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NEWS Westmont TIF clears final hurdle

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www.buglenewspapers.com

Our Community, Our News

STREET FAIR IS HERE

JUNE 12, 2013

Westmont launches new event. See what you missed on Page 23

Vol. 5 No. 28

Downers has new ‘plan’ for village’s future By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

JONATHAN SAMPLES/STAFF REPORTER

Burlington, Wis.-based Geneva Lakes Produce Farm and Greenhouse is one of many vendors set up at the Westmont Community Street Fair, which combines the Fresh Marketplace and Crusin’ Nights events.

The village of Downers Grove has begun a new process for future economic and policy planning, and the roadmap for that new program will be laid out during a series of public meetings throughout the summer. The Long-Range Plan was introduced by village staff during the May 21 Village Council meeting, and the unveiling of the LRP’s goals will continue during a series of public hearings on June 18, July 16 and Aug. 20. A preliminary report, available on the village website, laid out a new approach to village development that will combine elements of two previous planning procedures. The LongRange Financial Plan, introduced in 2009, and the Strategic Plan, introduced in 2006, have been used by village officials and staff to develop financial strategies and set policy agendas, respectively. Under these procedures, See LONG-RANGE, page 4


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THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

News

Westmont TIF clears final hurdle Few residents turnout for TIF public hearing By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

The village of Westmont and Community Unit School District 201 have worked out a deal regarding the Central Business District Tax Increment Financing District, and a public hearing last week put the bow on a process that has been 13 years in the making. During the June 3 Village Board meeting, Westmont TIF consultant Konstantine Savoy of Teska Associates gave an overview of the TIF process, which he said began in 2000 with the village’s Downtown Transit Oriented Plan. That earlier report and the village’s current comprehensive plan both identified a downtown TIF district as essential to revitalizing Westmont’s central

business district. “This has been long supported in the community,” Savoy said. Teska Associates, who also served as the consultant for a TIF district on 63rd Street and Cass Avenue, was contracted by the village in 2012 to begin working on the downtown TIF. The state allows communities to set up TIF districts in areas needing economic development. In a TIF district, officials set up specific boundaries and get a base assessed value of property in that area. Any increase in assessed valuation due to development goes into a special fund used to pay for more economic development in that specific area.The maximum term is 23 years. After Savoy’s overview, residents were given the opportunity to comment on the

JONATHAN SAMPLES/STAFF REPORTER

Some residents are concerned that the south side of Quincy Street will be rezoned for businesses.

TIF district. Norm Chimenti expressed concern over an area along the south side of Quincy Street that is currently zoned R-5, or multi-family residential. He said the property currently serves as a buffer between his block, which is zoned for single-family

detached residences, and the downtown business district. “My concern and the concern of our neighbors is about the potential expansion of the village’s Central Business District into residential areas,” Chimenti said. “Any rezoning so as to permit commercial uses

would be something that we would oppose.” Community Development Director Shannon Malik responded to Chimenti by stressing that the development of a TIF district is not a See TIF, page 3


THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

Woodridge Jubilee kicks off Wednesday

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TIF Continued from page 2

This year’s Jubilee starts Wednesday, June 12 and continues through Sunday, June 16. As in the past, Woodridge Drive is closed from 71st Street to Center Drive and Center drive is closed from Wild Plum to Plaza Drive until noon June 17. The village thanked neighboring residents and businesses for their cooperation and patience during this long-standing and enjoyable community tradition. Everyone is encouraged to come out and have some summer fun. For more information on the Woodridge Jubilee and a schedule of events, visit the Woodridge Park District’s website at www.woodridgeparks.org.

JONATHAN SAMPLES/STAFF REPORTER

Westmont police raises over $1,600 for Special Olympics On May 31,Westmont Chief of Police Tom Mulhearn and other officers sat on the roof of the Dunkin’ Donuts on 63rd Street just west of Cass Avenue as part of the Cop On Top Special Olympics fundraiser. “The weather cooperated for the most part and we had a great event,” says Chief Mulhearn who has participated in the event for the last several years. “We raised over

$1600 and that is the most we’ve ever raised. This is for a great cause and I’m proud to be associated with such a worthwhile effort.” The Cop On Top event is part of the Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics. All proceeds go directly to Special Olympics Illinois. There were a total of 151 locations throughout the state of Illinois participating in this event, which

is an all-time record. On Sunday, the Special Olympics Torch Run passed through Westmont. They reached the intersection of Cass and Burlington around 9:50 a.m. and proceeded north on Cass Avenue past the Police Station. Runners carried the Special Olympics Torch across Illinois and Westmont was one of the stops along the way.

mechanism for rezoning. She said that within the TIF plan, the south side of Quincy Street will remain zoned for high-density residential dwellings. Quincy Street runs along the south side of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe line. The only other resident to Speak during Monday’s public hearing was former Village Board trustee Lee Fleming. He thanked the current board for the work they had done to reach an agreement with School District 201, and welcomed the new TIF. “As everyone knows here, this has been a long and enduring process,” Fleming said. “I’m very happy to see it finally come to fruition.” Westmont spokesperson Larry McIntyre said the low turnout for the public hearing suggests that most residents are content with the terms of the downtown TIF. jsamples@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

Lisle seeks applications for vacant trustee position The village of Lisle is now accepting applications for the position of Village Board member, which was vacated by former Trustee Ed Young. Young resigned from the Village Board on May 21 after serving 14 years. His resignation will allow him to fulfill his duties as newly elected Lisle Township Trustee. Lisle Mayor Joe Broda is accepting applications from individuals interested in completing Young’s

term, which expires in April 2015. Interested parties should submit a resume and letter detailing the interest in the Trustee position and qualifications to serve by June 15. Correspondence should be directed to: Village of Lisle; Mayor Joe Broda; 925 Burlington Avenue; Lisle, Illinois 60532. For more information, contact Catherine Schuster at cschuster@villageoflisle.org or at (630) 271-4148.

Police investigate suspicious incident At approximately 5 p.m. on Saturday, June 8, the Downers Grove Police Department responded to the area of 72nd Street and Fairmount to investigate a suspicious incident. A 16-year-old girl reported that she was walking in the area when she was approached by a man driving a teal colored minivan. The man drove slowly alongside the girl, and asked if she wanted a ride. Police are attempting to locate the driver,

who is described as a male of Middle Eastern descent, 30 to 35 years of age. He had short dark brown hair, and a full beard with no mustache. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Downers Grove Police Department at 630434-5600 or 911. Everyone is asked to remind children to be aware of strangers and report any concerns immediately to police.

LONG-RANGE Continued from page 1 the village had to coordinate two different sets of strategies, solutions and actions. However, village staff hopes the new process will increase efficiency by combing the LRFP and the Strategic Plan into one strategy. “This year’s Long-Range Plan process is designed to obtain effective policy direction from the 2013-2015 Village Council by combining key elements of the village’s Long Range Financial Plan and Strategic Plan,” the preliminary report states. “The Long-Range Plan process will combine the elements of the LRFP and Strategic Plan to create a plan that is outcome driven and also addresses financial issues.” By aligning the LRP with the election cycle for Village Council—the current plan will run from May 2013 to May 2015—village personnel also hope to increase efficiency by directly involving new commissioners in the planning process. As it currently stands, the LRP will look to set goals for 201315, identify key issues facing the village, develop solutions and

strategies to address those issues, and create “High Priority Action Items” and a schedule for their completion. These high priority items are a carryover from the Strategic Plan and defined as “a list of specific actions to be taken to achieve the goals” outline by the village. So what has all this planning found so far? Village staff declined to be interviewed for this story, but according to the preliminary report, there are three major issues facing the village in the upcoming years: a potential reduction in revenues from the state of Illinois, an annual infrastructure maintenance gap of approximately $1.2 million and a Village Hall and police station needing “major renovation.” During the June 18 meeting, staff will discuss these “key issues,” as well as proposed strategies for meeting them. On July 16, the meeting will focus on high priority action items. The Aug. 20 meeting will review a draft of the 2013-15 LRP. To read the LRP preliminary report online, visit www. downers.us/govt/long-rangeplan. To submit feedback to the village, email lrp@downers.us. jsamples@buglenewspapers.com


Calendar ONGOING Summer Story Sprouts. June 4 through July 24 at the Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle. (There will be no storytimes the first week of July.) Space is limited. Little Movers and Shakers, Tuesdays, 9:30-10:15 a.m. Story Sprouts for Toddlers, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Story Sprouts for Preschoolers, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10:30-11:15 a.m. For more information, call 630-971-1675 or visit www. lislelibrary.org.

JUNE 12 Kids Karate Demonstration. 10 to 10:30 a.m. at the Downers Grove Public Library, 1050 Curtiss St. Learn karate moves and self-discipline. Each child will break their own board. Register online. Register at ww.downersgrovelibrary.org or 630-960-1200. Robin’s Dog Stars. 2-3 p.m. at the Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle. Starlight and her owner/trainer, Robin Bengtson, will teach Lisle summer readers all about dogs. Starlight will perform about 30 tricks. Stick around after the show to interact with the amazing Starlight! All ages. No registration necessary. For more information, call 630-971-1675 or visit www. lislelibrary.org.

JUNE 13-15 Woodridge Jubilee. Carnival rides, live music and a variety of food…summer doesn’t get any better than that! You’ll find that and much more at the 30th Annual Woodridge Jubilee, which is organized by the Woodridge Park District and Village of Woodridge. Join us from Wednesday, June 12 through Sunday, June 16 for fun for the whole family. Carnival rides for all ages begin Wednesday night and run throughout the event. On Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings, enjoy entertainment, delicious food, beverages and bingo. On Saturday, June 15, don’t miss the free children’s activities along with carnival rides, food, beverages and entertainment.

JUNE 13 55th Annual AAUW Used Book Sale. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Henry Puffer School, 2220 Haddow Ave., Downers Grove. Proceeds benefit the American Association of University Women Educational Foundation, which supports reentry to education, project grants, and fellowships.

Call 630-225-8162 or visit http:// sites.google.com/site/dgaauw/ book-sale. Fixed on Fiction Book Group. 7 p.m.at the Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle. Stop by to discuss The Uninvited Guests by Sadie Jones. Copies of each month’s books are available at the Library’s Reference Desk. For more information, call 630-9711675 or visit www.lislelibrary. org. Yogalicious. 2-3 p.m. at the Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle. For grades K-2. Looking to perfect your downward dog? Let’s stretch, stretch, stretch in this program where we will practice basic yoga poses and read stories that will get us moving. For more information, call 630-971-1675 or visit www. lislelibrary.org.

