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SPORTS Pettys, Lewis fall in MIVA finals

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News Westmont workshops produce balanced budget

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Our Community, Our News

MAY 1, 2013

Vol. 5 No. 22

On the road toward recovery Municipalities seek federal disaster declaration, assistance By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

Jonathan Samples/Staff Reporter

Residents in the 5200 block of Grand Avenue place items that were damaged during the April 18 and April 19 storms curb side last week.

It has been more than a week since severe thunderstorms dropped nearly 7 inches of rain across DuPage County and northern Illinois. But residents and village crews are still involved in the cleanup process. “This [event] resulted in significant hardship for many of our residents,� said Doug Kozlowski, Downers Grove communications director. The severe storms moved through the Chicago area April 17 and 18, causing substantial flooding and prompting Gov. Pat Quinn to declare 38 counties, See RECOVERY, page 4


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THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

News

Good Samaritan volunteers get crafty for kids On any given Wednesday morning at Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital, there are at least 300 pom-pons scattered across a table – each destined to be attached to a hat for a newborn baby. Many are made by a pair of hospital volunteers who reside in Peace Memorial Manor Retirement Community on the hospital campus. “Each infant receives three hats during their stay; one at delivery, one for their stay and another to take home,” said Lynn Murphy, a Downers Grove

resident and co-chair of the Auxiliary Recreational Crafts Committee. Otherwise known as ARK, the committee has been creating crafts for hospital patients for more than 35 years and has more than 20 committee members. April 22 to 26 was National Volunteer Week. The volunteers also sew pillows for pediatric patients, as well as pillows and hats for cancer patients. Each pillow is constructed and stuffed by hand and has a cute puppy dog

face on the front. These pillows are offered to the pediatric patients at Good Samaritan Hospital as well as the Downers Grove and Lemont outpatient centers. “It’s a great way to get a frightened child to calm down – you give them a pillow, and they have something to hold on to,” said Downers Grove resident Laurie Seils, co-chair of the ARK committee. “The hospital can be a scary place, and the pillows can really help.” Murphy added, “The ARK committee is great for socializing, too. These ladies know how to have fun. Each time we meet, someone brings a special treat to eat, and we are always looking for volunteers who like to sew.” For more information on volunteering at Good Samaritan Hospital, visit www. a d vo c a t e h e a l t h . c o m / g s a m / Volunteers or call 630-2751181.

Submitted Photo

Good Samaritan Hospital volunteers Laurie Seils, left, seated, and Lynn Murphy, co-chairs of the Auxiliary Recreational Crafts committee, show the pillows they make for pediatric patients.

I-355 repair work to begin this week A traffic shift on the southbound Veterans Memorial Tollway (I355) between the Boughton Road Toll Plaza and I-55 (and on the collector-distributor road at

Butterfield Road) is scheduled to begin on Thursday, May 2, so roadway resurfacing and bridge repair work scheduled for 2013 can start.

The Illinois Tollway is resurfacing three small sections of the original roadway between I-55 and Army Trail Road and repairing 12 mainline bridges this year. The majority of resurfacing and bridge repair work will be performed during off-peak hours to minimize the impact on traffic. Any weekend work will be performed with daytime lane closures. Work to shift traffic will begin overnight on Wednesday, May 1st, so on Thursday, May 2, southbound traffic between the Boughton Road Toll Plaza and I-55 will be shifted to the right with a work zone on the left.The resurfacing work is expected to take about a month to complete. Northbound traffic between I-55 and Boughton Road, and on the collector-distributor road at Butterfield Road and in both directions between Fullerton Road and Army Trail Road, will be shifted at a later date.


THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

Westmont has budget breakthrough Village Board proposes food-service tax to cope with loss of home-rule revenue By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

After a series of four workshops, the village of Westmont has worked out a proposed 2013-14 budget that raises revenues and cuts village expenses to bring in a projected net surplus of $4,223 in the general fund. The proposed budget has not yet been approved, but as they currently stand general fund revenues are expected to be $20,645,242 and expected expenses will total $20,641.018. It includes a 1 percent eatery tax on food service establishments and the elimination of Thursday committee of the whole meetings. “From my perspective, I think for what we had to work with we did pretty well,” Trustee Lee Fleeming said at the April 20 budget workshop. “We found a way to make some stuff work. I think that we could have done much better than we did.”

The loss of home-rule revenues, which totaled $2.4 million, meant that Village Board trustees had to get creative this time around.To increase revenue and cut expenses, the board had to go through the budget with a fine toothcomb. “For the last several years we have gone through the budget line by line, not simply the bottom line number of a specific department,” Mayor Pro Tem Sue Senicka said. The proposed 1 percent eatery tax is expected to bring in $510,000 in revenue and it has been suggested that it would go into effect on July 1—the date that the current home-rule sales tax is eliminated. After discussing the issue several times during the budget workshops, the board decided on budgeting for the tax at its April 16 meeting. During the meetings a number of examples were given of surrounding communities who have already implemented similar eatery taxes.

Westmont currently does not have any taxes in place that are specific to places where food is prepared. “A lot of that is going to be born by people who don’t live in this town,” Trustee Ellen Emery said. “Plus. When you look at the overall food bill, it’s going to be miniscule. [The revenue] is going to be in volume, not in amount per person.” The board would not have to put the tax up for referendum and could vote on it at an upcoming meeting. Similarly, the proposal to cut Thursday committee of the whole meetings was discussed several times during the budgeting process. By deciding to combine Thursday and Monday meetings, the village expects to save $19,800. Westmont Finance Director Spencer Parker said that the eatery tax and the elimination of Thursday board meetings would require a Village board vote. “These have been planned in the budget money-wise, but I think it would take separate action from the board to make those happen,” Parker said. “Right now, they are sort of saying that this is their plan.” Parker also said the board expects

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to save $326,000 by maintain position vacancies in the Police Department, Fires Safety Bureau and Pubic Works Department. Total revenues and expenses are $32,559,165 and $33,915,903, respectively. The total budget takes into account the general fund, convention and tourism, capital projects, water operating, and motor fuel tax, and shows a net loss of $1,356,738. Parker said that this deficit won’t affect the village’s ability to operate, because the non-general fund accounts are separate funds where money is set aside for future projects. “In the general fund you get income and you use it to do your day-to-day operations,” Parker Said. “The other accounts are more like savings accounts. If you’re putting in a little bit each year, it’s easier to cope with that expense when it comes up.” The budget has not yet been approved and the village board is expected to discuss the proposed budget atThursday’s committee of the whole meeting. Parker said it is then up for a vote on May 6. jsamples@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

Human remains identified as missing Lisle man Bugle Staff

The DuPage County Coroner has identified skeletal remains discovered in Woodridge last month as Anthony Scott Arcaro, a Lisle resident who was reported missing in 2007. Arcaro was 37 years old at the time of his disappearance, and a cause of death has not yet been determined. Woodridge Police,the DuPage County Coroner and Lisle Police are investigating the incident, and asking that anyone with information call the Woodridge Police Department at 630-7194764 or email crimetips@vil. woodridge.il.us. The remains were discovered

on the afternoon of March 30 by two youths in a wooded area in the 7900 block of Lemont Road. Examination of the remains began April 1, after DuPage County Coroner Richard Jorgensen and a deputy coroner responded to the location after being contacted by the Woodridge Police Department. The initial investigation was conducted by the Woodridge Police Department, the DuPage County Coroner, the DuPage County Sheriff’s Office Forensic Unit and the Felony Investigative Assistance Team. The investigation remains open. jsamples@buglenewspapers.com

Health Department offers water tests to well owners The DuPage County Health Department is offering free well water testing to residents who have private wells that were impacted by recent flooding. This offer is only for DuPage County homes on private wells and will be available until Friday, May 10. Residents who receive water from public water sources, such as municipalities, should contact their water supplier if they have questions about their water quality. Residents may stop at one of the Health Departments Public Health Centers at 1111 W. Lake St., Addison; 1111 E. Jackson

St., Lombard,; or 111 N. County Farm Road, Wheaton to pick up well water testing supplies and instructions, as well as drop off their samples. This is the only way well water will be accepted for testing. Testing results are usually known within 72 hours. The Health Department testing covers total coliform bacteria and E. Coli, and corrective actions are suggested if contamination problems are detected. Additional information on disinfecting wells is available at www.dupagehealth.org.

Bill to increase transparency of school funding approved by Senate budget committee Bringing greater accountability and transparency to the state’s system of funding schools is the goal of legislation that was approved April 25 by the Senate Appropriations budget committee. The bill was sponsored by state Sen. Christine Radogno (R-Lemont). “It’s time to shine a light on school funding in Illinois,” Radogno said. “The public has a right to know how we are spending the state’s limited education dollars. This bill will take education funding out of the shadows and begin to increase accountability.” Senate Bill 1984 requires that allocations of the state’s General State Aid (GSA) and its primary components-Foundation Level grants, Property Tax Extension Limitation Law (PTELL) adjustments and Poverty grantsmust be clearly delineated in the state budget and thus available for public review. Radogno said she will work with the State Board of Education to refine the

legislation before final passage. Radogno said the proposal was an outgrowth of a school funding report unveiled in March by Senate Republicans that took aim at claims by some that downstate and suburban schools in Illinois receive a “free lunch” through the state’s contribution to teacher retirement funds. “We started out simply looking at the claim that downstate and suburban schools receive an unfair financial benefit through teacher pension payments,” Radogno said. “We found that was clearly not the case and in fact, Chicago receives a disproportionate share of state school funding. “But as we dug more deeply, it became evident that school funding in Illinois has been skewed by policies and decisions that are made behind closed doors without benefit of public input or legislative review,” she said. She explained that in 2000,88% of the School Aid Formula was contained in Foundation Level

grants, which is the equalization part of the formula designed to ensure that each school district, regardless of property tax wealth, receives a minimum level of funding per student. Back then, poverty grants accounted for 10% of the funding formula and PTELL adjustments represented just 2%. Today, the Foundation Level grants have dropped to 53% of the Formula, while Poverty grants have climbed to 34% and PTELL adjustments now represents 13% of the Formula. That represents a 432% increase in Poverty grant funding and a 1,267% increase in PTELL adjustments. If the trend continues, Foundation Level grants will soon represent less than half of the School Aid Formula. The shift in funding has been hidden from the public and has never been submitted to policy makers for open debate and review. Radogno said this is a major policy that is not even disclosed in the annual budget submitted by the Governor.

