Issuu on Google+

INSIDE

SPECIAL SECTION

SPORTS Raiders fall in sectional semifinal

bolingbrookbugle.com

PAGE 11

Check out our Out and About guide and get the most out of your summer!

Your Community, Your News

JUNE 12, 2014

Vol. 7 No. 48

will coUnty

County moves forward with judicial complex PHOTOS BY JOHN PATSCH | FOR THE BUGLE

Visitors look at the War Birds at The Cavalcade of Planes at Clow Airport in Bolingbrook.

County will movie Sheriff’s department into First Midwest Building By NiCk ReiHeR managing editor

nreiher@buglenewspapers.com @Jolietilnews At the June 3 County Board Capital Improvements Committee meeting, members voted unanimously to begin programmatic planning for a new judicial complex in downtown Joliet and several related capital projects. “I am pleased we are taking positive steps forward with these actions on our capital plans that have been developed over the past several years,” said Denise Winfrey, chairman of the Capital Improvements Committee.“We made some key decisions this week that will enable the county to begin work on the judicial complex and continue work on improving other county >> see judicial | page 8


2

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

News Valley View School District 365U

VVSD adding security measures in thanks to large state grant Brown indicated VVSD will use the grant money to enhance security at entrances, exits Va l l e y View School District 365U has received a nearly $440,000 Illinois E m e r ge n c y Management leroy brown Agency grant School Safety to further Coordinator enhance security in its 22-school system. “Our primary focus is, and always has been, keeping students and staff as safe as possible,” said VVSD School Safety Coordinator Leroy Brown. “We deeply appreciate being considered for this grant.” “In recent years, we’ve seen deadly shootings across the country at college campuses,high schools and even elementary schools. Unfortunately we know that these types of events can happen anywhere at any time,” said state Sen. Kirk Dillard, R-Hinsdale, who announced the awarding of more than $1 million in grants through the IEMA’s Illinois School and Campus Safety Grant Program. “These grant dollars will be used to improve baseline security measures, particularly at

more notes Among the projects that will get underway this summer are: •Installation of cameras at the main and secondary entrances of all schools as well as video monitoring equipment •Installation of audible alarms on secondary exit doors in all schools including main office panels that will alert staff that someone is trying to open the door •Standardization of the hallway lockdown alarm tone in every school. •Installation of blue lockdown indicator lights at the main and secondary entrances of all schools.

school entryways, so parents can breathe a little easier when they send their kids off to school.” Brown indicated VVSD will use the grant money to enhance security at entrances and exits in all VVSD schools. “We are also looking at the feasibility of installing reinforced glass in the main entrances of some of our buildings,” Brown said. Work on the projects is expected to begin sometime later this summer and continue throughout the next school year.


News local

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014 3

Bolingbrook police participate in Torch Run Approximately 3,000 officers, representing every branch of law enforcement, covered the 23 legs of the run Law enforcement personnel from Stateville Correctional Center, Illinois State Police, Bolingbrook, Romeoville, Lockport and Crest Hill braved cool drizzle June 10 to carry the torch for Special Olympics Illinois. They carried the “Flame of Hope” to help raise funds for those hometown sports heroes competing with Special Olympics Illinois. Bolingbrook Police handed off the torch around 9:30 a.m. at Route 53 and Joliet Road to Romeoville police, who then handed off to Illinois State Police at Route 53 and Airport Road. Approximately 3,000 officers, representing every branch of law enforcement, covered the 23 legs of the Illinois Law Enforcement Torch Run. The Torch Run is the single

largest year-round fundraising vehicle benefiting Special Olympics Illinois. The annual intrastate relay and its various fundraising projects have two goals: to raise money and to gain awareness for the athletes who participate in Special Olympics Illinois. Each year,officers in Illinois run more than 1,500 miles carrying the “Flame of Hope” through the streets of their hometowns and deliver it to the State Summer Games in Normal in June.