JUNE 14 55th Annual AAUW Used Book Sale. 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. at Henry Puffer School, 2220 Haddow Ave., Downers Grove. Proceeds benefit the American Association of University Women Educational Foundation, which supports reentry to education, project grants, and fellowships. Call 630-225-8162 or visit http:// sites.google.com/site/dgaauw/ book-sale. Summer Nights Car Show. 6 to 9 p.m. in Downtown Downers Grove, Main St., Downers Grove. Featured vehicle: Air Cool Cars (Corvair, Porsche, VW, etc.); Featured performer: Matz Broz Band (Classic Rock). More at www.downtowndg.org

JUNE 15 Downtown Downers Grove Market. 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Main Street Strain Station. French-style market featuring local vendors of produce, flowers, herbs, jewelry, crafts and more. 55th Annual AAUW Used Book Sale. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Henry Puffer School, 2220

Haddow Ave., Downers Grove. Proceeds benefit the American Association of University Women Educational Foundation, which supports reentry to education, project grants, and fellowships. Call 630-225-8162 or visit http:// sites.google.com/site/dgaauw/ book-sale. Teen Henna Tattoos. 5 to 6 p.m. at the Downers Grove Public Library, 1050 Curtiss St. Learn about Henna and receive your own design! Henna may last up to three weeks. Register at www.downersgrovelibrary. org or (630) 960-1200.

JUNE 17 I Took the Photo – Now What? 7 p.m. at the Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle. Learn how to easily share photos with your family and friends! We’ll show you how to edit and enhance your digital photos so they look their best. Join us for a fun presentation that will also show what you can do with your photographs using online tools like Flickr and iPiccy. To register or for more information, call 630-971-1675 or visit www. lislelibrary.org.

JUNE 18 Kid’s Safety Preparedness Camp. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Fire Department, 6015 S. Cass Ave., Westmont. The Westmont Fire and Police Departments are committed to providing quality

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013 safety education. This camp provides an opportunity for 8, 9 and 10 year old children to spend time with their local heroes and learn much more than just the usual safety lessons. During the two, fun-focused days of learning, participants will increase their knowledge and awareness of all aspects of safety. For more information call 630-981-6402. Green Thumbs Unite! 2-3 p.m. at the Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle. For grades 3-5. Get your garden started and let your creativity run wild as we decorate terracotta pots. Then dig in as you pick the perfect plants, flowers or seeds to grow in them. For more information, call 630-971-1675 or visit www. lislelibrary.org. Hillbilly Rockstarz. 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Pavilion in Fishel Park, Grove Street west of Main Street. Hillbilly Rockstarz - Covering the latest hits in country music and some of your older favorites, always true and original. Simply put, this band has got you covered. FREE entertainment - Food and drinks available for purchase. In case of inclement weather, concerts are held at Lincoln Center, 935 Maple Ave. For weather updates, call 630-963-0575 after 5:30pm the day of the concert. This event is part of the Downers Grove Park District’s 2013 Family Concert Series.

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President Kennedy: His Assasination. 7:30 p.m. at the Gregg House Museum, 115 S. Linden Ave., Westmont. Meet Phil Singer who has studied the circumstances of the assassination of President Kennedy that took place 50 years ago. In the mid-‘70’s, Phil was part of the Citizens’ Commission of Inquiry that helped get the case reopened. He has interviewed witnesses and other important people in the case. Presently, he is working on a book that will have new information. Phil will discuss and answer questions about various theories that have evolved as to what actually happened concerning this tragic event in American history. Do you remember where you were when Kennedy was shot?

JUNE 19 Kid’s Safety Preparedness Camp. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Fire Department, 6015 S. Cass Ave., Westmont. The Westmont Fire and Police Departments are committed to providing quality safety education. This camp provides an opportunity for 8, 9 and 10 year old children to spend time with their local heroes and learn much more than just the usual safety lessons. During the two, fun-focused days of learning, participants will increase their knowledge and awareness of all aspects of safety. For more information call 630-981-6402. See CALENDAR, page 19


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THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Downers Grove, Westmont and Woodridge Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

Downers Grove

Elias Robles, 43, 321 W. Winthrop Avenue, Addison, was arrested at 7:13 a.m. May 31 on Benton and Summit for public indecency. Edgardo J. Lopez, 60, 3 Koloff Court, Woodridge, was arrested at 6:29 p.m. May 31 at 500 63rd Street for unlawful display of registration, expired registration and operating an uninsured motor vehicle. Alex Joseph Montemayor, 19, 7332 Hartford Road, Downers Grove, was arrested at 10:05 p.m. May 31 at the residence for endangering the life and health of a child. Edgar Hernandez, 24, 4605 Belmont, Downers Grove, was arrested at 2:59 a.m. June 1 on Ogden Avenue and Woodward for driving on a suspended license. Laura E. Caruso, 49, 8000 Revel Court, Orland Park, was arrested at 7:35 a.m. June 1 at Jewel-Osco, 1148 Ogden Ave., for driving while license suspended and speeding. Gorgi Z. Pavlovski, 36, 1217 Richfield Court, Woodridge, was arrested at 2:21 a.m. June 2 at 5100 Mochel for DUI/alcohol. Garaciela Lopez, 30, 9A Margaret Court, Aurora, was arrested at 9:58 a.m. June 2 on Ogden Avenue and Cross for no valid driver’s license. Monica L. Rivers, 24, 1853 Lakeshore Court, Romeoville, was arrested at 11:34 a.m. June 2 in the 900 block of Warren for resisting a peace officer and assault. Jeffrey D. Clark, 26, 4512 Bryan Place, Downers Grove, was arrested at 2:04 p.m. June 2 on Main and Oxford for a warrant. Arturo Ochoa, 52, 1161 Hinckley, Aurora, was arrested at 2:47 p.m. June 2 at the Downers Grove Police Station for no valid driver’s license. Michael S. Lasko, 24, 199 W. North Avenue, West Chicago, was arrested at 1:30 p.m. June 3 in the 400 block of Austin for a warrant. Michelle A. Daurham, 31, 7343 Woodward Ave., Woodridge, was arrested at 4:49 p.m. June 3 at 825 Burlington Ave. for a warrant. Tomeka O. Thomas, 32, 12017 S. Parnell, Chicago, was arrested at 4:59 p.m. June 3 at 1520 Ogden Ave. for driving while license suspended. Joseph M. Donna, 50, 26 W 374 Pinehurst Drive, Wheaton, was arrested at 7:45 p.m. June 3 at 1734 Ogden Ave. for driving while license suspended.

Police Blotter Lisa M. Conttrill, 41, 5501 Washington St., Downers Grove, was arrested at 10 p.m. June 3 at the residence for domestic battery, resisting a peace officer and harassment by telephone. Russell L. Fisher, 55, 3913 Saratoga Ave., Downers Grove, was arrested at 4:04 p.m. June 4 on Main Street and Havens Court for disorderly conduct/urinating in public. Dalia Hernandez, 34, 1020 S. Williams St., Westmont, was arrested at 4:49 p.m. June 4 in the 7100 block of Fairview for driving while license suspended and no insurance. Jeffrey T. Knutson, 23, 674 Stuart Drive, Carol Stream, was arrested at 7:39 p.m. June 4 at 3300 Finley Road for retail theft. Gabriel Ionita, 53, 2710 Woodmere Drive, Darien, was arrested at 8:57 p.m. June 4 in the 7400 block of Lemont Road for suspended vehicle registration. Tiara Kenyetta, 20, 1321 Virginia Drive, Westmont, was arrested at 9:44 p.m. June 4 in the 2000 block of Prentiss for driving while license revoked and operating an uninsured motor vehicle. Gina F.Klein,25,8509 Gleneyre Road,Darien, was arrested at 1:41 a.m. June 5 in the 6800 block of Main Street for DUI/alcohol. Andrew D. O’Donnell, 18, 3660 Creekwood Court, Downers Grove, was arrested at 2:14 a.m. June 5 at 3920 Saratoga Ave. for a warrant. Jesus C. Perez, 39, 6049 W. Roscoe, Chicago, was arrested at 10:14 a.m. June 5 in the 5200 block of Belmont Road for operating a vehicle while using a wireless phone and driving while license suspended. Antonio Adame, 27, 1015 N. 21st Ave., Melrose Park, was arrested at 4:56 p.m. June 5 on Fairview and Grant for driving while license suspended and no insurance. Esveydy Zamora, 25, 6708 Cedar Lane, Westmont, was arrested at 6:07 p.m. June 5 at 63rd Street and Williams Avenue for driving while license suspended.

Westmont Sometime between 3:20 and 4:30 p.m. May 27, an unknown offender(s) stole a bicycle in the 0-100 block of East Ogden Avenue. The total loss is $200. Sometime between 12:30 and 3 a.m. May 27, an unknown offender(s) damaged a light and the trunk of a vehicle parked in the 0-100 block of West 65th Street. The total damage is $350. At approximately 8 a.m. May 28, officers conducted a traffic stop in the 1400 block of South Williams Street. Officers arrested Michael Wilson, male, age 19, of 6705 South Lake Shore Drive #1, Westmont, for

driving with a suspended driver’s license. He was cited for disobeying a stop sign and operating an uninsured vehicle.Wilson was released on his own recognizance.

733 West Plymouth Street, Villa Park, was arrested for possession of cannabis and drug paraphernalia. Duran was released on her own recognizance.

At approximately 5:10 p.m. May 28, officers conducted a traffic stop in the 6000 block of South Cass Avenue. Officers arrested Gamal Mostafa, male, age 35, of 650 Renaissance Boulevard, Oak Brook Terrace, for driving with a suspended driver’s license. He was cited for speeding and operating an uninsured vehicle. Mostafa was released on his own recognizance.

