGORY

Natalie Takahashi tied a career-high with 30 points in the regional semifinal.


TWITTER: For up -to-the-minute coverage of upcoming local sport events going on in your area, follow @VoyagerSport

6 SPORTS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM RIVAL FROM PAGE 5 Westmont – a season that saw low numbers in the program “This is the end of a very tough season for us,” Panitch said. “We had many games where we only had five girls suit up because of injuries. We had one game where

we finished the game with only three players for the last two minutes – and we actually won it. It was a tough season and we persevered.” One good thing that came from the season is that the young players on the roster – such as freshman Megan Thompson. “They got thrown into the fire

and I think the season taught them a lot,” Panitch said. “Megan just has to get a little more under control to be a very good player. She is very physical and very quick and aggressive and hopefully she can harness all that and become a really good player.” The season wasn’t the easiest for Lisle, as the Lions (13-17) spent six games without Takahashi and McKenzie Weaver. “Takahashi and Weaver both went out in the same game,” Balaban said. “We lost Natalie in the second quarter against Reed Custer with a severe high ankle sprain and Weaver suffered a concussion in the third quarter and it was one of the worst incidents I have ever saw as a coach and the most scared I have ever been. We were without them for six games.” Lisle’s season came to a close a game after the win over Westmont, when they lost 42-33 to Timothy Christian in the regional final. Takahashi closed out her Lisle career as the school’s all-time leading scorer with 1,240 points over her four-year varsity career and will continue to play next season at Monmouth College.


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SPORTS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

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COLLEGE

NCC gets ready for lacrosse season Having conquered the learning curve and the challenges that come with building a first-year program in 2017, the North Central College men’s lacrosse team is prepared to get to the next level, building upon the foundation set in the inaugural season as the Cardinals head into year two. “Last season was a good start for us,” said second-year head coach Jay Farrell. “It was a learning year for us and we did a good job. This year, we have to learn how to win. We have increased the competition and will face harder teams. It’s what will get us prepared for when we get to conference and play at that caliber.” North Central began the inaugural season with a commanding 25-1 win against Concordia University-Chicago and helped set the tone for the remainder of the schedule. The team continued the success with a seven-game win streak before suffering a 9-7 loss to Concordia University-Wisconsin. The Cardinals began College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin (CCIW) play with an 11-3 win over the University of Dubuque, making their presence known in the conference. The next three games proved challenging for the young team and the Cardinals fell in close contests to Carthage College, Augustana College, and Elmhurst College, but ended the historic season on a high note with a 23-1 win against Carroll University and an overall record of 10-4, 2-3 in conference. In year two, North Central returns many of its members that started it all, in addition to eight freshmen, and Farrell is confident

that each member of the team will be a significant contributor. Sophomore Dylan Cost will be the Cardinals’ force in between the pipes, helping lead a defense that ranked third in Division III in goals against average in 2017. Sophomore All-CCIW selection Sean Tomonari, who collected 45 ground balls and 29 caused turnovers last season and sophomore Nick Pardo, the team leader in ground balls (56). Returning for the offense are sophomore Noah Parrill, who has transitioned to attack after a successful first season at midfield where he led the Cardinals with 19 assists, junior Tanner James, the team leader in goals (29) last season, and sophomore Tommy Huizinga, who ranked second to James with 27 goals and is looking to make an impact at midfield. North Central was picked to finish fifth in the annual CCIW Coaches’ Poll, released on Feb. 8. Illinois Wesleyan was picked to win the title after a 2017 that saw the Titans finish as conference champions and advance to the NCAA Division III Men’s Lacrosse Championship for the first time in program history. Elmhurst was picked second, followed by Carthage and Augustana, and Dubuque and Carroll were picked behind North Central in sixth and seventh, respectively. “It will be a challenging year for us: now we have a target on our back,” said Farrell. “We were picked fifth in the preseason poll, but we are confident we can make it to the playoffs.”