PHOTOS BY JOHN PATSCH | FOR THE BUGLE

(Far left, going clockwise) Personnel from Stateville Correctional Center, Illinois State Police and Crest Hill wait for the Special Olympics Torch to arrive from Romeoville. ; Runners from the Lockport Police Department and others relay the Special Olympics Torch south on State Street under the American Flag in an arch formed by the Lockport Township and Homer fire departments.; Special Olympians Jimmy Gottlich from Romeoville, Charles Schultz from Bolingbrook and Michael Ratcliff from Romeoville prepare to start their leg of the Special Olympics Torch Run June 10 in Romeoville.


4

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

News coVer Story

Clow Airport hosts Cavalcade of Planes Clow International Airport hosted the 15th annual Cavalcade of Planes June 7 and 8, offering visitors plane rides and the chance to see historic aircraft and displays. For more information, visit www.cavalcadeofplanes.com.

PHOTO BY JOHN PATSCH | FOR THE BUGLE

James Ryan explains Vietnam-era equipment to Cameran Driski, 11, and his brother, Teagan, 3. Ryan was a member of the 1st. Division at Cantigny. PHOTO BY JOHN PATSCH | FOR THE BUGLE

(TOP) Jeremiah Giron from Bolingbrook points out a plane to his 2-year-old son Brock at the Cavalcade of Planes at Clow Airport in Bolingbrook. (BOTTOM) Connor Merkel, 2 ½, of Naperville looks at the prop of a Steerman at the Cavalcade of Planes at Clow Airport in Bolingbrook.

The Bugle ran an incorrect photo caption with the photograph on page 8 of the June 5 issue. The caption should have been: “Bolingbrook Police Officers gather atop the roof of the Dunkin Donuts on Bolingbrook Drive to raise money for the Special Olympics.”The Bugle regrets this error.


Schools

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014 5

bolingbrook high School

New sound shell for BHS unveiled

Committee consisted of community members, parents, alumni, and VVSD staff and administrators

Bolingbrook High School celebrated “a new standard of excellence” for the community and students when the muchanticipated acoustic sound shell was unveiled in the BHS auditorium Wednesday night. “With your support, the ‘outlandish’ dream we had for our students has become a reality,” said BHS Music Boosters President Diane Parro, who lead the six-month drive to raise $120,000 to purchase and install the shell.“Our students are going places.These students deserve the best, and thanks to the generous donations by those of you in our audience, and the support of our school board, senior leadership and administration, we are able to give them the best.” “This sound shell represents the renewed commitment to our music and theatre programs and the very talented students who, over the years, have graced this auditorium with their performances,” said VVSD Superintendent James Mitchem. “I am sure this sound shell

will support many memorable performances for years to come.” A year ago, the large wooden structure which will significantly improve the sound experience in the auditorium for both the audience and the performers, was merely a dream in the minds of BHS Director of Bands Aimee Rupsis and her husband, Carl, who serves as auditorium manager. “When I found out the price, I thought that was a lot of money. I knew other schools have raised this kind of money before and I believed we could do it, too. I just thought it might take a while,” she said. “Well not OUR school and not OUR community. We did it in less than one year!” Parro and Rupsis headed up a committee consisting of community members, parents, alumni, and VVSD staff and administrators. “Thankfully, they believed this project could be accomplished,” said VVSD Board of Education President Steve Quigley. “It is a testament to the efforts of Diane Parro and Aimee Rupsis as well as the community.” “Everything we do as teachers should be about education for our students. This sound shell project is no different. Not

PHOTO COURTESY OF VALLEY VIEW SCHOOL DISTRICT

The Sunrise Singers and Wind Symphony perform for the first time under the new Bolingbrook High School acoustic sound shell Wednesday.

only will our students’ music education improve as a result, but they will also learn from this project because there were many, like me, who thought it was possible but would take a long time,” Rupsis said.“Students will take pride in this success and this auditorium for generations to come.” As part of the unveiling, the BHS Wind Symphony performed “A Copeland Portrait” and the Sunrise Singers performed “Ave Verum.” Then both groups

combined to present the debut of the Bolingbrook High School Alma Mater,which was composed by BHS Director of Choirs Lawrence Fisher and written

by BHS Class of 2011 graduate Kevin Nepomuceno. BHS Class of 2013 graduate Shane Cook >> see sound | page 8


6

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

Police Blotter

17

5

16 11 10

9

2 13

7

6

BHS

15

1 14 12

8

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Bolingbrook Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

1

Shaun Larry, 32, 17P Fernwood Drive, was arrested at 1:01 a.m. May 18 and charged with an in-state warrant on the 100 block of Remington Boulevard.