Woodridge

Sometime between 7:45 and 8:30 p.m. May 28, an unknown offender(s) stole a cellular phone in the 6400 block of South Cass Avenue.The total loss is $400. At approximately 1:06 a.m. May 29, officers conducted a traffic stop in the 0-100 block of West Burlington Avenue. Officers arrested David Ide, male, age 23, of 8250 Edgewood Drive, Downers Grove, for driving under the influence. He was cited for squealing tires. Ide was released on his own recognizance. Sometime between 5 and 5:20 p.m., an unknown offender(s) damaged a window of a vehicle parked in the 800 block of Blackhawk Drive and stole a purse. The total loss is $300. Sometime between 10 p.m. May 30 and 7 a.m. May 31, an unknown offender(s) damaged a window of a residence in the 0-100 block of Crab Tree Lane. The total damage is $50. At approximately 2:30 a.m. June 1, officers responded to the 600 block of North Cass Avenue for a subject asleep behind the wheel.Officers arrested Eric Geyer,male,age 26, of 3856 Cumnor Road, Downers Grove, for driving under the influence. He was cited for disobeying a traffic signal. Geyer was released on his own recognizance. Sometime between 10 p.m. May 31 and 11 a.m. June 1, an unknown offender(s) entered an unlocked vehicle parked in the 600 block of Baltimore Avenue and stole a cellular phone charger and bluetooth device.The total loss is $65. At approximately 8:15 p.m. June 1, officers conducted a traffic stop in the 0-100 block of West 63rd Street. Officers arrested Kenneth Karas, male, age 33, of 500 Brookside Drive #C,Westmont, for driving under the influence and possession of cannabis. Karas was released on his own recognizance. At approximately 1:45 a.m. June 2, officers conducted a traffic stop in the 800 block of North Cass Avenue. Officers arrested Humberto Samaniego, male, age 23, of 427 North Addison Avenue, Villa Park, for driving with a suspended driver’s license. He was cited for operating an uninsured vehicle. Samaniego was released on his own recognizance. The passenger of the vehicle, Mayra Duran, female, age 22, of

A residential burglary occurred between 8 and 9 p.m. May 31 in the 6600 block of Chick Evans Lane. Unknown persons made entry into a home and removed items of jewelry and U.S. currency. A burglary from motor vehicle occurred at approximately 4 p.m. June 1 in the 7200 block of Sprucewood. Unknown female removed U.S. currency from a parked vehicle. A burglary from motor vehicle occurred at approximately 7:45 a.m. June 3 at the Shell Gas Station, 7500 Lemont Road. Unknown person removed a pair of sunglasses from a parked vehicle. A burglary from motor vehicle was reported at approximately 8:19 p.m. June 3, in the 2400 block of Waterbury Drive. Unknown person removed a stereo system, speakers and a Playstation game system from a parked vehicle. A theft occurred between 8 p.m. June 2 and 2 p.m. June 3 from the 2400 block of Waterbury Drive. Unknown person removed a bicycle after cutting through the bike lock. A criminal defacement was reported at approximately 9:30 p.m. June 3 in the 2400 block of Waterbury Drive. Unknown person had painted gang related graffiti on the wall of an apartment building. A theft occurred between 11 p.m. June 3 and 3 a.m. June 4 in the 5900 block of Sherman Drive. Unknown person removed two concrete lawn ornaments. A criminal damage to vehicle occurred between 11 p.m. June 3 and 7:30 a.m. June 4 in the 6600 block of Foxtree Avenue. Unknown person damaged the front passenger side keyhole of a parked vehicle. A theft occurred between 11 p.m. June 4 and 4 p.m. June 5 in the 8000 block of Janes Avenue. Unknown person removed a fishing pole from a first floor apartment patio. A residential burglary occurred between 7:26 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. June 5 in the 6600 block of Chick Evans Lane. Unknown persons made entry into a home and removed items of jewelry. At approximately 11:43 p.m. June 5, James Wilcher, 23, 311 Chilton Ave., Elmhurst, was charged with disorderly conduct following a disturbance in the 7200 block of Woodward Avenue.


ForuM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy! Just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred. Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

Guest Columnist

Get ‘em While They’re Cheap! Over the last few years, I have noted the declining sales of desktop computers. There are many reasons for the decline, but I came to one conclusion about what it means …

So, what is next?

The biggest effect of the decline in desktop sales is that prices for desktop computers have reached the bottom. If you buy into that concept, there is no way for prices to go but up.The reason I think this Background will happen is twofold: First, less volume The early days of the desktop computer means shorter production runs and higher were mostly for the “do it yourself” types costs.The parts prices in lots of 10,000 are – you bought a kit, or parts, and assembled significantly higher than in lots of 100,000. it yourself. After Apple and IBM stepped Second, as manufacturers leave the field, in and popularized personal computers, the remaining companies have less price it seemed everyone jumped into the competition. Lower levels of competition personal computer manufacturing generally mean manufacturers have more biz. It was like the early days of the control over price. John Becker mass-produced automobile – the early Computer Tech experimenters made their own autos; Notes Conclusion: after Henry Ford figured out how to make a lot of them cheaply, everyone jumped OK, so if you have sampled my in. computer economics “Kool Aid” and The same thing happened in the computer biz. think it’s good, here is my advice: If you are even Remember some big names from the past? Altair, remotely considering replacing your current AST, Compaq, Atari, Packard-Bell, Micron, even desktop (or laptop) with another, Buy Now! I Xerox and Radio Shack made PCs. The biggest think 2013 is the last year of cheap desktop prices. name to disappear was of course IBM, who sold It also coincides with Microsoft’s determination to their PC division to Lenovo. Likewise, Gateway make Windows 8 a success. Microsoft has strongly went bankrupt and sold out to Acer. incented manufacturers to push Windows 8 on Crank up the time machine to current date, and new computers to spur sales. most desktops are pretty much all the same. Yes So I say, Go with it – Windows 8 with the “Classic they have different processors, cases, hard disks and Shell” interface is pretty nice once you get used some may have 4 vs. 6 USB ports, but really, there to it. Sometime after the Windows 8 introduction isn’t much difference in the basic motherboard period – and when the Windows 7 machines are designs or features in the last four or five. And sold out - the party is over. Prices will surely go up clearly the dog-eat-dog price wars have taken their in 2014. toll: Few manufacturers make a sustainable margin on PCs anymore. It was a race to the bottom, and I John Becker is a Home and Small Business computer think we have reached bottom. consultant in the western suburbs of Chicago. He can be

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Illustrated Opinions


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THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013


taKe 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Puts a little too close to the flame 7 Does away with 11 Spirit 14 Set straight 15 Narrow space 16 Pay add-on 17 Where many changes occur 18 August 20 Boast à la Donald Trump? 22 Patriot Act protesters: Abbr. 24 Malt finish? 25 Goddess of motherhood 26 “Our overly fussy friend has a point”? 31 Wasikowska of “The Kids Are All Right” 32 “Trinity” novelist 33 Union agreement 34 Fiber source 36 Illegal pitch 40 “Have some” 41 Kid on “The Cosby Show” 42 Big name in ‘40s-’50s

Down Argentina 43 Joplin piece about modern weaponry? 47 Went under 48 Emulate Eminem 49 Irascibility 50 Delay from an 18th-century English ruler? 55 LA and MI, but not DO or RE 56 Gas up? 59 NRC predecessor 60 It can get you credit in a store 61 Shrink, in a way 62 “The __ of Pooh”: ‘80s best-seller 63 “Right away, Mammy” 64 It’s zero in free-fall -- and, put another way, a hint to how the four longest puzzle answers were formed

1 Religious org., perhaps 2 George’s lyricist 3 Show little interest in, as food 4 Get ready for action 5 Sicilian resort 6 Unaccompanied 7 Biology text topic 8 Roadside attention getters 9 Water brand named for its source 10 Dam up 11 Fertilizer substance 12 Draw forth 13 Treaties 19 Water source 21 Surround with dense mist 22 Spherical opening? 23 Hirsute pet 27 Like the sticks 28 Sizzling 29 More fleshy, perhaps 30 Under the weather, e.g. 35 Anouilh play made into a Burton/O’Toole

film 36 It’s not always easy to get into 37 “Tootsie” Oscar nominee 38 Assessment, for short 39 Popular trend 41 Pontiac muscle car 43 Sartre work 44 Paris-based cultural org. 45 “Gunsmoke” star 46 Popular purveyor of stromboli 47 Zippo 51 Deep blue 52 Play to __ 53 Named names 54 Two pages 57 Front-of-bk. list 58 Cote girl Tribune Media Services 2013

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

Horoscopes Affirm your positive attitude through affirmations. Instead of allowing worry to flourish, focus on ways to maintain a state of health and abundance. Avoid making waves on the financial front this week.

Grab a tennis racket, a Frisbee or a friend for a refreshing day in the great outdoors. You may have more energy than usual to tackle cleaning or physical endeavors during the upcoming week.

Dreams can come true, it can happen to you. It might be a good time to gain the ear of an ally or supporter at work. Listen to friendly advice and embrace opportunities that come your way in the week ahead.

Fleeting moments that involve fun or kindness can add up to a treasure trove of good that will last long after this week is done. You may be aware of power struggles but helpless to counteract them.

Adventure stokes ardor. A romantic partner may need reassurances this week, so hold hands as you wade through a stream or visit new spots. Loved ones are looking for encouragement to explore unique places.

Keep on trucking. Energy levels remain high during the week ahead. Complete innovative projects and pursue personal educational objectives. Don’t sign a new contract or engage in new investments.

You aren’t weak when you are wise. If you made a blueprint for action ahead of time, there was probably a very good reason, so follow through on those plans in the upcoming week. Stick to your guns.

Learn the secret of success. Use traditional methods as long as feasible and reach for the new when it is a better option. Don’t give in to the urge to spend more than you have in the week ahead.

Your heart is in the right place, even if others don’t always appreciate your easygoing outlook. Go plant a few flowers or groom the dog in your spare time. Avoid making new investments this week.

Life may give you the experience you need to achieve your ambitions in the week ahead. You could be wiser than usual about money, but still subject to minor jealousies or power struggles in a relationship.

Wish upon a star. Some of your dreams can become reality in the week ahead, especially if you take advantage of opportunities. Benevolent supporters will be willing to assist you in achieving a worthy objective.

Speak what’s on your mind and in your heart. There is no reason to screen your calls, as anyone who speaks with you will be pleased by what you say. Make presentations in the early part of the week.

Sudoku

Jumble

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • ABBOT • ELATE • HAZARD • VERBAL

Answer:

The couple wasn’t happy with their lot because they didn’t -- HAVE A LOT

9


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THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Handwork tabbed top player; five locals named to all-area team, page 12; Spring stats leaders, page 15

www.buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

11

Mustangs fall short in bid to go to state By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

An accident on northbound I-294 June 3 closed off three lanes and delayed the start of Downers Grove South’s Class 4A supersectional contest against St. Charles East in Rosemont for an hour so that each team had time to warm up and fans had time to get to the game. Once the contest got under way at Chicago Bandits’ stadium, the Mustangs couldn’t quite get enough traffic to cross home plate. They saw what had been a remarkable postseason run come to an end, as the Saints posted a 6-3 victory to earn a trip to last weekend’s state tourney at the EastSide Centre in East Peoria. “We had one bad inning,” said DGS coach Ron Havelka, whose ninth-seeded Mustangs knocked off top-seeded Naperville Central and No. 3 seed Downers North on their way to the supersectional. “There were a couple of opportunities that we had that we squandered, but this team always fights back. They never quit. I’m really proud of them. I told them there’s nothing to be ashamed of.” The one bad inning to which Havelka is referring occurred in the third. The Saints plated four runs off of freshman lefty Caroline Hedgcock, with Kate Peterbus delivering the inning’s big blow: a three-run triple. “Everybody really wanted to win today, and everybody played their hearts out,” Hedgcock said. “We left everything out on that field.” The Mustangs (22-11) did have runners at first and second with one out in their half of the third, and also threatened in the fourth after Caitlyn Daly singled Jessica Andree (who reached on an error) over to third. But DGS failed to score in either inning.