TRACK AND FIELD Winning seven of the 16 com-

peting events, the top-ranked North Central College men’s track and field team treated its home supporters to an exceptional performance in Saturday’s Pat Heenan Invitational, turning in some of the nation’s top performances and finishing well ahead of an eight-team field at Al B. Carius Track. The Cardinals totaled 236 points, well ahead of closest pursuers Lewis University (97.5) and Olivet Nazarene University (97). North Central swept the top seven places in the 5,000-meter run. Leading the field to the line was Dhruvil Patel, who established a new facility record with his winning time of 14 minutes, 24.83 seconds, a time which currently ranks third-fastest among NCAA Division III competitors this season. Matt Norvell and Dan O’Keefe followed in second (14:27.88) and third (14:29.09) with times that move them into the Cardinals’ all-time indoor top 10 and rank them fourth and fifth

nationwide. Zach Hird’s winning time of 4:13.04 in the mile run is the seventh-fastest Division III time this season, and teammates Chris Buechner and Michael Anderson came in second (4:14.49) and third (4:16.59). North Central also swept the top three spots in the 400-meter dash, with Peyton Piron (50.00), Daniel Spaccapaniccia (50.17) and Michael Stanley (50.79) topping the list, while Brendon Sebastian (1:57.26), Jonah Penningroth (1:57.42) and Tyler McQuality (1:57.59) delivered a 1-2-3 finish in the 800-meter run.

Spaccapaniccia and Piron teamed with Maceo Findlay and Ben Nordman to win the 4-by400-meter relay in 3:19.23, a season-best time which ranks as the second-fastest time in the nation this season. Also placing first were Javon Kunkel in the long jump (22 feet, five inches) and Dylan Kuipers in the pole vault (16’2.75”). Other second-place finishes came from Kyle Hilton in the 60-meter hurdles (8.43), JD Gieson in the long jump (21’10.25”) and Jake Jaskowiak in the 3,000-meter run (8:48.34).


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BUSINESS + REAL ESTATE

NEWS ABOUT LOCAL BUSINESSES IN YOUR COMMUNITY THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

COLUMN >> DAVE SAYS

Needing a co-signer means not ready to buy a house DEAR DAVE, My sister has bad credit due to a lot of late payments. She has finally started to change her ways and get control of her finances, because she and her fiancé want to make an offer on a house. The bank won’t approve it if she is on the loan, and his income alone isn’t enough to get the amount they need. His parents are well-off, and they have offered to co-sign on the loan. Is this a bad idea? RHONDA DEAR RHONDA, It’s a really bad idea. Those two have no business thinking about a house right now, and his parents are about to make things even worse with their loving, misguided help. If you need a co-signer, you’re nowhere near ready to buy a home. They need to slow down.

paying off their debts. After that, they need to save up an emergency fund of three to six months of expenses, then start setting cash aside for a huge down payment on their first, modest home. These two have a bad case of house fever. And mom and dad need to step back, look at things objectively, and realize they would not be blessing these kids by helping get them into a home they obviously can’t afford! —DAVE

I mean, they’re just engaged. They don’t even need a house at this point. They should get married, live in a cheap apartment for a while, and work on

* Dave Ramsey is CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven best-selling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 13 million listeners each week on 585 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on the web at daveramsey.com and on Twitter at @DaveRamsey.


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TAKE 5

FOR WHEN YOU NEED 5 MINUTES FOR YOURSELF! THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 | BUGLENEWSPAPERS.COM

ARIES

MARCH 21 TO APRIL 20

You might prefer to be a trail blazer and doer of daring deeds but in the week ahead you are more likely to earn disapproval for your efforts. Maintain a low profile and steer clear of disputes.

GEMINI

M AY 2 2 T O J U N E 2 1

Don’t hide the truth or obscure the facts. Overcome obstacles and objections by holding honest discussions. Emphasize the mutual benefits rather than pointing out the weaknesses this week.

LEO

J U LY 2 3 T O A U G U S T 2 1

Don’t fall prey to wishful thinking as this week unfolds. Don’t ignore the people who support and appreciate you even if you think you can do better elsewhere. Be romantic, not gullible.

ACROSS 1 PREPARES TO STRIKE, IN A WAY 6 WHERE MANY LEADING MALES MAY BE SEEN? 15 NOCTURNAL PROBLEM, USUALLY 16 SOURCE OF SOME SAUCE 17 LETS 18 HELP 19 CHIC MODIFIER 20 ADVERTISERS SAY IT SELLS 21 MOTHER OF HUEY, DEWEY AND LOUIE 22 SERVICE PROVIDERS 24 HALL OF FAME NHL COACH ROGER 26 SMALL POWER SOURCE 27 PARAGON 28 TOOK A SHOT AT 29 STICKS 33 GOOGLE GOAL 34 “SEMPER FIDELIS” COMPOSER 35 “I LIKE THAT!” 36 ENCOURAGEMENT BEFORE A SHOT 39 MILLIONS CAN PLAY IT AT ONCE 41 FREQUENT GREENSTREET COSTAR 42 OLYMPICS COMPETITOR SINCE 1896 43 TO THE EXTENT THAT 46 QUAINT INN ROOM UPRIGHT 47 ADJUST ONE’S SIGHTS 48 GET EVEN WITH 49 PIC SANS NOM, PAR EXEMPLE 50 PET IDENTIFICATION AID 53 COME UP WITH __ 54 RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH FEATURE 55 “CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE”