RECOVERY

“Regardless of whether people filled out surveys or not,if and when there are relief funds available, people will be able to apply,” he said.“It was not an application for funds; none of that.This was just a preliminary assessment to make a determination.” On Monday, officials from DuPage County, the Illinois Emergency Management Agency and the Federal Emergency Management Agency will begin touring flood-damaged areas in DuPage County. The FEMA teams will use information from those initial surveys, as well as information gathered during their tour, to conduct their preliminary damage assessment. Because a large number of counties in the state experienced flooding, the DuPage County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management expects the process to take several weeks to complete. Whether President Obama issues a federal disaster declaration is based on the results of FEMA’s assessment. Kozolowski said Downers Grove residents will be informed

if a declaration is made, but urged them to check regularly on the village’s website for updates. Westmont and Woodridge have also made information available online. Residents can also visit www.protectdupage.org for county-wide information. In the meantime, the DuPage County OHSEM is warning residents of potential scams relating to flooding and damage assessment. The department’s website advises homeowner to be suspicious of contractors who promise that FEMA will reimburse the property owner for any work the contractor preforms. Because a federal disaster declaration has not yet been made, there is no guarantee funds will be available. Furthermore, municipal, county, state or federal officials may inquire about damage to homes and property, but there should be no need for officials to enter the home. The DuPage County OHSEM is advising residents to alert authorities if they see suspicious activity.

Continued from page 1 including DuPage, State Disaster Areas. Downers Grove officials estimate that more than 1,000 residential and commercial properties were flooded from the torrential rains, and those property owners are currently uncertain about the status of state and federal assistance. Starting last week, DuPage County and the villages of Downers Grove, Westmont and Woodridge began the process of obtaining those funds by asking property owners to complete a damage assessment survey online. The results of those surveys were then submitted to the Illinois Emergency Management Agency on April 24. Kozolowski said Downers Grove submitted more than 1,000 damage assessment surveys to the county, but stressed these surveys were not a prerequisite to apply for federal funds if they become available.

jsamples@buglenewspapers.com


Calendar ONGOING National Library Week. The Lisle Library, 777 Front Street, Lisle, will have a variety of activities celebrating the week’s theme, “Communities Matter @ the Library.” Test your knowledge on a local history quiz. April 17 is Fine Amnesty Day. Stop by the Community Fair on April 20. For more information, call 630-971-1675 or visit www.lislelibrary.org. ‘Main Street USA.’ This exhibit at the Downers Grove Museum, 831 Maple Ave., runs through April 20. This new exhibit highlights the importance of Main Street in Downers Grove and how it has evolved over the last 180 years. Call 630-963-1309 for more info or to book a group tour. Third Thursday. 5–7 p.m. every third Thursday at the DuPage Children’s Museum. Third Thursdays are a special time once a month for families of children with autism spectrum disorder, visual, and mobility impairments to come play at the Museum.All activities are free with admission or membership. B & B Ladies Golf League. Join us for golf and fun every Friday morning. Season runs May 4-Sept. 28. 9 holes at Village Greens of Woodridge. For information call 630-9853610. Great Decisions Foreign Policy Discussion Group. 9:30-11:30 a.m. every Monday at the Downers Grove Library. Topics for 2012 include: Middle East realignment, promoting democracy, Mexico, cybersecurity, exit for Afghanistan and Iraq, state of the oceans, Indonesia, and energy geopolitics. Registration is not required. Call Nancy Peraino at 630-968-8706 for more information. Do you want to stop drinking? Contact Alcoholics

Anonymous at 630-887-8671 to get help, or go online to www.aa-nia.org to find a local meeting. Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings daily at the West Suburban Alano Club, 17 W. Quincy St., Westmont. Open speaker meetings at 7 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. Sundays, other meetings listed by day and hour on www.wsacaa. org.  Memberships available: inquire at the Club. Baby and Toddler Storytime. 10:15-10:45 a.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays at the Westmont Library. Get ready for stories, songs, and interactive play. Young children and a caregiver can enjoy this weekly time together while nurturing a love of reading. For ages 0-3. Toddler & Me Playgroup. 10:45-11:30 a.m. Thursdays at the Westmont Library. Bring your young children to a special morning playtime in the library’s meeting room. Interact with other moms and caregivers while the kids play and eat snacks. Saturday morning storytime. 9:30-10 a.m. at the Downers Grove Library. Join in every Saturday morning for storytime filled with stories, songs, and fingerplays. This program is for children of all ages and their caregivers. Adult participation is an important part of this storytime. Job Club. Mondays from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Woodridge Library, 3 Plaza Drive, Woodridge. Job Club members learn to write résumés and cover letters, develop interviewing skills and find job leads. No sign-up, no fee, just drop in. For further information call 630-964-7899, email askus@ woodridgelibrary.org, or visit www.woodridgelibrary.org.

MAY 1 Darien Seniors Club. 12 p.m. at the Darien Sportsplex, 451 Plainfield Road, Darien. Membership is not restricted to Darien residents. They enjoy refreshments, a business meeting and various program for a $15 annual membership fee.

MAY 2

Concert:American English. 7 to 9 p.m. at the Tivoli Theatre, 5021 Highland Ave., Downers Grove. Beatles tribute band. Benefit concert for SEASPAR. Tickets are $20; $25 after April 26. More at 630-960-7600 or www.seaspar.org.

MAY 3 Smart Money Seminar. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Benedictin University Krasa Center, 5700 College Road, Lisle. Sponsored by Illinois State Treasurer Dan Rutherford. Admission is free, but registration is required. Refreshments will be servied. Register at http://www.treasurer.il.gov/ programs/financial-education/

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013 SmartMoneyConference.aspx. Teen Xbox 360Tournament. 5 p.m. at the Downers Grove Library, 1050 Curtiss St. Compete for prizes by playing Halo: Reach. Online registration is required. Snacks and other console games provided. Register for these events online at www.dglibrary.org/calendar. html, at a service desk, or by calling (630) 960-1200.

MAY 5 Founders Day. 1 to 3 p.m. in Downtown Downers Grove. The Downers Grove Historical Society sponsors this day to honor our Village’s namesake, Pierce Downer. A plaque will be dedicated at 1 p.m. at the Main Street Cemetery. Each family attending will receive a free tree sapling, while supplies last. For more information, visit www.downer sgrovehistor y. org. Concert: FUMC Four. 3 to 4:30 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 1032 Maple

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Ave., Downers Grove. FUMC 4- Men’s Quartet Concert. Proceeds to benefit the Bridge Board, which aids the homeless.

MAY 7 History of Midway Airport. 7 p.m. at the Downers Grove Library, 1050 Curtiss St. Learn about the airport that grew up with the aviation age. This program was rescheduled from a February snowday. Art of Aging. 7 p.m. at the Downers Grove Library, 1050 Curtiss St. Radio personality Clark Weber discusses how to face the challenges of aging.

MAY 8 Great Decisions Foreign Policy Discussion Group. 7 p.m. at the Downers Grove Library, 1050 Curtiss St. Topics for 2013 include: Future of the Euro, Egypt, NATO, Myanmar and Southeast Asia, Humanitarian Intervention, Iran, China in See CALENDAR, page 8


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THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Downers Grove, Westmont and Woodridge police departments. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

Downers Grove

Piotr G. Mierzejewski, 23, 6148 Pinewood Court, Willowbrook, was arrested at 2:30 p.m.April 19 at 800 Ogden Ave. for driving while license suspended. Tawanda Faye Lewis, 42, 6812 Penner Ave., Downers Grove, was arrested at 10:30 p.m.April 19 at 6028 Leonard for keeping a disorderly place. MichaelA.Gutierrez,30,3700 N.Greenview Ave., Chicago, was arrested at 1:09 a.m. April 20 at Good Samaritan Hospital for DUI/alcohol and miscellaneous traffic codes. Julius R. Isaac, 40, 2427 Ogden Ave., Downers Grove, was arrested at 8:15 p.m. April 20 at the residence for disorderly conduct. Wenceslao Huerta, 26, 2117 Prentiss, Downers Grove, was arrested at 1:23 a.m. April 21 on Maple and Woodward for revoked driver’s license. Sanchez Lizbeth, 21, 5S301 Beau Bien, Lisle, was arrested at 8:25 a.m. April 21 at 1700 Ogden Ave. for no insurance, no valid driver’s license and speeding. Renata Ann KolodzieJ, 900 Crane Drive, DeKalb, was arrested at 5:56 p.m. April 21 on 71st Street and Powell Street for a traffic warrant. Robert J. Okonski, 52, 720 Remington Court, Woodridge, was arrested at 8 p.m. April 21 at 1000 Burlington for urinating in public. Erica L. Monson, 29, 312 Pacific, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 8:25 a.m. April 22 in the 5000 block of Main Street for a warrant.

Police Blotter Andrew D. Donnel, 38, 3660 Creekwood Court, Downers Grove, was arrested at 12:21 p.m. April 22 at 4330 Saratoga for criminal trespass to land.

7 a.m. April 16, an unknown offender(s) entered a vehicle in the 0-100 block of South Wilmette Avenue and stole currency and jewelry.The total loss is $550.