Additionally, Kaley Smith advanced to third on an outfield error after leading off the fifth with a single. The next two DGS batters hit fly balls to right and center field, respectively, but not deep enough to score Smith, who was left stranded at third. The Mustangs felt confident they could eventually get a big inning going against St. Charles East starter and winning pitcher Haley Beno, but a breakthrough inning never materialized. “We thought we were going to get on her, but we never strung it (hits) together like we should have,” said DGS shortstop Jessica Andree. “It just didn’t work the way we wanted it to.” The Mustangs got on the scoreboard in the sixth, as Melissa Orton led off with a walk and went to third on Andree’s double. RBI groundouts by Daly and Hedgcock eventually plated both Orton and Andree. That made it 4-2. “We knew we were going to get to her,” Hedgcock added. “It just came a little late for us, but the pitcher was very good.You’ve got to give that to her. She was going low and outside and was getting us off (balance) a little bit. She was a good pitcher.” The Saints tacked on two more runs in the seventh for a 6-2 lead. Smith crossed home plate on an error in the bottom of the inning for DGS. The Mustangs had runners on second and third, but the rally ended there. The Mustangs, however, have plenty to be proud of this season … and plenty to look forward to next spring. They return Andree, Daly, Smith, Orton, Zahryha McFarland and Kristen Bialek, as well as Hedgcock, who’ll be one of the area’s top pitchers for the next three years. “We’re a very young team, and we’re going to be very good in the future,” Havelka said. “We’ll

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Downers South junior shortstop Jessica Andree doubled and scored a run in the Mustangs’ June 3 Rosemont supersectional loss to St. Charles East.

be a year older, more polished. We started three freshmen, and the pitcher’s one of them. She’s going to be a real good one; they all are. We have a nice, solid team coming back. I was proud

of them. It was just one of those games.” “This playoff run was incredible,” Andree said. “At the beginning of the season, none of us ever thought we would make it

this far. Everyone underestimated us, and just the fact that we made it to the supersectional, one game away from going to state, is incredible.” mike@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

Sports

Ashley Handwork tabbed top player By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Scott Taylor/Enterprise Staff

Plainfield North’s Ashley Handwork scored 39 goals on the season en route to being named the Voyager Media Player of the Year.

For the first three years of her career at Plainfield North, Ashley Handwork was a solid goal scorer, averaging nearly 20 goals per season. However, she was teamed with Callie O’Donnell, who was making the headlines, scoring 29 goals in a season and won the 2011 Voyager Media Player of the Year award. With O’Donnell off to college this year, that left room for Handwork to take command of the Tigers’ attack. And that she did, scoring 39 goals, one off the District 202 record, en route to leading Plainfield North to its first regional championship. For those reasons Handwork is the 2013 Voyager Media Girls Soccer Player of the Year. “I think it’s awesome,” Handwork said. “I owe a lot of it to my teammates, we had a really good season. I didn’t think I was ever going to score that many goals.” “Ashley emerged as the most dangerous player in the area,” North coach Jane Crowe said. “After three very good years, she really elevated her level of play this year. Even though she drew a lot of attention from opposing

defenses, she was still able to come up with big goals in big games. Her speed was extremely difficult for defenders to match.” Handwork had some motivation entering her senior campaign as she was hoping to not only break O’Donnell’s records, but to get ready for college, where she will be playing for Marquette University in Milwaukee. “I knew she had some records and I wanted to break some of those,” said Handwork, who also now has the career goalscoring record at North with 98. “Also, since it was my last season, I wanted to get better for Marquette.” Signing with Marquette in the winter helped allow her to focus on just playing soccer her senior year. “I was verbally committed my junior year, but it was pretty hectic before that,” she said. “It took a lot of pressure off me this year. I just wanted to be good at my game, but also to have fun.” Her season was capped off by the team winning the regional title and advancing to the finals of the Pepsi Tournament. “That was rally important,” Handwork said.“We finally broke through and it felt really amazing. We did well all season and got a good seed. The highlights of my career were winning regionals and making it to the finals of the Pepsi Tournament. Now it is off to Marquette, where Handwork is ready for the challenge. “I am totally excited,” she said. “I’m working really hard. I know it’s not going to be easy, but I like the challenge.” The rest of the members of the 2013 Voyager Media AllArea Girls Soccer team are:

KATIE BAUMANN The Benet junior was an All-Sectional performer for the regional champions, scoring five goals on the year. “Katie patrols the middle and wins balls and dominates defensively,” Benet coach Bob Gros said. “She maintains possession for us and contributes See ALL-AREA, page 13


Sports ALL-AREA Continued from page 12 so much to us being able to start our possession from the back.”

LACEY CLARIDA The Lockport junior joined the Porters this season after focusing on travel play the last two years and scored 25 goals and added seven assists. “Lacey is without a doubt the most dangerous forward in our  area  (in the top three in the state),” said Lockport coach Todd Elkei. “She has been involved in 90 percent of scoring plays this year. She is the most talented player I have seen and that includes all of the teams in the Pepsi Showdown, Burlington, Iowa Tournament of Champions, and  all  the teams on our schedule.   She is truly a difference maker and scores with both feet and is a force in the air.”

ALLI CURRY Curry will be heading to Boston College in the fall, but for academic reasons only. She made her final season with Maine South a memorable one, tallying a team-high 32 goals and 14 assists—among the top five single-season scoring totals in Maine South history— and was a big reason why the

Hawks advanced to the sectional semifinals. The three-year starter was the Hawks’ leading scorer the past two seasons and was an all-CSL performer. “Not only does she help you score, but she’s a leader and she does everything in a positive manner,” said Hawks coach JJ Crawford. “She tries to pick everybody up so everything is positive with her. It’s been a real treat and blessing to have her on the team.”

PAIGE FULLER Fuller led Plainfield Central offensively with nine goals on the year. “Paige is technically and tactically sound,” Plainfield Central coach Ken Schoen said. “She also does a great job of winning and holding the ball, and attacking people 1 on 1. Paige is extremely competitive and has a very high work rate, which makes her play very consistent. I believe there is not a player in our area who displays more heart and effort than her. She has unbelievable mental toughness and fitness, which allows her to play with high intensity the whole game. Paige also takes the majority of our corners and set plays for us, consistently making us dangerous on such plays.”

MARISOL GALVAN Minooka junior has already verbally committed to Northern

Illinois. She posted two goals and 10 assists this season. “Marisol is a very aggressive and talented player. She controls the middle of the field, she wins the ball in the air,is great with her feet, a hard worker, great teammate and truly one of those players that you want on your team,” said Minooka coach Christopher Brolley. ”Her competitive nature and hardworking mindset brings the level of the entire team up.”

HEATHER HANDWORK The Plainfield North junior and Ashley’s younger sister finished with 12 goals and nine assists. “She used the combination of speed and creativity to give us a dangerous weapon coming from the outside,” Crowe said. She also played forward and center mid and was equally effective from those positions.”

JILL HETFLEISCH A University of Wisconsin-

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013 Parkside recruit, she tallied 32 goals and three assists for Minooka. “Jill Hetfleisch is one of the most talented players we have had at Minooka, she has been a captain for two years and the heart of this team,” said Minooka coach Christopher Brolley. “She is an All-Sectional player and  allconference player.  This is her third straight year with that same offensive production. She is very quick but very smart soccer player. Her ability to play multiple positions with ease allows her to play defense for us when we need her to. She has been the best player on the field in every game we’ve played this year. She is definitely one of the top players, if not the top player in our area. She had 83 career goals at Minooka. She’s a human highlight real.”

NICOLE JANOWIAK A senior from Downers Grove South, Janowiak finished the season with 10 goals and three assists, while being an AllSectional performer in returning

13

from an ACL injury. “ S h e jumped right in for a team n e e d i n g leadership, especially after losing so many important role players from a third-place team,” Downers South coach Abby Anderson said. “She played an attacking midfielder, as well as support positions in the defense and as a forward with our injuries. No matter where she played, all of our attack developed through her. Nicole’s ability to see 2-3 plays ahead of the game as well as to distribute dangerous through balls to her teammates is a strength. She also has an extremely calm, yet intense demeanor which her teammates feed off of.”

KAELA LESKOVAR A

Plainfield

North

senior,

See ALL-AREA, page 14


14

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

ALL-AREA Continued from page 13 Leskovar was a key ingredient to the Tigers’ run to the regional title. “Kaela was our unsung hero in the middle of the field,” Crowe stated. “She controlled the midfield for us and everything went through her. She has the ability to hold the ball, and play the perfect pass her to her teammates. She was also very dangerous shooting the ball from distance.”

MICHELLE MOREFIELD The Benet center-mid tallied 14 goals and six assists for the regional champs and was an

All-Sectional selection. “ M i ch e l l e was the heart and soul of our team,” Gros said. “She runs the offense as the attacking mid. She was a key player for us.”

EMILY O’GRADY The junior is already one of the CSL South’s top goalies and will take her talents to Iowa State after her final season at Maine South next spring. The team MVP helped the Hawks to a 145-5 record this season and made 121 saves with five shutouts. “She makes saves that you don’t expect a high school keeper to make,” said Crawford. “Emily is just an amazing keeper.”

Sports LEAH PLESCIA Senior midfielder scored four goals and had 10 assists as a captain for Lockport. “Leah has become one of the most dominant midfielders in the  area,” Elkei said. “Leah has shut down the middle for us  all  year and has become a quality finisher as well.   Leah game in and game out has made a difference for us and we are nowhere near as successful without her leadership on the field.”

KELSEY PRUETT Junior from Plainfield South scored four goals and added five assists this year. Has verbally committed to Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville. “Kelsey was voted as an AllSectional First team player this year,” South coach Dave Brown said. “Her quickness, vision and determination make her a player that any coach would want on their team.”

YESSICA REYES The Joliet Central senior tallied 13 and 11 assists for the season. “She has been a four-year varsity starter. Her freshmen year, she was on the Joliet Township team that made it all the way to the Super-Sectional game.  Her sophomore and junior year were injury plagued years which she didn’t play much due to ACL

injuries,” said Central coach Eduardo Contreras. ”This past year was her first year since her freshmen year that she was injury free and it showed on the field. She was our leader on and off the field. Our team has improved each year and she was a big part of the reason why. ”

CRISTINA SIDDU A senior two-year starter for the Trojans, Siddu helped Downers N o r t h improve its victory total by three over last season (eight total victories in 2013) and was in goal when the Trojans defeated rival Downers South in April for the first time since the 1990s. Siddu recorded four shutouts and had a 1.40 goalsagainst average. “Cristina had a great year,” said Downers North coach Bob Calder. “She was a captain and leader for our young team. She did a nice job coming off of her line, has good foot skills, and makes quick decisions— all leading to an all-around goalkeeper that we were fortunate to have.”

NIKIA SMITH The Bolingbrook junior standout tallied four goals and

six assists on the year. “Nikia was the best athlete on the field in every game she played,” Bolingbrook coach Martin Uscila said. “With Nikia in the back, we limited teams to nine goals against in the regular season and 12 total shutouts. Nikia’s leadership and dedication to the sport has made her one of the top girls to watch out for in 2014.”