2

Agustin Ortiz, 19, 8103 Rt.53, Woodridge, was arrested at 2:38 a.m. May 22 and charged with failure to signal, a traffic sign violation, no insurance and DUI, following a traffic stop on the 400 block of N. Bolingbrook Drive.

3

Crystal Ponce-Ara, 28, 505 Preston Drive, was arrested at 5:48 a.m. May 22 and charged with three in-state warrants.

4

Robert Franklin, 22, 315 Woodcreek Drive, was arrested at 2:23 p.m. May 23 and charged with sex offender registration violation.

5

Officers responded to a storage unit on the 600 block of E. Boughton Road for the report of a burglary.The lock was cut from a storage unit and several appliances, TV, window air conditioner, mattress set, bicycle and two drills were taken between May 21 and May 23. Loss valued at $3,500.

6

Kathryn Dixon, 25, 774 Colorado Street, Marseilles, was arrested at 12:33 p.m. May 23 and charged with safety belt violation,possession of controlled substance and possession of hypodermic syringes, following a traffic stop in the 300 block of S. Bolingbrook Drive.

7

Chancellor Dorsey, 32, 138 E. Brookwood Circle, was

arrested at 11:57 a.m. May 23 and charged with criminal trespass to property on the 100 block of N. Commonwealth Drive.

8

Jason Novar, 37, 107 Cedar Bend Drive, Romeoville, was arrested at 9:19 a.m. May 24 and charged with leaving scene of an accident, no insurance, failure to reduce speed, electronic violation and expired registration, following a traffic stop at Cedarbend and Honeytree drives.

9

Chancellor Dorsey, 32, 138 E. Brookwood Circle, was arrested at 12:16 p.m. May 24 and charged with criminal trespass to property at Meijer, 225 N. Weber Road. James Barnhill, 46, 271 Hywood Lane, was arrested at 8:14 p.m. May 25 and charged with battery and criminal trespass to property after a call to the 200 block of Hywood Lane

10

for a neighborhood dispute. Vivek Gumidyala, 24, 355 Gehrig Circle, was arrested at 11:17 p.m. May 26 and charged with an in-state warrant on the 400 block of W. Boughton Road.

11

Christopher Yearby, 35, 706 Melissa Drive, was arrested at 3:21 p.m. May 27 and charged with driving on a suspended license, no insurance and possession of controlled substance, following a traffic stop on the 100 block of E. North Frontage Road.

12

Marina Martinez, 36, 2721 Hudson Ave., Woodridge, was arrested at 11:04 p.m. May 27 and charged with driving on a suspended license, speeding and in-state warrant, following a traffic stop at Bolingbrook Drive and Northridge Avenue.

13

14

A 2000 Freightliner and trailer were taken from

the parking lot on the 200 block of W. South Frontage Road between May 26 and May 27. Officers were called to a business parking lot on the 500 block of S. Bolingbrook Drive for the report of a burglary to vehicle. Three hundred gallons of diesel gasoline and an air filter cap were removed from the vehicle between May 23 and 27. Loss valued at $1,300.

15

A 2007 silver Caravan was taken from a parking lot on the 400 block of West Boughton Road between 12:30 to 8:30 a.m. May 27.

16

Jason Anderson, 33, 10G Wildwood Lane, was arrested at 9:12 p.m. May 27 and charged with public indecency and resisting a peace officer, after urinating on a vehicle in the parking lot on the 600 block of E. Boughton Road.