Benjamin A. Jackson, 31, 2020 Prentiss Drive, Downers Grove, was arrested at 12:38 a.m. April 23 at the residence for a failure to appear warrant.

At approximately 6:55 p.m. April 16, officers responded to the 0-100 block of West 63rd Street for a battery. Officers arrested Stacey Jones, female, age 47, of 807 South Adams Street #202, Westmont, for battery after she shoved the victim during a traffic altercation. She was released on her own recognizance.

Denver Hinkle, 61, 4925 Fairview Ave., Downers Grove, was arrested at 8:18 a.m. at 1600 Maple for driving while license suspended. Patrick A. Millard, 56, 638 W. 47th St., Chicago, was arrested at 10:21 a.m. April 23 on Ogden Avenue and Saratoga for driving while license suspended and uninsured motor vehicle. Mark I. Larsen, 54, 1022 Gramercy, Addison, was arrested at 10:34 a.m. April 23 on Forest and Warren for suspended license plates, no insurance and driving while license suspended. Jawaun L. Manson, 27, 129 Thackeray Drive, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 1:04 a.m. and Ogden and Ivanhoe for driving while license suspended.

Westmont Sometime between 9 p.m. April 14 and 7 a.m. April 15, an unknown offender(s) damaged a mailbox in the 0-100 block of East 60st Street. The total damage is $150. Sometime between 6:30 p.m. April 14 and 9:45 a.m. April 15, an unknown offender(s) damaged a window of a residence in the 300 block of Cromwell Court. The total damage is $400. Sometime between 8 p.m. April 15 and 8 a.m. April 16, an unknown offender(s) entered an unlocked vehicle in the 200 block of East Quincy Street and stole an I-Pod. The total loss is $200. Sometime between 7 p.m. April 15 and

Sometime between 8:30 p.m. April 16 and 7:30 a.m. April 17, an unknown offender(s) entered an unlocked vehicle in the 6200 block of South Western Avenue and stole a cellular phone and a radar detector. The total loss is $250. At approximately 10 p.m. April 18, officers responded to the 0-100 block of East Chicago Avenue for a battery. Officers arrested William Barrett, male, age 48, of 20 East Chicago Avenue #2, Westmont, for domestic battery after he struck a household member. He was transported to the DuPage County Jail for a bond hearing. Sometime between 5 and 5:15 p.m. April 18, an unknown offender(s) stole a license plate off a vehicle parked in the 0-100 block of East Ogden Avenue. The total loss is $60. At approximately 12 p.m. April 19, officers responded to the 100 block of North Roslyn Road for graffiti complaint. Officers arrested Doug Morris, male, age 18, of 137 Stanhope Drive #D, Willowbrook, for drawing gang graffiti on a driveway. He was released on his own recognizance. At approximately 12:30 p.m. April 20, officers responded to the 6700 block of Cedar Lane for a battery. Officers arrested Jacqueline Tully, female, age 41, of 6707 Cedar Lane #4, Westmont, for battery after she struck the victim in the face. She was released on her own recognizance.

At approximately 7:30 p.m. April 21, officers responded to the 6700 block of Lake Shore Drive for a battery. Officers arrested Cesar Resendiz, male, age 41, of 6707 Lake Shore Drive #1, Westmont, for domestic battery after he pushed a family member. He was transported to the DuPage County Jail for a bond hearing.

Woodridge A theft occurred at approximately 11:25 a.m. April 19 in the parking lot of Suparrosa, 6310 Route 53. Unknown persons removed a case of meat from a parked delivery truck. A theft occurred sometime between 2:30 and 3:30 p.m. April 19 at Kohl’s, 1001 75th St. Unknown persons removed a wallet from a shopping cart. A theft occurred at approximately 10:07 p.m.April 20 at the Marathon Gas Station, 2340 W. 75th St. Unknown female subject removed $28 worth of gasoline. At approximately 2:48 p.m. April 21, Kimberly Reid, 53, 18 W 125 63rd St., Westmont, was charged with retail theft after removing jewelry from Kohl’s, 1001 75th St. At approximately 6:50 p.m. April 21, Gabriela Lopez, 38, 51 W. 66th St., Westmont, was charged with retail theft after removing clothing from Kohl’s, 1001 75th St. A theft occurred at approximately 7:39 a.m. April 22 at St. Scholastica Church, 7800 Janes Ave. Unknown subject entered the church and removed approximately $2 in U.S. currency, all coins. At approximately 3:42 a.m. April 25, Hector Martinez, 24, 1429 Sage Drive, Woodridge, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol, operating an uninsured motor vehicle and improper lane usage following a traffic stop on International Parkway at Lemont Road.


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THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

Illustrated Opinions

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Schools

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

District 68 appoints new Meadowview principal

Submitted Photo

The Woodridge School District 68 Board of Education unanimously appointed Regina Leeberg as the new principal of Meadowview School.

The Woodridge School District 68 Board of Education unanimously appointed Regina Leeberg as the new principal of Meadowview School during its April 22 regular meeting. She will take over for retiring principal Jodi Innes July 1, 2013. “I’m thrilled to be a part of the Meadowview School community, and am looking forward to working in collaboration with the faculty, staff and parents to create a safe, caring environment in which high expectations are established, students are engaged, data is used strategically and students are offered feedback that positively impacts their learning and ensures that they are meeting their full potential,” Leeberg said.

“The Meadowview faculty and staff have already begun the important work of preparing their students  for college and career and I’m honored to  join in this endeavor with them.” Leeberg has 14 years of experience in elementary education, and she is currently with the Valley View School District 365U, where she has gained district-level experience as the Director of Literacy and Social Studies (Pre-K – 5th grade). She began her career with Lisle CUSD 202 as a first and second grade classroom teacher for eight years and then as an instructional coach for Pre-K through 5th grade for four years. Leeberg has a master of arts in education in leadership and administration from

District 58 to host special education services meeting The Downers Grove Grade School District 58 will host a meeting to discuss the district’s plans for providing special education services during the 2013-14 school year to students with disabilities who attend private/parochial schools or will be home-schooled within District 58. The meeting will held at 9 a.m. Wednesday, May 15 at the District 58 Administrative Service

Center, 1860 63rd St. Parents of private/parochial school students or home-schooled students who has been or may be identified with a disability and reside within the boundaries of Downers Grove Grade School District 58 are urged to attend. Call 630-7195824 for more information or to indicate your intention to attend this meeting.

North Central College and a master of science in education in reading from Northern Illinois University. She also has a bachelor of science in elementary education from Benedictine University. “When looking for a new principal for Meadowview School, we are fortunate to have found an educator like Regina.  She is a strong leader who is highly respected by her colleagues,” District 68 Superintendent Cathy Skinner said. “Her level of knowledge and vision for the school will motivate and lead Meadowview to further build upon its solid foundation. We look forward to her joining our quality district and strong administrative team.” Leeberg lives in Plainfield with her husband and two children.

CALENDAR Continued from page 5 Africa, and Threat Assessment. Contact: Nancy Peraino at (630) 968-8706 with questions. Senior Outing: Fair Oaks Farm. 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 1st United Methodist Church, 1032 Maple Ave., Downers Grove. The “Young at Heart” senior will visit Fair Oaks Farm in Indiana. Meet in the church parking lot at 8 am and travel in vans to the Farm. Cost per person for transportation and admission is $18. Lunch is on your own. To reserve a “seat” please call Marilou Welch 630 968-4136.

MAY 10 Brainiacs Club. 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Good Sam Wellness Center, 3551 Highland Ave., Downers Grove. Give your brain a workout by playing fun and stimulating games designated to sharpen your mind. You will leave feeling energized armed with activities to do at home. FEE: $2. Registration is required at 1-800-323-8622, and provide a registration code of 4S39.

MAY 11 DG Organic Gardeners Plant Sale. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hummer Park,4833 FairviewAve., Downers Grove. Just in time for Mother’s Day! The sale features vegetables, herbs, and native annuals and perennials. More at www.dgorganicgardeners. blogspot.com.

MAY 13 Friends

of

the

Library

Writers Workshop. 7 p.m. at the Downers Grove Library, 1050 Curtiss St. Aspiring writers meet to share their works.

MAY 18 Rotary Club’s Recycling Extravaganza. 8 a.m. to noon. Save the date for the annual Rotary Club Recycling Extravaganza. Visit www.vil. woodridge.il.us for updates as the date draws near. More information will also appear in E-News as the date draws near.

MAY 19 Age Well DuPage. 1 to 4 p.m. in Student Resource Center, Room 2000, at the College of DuPage, 425 Fawell Blvd., in Glen Ellyn. Join the DuPage County Senior Services and College of DuPage Continuing Education for this event. Lucia West Jones will present information on aging in DuPage, and participants will be able to hear about experiencing the services and opportunities available in DuPage County for a full life at any age! This is a free event. For more information, and to register for this free event, contact Antonia Harlan, DuPage County Community Services, at (630) 407-6500, or Antonia. Harlan@dupageco.org.

MAY 20 Book An Adventure: Summer Reading Club Begins! At the Downers Grove Library, 1050 Curtiss St. Kids, teens, and adults can win prizes just for reading! We invite you to broaden your reading horizons as we travel to the seven continents and beyond. Visit www.dglibrary. org for club information.


taKe 5 C ro s s w o rd P u z z l e

Across

Down

1 Shoots the breeze 6 1940s-’50s Israeli U.N. ambassador 10 Game __ 14 “The Wolf and the Crane” author 15 Cross off 16 Piece of one’s mind? 17 Halloween tricksters’ route? 19 Awestruck 20 Roy Halladay stat 21 Sister of Calliope 22 It may be icy 23 Best place to watch “Animal House”? 25 Close, for instance 28 Unburden 29 Kate of “Ironclad” 30 Soften by soaking 35 How most reading is done, and this puzzle’s title 39 Sherry alternatives 40 Albany’s father-

in-law 41 “Piers Morgan Tonight” channel 42 Eisenhower library site 45 Feathers? 50 Nigerian seaport 51 Noted Beethoven interpreter 52 CIA’s ancestor 55 Cancel 56 Work the late shift at the diner? 58 “__ no kick from Champagne”: song lyric 59 Steady 60 Response to a skeptic 61 Gets into 62 Employee IDs 63 Third shift hr.