VICKI TIROVOLAS Brett Clish, Niles West’s coach, says Tirovolas, a sophomore, gives opposing goalkeepers headaches simply because her shot comes at them like a knuckleball. Tirovolas, an AllCSL pick, scored a team-best 16 goals for the Wolves, and Clish said she’s got the potential to increase her assists totals next season while maintaining her goal-scoring output. “It’s moving all over the place,” Clish said. “I don’t think there’ s really many girls that shoot like that; it’s just the way it comes off her foot, and she has a lot of power as well. Her ball skills are the best I’ve coached in the 10 years I’ve been here.”

SKYLER TOMKO The fouryear AllInterstate E i g h t selection ended her v a r s i t y career as Lisle’s No. 2 all-time leading goal-scorer with 65. This spring, she tallied 29 goals and 10 assists in 21 games (both totals led the team). “She’s a great player and had an awesome career,” said Lisle coach Paul Kohorn.“Basically the team ran through her. The team took its lead from Skyler. She’s an outstanding as a leader as well as a great player.” Tomko will join her sister, Brynn, on the Illinois Wesleyan University soccer team in the fall.

RACHEL ZAMPA Joliet Catholic senior was a four-year starter and three-time all-area member. Zampa helped the Angels win a regional title this year and will be continuing her career at Northwestern University Mark Gregory and Mike Sandrolini contributed


sPorts

BASEBALL Average Charlie Donovan, Westmont Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North Ryan Schlicher, Westmont Tyler Butler, Plainfield South Cody Grosse, Joliet West Max Brozovich, Minooka Connor Kopach, Downers North Zack Burdi, Downers South Danny Mayer, Downers South Zack Jones, Maine South Josh Krueger, Romeoville John McNulty, Plainfield South Rick Salazar, Plainfield South Jason Kenealy, Plainfield Central Chris Tschida, JCA Matt Zinnecker, Downers South Neal Tyrell, Minooka Tyler Desmairais, Minooka Derek Bangert, Lockport Matt Ryan, Plainfield Central Robert Kokoszka, Westmont Zach Trusk, Plainfield North Dan Sullivan, Lockport Seth Rosenburg, Niles West Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Matt Cranley, Plainfield South Nick Dalesandro, JCA Zack Thomas, Joliet West Kevin Raher, Downers South Jermaine Terry, Plainfield South Victor Garcia, Plainfield South Alex Galik, Downers South Larry Holman, Joliet West Zac Taylor, Downers South Matt Zaboudil, Downers North Jack Arkus, Niles West Zach Zyburt, Plainfield North Hits Danny Mayer, Downers South Tyler Butler, Plainfield South Kurt Palandech. Plainfield North Zack Burdi, Downers South Connor Kopach, Downers North Neal Tyrell, Minooka Max Brozovich, Minooka Zac Taylor, Downers South John McNulty, Plainfield South Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Rick Salazar, Plainfield South Victor Garcia, Plainfield South Joe Becht, Downers South Dan Sullivan, Lockport Chris Tschida, JCA Zach Trusk, Plainfield North Nick Dalesandro, JCA Matt Cranley, Plainfield South Josh Krueger, Romeoville Cody Grosse, Joliet West Alex Voitik, JCA Kevin Raher, Downers South Derek Bangert, Lockport Zack Thomas, Joliet West Troy Southard, Downers North Zach Zyburt, Plainfield North Joe Carnagio, Minooka Frank Perrone, Maine South Runs Tyler Butler, Plainfield South Chris Tschida, JCA Ryan Schlicher, Westmont Zac Taylor, Downers South Connor Kopach, Downers North Neal Tyrell, Minooka Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North Zack Burdi, Downers South Charlie Donovan, Westmont Larry Holman, Joliet West Dan Sullivan, Lockport Kevin Raher, Downers South Alex Galik, Downers South Joe Becht, Downers South Joe Carnagio, Minooka John Smith, Plainfield South Mike Torres, Romeoville Jermaine Terry, Plainfield South John McNulty, Plainfield South Rick Salazar, Plainfield South

.493 .456 .447 .440 .432 .431 .426 .418 .415 .415 .406 .402 .400 .400 .392 .387 .385 .385 .384 .382 .382 .379 .377 .375 .374 .371 .371 .370 .369 .368 .366 .366 .365 .364 .364 .362 .360 49 48 47 46 46 45 44 43 43 43 42 41 41 40 40 39 39 39 39 38 38 38 38 37 37 36 36 36 43 42 41 41 41 36 34 34 33 33 33 32 32 30 30 29 29 28 28 28

RBI Derek Bangert, Lockport Danny Mayer, Downers South John McNulty, Plainfield South Charlie Donovan, Westmont Max Brozovich, Minooka Chris Tschida, JCA Seth Rosenburg, Niles West Tyler Butler, Plainfield South Anthony DiNardo, Joliet West Zack Burdi, Downers South Troy Southard, Downers North Victor Garcia, Plainfield South Joe Becht, Downers South Matt Cranley, Plainfield South Jesus Saavadra, Maine South Zack Jones, Maine South Nick Dalesandro, JCA Jack Butler, Plainfield North Doug Matthews, Lockport Frank Perrone, Maine South Kevin Raher, Downers South Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Zach Trusk, Plainfield North Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Rick Salazar, Plainfield South Austin Kolmodin, Lockport Doubles John McNulty, Plainfield South Zach Trusk, Plainfield North Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Frank Perrone, Maine South Chris Tschida, JCA Max Brozovich, Minooka Josh Krueger, Romeoville Danny Mayer, Downers South Zack Jones, Maine South Troy Southard, Downers North Gehrig Parker, Maine South Zac Taylor, Downers South Zack Burdi, Downers South Tyler Butler, Plainfield South Joe Kukla, Notre Dame Joe Becht, Downers South Mark Fox, Minooka Tommy Toldeo, Niles West Michael Ferri, Notre Dame Chayancze Stirbis, Plainfield East Zack Thomas, Joliet West HR Derek Bangert, Lockport Frank Perrone, Maine South Tyler Butler, Plainfield South John McNulty, Plainfield South Ted Snidenko, Lockport Danny Mayer, Downers South Joe Carnagio, Minooka ERA Eric Duzan, Lockport Lucas Fisher, Downers North Steven Waldrop, Bolingbrook Justin Gustafson, Maine South Jean Pietrzak, Westmont Sam Couch, JCA Josh Krueger, Romeoville Mike Formella, Lockport Josh Mitchell, Minooka Trevor Henderson, Plainfield South Brian Glowicki, Downers South Jake Herron, Joliet West Quinn Ahern, Joliet West Troy Southard, Downers North Kyle Colletta, Niles West Zach Hinkamp, Maine South Brian Hurley, Romeoville Ryan Nikolich, Notre Dame Strikeouts Trevor Henderson, Plainfield South Brian Glowicki, Downers South Mike Virgilio, Maine South Jake Herron, Joliet West Tomas Aguilar, Plainfield Central Josh Mitchell, Minooka Sam Couch, JCA Kyle Colletta, Niles West Evan Martens, Lockport Zack Burdi, Downers South Nick Dalesandro, JCA Quinn Ahern, Joliet West Eric Duzan, Lockport

45 43 38 34 33 31 31 31 31 31 29 28 27 27 27 26 26 26 25 25 25 25 24 24 24 23 232 14 14 13 12 12 11 11 11 10 10 10 10 10 10 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 6 6 5 5 4 4 0.44 0.78 0.98 1.17 1.20 1.21 1.21 1.40 1.41 1.44 1.48 1.51 1.53 1.68 1.68 1.80 1.84 1.87 93 68 68 68 68 68 67 64 60 57 52 52 51

Mitch Vogrin, Minooka Brian Jones, Maine South Adnan Sator, Notre Dame Zach Hinkamp, Maine South Cody Pazik, Niles West Steve Waldrop, Bolingbrook Mario Samuel, Bolingbrook Mike Formella, Lockport Zack Thomas, Joliet West Wins Evan Martens, Lockport Jake Herron, Joliet West Eric Duzan, Lockport Trevor Henderson, Plainfield South Cal Placher, JCA Brian Glowicki, Downers South Nick Alfini, Downers South Ryan McQueen, Plainfield South Brian Jones, Maine South Nick Dalesandro, JCA Lucas Fisher, Downers North Jean Pietrzak, Westmont Mike Formella, Lockport Zach Moran, Westmont Danny Mayer, Downers South Tomas Aguilar, Plainfield Central Troy Southard, Downers North Josh Mitchell, Minooka Sam Couch, JCA Zach Hinkamp, Maine South Mike Virgilio, Maine South Cody Pazik, Niles West Quinn Ahern, Joliet West Steve Szymanski, Minooka Trevor Maly, Minooka

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

50 49 45 43 42 41 40 40 40 9-0 8-1 7-1 7-2 7-4 6-1 6-1 6-0 6-2 6-2 5-0 5-1 5-0 5-1 5-1 5-4 5-4 5-1 5-1 5-3 5-2 5-3 5-2 5-2 5-0

SOFTBALL Average Rosa Gonzalez, Joliet Central Stephanie Abello, Benet Courtney Grasz, Resurrection Carolyn Nojiri, Downers North Maeve McGuire, Benet Emily Bernath, Resurrection Marissa Panko, Benet Summer Stitt, Lisle Sarah Benavides, Resurrection Breanne Sobotks, Resurrection Ashley Beck, Romeoville Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central Kristen Skala, Westmont Kate Moriarity, Resurrection Abby Tarasewicz, Lisle Kelsey Smith, Minooka Emily York, Benet Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South Carly Dundee, Lockport Susie Sternard, Westmont Sara Novak, Minooka Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central Ali Michalik, Benet Kristina Shahan, Plainfield Central Nina Maggio, Plainfield East Hits Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central Marissa Panko, Benet Carolyn Nojiri, Downers North Carly Dundee, Lockport Maeve McGuire, Benet Ali Michalik, Benet Michaela Schlattmann, Plainfield C. Gabby Voulgaris, Lockport Kelly Pattison, Lockport Stephanie Abello, Benet Sara Novak, Minooka Emily York, Benet Joy Treasure, Joliet West Rosa Gonzalez, Joliet Central Jennifer Ames, Joliet West Kristina Shahan, Plainfield Central Timi Tooley, Plainfield Central Alison Mangino, Plainfield Central Emma Carter, Lockport Kristine Bourg, Joliet West Breanne Sobotks, Resurrection Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South Julianne Rurka, Benet Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central Adri Cura, Plainfield South

.528 .550 .521 .519 .516 .508 .496 .480 .478 .474 .471 .451 .440 .439 .438 .438 .430 .429 .424 .422 .422 .420 .412 .411 .405 60 58 55 50 49 47 45 45 45 44 43 43 43 38 43 44 41 41 40 40 39 39 38 37 36