17


ForuM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy! Just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred. Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

ColUmN

7

Lidice: Czech for, ‘Take That, Adolph!’ By NiCk ReiHeR managing editor

nreiher@buglenewspapers.com @Jolietilnews

OK, I swear John Pritasil, president of the Czechoslovak American Congress, was looking at my notes. Out of habit, no pun intended, I almost threw up my hand and yelled,“Sister, he copied!” I was sitting in the crowd on a beautiful Sunday, jotting down notes at the annual Lidice Memorial in Crest Hill. (See my story on Page 1). As the United Moravian Societies Singers were serenading us with traditional folksongs, I mused about the many different ways people pronounce “Lidice,” the town in the current Czech Republican that rose from the ashes after a massacre by the Nazis 72 years ago. I mused for a while about the name “Lidice,” which I had first seen on a Pace bus not long after I came to Will County nearly 30 years ago. It took me a while to find out why that name was on a bus after all. Then, there’s how you say it: “Lah DEES;” “Lah DEET zuh;” “LEE DEE CHEY.”Always thinking about clever things to say (I know, you thought I just spouted them on the spot), I wrote down in parentheses in my notes:

“Doesn’t matter how you say it, just remember it.” I listened to a few more speakers, congratulating myself on my wit, when Pritasil gets up there and says, “Each person has a little different way of saying it. It’s not important how you say it. It’s important you remember it.” Oh well, it’s not important who said it first, only that we do remember Lidice, the source of an atrocity at the hands of the

it’s kind of sad more people don’t know about lidice. it is a wonderful story about how by working together, good can triumph over evil, eliminating racism along the way. Nazis that a relative handful of people throughout the world, including what would become a Crest Hill neighborhood, took as a challenge in rubbing Hitler’s crazed, smug venom back in his mustachioed muzzle. Crest Hill, noted Mayor Ray Soliman, has one of only two Lidice memorials in the United States. The other is in Phillips, Wisc. But there are memorials, streets, etc. all over the world to memorialize the tiny Czech

town. On Sunday, we got a chance to see what a mining town in England did to help rebuild Lidice, courtesy of a documentary presented in person by a representative of the company that made it. It was gratifying to see younger people in the audience at the memorial and the movie showing. For years when I attended the event, the crowd was mostly elderly Czechs from Chicago, Cicero and Berwyn, bastions of Bohemians. Now, there were young families and teens, which made me comfortable the story of Lidice would not go away any time soon. Especially if Tina Oberlin has anything to say about it.The Crest Hill alderwoman has dedicated herself and her special events committee to making the annual Lidice Memorial event a focal point for the city and the region. To help make that happen at the recent event, Tina did about everything except whistle the Czech National Anthem. Give her time, though. It’s kind of sad more people don’t know about Lidice. It is a wonderful story about how by working together, good can triumph over evil, eliminating racism along the way. That sure sounds like a lesson we can use pretty often.

leTTeR To THe ediToR General Manager V.P. Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Managing Editor Nick Reiher nreiher@buglenewspapers.com Assistant Managing Editor Jonathan Samples jsamples@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Stewart Warren Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Director Pat Ryan pryan@enterprisepublications.com

facebook.com/thebuglenewspapers twitter.com/buglenewspapers instagram.com/buglenewspapers

Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Enterprise Newspapers, Inc. 23856 Andrew Road #104 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication sweditor@buglenewspapers.com www.buglenewspapers.com Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 12 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 12 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

Why are diplomats making military decisions? During General Lovell’s Congressional testimony, he said the Libyan area is controlled by Africom You wouldn’t hire a forklift operator to perform brain surgery, then why are we allowing diplomats to make military decisions? During General Lovell’s Congressional testimony, he said the Libyan area is controlled by Africom, headed by the State Department, not the military. Also, on the evening of the 9/11/12, tragedy most members -- State Department and Military -were called to their headquarters in Germany. Within a short time of convening, the military and security personnel declared this to be a terrorist act versus spontaneous demonstration and indicated the responsible group.