NOVELIST 56 GOT BACK TO ONE’S OFFICE? 57 THREW WIDE, SAY

DOWN 1 COURSES AROUND COURSES 2 BELLINI’S “CASTA DIVA,” FOR ONE 3 METROPOLITAN AREA 4 MUSER’S WORDS 5 NORDIC CARRIER 6 AGRICULTURAL UNITS 7 CULMINATION 8 MD’S EMPLOYEE 9 GEORGE WASHINGTON RECEIVED AN HONORARY ONE FROM HARVARD U. 10 PREPARED 11 PLAY THAT INSPIRED AN OPERA 12 GRUELING GRILLINGS 13 __ PARK, CALIF. 14 IMPALA, E.G. 20 SUBJ. OF SOME “BOSSYPANTS” CHAPTERS 23 LIKE SOME TIMERS? 24 OMINOUS OATER

SYMBOL 25 “HAIRSPRAY” MOM 27 LOGITECH PRODUCT 29 TRANSVAAL SETTLERS 30 IT MAY HAVE A BELL ON IT 31 BAG LADY? 32 CUT 34 SHOT CONTENTS 37 MAKER OF AGEDEFY PRODUCTS 38 INSULIN, FOR ONE 39 PRECEDED 40 THEORETICALLY 42 LAWYER’S CHARGE 43 DEFENSIVE COVERING 44 IT FLOWS THROUGH TROYES AND MELUN 45 PRIMA __: SELFEVIDENT 46 OSTRICH, FOR EXAMPLE 48 IPHONE DISPLAY 51 AGCY. CONCERNED WITH DRUG-RESISTANT BACTERIA 52 IN 53 EQUALS

LIBRA

SEPTEMBER 24 TO OCTOBER 23

Friends and co-workers can be a great resource for financial advice in the week ahead. Make purchases that require good taste in the next two days. Avoid disagreements later in the week.

SAGITTARIUS

NOVEMBER 23 TO DECEMBER 22

Use every opportunity to clear the air and put relationships on track in the first part of the week. By the end of the week people may easily misunderstand your motives or intentions.

AQUARIUS

JANUARY 21 TO FEBRUARY 19

Sweet dreams are made of this. You may become more romantic and preoccupied by your inner fantasies as this week unfolds. Use your imagination when purchasing tasteful household decor.

SUDOKU

11

TAURUS

A P R I L 2 1 T O M AY 2 1

Speak calmly and clearly and then people will listen to what you say. During the week ahead you can improve your reputation and engender good will by encouraging teamwork.

CANCER

J U N E 2 2 T O J U LY 2 2

You might take pride in good heart-keeping rather than good housekeeping in the week ahead. Put your best efforts into mending fences and head off misunderstandings in advance.

VIRGO

AUGUST 22 TO SEPTEMBER 23

Your artistic and creative side might begin to bloom during the week ahead. Your job might entail some handicrafts or using your imagination. Learn to do something that is inspiring.

SCORPIO

OCTOBER 24 TO NOVEMBER 22

The upcoming week provides numerous opportunities to be creative or create lasting relationships. Make major purchases and sign agreements as early in the week as possible.

CAPRICORN

DECEMBER 23 TO JANUARY 20

Be honest with yourself as well as others in the week to come. Don’t beat around the bush or cover up financial expenditures. Make key decisions as soon as possible or next week.

PISCES

FEBRUARY 20 TO MARCH 20

Embrace what is offered. Someone could offer you an incentive to begin a new study, to join a team sports program or to travel early this week. Every opportunity contains a hidden benefit.

JUMBLE

Tribune Content Agency, LLC. 2018

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

PREVIOUS PUZZLE’S ANSWERS

JUMBLES:

• ACUTE • ICING • SURVEY • PURSUE

ANSWER:

TO LEARN ABOUT THE COSMOS, CARL SAGAN ATTENDED A -- “UNIVERSE-ITY”


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Downers Grove 2-15-18  
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