Ashley London, Lockport 36 Kelsey Smith, Minooka 35 Runs Marissa Panko, Benet 46 Carly Dundee, Lockport 46 Maeve McGuire, Benet 45 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 40 Kristine Bourg, Joliet West 39 Jennifer Ames, Joliet West 37 Julianne Rurka, Benet 36 Ali Michalik, Benet 33 Carolyn Nojiri, Downers North 33 Kelly Pattison, Lockport 32 Kelsey Gockman, Downers North 29 Timi Tooley, Plainfield Central 29 Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central 28 Sara Novak, Minooka 28 Joy Treasure, Joliet West 28 Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South 28 RBI Stephanie Abello, Benet 51 Maeve McGuire, Benet 51 Julianne Rurka, Benet 40 Emily York, Benet 39 Gabby Voulgaris, Lockport 39 Kelsey Gockman, Downers North 38 Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central 35 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 32 Alysia Rodriguez, Joliet West 31 Kate Moriarity, Resurrection 30 Marissa Panko, Benet 30 Michaela Schlattmann, Plainfield C. 29 Joy Treasure, Joliet West 28 Carly Dundee, Lockport 28 Ali Michalik, Benet 28 Jennifer Ames, Joliet West 28 Adri Cura, Plainfield South 28 Courtney Grasz, Resurrection 27 Timi Tooley, Plainfield Central 26 Breanne Sobotks, Resurrection 25 Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South 25 Sara Novak, Minooka 24 Jackie Lilek, Minooka 24 Katie McKay, Joliet West 24 Hannah Franceschini, Plainfield Central 24 Doubles Gabby Voulgaris, Lockport 15 Emily York, Benet 13 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 12 Marissa Panko, Benet 11 Nina Maggio, Plainfield East 11 Erica Kramer, Plainfield North 11 Julianne Rurka, Benet 10 Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central 10 Stephanie Abello, Benet 9 Alysia Rodriguez, Joliet West 9 Whitney Lanphier, Plainfield South 9 Ashley London, Lockport 9 Emma Carter, Lockport 9 Carolyn Nojiri, Downers North 9 Alora O’Malley-Molk, Plainfield East 9 Maeve McGuire, Benet 9 Jill Rashid, Niles West 9 Joy Treasure, Joliet West 9 HR Stephanie Abello, Benet 12 Emily York, Benet 9 Maeve McGuire, Benet 9 Kelsey Gockman, Downers North 9 Carly Dundee, Lockport 8 Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South 8 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 7 Jennifer Ames, Joliet West 7 Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South 6 Kelly Kennedy, Plainfield North 6 Sara Novak, Minooka 6 Kate Moriarity, Resurrection 5 Adri Cura, Plainfield South 5 Marissa Panko, Benet 5 ERA Elaine Heflin, Downers North 0.96 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 1.41 Jackie Lilek, Minooka 1.73 Emma Carter, Lockport 1.73 Summer Stitt, Lisle 1.79 Jenna Christie, Maine South 2.03 Kristen Skala, Westmont 2.07 Katie McKay, Joliet West 2.09 Strikeouts Elaine Heflin, Downers North 267 Jenna Christie, Maine South 137

15

Krista Dawson, Niles West 137 Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South 135 Kristen Skala, Westmont 126 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 125 Sara Novak, Minooka 120 Summer Stitt, Lisle 90 Annie Molek, Plainfield East 81 Jackie Lilek, Minooka 78 Sydney Schmittel, Plainfield North 76 Wins Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 25-4 Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South 18-7 Elaine Heflin, Downers North 17-5 Jackie Lilek, Minooka 13-3 Emily York, Benet 13-4 Carly Dundee, Lockport 12-5 Katie McKay, Joliet West 11-8 Joy Treasure, Jolet West 10-3 Krista Dawson, Niles West 10-13 Sydney Schmittel, Plainfield North 9-7 Summer Stitt, Lisle 9 Megan Stoppelman, Benet 9-5

SOCCER

Goals Ashley Handwork, Plainfield North Jill Hetfleisch, Minooka Alli Curry, Maine South Skyler Tomko, Lisle Lacey Clarida, Lockport Vicki Tirovolas, Niles West Michelle Morefield, Benet Yessica Reyes, Joliet Central Shayna Dheel, Plainfield North Heather Handwork, Plainfield North Nicole Janowiak, Downers South Lexi Kiotis, Maine South Meaghan O’Hara, Benet Ashleigh Zurek, Lisle Assists Alli Curry, Maine South Vicki Tirovolas, Niles West Leah Plescia, Lockport Yessica Reyes, Joliet Central Ashley Handwork, Plainfield North Marisol Galvan, Minooka Skyler Tomko, Lisle Jacquie Kaufman, Benet Heather Handwork, Plainfield North Kaela Leskovar, Plainfield North

VOLLEYBALL

Aces Andre Flores, Plainfield East Phil Hannon, Minooka Matt Svetlecich, Minooka Steven Lendy, Notre Dame Jordan Pawlicki, Downers South Assists Jordan Pawlicki, Downers South Phil Hannon, Minooka Jordan Moy, Niles West Louis Dow, JCA Tyler Spangler, Plainfield Central Blocks Maalik Walker, Minooka Zach Gelfand, Niles West Mitch Perinar, Minooka Nick Timreck, Downers South Tim Leffler, Plainfield Central Will Tischler, Downers South Phil Hannon, Minooka Kills Matt Svetlecich, Minooka Steven Lendy, Notre Dame Brian Lyman, Joliet West Nate Wolf, Maine South Tom Poznanski, Plainfield Central Nick Timreck, Downers South Eli Gelfand, Niles West Sebastian Ahn, Niles West Mitch Perinar, Minooka Digs David DeMarco, Downers South Tyler Zowalski, Downers South Chris Tomuta, Niles West Jordan Pawlicki, Downers South

39 32 32 29 25 16 14 13 12 12 10 9 8 8 14 12 11 11 11 10 10 9 9 9

97 50 35 34 32 926 881 764 327 327 135 83 75 71 71 68 68 299 286 255 251 238 238 236 234 231 392 323 259 199


16

buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

Johnson bounces back with win By Reid Spencer NASCAR Wire Service

It’s not a good idea to rile up Jimmie Johnson. A week after a penalty for jumping the final restart at Dover knocked Johnson out of a near-certain victory, Johnson absolutely scorched the field in Sunday’s NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Party in the Poconos 400, beating Greg Biffle to the finish line by 1.208 seconds. The win was Johnson’s third of the season, his third at the Tricky Triangle and the 63rd of his career. Johnson increased his series lead over second-place Carl Edwards (18th Sunday) to a staggering 51 points after 14

races. Dale Earnhardt Jr. ran third, followed by Stewart-Haas Racing teammates Tony Stewart and Ryan Newman. Kyle Busch, Kurt Busch, Denny Hamlin, Kevin Harvick and Joey Logano completed the top 10. “What a race car!” Johnson said after climbing from the No. 48 Chevrolet in Victory Lane. “Not only a great race car but an engine. We had fuel mileage and plenty of power. It was awesome on the straightaways today to be able to do what I wanted around other cars. “So hats off to chassis, aero and the engine shop for this awesome race car.” You might think winning at

Nick Laham/Getty Images

Jimmie Johnson, driver of the #48 Lowe’s/Kobalt Tools Chevrolet, celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Party in the Poconos 400 at Pocono Raceway on June 9, 2013 in Long Pond, Pennsylvania.

Pocono for the first time since he swept both races here in 2004 might assuage the sting of last week’s penalty. You’d be wrong. “No, but it’s OK,” Johnson said. “It doesn’t make up for much, but we know we’re a great race team. Things won’t keep us down. We had a great race car today and had a lot of fun. That was a lot of fun out there.”

Johnson avoided a surfeit of action in the late stages of the race--because he was ahead of it. By the time Dave Blaney’s spin brought out the fourth caution on Lap 138, the five-time champion already had led 106 laps. That yellow followed a caution for an accident in the Tunnel Turn on Lap 133, when Juan Pablo Montoya drove hard into the corner under Matt Kenseth,

lost control of his No. 42 and started a synchronized spin with Kenseth. Subsequently, Johnson had to endure four restarts but did so as the leader and quickly regained control of the race in each instance. All told, Johnson led 128 of 160 laps. Biffle was happy with a runnerup finish that jumped him three positions to 10th in the standings,

WEEKLY RACING UPDATE STANDINGS

ONE FAN TO LIVE THE DREAM Chicagoland Speedway and Venturini Motorsports announced a contest allowing one lucky winner to become a part of the Venturini Motorsports ARCA racing team during Rally, Rock and Race weekend this July 19-21. The grand prize winner will have the chance to become an honorary member of the Venturini team and witness a race like never before. As the newest member to the Venturini team, the contest winner will receive a team jersey, a garage tour, access to the driver’s meeting, and a meet and greet with team drivers. Additionally, the prizewinner will act as an honorary member of the pit crew during the race and will have the opportunity to wave the green flag during the ARCA Series Qualifying race. Since the 1950s, Venturini Motorsports has been home to a proud tradition of Chicago racing. An early pioneer of the sport, Tony Venturini raced stock cars at Soldier Field competing with legendary NASCAR drivers, such as ‘Tiger’ Tom Pistone and Freddy Lorenzen. Today, after a successful ARCA racing career of his own, Bill Venturini,Tony’s son, is now the CEO of Venturini Motorsports. A racing legend, the Venturini team has also found success at Chicagoland Speedway, as driver Kevin Swindell won last season’s ARCA race as the VMS team celebrated its 30th Anniversary.

2012 Sprint Cup Series 1) Jimmie Johnson 521 2) Carl Edwards -51 3) Clint Bowyer - 69 4) Dale Earnhardt, Jr. - 82 5) Kevin Harvick -87 6) Matt Kenseth -103 7) Kyle Busch -109 8) Kasey Kahne -121 9) Brad Keselowski -123 10) Greg Biffle -126 11) Jeff Gordon -128 12) Paul Menard -136

2013 Nationwide Series 1) Regan Smith 2) Sam Hornish, Jr 3) Justin Allgaier 4) Austin Dillon 3) Elliot Sadler

448 -23 -44 -46 -60

2013 Party in the Poconos 400 finishers 1) Jimmie Johnson 2) Greg Biffle 3) Dale Earnhardt, Jr. 4) Tony Stewart 5) Ryan Newman 6) Kyle Busch 7) Kurt Busch 8) Denny Hamlin 9) Kevin Harvick 10) Joey Logano 11) Jeff Burton 12) Jeff Gordon 13) Jamie McMurray 14) Juan Montoya 15) Clint Bowyer 16) Brad Keselowski 17) Marcos Ambrose 18) Carl Edwards 19) Mark Martin 20) Travis Kvapil


Health & Fitness

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

17

Why should osteoporosis be important to you?