1 Champs Élysées feature 2 Bach title? 3 Land east of the Urals 4 Dress finely, with “out” 5 Field of influence 6 Americans in Paris, maybe 7 Tug and junk 8 Overlord 9 Ultimate 10 Home at the park? 11 Airport whose code is BOS 12 Decide not to finish 13 Desert bordering the Sinai Peninsula 18 Choral syllables 22 Feast in the month of Nisan 23 Position in a viewfinder 24 Moneyed, in Monterrey 25 Like some switches 26 Word spoken with amore 27 Put one’s foot down

30 Summer escapes: Abbr. 31 Little streams 32 “The African Queen” coscreenwriter 33 Instead of 34 Raison d’__ 36 Trounces 37 Cube creator Rubik 38 Royal introductions 42 France-based jet maker 43 Sound from Eeyore 44 “Beats me!” 45 Not fixed 46 Title chameleon voiced by Johnny Depp in a 2011 animated film 47 Osmonds’ hometown 48 Codgers 49 Two-time loser to McKinley 52 Look like a creep? 53 Brnch of Islam 54 Check 56 NFL ball carriers 57 Fluoride, for one

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

H o ro s c o p e s Risky business is not show business. Sometimes you like to walk on the wild side and push your limits but in the week to come, you would be wise to avoid strenuous escapades like rock-climbing.

Party animals on the prowl sometimes growl. With funloving Venus in your sign, you may have numerous opportunities to socialize in the week ahead - but a heavy work load could cramp your style.

Strive to be a voice, not an echo. You might have a tendency to adopt other people’s opinions as your own in the week to come. You can’t take it for granted that those opinions are based on due diligence.

A satisfying job and financial security might be your priority in the week ahead. Family and social life could take a back seat to career, as you focus on realizing your ambitions.

Focus on achieving ambitions, not on group consensus. Interpersonal relationships could be a bit challenging early in the week. Be as straightforward as possible to avoid alienating those you value the most.

Pay attention to what is going on in the outside world. In the upcoming week, tune into the news, the radio or TV, and you will find guidance for your job and career problems right there in plain sight.

You won’t be able to make permanent plans with temporary people. You may be frustrated in attempts to stand up for yourself. The week ahead isn’t a good time to invest your money or your emotions.

Buck up. The more you talk about the drama and demands in your life, the more you reinforce them. In the upcoming week, simply get on with your jobs and refuse to dwell on the nagging negatives.

Beautify your surroundings. Harmony around you will reflect the harmony within during the week ahead. You might take a few minutes to make a difference by improving work conditions.

The secret to success in the week ahead is to focus your energy on building up something new rather than tearing down something old. You may feel that your private space is threatened by others.

Having a few adventures may be good for you. Remain cautious, however, and don’t neglect duties. If you are thinking of beginning anything long-lasting or important, hold off until this week is over.

The love of your life may be difficult to find, but once found, will be impossible to forget. During the upcoming week, you may experience a few trials and tribulations but will be rewarded for your efforts.

Sudoku

J umble

Tribune Media Services 2013

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • STAID • FRUIT • AUTHOR • CROUCH

Answer:

What he considered his wife’s new hat -“HAT-ROCIOUS”

9


10

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Sectionals next for Downers North badminton, page 12; Go to www.buglenewspapers.com for Westmont and Lisle roundup

www.buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

11

Pettys, Lewis fall in MIVA title game By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Steve Woltmann/Lewis University

Downers Grove North alum Jay Petty finished his career at Lewis Saturday.

When the Lewis University men’s volleyball team fell in five games to Loyola in the 2013 Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association Championship, it not only ended the season for the Flyers, it also ended the career for Flyer standout Jay Petty from Downers Grove North High School “I don’t know that you can say enough about Jay Petty,” said Lewis coach Dan Friend. “Not only what he has done for the team, but what he has done for the program over his time here over five years. He basically carried us to the Final Four last year and this year after shoulder surgery, he found another role passing and playing defense while still managing to score points and block.” In the 23-25, 25-23, 10-25, 2522, 15-7 loss to Loyola April 27, Petty posted nine kills, eight digs three block assists and a solo block. He was also named to the MIVA All-Tournament Team along with teammates B.J Boldog, Geoff Powell and Eric Fitterer. “It is not the way I wanted to end my career, but it is what it is,” Petty said. “We played up and down volleyball this year and even in this match. It has been fun. The people that I have met here, it has been great.” Petty said he has enjoyed the fact that the majority of the Flyers’ squad is from the greater Chicagoland area, something he did not expect coming out of high school five years ago. “When I started playing club, there was a big emphasis on the California kids being the best players and I got to see that change over my career,” he said. “In a sense I am the last. I was overlooked and I had a chip on my shoulder and Dan (Friend)

was the only to take a chance on me and used that chip while I was here.” One of those Chicago area players, Eric Butch, a redshirt sophomore out of Maine South, is happy Petty broke the mold. “Jay Petty did a great job all season,” Butch said. “He is such an inspiration. He raised the level of play every day in practice and in games and we are going to miss that.” Butch, who posted eight digs from his libero position in the loss, will return next season, along with a lot of other players that should have the Flyers back ready to contend again. One of those returners will definitely keep Jay Petty watching his alma mater, as younger brother Greg is a sophomore on the Flyers. After battling mono for nearly two months this season, Greg did not play as much as he did a year ago, but did get on the floor in the fifth set and record a pair of kills. “It was nice (to be on the floor together to end it),” Jay said.“Last year was great when I got to spend almost the whole season on the floor with him and that was great.” Greg knows that although his brother will be gone next season, the talent is there to compete for another trip to the Final Four. “The great thing about us is, we are all still pretty raw,” Greg said. “We are all really from the Chicagoland area and a lot of us started playing volleyball late, so we still have a lot we can learn. We are going to work hard and try to get back to the final four again next year.” Lewis ended the season this year with a 20-10 record. In the loss, Lewis came out and won the first set with a .583 See PETTY, page 13


12

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

Sports

Sectionals next for DGN badminton By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

One of the most successful teams on either side of town in District 99—no matter what the sport—is Downers North’s badminton squad, a perennial state qualifier since 2000. The Trojans this season are led by an undefeated No. 1 doubles squad which advanced to the state quarterfinals last season, along with two returning state qualifying singles players: seniors Karissa Brazdys and Amanda Schneeweis. DGN geared up for what it hopes will be another trip downstate by edging York, 50.5 points to 48.5, to take the team title at the West Suburban Silver championships April 26. Sectionals await Downers North later this week.The Trojans are one of 23 schools in their sectional quadrant. They learned

in a seeding meeting earlier this week at which sectional they’ll be competing, as well as how they’ll be seeded. But it’s safe to assume the Trojans will draw a high seed. Anthony Calderone, in his 19th season as head coach, guided DGN to consecutive state championships in 2003 and 2004. (The team also tied Hinsdale South for the 2006 state crown.) Barring any upsets at sectionals, Calderone likes his team’s chances of bettering its ninth-place finish at state last spring. “I think we’re optimistic,” he said. “No. 1, I hope we qualify (for state). If things go well in the sectional, I just hope they go and play well (at state).” That undefeated doubles tandem, seniors Emily Buhle and Emily Planek, captured the WSS title with a 21-7, 21-12 win over a team from Lyons Township.

Buhle and Planek played into the quarterfinals of the championship round at state in 2012, and also made it to the semifinals of the consolation round. “I thought it was a really great experience, because I’ve never done anything like that before,” said Planek, who also played tennis for the Trojans last fall. “There’s so many people down there (at the state tourney), and there’s so much cheering going on. You have to focus and get in your zone.” Calderone said Buhle and Planek are as good as any doubles team he’s had at DGN. “They’re definitely going to make some noise (at state),” Calderone said. “I don’t know where they’ll finish. They know doubles; they understand it.They make good adjustments on the See NEXT, page 13

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Downers North senior Karissa Brazdys, a state qualifier in singles last season, will be attempting to make a return trip to state during sectional play this weekend.


Sports PETTY Continued from page 11 hitting percentage, picking up 14 kills on 24 total attempts with no errors and out-blocking the Ramblers, 3.5 total team blocks

NEXT

13

to zero. Powell paced Lewis with six kills while Fitterer picked up five. The Ramblers came right back in the second and tied the match a one set each. In the third, it looked like Lewis took control. The Flyers swung at a .529 clip, posting 11 kills

and two errors in 17 attempts, while holding the Ramblers to a negative .130 (6 kills, 9 errors, 23 total attempts). Fitterer had four kills and Powell had three. In the fourth, the teams were tied at 17-17 when Loyola took control of the match. The Ramblers took advantage

of three late Flyer errors for the set victory and force a fifth set, which was all Loyola. The Ramblers jumped out to a 3-0 lead and never looked back, taking the win.  Fitterer led the Flyers with 16 kills, six digs and three block assists while Powell had 15 kills,

eight digs and two block assists. Boldog had 44 assists, nine digs and two block assists and freshman middle blocker Bobby Walsh had seven kills while collecting one solo block and four block assists.

competition last May.

•Benet defeated Providence 3-1 as Loretta Elder scored twice and Meaghan O’Hara had the other. Edler also had an assist. The Redwings defeated LincolnWay Central 4-2 as Elder, Michelle Morefield, O’Hara and Ellie Bumpus scored goals, with O’Hara, Jacquie Kaufman and Amanda Smairat picking up assists. Benet got a second half goal from Michelle Morefield to take down Palatime 1-0 in

the Naperville Tournament.