O

steoporosis, or the  There are also certain thinning of bones, is medications and medical often asymptomatic. conditions that can increase Many will question the risk, including family history of need for tests and osteoporosis, Caucasian even medication to race, early menopause treat low bone density. or surgical removal of Half of women over the ovaries, low body the age of 50 will have weight, lack of exercise, an osteoporosis related alcoholism, and a diet low fracture in their lifetime. in calcium. These fractures can be Prevention is key painful, crippling and because once bone is even disabling. Medical Memo lost, it is very difficult to Symptoms of Dr. Kristia Patsavas grow again. Ideally, begin osteoporosis include with building your bone back pain or tenderness. strength and then make every Additionally, an affected woman effort to slow bone loss.The two may have loss of height that is main components of bone loss more than normal for her age prevention are weight bearing group.There can be a slight exercises and a diet rich in curving of the upper back as the calcium and vitamin D. thinning spinal bones bend under Bones respond to exercise the weight of the upper body. the same way muscles do; they  Who is at risk? Women are become stronger with use.As the at increased risk because their muscles pull on the bones, the bones are smaller than men’s and bones strengthen.The best types because of the hormonal changes of exercise for bone strength are that happen at menopause. weight-bearing exercises, such Prior to menopause, women’s as low impact aerobics, brisk bodies contain estrogen, which walking, or sports. Even short protects against bone loss. After walks can help build your bone menopause, much less estrogen density. is produced and the protection A low calcium diet is associated decreases. with an increased rate of

bone loss. If you don’t have enough calcium in your body’s bloodstream, your body will take the calcium from your bones to supply the rest of your body. Studies show that most women do not consume enough calcium in their diet and many women are only getting as little as half of the daily amount that they need. Sources of calcium include dairy products, leafy green vegetables, nuts, seafood, juices and cereals that are fortified with calcium.  Additionally, calcium cannot be absorbed without vitamin D. Milk products that are fortified with vitamin D are a great source, as is sunlight.As little as 15 minutes per day of sunlight increases your vitamin D levels through your skin.Those of us that live in the Midwest need to take advantage of our dietary sources, given our long winters and lack of exposure to the sun. Supplements for calcium and vitamin D are also available. The most accurate test available to measure bone density is a Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry test or DXA test. It takes a few minutes and has minimal radiation exposure.The test results are given as T-scores,

which compare your bone density to that of a healthy 30 year old.A negative score means your bones are weaker than this 30 year old, a positive score means they are stronger. A score between -1.0 and -2.5 indicates the bones are becoming thinner.This is called osteopenia. A score lower then -2.5 is indicative of osteoporosis. It is recommended to perform DXA scans every 2 years in women older than 65 and in younger women with one or two of the risk factors discussed above.  There are multiple treatment options available to help reduce the risk of bone fracture once osteoporosis is diagnosed. One category of medications is Bisphosphanates.They are used to slow bone breakdown, increase bone density and reduce the risk of fractures.These medications can be taken weekly or monthly and must be taken on an empty stomach.There is also an intravenous version that is given yearly. Other medications include selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), which may be a good choice for women who cannot take hormones, and

hormone therapy, which is a good choice for women who need to prevent bone loss as well as treat other symptoms of menopause.  Doctor’s Rx: Osteoporosis is the thinning of bones that can lead to bone weakness and fracture. Fracture can cause chronic pain or permanent disability. Prevention of bone loss is essential. The best methods of prevention are to perform weightbearing exercises that strengthen the bones and a diet high in calcium and vitamin D.Your doctor may perform a DXA scan to check your bone density and determine if you have osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is treated with different kinds of medications.Talk to your doctor about your options.  

 Dr. Kristia Patsavas, MD is a physician specializing in Obstetrics and Gynecology and is based in Park Ridge, Illinois. The advice contained in this column is for informational purposes only. Readers should consult with their physician to evaluate any illness or medical condition. Dr. Patsavas accepts new patients. Call (847) 8257030 or view her web site at: www. associatesinobgyn.com to schedule an appointment.

Medications for Parkinson’s only control symptoms By Tribune Media Services

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: What are the latest findings on Parkinson’s disease? Are there any new medications? I’ve heard a lot about CoQ10 as a promising alternative for those with Parkinson’s. Is there any truth to this? ANSWER: CoQ10 initially seemed to be a promising therapy for Parkinson’s in early research involving small numbers of patients. However, follow-up studies using larger numbers and higher doses have failed to confirm benefit from this drug. The medications currently available for Parkinson’s are directed at controlling symptoms. They can be very effective. Unfortunately, despite decades of intensive research, no drugs have been proven to slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease is a disorder of the nervous system that develops gradually over

time.The hallmark symptoms include tremor, muscle rigidity and slowness of movements. In later stages, new symptoms may develop that include difficulties with memory and thinking, as well as bladder and bowel problems and, in some people, low blood pressure. In the 1960s, researchers discovered that the brains of people with Parkinson’s disease are low in a brain chemical called dopamine.This was a huge step forward in understanding and treating the disease.After that, researchers began to focus Parkinson’s treatment on replenishing dopamine.The early result of those efforts was a medication known as carbidopa-levodopa, which effectively restores brain dopamine and typically reduces many Parkinson’s symptoms. Four decades later, carbidopa-levodopa is still the best drug available for Parkinson’s.Although it does not treat the cause, carbidopalevodopa does restore some of

the normal brain chemistry. Unfortunately, as Parkinson’s advances, levodopa and related medications often become less effective in controlling symptoms, and the problems caused by the disease tend to get worse. Thus, with advancing Parkinson’s disease, the problems go beyond brain dopamine. Understanding the cause of Parkinson’s disease is the crucial first step to finding a way to slow or halt disease progression. A variety of environmental factors have been identified that influence the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. However, these account for only a small part of this risk. Genetics have also been extensively studied and remain a strong focus among researchers. Initial genetic studies investigated rare families in which many members had Parkinson’s disease.Although gene mutations were identified to explain the cause in many of these families, these same gene mutations were

not found to cause Parkinson’s disease in general. Known gene mutations account for just a small percent of typical Parkinson’s disease. However, these genetic studies shed light on processes that appear to play important roles in causing Parkinson’s disease. One important genetic finding surfaced early in these studies of familial Parkinson’s disease. In selected Parkinson’s disease families from Italy and Greece, the cause turned out to be the gene coding for alpha synuclein.This gene mutation was not found in run-of-the-mill Parkinson’s disease, but led to another important discovery. People with typical Parkinson’s disease were found to have deposits of alpha synuclein in affected brain cells, suggesting that this molecule might play an important role in all Parkinson’s disease. Of further interest has been the recognition that people with a disease somewhat similar to Parkinson’s but associated with

early dementia, called dementia with Lewy bodies, also is marked by brain alpha synuclein deposits. Researchers are now studying the relationship between these two disorders, which appear to have a common link. Although we do not have a drug that halts the progression of Parkinson’s disease, that should not be reason for pessimism.After all, before you can fix either a car or a body, you have to know how it works.That is certainly true for Parkinson’s disease. Once we fully understand what causes it, new treatment should quickly follow. - J. Eric Ahlskog, M.D., Ph.D., Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic is an educational resource and doesn’t replace regular medical care. E-mail a question to medicaledge(AT SIGN)mayo.edu , or write: Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic, c/o TMS, 2010 Westridge Drive, Irving, TX 75038. For more information, visit www.mayoclinic.org.


18

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

Business & Real Estate

Veteran opens new Woodridge resale shop By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

Woodridge resident Mike Uka knows a thing or two about finding a deal, and that is why the Iraq War veteran decided to turn his sense for spotting bargains into value for his customers. On May 12, 99 Names Retail/Thrift, 7400 Janes Ave., Woodridge, opened its doors to customers looking for a deal, but shopping on a budget. The shop has everything from apparel and accessories to kitchenware, and Uka says prices are half of what you’d

expect to see in a designer store. “I’m tremendously frugal, and shelling out loads of cash to buy clothing just isn’t an option,” Uka said. “Our goal here is to help anybody find what they’re looking for at a very reasonable price.” Uka served in the Iraq War between 2002 and 2006 as a member of the U.S. Air Force, and he said a portion of the store’s earnings will go to the Vietnam Veterans of America. 99 Names Retail/Thrift is open 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Shifting perspective will shift your results Q. I’m an optimist about human behavior. I think most people mean well and are kind. Yet in the workplace I am constantly surprised by the thoughtless behavior my coworkers and customers will pull without blinking an eye. What am I missing, and how do I get people to behave better? A. You are missing considering the reality of the human brain. Physically, our brains have three parts: a primitive reptilian brain, our emotions, and the relative

evolutionary newcomer that is the thinking portion. What you are shocked by is that many people are run entirely by their reptile part and emotions. What you are correctly observing is that people’s behavior in the workplace is often indeed “thoughtless.” What I mean is it is literally without thought, automatic or unconscious. The empathy or kindness you are seeking would only occur in a human being who could use their emotions and think about the effect they have on others. When I was studying for my Ph.D. in human development, I was shocked to learn that most adults don’t even achieve the last three levels of adult maturity. The most advanced stages of human development involve being able to use your feelings to identify with others and realizing you have to benefit others to achieve long-term success. You are not going to find Harry Potter’s wand, wave it around in your workplace, and change your coworkers’ and customers’ level of maturity. You can stop acting as if they possessed abilities that they don’t. If you were dealing with a crocodile, you know you would deal with it differently than with a loyal dog. When you look around your workplace, realize most people you deal with will do the right thing but only because it will hurt them if they don’t. Your job is to stop pretending you are dealing with a bunch of lovely animals and more assertively define what will happen if people don’t behave well. Let’s say you have a meeting and it is imperative none of your team come late. You could send out a memo with the start time and cross your fingers that everyone will be thoughtful. Then again,

keeping your new theory in mind, you could send out a memo that anyone who is not in the room at 9 a.m. will not be able to work on this highly visible and important project. Lining up what you do and say to be more in line with the reality of most adults level of maturity does not mean being a crocodile or thoughtless yourself. What you are doing instead is not believing and acting on a reality that never existed in your workplace Most of my clients spend at least a little time grieving that they do not currently live on the planet Kind and Thoughtful. Then they realize that most people are suddenly behaving (finally!) in thoughtful ways because now it is in their best interests to do so. You can wait for the world to change, or you can change the way you see the world and get immediate results.

The last word(s) Q. One of my coworkers is slow as molasses when it comes to returning email. Should I assume he is one of the following: stupid, lazy or disrespectful? A. No, you should assume he doesn’t know your preferences about email. Let him know you find it critical people respond within your stated timeframe. Now if he ignores that you can assume a darker intention.

Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www.interpersonaledge. com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.

(c) 2013 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.


THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS 2012 CH 002392 Fifth Third Mortgage Company PLAINTIFF Vs. David Sheradon; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 3/20/2013, John Zaruba, the Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois will on 7/23/13 at the hour of 10:00AM at Dupage County Sheriff’s Office 501 North County Farm Road Wheaton, IL 60187, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DuPage and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 09-17-101-004 Improved with Multi-Family Unit COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 5523 Carpenter Street Downers Grove, IL 60516 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-14437. I539680 Published 6/12, 6/19, 6/26

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, PLAINTIFF vs. WESLEY CHAPMAN; KIMBERLY CHAPMAN; THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, FORMERLY KNOWN AS THE OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWHEQ, INC., HOME EQ; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANTS 12 CH 4630 Address: 1034 Carol St. Downers Grove, Illinois 60516 Judge Gibson NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 3, 2013, I, Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois, will on July 9, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 AM at the Dupage County Sheriff’s Office, 501 N. County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DuPage, State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: COMMON ADDRESS: 1034 Carol St., Downers Grove, Illinois 60516 P.I.N.: 09-20-108-014 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT WAS: $197,977.78 Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds; the balance, by certified funds, is due within twenty four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “as is” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representations as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. Pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amounts of any surplus bid will be held by the sheriff until a party obtains a Court Order for its distribution, or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus, it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, please refer to file number IL 12 3272. Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois Johnson, Blumberg, & Associates, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 Ph. 312-541-9710 Fax 312-541-9711 JB&A # IL 12 3272 DuPage County No.: I528525 Published 5/29, 6/5, 6/12

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2003-4 PLAINTIFF VS LISA BORGEALT; AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE COMPANY F/K/A LONG BEACH MORTGAGE COMPANY; WESTBROOK WEST CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION; STATE OF ILLINOIS; RAYMOND ADELMAN A/K/A RAYMOND J. ADELMAN; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; DEFENDANTS 12 CH 1932 4220 SARATOGA AVENUE APT 304 DOWNERS GROVE, IL 60515 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on April 2, 2013, DUPAGE COUNTY SHERIFF in DU PAGE County, Illinois, will on July 18, 2013, in 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, at 10:00 AM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DU PAGE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 09-05-123-269 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 4220 SARATOGA AVENUE APT 304 DOWNERS GROVE, IL 60515 Description of Improvements: THREE STORY CONDOMINIUM BUILDING The Judgment amount was $97,919.27. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.attypierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1204096 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I537231 Published 6/5, 6/12, 6/19

CALENDAR

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to grow in them. For more information, call 630-971-1675 or visit www.lislelibrary.org.

Continued from page 5 Chris McBrien’s Magic and Mayhem Fun Show. 2-3 p.m. at the Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle. Lisle’s own Chris McBrien performs the zaniest and funniest magic ventriloquism show in Chicago. All ages. No registration necessary. For more information, call 630-971-1675 or visit www. lislelibrary.org.

JUNE 21 Zumba. 1:30-2:15 p.m. at the Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle. High energy music + awesome moves = guaranteed fun! Join this dance-inspired program that will get you moving and shaking. Ages 5 and up. For more information, call 630-971-1675 or visit www. lislelibrary.org.

Just the Facts Nonfiction Book Group. 7 p.m. at the Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle. Stop by to discuss Eighty Days by Matthew Goodman. Copies of each month’s books are available at the Library’s Reference Desk. For more information, call 630-971-1675 or visit www.lislelibrary.org.

Malaysian Martial Arts: Silat Seni Gayong Demo. 7 p.m. at the Woodridge Public Library, 3 Plaza Drive. Jen Para is the highest ranked woman in this form of martial arts outside of Malaysia. She has traveled to Malaysia for cultural understanding and for training in empty-hand and weapons by high ranking Gayong masters.

JUNE 20 Green Thumbs Unite! 2-3 p.m. at the Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle. For grades K-2. Get your garden started and let your creativity run wild as we decorate terracotta pots. Then dig in as you pick the perfect plants, flowers or seeds

JUNE 24 Just Between Frames Film Group. 7 p.m. at the Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle. Stop by to see and discuss Salmon Fishing in the Yemen. For more information, call 630-971-1675 or visit www. lislelibrary.org.


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THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013


THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

21


22 THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, PLAINTIFF vs. WESLEY CHAPMAN; KIMBERLY CHAPMAN; THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, FORMERLY KNOWN AS THE OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWHEQ, INC., HOME EQ; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANTS 12 CH 4630 Address: 1034 Carol St. Downers Grove, Illinois 60516 Judge Gibson NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 3, 2013, I, Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois, will on July 9, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 AM at the Dupage County Sheriff’s Office, 501 N. County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DuPage, State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 19 IN BLOCK 4 IN DOWNERS GROVE ESTATES, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 11, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JULY 9, 1926 AS DOCUMENT 217375, IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. COMMON ADDRESS: 1034 Carol St., Downers Grove, Illinois 60516 P.I.N.: 09-20-108-014 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT WAS: $197,977.78 Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds; the balance, by certified funds, is due within twenty four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “as is” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representations as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. Pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amounts of any surplus bid will be held by the sheriff until a party obtains a Court Order for its distribution, or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus, it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, please refer to file number IL 12 3272. Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois Johnson, Blumberg, & Associates, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 Ph. 312-541-9710 Fax 312-541-9711 JB&A # IL 12 3272 DuPage County No.: I528525 Published 5/29, 6/5, 6/12

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY WHEATON, ILLINOIS DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2003-4 PLAINTIFF VS LISA BORGEALT; AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE COMPANY F/K/A LONG BEACH MORTGAGE COMPANY; WESTBROOK WEST CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION; STATE OF ILLINOIS; RAYMOND ADELMAN A/K/A RAYMOND J. ADELMAN; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; DEFENDANTS 12 CH 1932 4220 SARATOGA AVENUE APT 304 DOWNERS GROVE, IL 60515 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on April 2, 2013, DUPAGE COUNTY SHERIFF in DU PAGE County, Illinois, will on July 18, 2013, in 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, at 10:00 AM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DU PAGE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: RESIDENTIAL UNIT 304-1 TOGETHER WITH THE UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT TO SAID UNIT IN WESTBROOK WEST CONDOMINIUM, IN PART OF THE EAST HALF OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 11, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AND IN PART OF LOT TWO, KALBRIER AND CASSIDY’S SURVEY SITUATED IN PART OF SECTIONS 5 AND 6, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 11, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, RECORDED MAY 20, 1948 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 545419 IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OWNERSHIP AND PLAT OF SURVEY ATTACHED THERETO AS EXHIBIT “A” RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE RECORDER OF DEEDS, DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R79-44909. TAX NO. 09-05-123-269 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 4220 SARATOGA AVENUE APT 304 DOWNERS GROVE, IL 60515 Description of Improvements: THREE STORY CONDOMINIUM BUILDING The Judgment amount was $97,919.27. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/ expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1204096 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS 2012 CH 002392 Fifth Third Mortgage Company PLAINTIFF Vs. David Sheradon; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 3/20/2013, John Zaruba, the Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois will on 7/23/13 at the hour of 10:00AM at Dupage County Sheriff’s Office 501 North County Farm Road Wheaton, IL 60187, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DuPage and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 39 IN BRANIGAR BROTHER’S “DOWNERS GROVE FARMS” BEING A SUBDIVISION IN SECTIONS 17 AND 18, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 11, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED SEPTEMBER 14, 1920, AS DOCUMENT 144285, IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN 09-17-101-004 Improved with Multi-Family Unit COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 5523 Carpenter Street Downers Grove, IL 60516 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twentyfour (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-14437.

I537231

I539680

Published 6/5, 6/12, 6/19

Published 6/12, 6/19, 6/26


News

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013

23

Street Fair combines old favorites By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

JONATHAN SAMPLES/STAFF REPORTER

Classic car owner Pete Johnson shows off his 1932 Chevrolet to Downers Grove resident Joe Perrewe.

JONATHAN SAMPLES/STAFF REPORTER

Couple looks at the classic cars that are apart of the Crusin’ Nights event.

JONATHAN SAMPLES/STAFF REPORTER

Customer purchases plants from Geneva Lakes Produce Farm and Greenhouse.

The Westmont Special Events Corporation introduced its brand new Community Street Fair last week, and people came out en masse to take a look at the new event. Combining the Westmont Fresh Market Place and Crusin’ Nights, the new street festival format builds upon these old favorites. By closing down Cass Avenue for the fair, the WSEC looked to create an event that was both safer and more inclusive. The result is a weekly street festival in the heart of downtown Westmont. “It’s sort of like a mini-Taste of Westmont in our downtown each week,” Village Trustee Sue Senicka said. The Street Fair also features live music, kids activities and other attractions, making it a draw for residents of Westmont and neighboring communities. Downers Grove resident Joe Perrewe saw an advertisement for the event and brought his wife out to see what the fair had to offer. “We usually go to the Downers Grove car show, so we figured we’d check it out,” he said. “It’s nice looking at these old cars because most of them are from my era.” The Community Street Fair runs from 4 to 9 p.m. Thursday in June, July and August. The Fresh Marketplace is located on the south end of Cass Avenue near Burlington, and classic car owners can park their rides on the north end of Cass Avenue at Irving Street.

Radogno, Durkin and Sandack host safety expo State Sen. Christine Radogno, R-Lemont, is teaming up with state Reps. Jim Durkin, R-Western Springs, and Ron Sandack, R-Downers Grove, to host a free Children’s Safety Expo from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 22, at Lakeview Jr. High School, 701 Plainfield Road, Downers Grove. “I always enjoy this event, and this year I look forward to teaming up with Rep. Durkin and Rep. Sandack,” Radogno said. “It’s a great way for us

to meet families living in the district, and I think everyone benefits-the kids enjoy themselves while their parents can gather information about local activities, college savings programs and more.” “It is very important to get keep your children involved, active and reading during the summer and this provides a one stop shop for activities and children’s entertainment,” Durkin said. Sandack added, “I want to

invite everyone to come out and join us. The kid’s fair is one of my favorite events because there is so much going on and a ton of fun to be had.” The lawmakers emphasized that admission is free and complimentary refreshments will be provided. There will be a noon drawing for giveaways, as well as face painting and the Traveling World of Reptiles Show from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. More than 20 “Touch a Trucks” will be at the Safety

Expo, including a medical helicopter and a rollover simulator. Kids are invited to see, touch and get behind the wheel of their favorite vehicle. Local professionals will be available to answer questions about the equipment and the work they do. In addition, public service representatives will be available to speak with event participants on health, education and safety issues, including Internet safety and cyber bullying, bicycle and

fire safety, college savings and after school programs and more. There will also be an exhibition by the Darien Police K-9 Unit, as well as demonstrations by the Midwest Judo & Jujitsu Club, Spotlight Dance Studio and the Traveling World of Reptiles Show. For more information on demonstrations, participants and events you can visit www. senatorradogno.org, www. jimdurkin.cnet or www. ronsandack.org.


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THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2013


Downers grove 06-12-13  

Downers grove 06-12-13

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