McInerney had a pair of hits and a pair of RBI. •Downers South took down Lyons 5-1. Brian Glowicki got the win, allowing six hits and one earned run, striking out three. Zac Taylor, Danny Mayer (RBI), Matt Zinnecker (RBI) and Alek Galik (double) all had two hits. John Dreveny had four RBI in the Mustangs’ 15-0 win over Proviso East.

SOCCER

Continued from page 12 court, and they’re athletic.” “I definitely think we have a good chance (at state),” Buhle added. “We’ve definitely worked hard. I think we’re playing really well.” Schneeweis went 3-2 and Brazdys was 2-2 in state singles

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

Downers South edged Hinsdale South 2-1 as Kelly Stapleton and Autumn Rasmussen scored first half goals, with an assist to Ava Porlier. The Mustangs also suffered a pair of 1-0 defeats to Wheaton North and Fremd at the Naperville Invitational Tournament.

Invitational

BASEBALL Two sixth inning runs propelled Benet past Nazareth 8-6. Chris Whelan, Pat McInerney, Joe Giuffre and Jason Blohm all had two hits each. McInerney’s RBI gave the Redwings a 3-1 win over Marist. Giuffre had three hits, while

Follow Mark @2Mark_My_Words mark@buglenewspapers.com

mike@buglenewspapers.com


14

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

Sports

IHSA needs to find a way to fix spring schedule With all of the spring rain and cold weather, M o t h e r Nature is making things difficult on coaches, a t h l e t i c directors and sports reporters due to all of the cancellations. Some of this can’t be helped, such as the rain. You can’t play softball or baseball in puddles, same can be said of track. However, you can run in the cold, which is why the cancellations of some track and soccer events across the area have been baffling. There used to be a day when you would suck it up and play soccer in 20 degree temps or have a baseball game at the freezing mark. I even remember playing Little League baseball with turtlenecks and long underwear on, wishing I had a parka on. After all, football players play in those elements.

But those days for the other sports are no more. Rather than continue on a rant about why you should play in the cold, I will instead make a pitch that has a better opportunity of making a difference (like any powerful people will listen to me). Anyway, something seriously needs to be done about the spring sports system. For the second year in the past three, we are getting drenched with bad weather and make-up games. As nice as last year was for everyone involved, this year has been just as bad. So, what can we do about it? Well, I have four different options. All have issues, but should be considered. First, you could start seasons later. Why can’t we push the outdoor sports back a couple of weeks? I know, this cuts into valuable summer vacation time, especially if you are a good baseball or softball team, but even state finals will still be in

June. That gives you the whole month of July to plan vacations around. The other outdoor sports could probably get away with starting just a week later and still be done around Memorial Day. While there will still be rainouts, the weather tends to get drier in May and it won’t be as cold in April as March. A second option is to turn baseball and softball into summer sports. The season could start around Memorial Day with future juniors and seniors making up the varsity squads. A two-month season would lead to playoffs the last week in July and early August. The state finals would be played the week the fall sports open tryouts/practice, so the only players missing anything are those in the state finals, which can happen in both fall and winter seasons already. I know, this would ruin summers for these players, but most of them have travel ball anyway, and if they have to get

away for a week early in the season, I don’t think it would be too costly. The benefit would be playing baseball in perfect baseball conditions. This option is already in place in some Midwestern states. A third option is to move baseball and softball to the fall. This is the one option I’m not as big of a fan of. For one thing, you would have to start the season earlier than the rest of the fall sports. Having the playoffs in October isn’t the best of ideas, I would rather have the playoffs in the nice spring weather. You are also going to lose some of the football players to baseball and baseball players to football. So, the only way I could see this working is if you start games right away in August and have the playoffs in late September. The final idea and my favorite one, is to make the seasons similar to how they are on the collegiate level. Sports such as tennis and golf split their seasons between the fall and spring and I would love for

the IHSA to do this in multiple sports. First off, there would be too many sports having championships in the spring, so boys volleyball and badminton would get moved to the fall. Girls soccer is played in the fall collegiately, but I don’t see that happening here unless all schools have separate soccer fields or turf fields. Having two soccer teams playing in addition to a football team is a lot of wear on that grass and if there is a lot of rain, fields can turn into mush by the end of the season. However, I believe in an ideal situation, moving girls soccer to the fall would be good. Boys and girls cross country and track and field can stay in their respective seasons, as can rugby and lacrosse. That leaves boys and girls tennis and golf, softball and baseball as the major outdoor sports left. You can start the season in August and play through See SCHEDULE, page 15


sPorts

BASEBALL Average Cody Grosse, Joliet West Matt Ryan, Plainfield Central Ryan Schlicher, Westmont Derek Bangert, Lockport Max Brozovich, Minooka Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Sam Ferri, Notre Dame Charlie Donovan, Westmont Zack Thomas, Joliet West Alex Voitik, JCA Chayancze Stirbis, Plainfield East Nick Sramek, Bolingbrook Phil Papaioannou, Maine East Jack Arkus, Niles West Nick Dalesandro, JCA Mario Samuel, Bolingbrook Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Tommy Toledo, Niles West Jeff Duschene, Lockport Kyle Colletta, Niles West Larry Holman, Joliet West Thomas Smith, Lockport Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Troy Carlson, Joliet Central Anthony DiNardo, Joliet West Hits Max Brozovich, Minooka Neal Tyrell, Minooka Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Derek Bangert, Lockport Zack Thomas, Joliet West Cody Grosse, Joliet West Ryan Schlicher, Westmont Joe Carnagio, Minooka Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Matt Ryan, Plainfield Central Nick Dalesandro, JCA Sam Ferri, Notre Dame Joe Kukla, Notre Dame Charlie Donovan, Westmont Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Anthony DiNardo, Joliet West Thomas Smith, Lockport Zach Moran, Westmont Alex Voitik, JCA Larry Holman, Joliet West Chayancze Stirbis, Plainfield East Chris Costa, Minooka Jovany Urbieta, Plainfield East Drake DeBenedetti, Joliet Central Jeff Duschene, Lockport Rylan Bannon, JCA Danny Hyde, Notre Dame Nick Sramek, Bolingbrook Jason Kenealy, Plainfield Central Tommy Simon, Notre Dame Runs Ryan Schlicher, Westmont Joe Carnagio, Minooka Charlie Donovan, Westmont Neal Tyrell, Minooka Max Brozovich, Minooka Larry Holman, Joliet West

.459 .457 .444 .439 .426 .423 .421 .417 .415 .412 .400 .390 .385 .375 .372 .370 .365 .364 .364 .353 .350 .350 .349 .349 .344 .341 20 19 19 18 17 17 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 15 15 15 15 14 14 14 14 13 13 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 21 16 15 15 15 14

SCHEDULE Continued from page 14 September. In sports such as tennis and golf, you could have your conference regular season then. In baseball and softball, you can play the first half of your conference season after some nonconference games.

Avery Lochow, Lockport Zack Thomas, Joliet West Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Brennan Polcyn, Minooka Joe Kukla, Notre Dame Mark Fox, Minooka Sam Montalbano, Westmont Dan Sullivan, Lockport Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Cody Grosse, Joliet West Ted Snidenko, Lockport Rylan Bannon, JCA Chris Tschida, JCA RBI Derek Bangert, Lockport Max Brozovich, Minooka Charlie Donovan, Westmont Anthony DiNardo, Joliet West Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Doug Matthews, Lockport Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West John Kelly, Westmont Chris Costa, Minooka Zach Moran, Westmont Tommy Toledo, Niles West Zack Thomas, Joliet West Ted Snidenko, Lockport Jon Trotto, JCA Chris Tschida, JCA Nick Sramek, Bolingbrook Joe Carnagio, Minooka Sam Ferri, Notre Dame Joe Kukla, Notre Dame Brennan Polcyn, Minooka Sam Montalbano, Westmont Jason Kenealy, Plainfield Central Seth Rosenberg, Niles West Doubles Max Brozovich, Minooka Chayancze Stirbis, Plainfield East Zack Thomas, Joliet West Joe Kukla, Notre Dame Tommy Simon, Notre Dame Jovany Urbieta, Plainfield East Nick Sramek, Bolingbrook Brad Elmore, Bolingbrook Michael Ferri, Notre Dame Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Mark Fox, Minooka Tommy Toledo, Niles West Alex Voitik, JCA Brock Pulth, JCA Scott Flotz, Bolingbrook Jacob Huff, Bolingbrook Ryan Schlicher, Westmont Zach Moran, Westmont Sam Ferri, Notre Dame HR Derek Bangert, Lockport Doug Matthews, Lockport Ted Snidenko, Lockport Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Joe Carnagio, Minooka Max Brozovich, Minooka ERA Patrick Dillon, Notre Dame Cody Pazik, Niles West

14 13 13 13 13 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 21 18 17 16 14 14 13 12 11 10 10 10 10 10 10 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 7 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 3 3 2 2 2 2 0.31 0.41

Then in the spring, all sports will begin with a few nonconference games/meets in mid to late April to get ready for the rest of the year. Then in tennis and golf you have your conference tournaments and state series. In baseball and softball, you have your second half of conference season and then playoffs the same time they currently are.

Eric Duzan, Lockport Kyle Colletta, Niles West Josh Mitchell, Minooka Nick Yusko, Plainfield Central Evan Martens, Lockport Nick Dalesandro, JCA Sam Couch, JCA Jake Herron, Joliet West Jordan Hartanovich, Plainfield East Ryan Nikolich, Notre Dame Tomas Aguilar, Plainfield Central Quinn Ahern, Joliet West Mario Samuel, Bolingbrook Strikeouts Jake Herron, Joliet West Josh Mitchell, Minooka Mitch Vogrin, Minooka Cody Pazik, Niles West Quinn Ahern, Joliet West Patrick Dillon, Notre Dame Sam Couch, JCA Nick Dalesandro, JCA Adnan Sator, Notre Dame Steve Waldrop, Bolingbrook Lukas Parker, Maine East Zack Thomas, Joliet West Cal Placher, JCA Nick Rana, Plainfield Central Ryan Nikolich, Notre Dame Kyle Colletta, Niles West Nick Yusko, Plainfield Central Jordan Hartanovich, Plainfield East Brad Elmore, Bolingbrook Wins Jake Herron, Joliet West Cody Pazik, Niles West Aleks Stobbe, Joliet West Josh Mitchell, Minooka Cal Placher, JCA Quinn Ahern, Joliet West Jordan Hartanovich, Plainfield East Patrick Dillon, Notre Dame Nick Dalesandro, JCA Adnan Sator, Notre Dame Mitch Vogrin, Minooka Steve Szymanski, Minooka Dom Matrisciano, Minooka

SOFTBALL

Average Stephanie Abello, Benet Ashley Beck, Romeoville Maeve McGuire, Benet Marissa Panko, Benet Julianne Rurka, Benet Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central Adri Cura, Plainfield South Carolyn Nojiri, Downers North Briana Floyd, Romeoville Erica Kramer, Plainfield North Ali Michalik, Benet Kristine Bourg, Joliet West Courtney Richardson, Maine South Nina Maggio, Plainfield East Annie Molek, Plainfield East Emily York, Benet Olivia Valdez, Romeoville

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

0.43 0.51 1.18 1.20 1.43 1.58 1.65 1.62 1.84 1.87 1.91 2.13 2.15 40 40 25 24 24 24 21 20 18 17 16 15 15 14 14 13 12 12 11 4-1 3-0 3-0 3-1 3-3 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2

.750 .714 .700 .690 .586 .529 .515 .511 .500 .484 .481 .472 .458 .448 .448 .440 .438

Now you are playing your full season in the best weather. For golf and girls tennis, you don’t have to play your playoffs in poor conditions. For every year the girls tennis state has a full backdraw tournament played outside, there seems to be two years where there is no backdraw with several games indoors. This rarely happens to the boys. Golfers don’t need to

Kristina Shahan, Plainfield Central Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South Joy Treasure, Joliet West Cece Floyd, Romeoville Angie Vargas, Plainfield South Hits Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central Kristine Bourg, Joliet West Carolyn Nojiri, Downers North Joy Treasure, Joliet West Rosa Gonzalez, Joliet Central Marissa Panko, Benet Jennifer Ames, Joliet West Stephanie Abello, Benet Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central Karina Vargas, Joliet West Julie Liceaga, Joliet West Julianne Rurka, Benet Adri Cura, Plainfield South Briana Floyd, Romeoville Katie McKay, Joliet West Kristina Shahan, Plainfield Central Lorelei Tokarczyk, Joliet West Michaela Schlattmann, Plainfield C. Erica Kramer, Plainfield North Alysia Rodriguez, Joliet West Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South Taelor Martin, Joliet Central Jaelyn Tate, Joliet Central Autumn Lawson, Joliet Central Maeve McGuire, Benet Tara Cannella, Plainfield Central Ali Michalik, Benet Alison Mangino, Plainfield Central Nina Maggio, Plainfield East Annie Molek, Plainfield East Runs Kristine Bourg, Joliet West Jennifer Ames, Joliet West Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central Paloma Singletary, Joliet Central Joy Treasure, Joliet West Maeve McGuire, Benet Jaelyn Tate, Joliet Central Karina Vargas, Joliet West Julianne Rurka, Benet Marissa Panko, Benet Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South Adri Cura, Plainfield South Alysia Rodriguez, Joliet West Ali Michalik, Benet Julie Liceaga, Joliet West Gretchen Egly, Plainfield Central RBI Stephanie Abello, Benet Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central Jennifer Ames, Joliet West Julianne Rurka, Benet Alysia Rodriguez, Joliet West Julia Liceaga, Joliet West Katie McKay, Joliet West Adri Cura, Plainfield South Joy Treasure, Joliet West Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South Briana Floyd, Romeoville Maeve McGuire, Benet Taelor Martin, Joliet Central

.421 .417 .411 .407 .400

15

25 22 20 19 17 17 16 16 15 14 14 14 13 13 12 12 11

Marissa Panko, Benet 11 Erica Kramer, Plainfield North 11 Doubles Lorelei Tokarczyk, Joliet West 7 Jaelyn Tate, Joliet Central 7 Alora O’Malley-Molk, Plainfield East 6 Julia Liceaga, Joliet West 6 Kristine Bourg, Joliet West 6 Alysia Rodriguez, Joliet West 5 Joy Treasure, Joliet West 5 Julianne Rurka, Benet 5 Adri Cura, Plainfield South 5 Stephanie Abello, Benet 4 Maeve McGuire, Benet 4 Emily York, Benet 4 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 4 Kristina Shahan, Plainfield Central 4 Tara Cannella, Plainfield Central 4 Nina Maggio, Plainfield East 4 Annie Molek, Plainfield East 4 Erica Kramer, Plainfield North 4 Amy Cecil, Plainfield North 4 Shannon Vaughan, Plainfield North 4 Katie McKay, Joliet West 4 Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central 4 HR Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 7 Stephanie Abello, Benet 6 Jennifer Ames, Joliet West 6 Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South 6 Adri Cura, Plainfield South 4 Megan Stoppelman, Benet 4 ERA Elaine Heflin, Downers North 0.73 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 0.95 Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South 1.83 Strikeouts Elaine Heflin, Downers North 125 Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South 65 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 57 Jenna Christie, Maine South 47 Sydney Schmittel, Plainfield North 42 Hannah Gawenda, Joliet Central 40 Katie McKay, Joliet West 36 Annie Molek, Plainfield East 32 Wins Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 9-1 Elaine Heflin, Downers North 8-2 Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South 8-3 Katie McKay, Joliet West 6-6 Sydney Schmittel, Plainfield North 5-3 Hannah Gawenda, Joliet Central 5-4 Emily York, Benet 4-1 Jenna Christie, Maine South 3-1

26 23 21 20 18 16 15 15 13 13 13 12 12 12

Goals Ashley Handwork, Plainfield North Lacey Clarida, Lockport Vicki Tirovolas, Niles West Heather Handwork, Plainfield North Shayna Dheel, Plainfield North Assists Ashley Handwork, Plainfield North Heather Handwork, Plainfield North Kaela Leskovar, Plainfield North Sam Elster, Plainfield North

27 25 23 23 21 20 19 18 18 18 18 17 17 17 16 16 16 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 14 14 13 13 13 13

deal with 40 degree fall days at state or trying to qualify for state. I understand a drawback of this is there will be multisport athletes who may not get to compete in as many sports. However, there are fewer multisport athletes out there, so you are catering to a smaller segment. Also, you can still play a fall

SOCCER

13 11 7 5 5 7 4 4 4

and a spring sport. If you are a star football player such as Plainfield North’s Kurt Palandech or Westmont’s Jean Pietrzak, you can play football in the fall and still play baseball in the spring to help your team out when it matters most. This is a win-win situation on both fronts. Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@enterprisepublications.com


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buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

Kahne’s Hendrick resume gets better Call it motivation from within. And Rick Hendrick likely wouldn’t have it any other way. Jimmie Johnson’s road to a sixth NASCAR Sprint Cup Series championship well might converge with those of one or more Hendrick Motorsports teammates. Dale Earnhardt Jr., in fifth place, headed the standings earlier this year. Now the pressure comes

from Kasey Kahne, who ended the 2012 season with a flourish and has yet to lift his foot from the accelerator of the No. 5 Chevrolet. Kahne’s third top-two finish of the season last Sunday at Kansas Speedway boosted the Washington native to the No. 2 spot in rankings entering Saturday night’s Toyota Owners 400 at Richmond International Raceway. Kahne trails Johnson by

37 points. A year ago – his first with the Hendrick organization – Kahne had just begun his climb from the purgatory of four finishes of 29th or worse in the season’s opening six races. A fifth-place finish at Richmond was part of a 10-race run of top 10s that included a Coca-Cola 600 victory in Charlotte. Kahne made the Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup™ and

finished fourth in points. His current second place matches a career best, and he’s never been this high in the points this late in the season. “I feel like we have a great team and we’re in a really good spot right now,” said Kahne after running second to Kansas winner Matt Kenseth. Statistically speaking,Kahne has been hot and cold at Richmond. He scored his first Sprint Cup

victory at the 0.75-mile track in spring 2005 leading 242 of the 400 laps. Kahne’s Driver Rating of 87.8, however, ranks 12th among current competitors and his average finish is 18.0. Judging a driver’s present with his past can be deceiving. Kahne’s Richmond statistics are a mix of 18 races with Hendrick, Red Bull Racing,Richard Petty Motorsports and Evernham Motorsports.

WEEKLY RACING UPDATE STANDINGS

FAMILY BUSINESS

Warshaw/NASCAR via Getty Images

Kasey Kahne is the driver of the No. 5 Chevrolet for Hendrick Motorsports.

With the Earnhardt name comes lofty expectations from the fans, media and … family. Jeffrey Earnhardt, the son of Kerry Earnhardt and grandson of the late Dale Earnhardt, finished 17th in the the No. 5 JR Motorsports Chevrolet in Friday’s NASCAR Nationwide Series race at Richmond. He drove for 10-time NMPA Most Popular driver Dale Earnhardt Jr., who just happens to be his uncle. The opportunity could be Jeffrey’s last chance to prove that he has the chops to succeed in one of NASCAR’s national series. He’ll be in top-notch equipment as JR Motorsports receives engines and support from Hendrick Motorsports. So, there will be very little room for excuses. In five races this season, the youngest member in the Earnhardt NASCAR lineage has an average finishing position of 24.4, with his best finish (20th) coming at Phoenix. In 15 career starts in the NNS, his best finish was a 19th in the July 2011 event at Daytona International Speedway. In 10 career races in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series, Jeffrey’s best finish is a seventh in the 2011 season opener at Daytona.

2012 Sprint Cup Series 1) Jimmie Johnson 343 2) Carl Edwards -43 3) Kasey Kahne -46 4)Dale Earnhardt, Jr. -46 5) Clint Bowyer -53 6) Brad Keselowski -59 7) Kyle Busch -65 8) Greg Biffle -71 9) Kevin Harvick -72 10) Paul Menard -72 11) Aric Almirola -85 12) Jamie McMurray -98

2013 Nationwide Series 1) Sam Hornish, Jr. . 2) Regan Smith 3) Austin Dillon 4) Justin Allgaier 3) Brian Scott

2013 Toyota Owners 400 finishers 1) Kevin Harvick 2) Clint Bowyer 3) Joey Logano 4) Juan Montoya 5) Jeff Burton 6) Carl Edwards 7) Matt Kenseth 8) Aric Almirola 9) Kurt Busch 10) Dale Earnhardt Jr. 11) Jeff Gordon 12) Jimmie Johnson 13) Paul Menard 14) AJ Allmendinger 15) Ryan Newman 16) Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 17) Martin Truex Jr. 18) Tony Stewart 19) Bobby Labonte 20) David Ragan


traVel

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

17

Going Dutch

ON A DAY TRIP FROM AMSTERDAM

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Less than an hour away from Amsterdam, the fishing village of Marken is a time-warp trip into old Holland.

W

hen researching my guidebooks, almost by definition I have to revisit the same places. But I also like to take a few day trips here and there to scout out new destinations - both for future editions and for future TV shows. On my last visit to Europe, I explored many places, including the lush lowlands of Holland. In a country as tiny as the Netherlands, daytripping is easy to do. Within a half-hour of leaving Amsterdam’s main train station, you can be deep in the Dutch countryside - awash with tulips, red-brick houses, quaint waterways, and black-andwhite cows. I found canals with reflections that would inspire Monet to set up his easel. While there are lots of day-trip options - such as Haarlem, Delft, the Hague, or Arnhem - I spent my day visiting Edam, Marken, and Volendam - three picturesque villages in a region northeast of Amsterdam aptly called the

Waterland. Edam - known for its famous cheese covered in red or yellow wax - is full of history, charm, great hotels, and ambience. I loved it. This adorable village is sweet but not saccharine, and is just 30 minutes by bus from Amsterdam. If you go, try to visit during Edam’s Wednesday morning market; it’s held yearround, but is best in July and August, when farmers bring their cheese by boat and horse to the center of town.You can watch as the cheese is weighed and traded by Edamers in traditional garb. Although Edam is known today for cheese, it was once an industrious shipyard and port. That’s why, in the 17th century, the town’s specialty became one of the most popular cheeses in the world. Sailors took wheels of Edam on their voyages - the cheese doesn’t spoil easily and could be traded for spices and other riches of the East.

The ships are long gone; today, Edam’s main trade is tourism.The best thing to do is to just wander its storybook lanes and canals. Consider taking a short walking tour; ask for a free tour booklet available at the tourist-info office on the main square. While the town itself is the real attraction, I also checked out the Edam Museum - a 400-yearold historical residence that provides a fun peek at what old canal houses once looked like (www.edamsmuseum.nl).This house is particularly interesting for its floating cellar, designed to accommodate changes in water level without destabilizing the structure. After a cheesy morning in Edam, I traveled to one of the Netherlands’ most traditional fishing communities - Marken. This time-passed hamlet in a bottle - once virtually abandoned - has been kept alive as a tourist attraction. It’s quiet, perfectly quaint, and well-preserved, but not annoyingly crowded. This island town once had a harbor for whaling and herring

fishing, but when the Zuiderzee began to silt up in the late 17th century, it became more and more difficult to eke out a living here. Centuries later, when the Zuiderzee was diked off, Marken became a virtual ghost town. But in 1957, engineers built a long causeway from the mainland to the island hamlet, which allowed easy access for visitors to marvel at its cuteness. Walking around Marken, I was impressed with the town’s unique architecture, adapted to survive the challenging local conditions. Because the tides could be so temperamental, houses here tend to cluster on little hills called werven, or are built on pilings to keep them high and dry.Traditional Marken homes, while dull and blacktarred outside, are painted a cheerful yellow and blue inside. In the extremely charming neighborhood of Kerkbuurt, I found the modest Marker Museum, which celebrates the 16th-century costumes (still worn for special events) and traditional lifestyles of the people of Marken

(www.markermuseum.nl). For sustenance, I nibbled on some kibbeling (local fish-and-chips) at an idyllic eatery on the harbor. Some visitors take a 40-minute walk out to the town’s lighthouse, picturesquely situated at the far end of the island, at the tip of a sandy spit. The third town I visited Volendam - was grotesquely touristic ... mix Killarney and Coney Island and then drizzle with herring juice.The town’s promenade is lined with souvenir shops, indoor/outdoor eateries, and Dutch cliches. For a megadose of kitsch, visit the Volendam Museum’s Cigarband House, where a local artist has glued 11 million cigarbands to big boards to create giant images - from Dutch windmills to a sour-looking Statue of Liberty. Amsterdam can be thrilling, but any native will tell you:To really experience everyday life in the Netherlands, get out of town. In postcard-perfect Dutch villages like Edam, you can mellow out like a hunk of aging cheese.


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THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

Business & Real Estate

Speak up if you want gratitude Q. No one seems to be noticing all the good work I have done. I am very good at my job, tackle the hard projects, and even help out when my coworkers are swamped. Do I just work for an unusually ungrateful organization? A. No, unless you make coworkers aware of what you do and require a certain level of appreciation, you almost certainly will not get it. Gratitude is a hallmark of high mental health. People who are emotionally well are spontaneously and keenly aware of gratitude pretty much 24 hours a day. They appreciate the extra work you do, the competency with which you do it, and even the fact you just made coffee. On the other end of the mental

health spectrum are people who wouldn’t appreciate it if you just saved their life and their job. In fact, these people might even get mad at you for not doing more. If you want an instant barometer of how emotionally well your coworkers are, simply pay attention to their capacity for appreciation.You’ll have a better assessment of their general mental health than most sophisticated psychological instruments. If you believe that just doing good work will result in workplace appreciation, you’ll be sorely disappointed. If gratitude is important to you, you will have to make what you are doing obvious to all. For instance, if you are giving your customers a break on fees, tell them and tell them more

than once. If you are staying late and missing your child’s soccer game, tell your coworker. If you had to rearrange your family’s vacation schedule, make sure your boss is crystal clear about the inconvenience. Going the extra mile once in awhile (and making sure people realize this is a blue-moon event) will get you gratitude. Being silent and long-suffering will just get you resentment. People simply are too busy at your workplace to slow down long enough to consider that you are doing them a favor. Most folks easily will take what you do for granted unless you are articulate and force them to be aware that you going out of your way for them. Most of us really don’t like feeling dependent, and when you help others at work, you bring up their dependency. You may be shocked to find others

may even have amnesia about all the times you helped them, but this is pretty normal. Being aware of being helped makes people feel weak. Of course, your problem isn’t helping other people avoid their issues with vulnerability. Your problem is getting a well deserved “thank you.” The only way you’ll consistently receive appreciation is to make people around you conscious of exactly what you have done for them. You can always be gracious about the favors you do. Letting your coworker, boss or customer know you think highly of them, and thus you are doing a favor, is effective. They will get to feel special and you will get to feel appreciation!

The last word(s) Q. People in my workplace seem increasingly irritable. Is it

something I’m doing? A. Probably not. The most effective theory for other people’s behavior is that it is never about you. You’ll see a lot more about your workplace if you don’t take everything personally.

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2013 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Moving forward after a divorce Dear Dave, My divorce will be final in a month, and I’ll have $100,000 when everything is over. I will also have $8,000 in credit card debt, and I’m currently unemployed. Do you have any suggestions to help me move forward? Meryl Dear Meryl, The first thing I want you to do is raise your right hand and promise never to use credit cards again. Then, if you still have any of those awful things, I want you to cut them

up and close out the accounts. The next step is for you to find some kind of income, whether it’s a regular job or just something part-time to get money rolling in on a regular basis. Your credit card debt is a small part of your financial picture right now. I think I’d go ahead and pay off the cards. That way, you’ll be debt-free and still have $92,000 in the bank. But here’s the key. You have to live like that money doesn’t exist. Use just enough to get yourself settled, and go make some money so you can eat and

keep the lights on. A year from now, when you’re past some of this stuff emotionally and looking toward a new future, that money will still be sitting there. As long as you have this mentality, you’ll come through this mess stronger and in good financial shape. God bless you, Meryl! —Dave

Should she have skin in the game? Dear Dave, My daughter has the opportunity to take a trip with her eighth-grade class. The cost is $650. Do you think she

should have to contribute to the cost of the trip, or should I cover it all? Colleen Dear Colleen, This is a really good question. When it came to making these kinds of decisions at our house, we’d take a look at whether the kid was behaving, getting good grades and stuff like that. It can be a challenge at that age, I know. But if they were living like responsible young people, we would pay for this sort of thing as a reward. Still, at that age a kid should definitely have some skin in game. If you can pay for this without breaking the

bank, and she’s fulfilling her responsibilities as a good kid, it would be a good idea to make her come up with her own spending money for the trip. You don’t want her to grow a sense of entitlement, and doing this would force her to work and save a little bit to make this thing happen! —Dave * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.


Business Profile

International company extends Woodridge lease Earlier this year, GKN Walterscheid indicated that they will be extending their lease at 2715 Davey Road, Woodridge, for an additional 10 years. In addition to extending the lease, the company started consolidated their existing corporate center from their Lisle office into the Woodridge facility this month. “We’re very excited about the GKN’s expansion and strengthening of our industrial base in the village,” Mayor William Murphy said. “When internationally recognized businesses such as GKN grow and prosper, so too does the village of Woodridge.” GKN currently operates four divisions: GKN Driveline (automotive), GKN Powder Metallurgy, GKN Aerospace, and GKN Land Systems. The Land Systems - Walterscheid business in Woodridge designs, manufactures and supplies driveline products and services for the agricultural, military and marine industries. The consolidation from Lisle will bring an additional 17 employees that provide tax, legal, and

Published 4/24, 5/1, 5/8

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environmental services to all GKN companies in North America. GKN Land Systems currently occupies the 140,000 square foot building at 2715 Davey Road in the Woodhill Crossings Business Park and employs 190 employees, including 40 temporary employees. “We are really happy with our location here in Woodridge,” said Scott Caskey, leader of the build out project for GKN. “We have excellent employees, great transport links and the village was very helpful in accelerating the building permit process. We look forward to continuing to work closely with the Village as our business continues to grow.” The village of Woodridge assisted GKN’s expansion by sending it through a streamlined development review process, which is available in the village. Murphy said this is a great example of the positive and long-established working relationship between the village and the local business community.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY- WHEATON, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, vs. Antanas Sereiva; Ligija Sereiviene; JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.; Prentiss Creek Homes Association; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendants. 11CH2467 Property Address: 2231 Midhurst Road, Downers Grove, Illinois 60516 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the aboveentitled cause on September 13, 2012, I, Sheriff, John E Zaruba of Dupage County, Illinois, will hold a sale on June 4, 2013 , commencing at 10:00 am, at Dupage County Sheriff’s Office, 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL 60187. to sell to the highest bidder or bidders the following described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit: Commonly known as: 2231 Midhurst Road, Downers Grove, Illinois 60516 P.I.N.: 08-24-208-004 First Lien Position; Single-Family Residence; Judgment Amount $275,681.04 IN ACCORDANCE WITH 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) AND (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), AND 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE PURCHASER OF THE PROPERTY, OTHER THAN A MORTGAGEE, SHALL PAY THE ASSESSMENTS AND LEGAL FEES REQUIRED BY SUBSECTIONS (g)(1) AND (g)(4) OF SECTION 9 AND THE ASSESSMENTS REQUIRED BY SUBSECTION (g-1) OF SECTION 18.5 OF THE ILLINOIS CONDOMINIUM PROPERTY ACT. The property will not be open for inspection. Terms of Sale: CASH - 10% down at the time of sale and the balance due within 24 hours of the sale. All payments fo the amount bid shall be in certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Dupage County. The person to contact for information regarding this property is: Anthony Porto at FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, IL (866)402-8661. For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60563 630-453-6960 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (fax) I527463

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB PLAINTIFF VS DON ROSENBERGER A/K/A DON A. ROSENBERGER; WENDY ROSENBERGER A/K/A WENDY L ROSENBERGER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AEGIS FUNDING CORPORATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; DEFENDANTS 12 CH 002905 3038 EVERGLADE AVENUE WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on February 28, 2013, DUPAGE COUNTY SHERIFF in DU PAGE County, Illinois, will on June 4, 2013, in 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, at 10:00 AM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DU PAGE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 08-26-413-003 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3038 EVERGLADE AVENUE WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 Description of Improvements: RED BRICK SINGLE FAMILY RANCH WITH A TWO CAR DETACHED GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $233,164.32. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service. atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1211655 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I524998 Published 4/24, 5/1, 5/8


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THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013


THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

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22

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB PLAINTIFF VS DON ROSENBERGER A/K/A DON A. ROSENBERGER; WENDY ROSENBERGER A/K/A WENDY L ROSENBERGER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AEGIS FUNDING CORPORATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; DEFENDANTS 12 CH 002905 3038 EVERGLADE AVENUE WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on February 28, 2013, DUPAGE COUNTY SHERIFF in DU PAGE County, Illinois, will on June 4, 2013, in 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, at 10:00 AM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DU PAGE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: LOT 173 IN WOODRIDGE, UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED DECEMBER 17, 1958 AS DOCUMENT 906508, IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. TAX NO. 08-26-413-003 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3038 EVERGLADE AVENUE WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 Description of Improvements: RED BRICK SINGLE FAMILY RANCH WITH A TWO CAR DETACHED GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $233,164.32. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.attypierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1211655 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY- WHEATON, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, vs. Antanas Sereiva; Ligija Sereiviene; JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.; Prentiss Creek Homes Association; Unknown Owners and NonRecord Claimants Defendants.

I524998

11CH2467 Property Address: 2231 Midhurst Road, Downers Grove, Illinois 60516 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the above-entitled cause on September 13, 2012, I, Sheriff, John E Zaruba of Dupage County, Illinois, will hold a sale on June 4, 2013 , commencing at 10:00 am, at Dupage County Sheriff’s Office, 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL 60187. to sell to the highest bidder or bidders the following described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, towit: LOT 16 IN PRENTISS CREEK UNIT NO. II, A SUBDIVISION SITUATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 2231 Midhurst Road, Downers Grove, Illinois 60516 P.I.N.: 08-24-208-004 First Lien Position; Single-Family Residence; Judgment Amount $275,681.04 IN ACCORDANCE WITH 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) AND (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), AND 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE PURCHASER OF THE PROPERTY, OTHER THAN A MORTGAGEE, SHALL PAY THE ASSESSMENTS AND LEGAL FEES REQUIRED BY SUBSECTIONS (g)(1) AND (g)(4) OF SECTION 9 AND THE ASSESSMENTS REQUIRED BY SUBSECTION (g-1) OF SECTION 18.5 OF THE ILLINOIS CONDOMINIUM PROPERTY ACT. The property will not be open for inspection. Terms of Sale: CASH - 10% down at the time of sale and the balance due within 24 hours of the sale. All payments fo the amount bid shall be in certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Dupage County. The person to contact for information regarding this property is: Anthony Porto at FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, IL (866)402-8661. For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois. com 24 hours prior to sale. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60563 630-453-6960 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (fax)

Published 4/24, 5/1, 5/8

I527463 Published 4/24, 5/1, 5/8


Variety

THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013

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Lawrence K. Ho/Los Angeles Times

From left, Zosia Mamet, Lena Dunham, and Allison Williams backstage at the 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards show at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, January 13, in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Tuning in: Media faces demographic divide By Brian Lowry Variety

If you’re reading this in print, you’re holding a new Variety, something that represents a variation on more than a century of tradition. Of course, the odds are also pretty good you’re reading this on a computer, tablet or phone, which helps explain why so many pubs have grappled with similar remodeling and reinvention - and offers a demonstration of the inherent, sometimes-delicate conflict between preserving the past and adapting to meet the digital present and future. It’s easy to forget the entertainment industry really hasn’t been around all that long in its present form. Feature-length movies are less than 100 years old, and talkies even younger.When the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences honored Philo T. Farnsworth, the guy who invented the first electronic television, at its recent Hall of Fame induction ceremony, his son was actually on hand to accept on dad’s behalf. Nevertheless, despite its relative youth, there’s also a tremendous amount of

tradition surrounding the media business. And the bond that people feel to what’s gone before is fostering tension regarding how much can be maintained at the expense of evolution - holding on to models and ideals whose value becomes more uncertain when faced with a volatile and unpredictable future. In a way, print journalism and the wrenching changes the business has undergone as newspaper pages evaporate into digital bits represent an extreme demonstration of the challenge posed to the visual media as they grapple with this calculus. The push and pull is creating a kind schizophrenia, and risks inducing whiplash. Yes, the Oscars still do a somber necrology segment recognizing those who passed away during the previous year, but honorary awards have been banished to a separate event, ostensibly to streamline a telecast that carved out time for host Seth MacFarlane chosen thanks to his popularity in younger demographic precincts - to sing about boobs. Talk to the industry’s old guard, and

a common lament is that the millennial generation doesn’t appreciate or respect the past. Producers of a certain age grumble about being met with blank stares from young programming execs when they reference projects predating the Clinton administration. Yet from the perspective of those who graduated college this century, why bother boning up on history - especially in a media world that’s changed so dramatically in just the past 10 or 15 years. In that context, invoking All in the Family or The Honeymooners has about as much relevance as vaudeville. The political world is well aware of this generational rift. Media, however, often fritters at the edges of this debate: Something like Girls, for example, lights up the Twitterverse with outrage from those eligible to join AARP, while eliciting a collective shrug from series creator Lena Dunham’s contemporaries. Even an upcoming TV Land reality series that seeks to tackle the generation gap - Forever Young, about twentysomethings thrown together with senior citizens - mostly obscures such

concerns amid a jokey tone. Standard-bearers of the media’s grizzled elite have sought to reassure us - or perhaps console themselves - by contending that despite a shift in packaging, the underlying fundamentals still apply. CBS News’ Bob Schieffer said as much during his Hall of Fame induction, while the New York Times’ Maureen Dowd writing about Time Warner spinning off its magazine unit - suggested, “It will be good if this moment provokes a reckoning about what really needs to be preserved in the culture, about what is valuable.” Digital platforms, she added, are “shiny sacks with bells and whistles, but without content, they’re empty sacks.” By contrast, the Los Angeles Times’ coverage of Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes’ decision noted that despite Time magazine’s storied history, “Sentimentality wasn’t enough for Bewkes to keep Time Inc.” In professional terms that means preserving the past is an admirable goal, provided that reverence to the necrology segment doesn’t extend to causing you to wind up in it.


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THE BUGLE MAY 1, 2013


Downers Grove 5-1-13