The State Department ignored the military input and, although the military had put possible response units on alert, no request was initiated. The military wasn’t told to stand down and weren’t asked to stand up. Could we have saved some lives? Maybe, but we didn’t try. Shameful!!! Questions still need to be asked: Was Libya asked to send security personnel? If so, why not? Obviously, we had permission to be in airspace because we had a drone overhead. Was it armed? If so, why didn’t it try to neutralize the invaders. If not, why wasn’t an armed one launched? Why weren’t stealth

fighters launched to help? Had we airlifted a platoon of Marines or Rangers, they could have come up behind the invaders and/or gone after, captured them, and immediately secured the area. Who did the state Department employees converse with up the chain of command? How far did it go? Why haven’t all those State Department employees and their Washington counterparts been held accountable? Why didn’t we go after the attackers? Brave people died who might have been saved by an immediate military response. Those who are responsible need to be dealt with- now!!! The comment, “Who cares now?” I do, and so should all Americans. Mark Turk Joliet


8

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014 >> judicial, from page 1 facilities in downtown Joliet.” These decisions included authorizingWill County Executive LarryWalsh to enter into a contract with Wight and Company for programmatic design of the new judicial complex. Additionally, the county took action to move one step closer to moving Sheriff’s department functions into the First Midwest Building once the county officially acquires the property. “Working together with Chairwoman Winfrey and the rest of the County Board, we are making real progress that will benefit Will County residents and will aid in the revitalization of downtown Joliet,” Walsh said. “This is a very positive day and we are continuing to proactively address the County’s capital needs.” Along with the approval of the programming contract for the Judicial Complex, the county also approved agreements to move the Will County Recorder of Deeds’ office and the Coroner’s office into the former Social Security Building at the corner of Scott and Cass streets. This relocation is expected to save the county approximately $230,000 >> SOUND, from page 5 assisted with orchestrations. “An Alma Mater differs from a fight song in that it is generally a slower tempo and uses a text that speaks fondly about the school and affirms devotion towards the school,” Fisher said. “I hope this Alma Mater becomes a new Bolingbrook High School tradition and something that will speak to generations to come.” Included in the ceremonies was the unveiling of a new patron board in the auditorium lobby indicating the donors who

annually in rent payments. “We have a number of steps planned out that will allow the County to address our most pressing capital needs while working our way towards construction of a new Judicial facility,” said Walsh. “Once we have vacated the 121 N. Chicago building, one option the City of Joliet has discussed for this property is making it a public plaza that will bring more open space in the downtown area for farmers markets, outdoor concerts and other civic events.” “My committee, Executive Walsh, and his staff have been working closely with Chief Judge Richard Schoenstedt and the Mayor Tom Giarrante to continue our collaborative efforts to keep things rolling,” said Winfrey. “I would expect many more positive steps forward in the coming months ahead.” More good news for the county came when the Illinois Senate passed HB 5889, allowing the county to impose and collect court fees to help pay for new judicial facilities. The user fees would be imposed on parties in civil cases and defendants who plead guilty in criminal cases, but would not apply in traffic, ordinance and

conservation cases when fines are paid without a court appearance. Depending on the structure set by the board, the new user fee could raise as much as $2 million for judicial facilities. Board members envision the judicial complex housing judges and numerous departments including court clerk, state’s attorney, public defender, court administration, jury commission, court reporters, probation and the sheriff. The City of Joliet has indicated moving the judicial complex forward is vital to the city’s revitalization plan. The county recently entered into a contract to purchase the First Midwest Bank building at 50 W. Jefferson St. in downtown Joliet and was joined by Mayor Tom Giarrante at the May Board meeting for a ceremonial signing of the contract. Closing on the property is expected this summer. Plans call for the building’s upper floors to temporarily house offices currently in the county’s EMCO building while it is being remodeled to consolidate the State’s Attorney’s Office. A new courthouse could eventually be built on the First Midwest property, which is across the street from the existing courthouse at 14 W. Jefferson St.

played a significant role in the fundraising efforts.

“Mayor Claar and his family have been big supporters of many different improvements and programs at BHS over the years,” Quigley said. “Annually he awards $20,000 in college scholarships to Bolingbrook seniors, $16,000 of which goes to BHS students.” “The high school is the focal point for the youth in a community,” said Claar, who was one of the leaders in the effort to build a new high school in Bolingbrook a decade ago. “This is a beautiful facility. It is a world class institution in academics and athletics. Now we have a world class auditorium. This is truly an honor for my family.” Claar is a former Director of Career Education for Valley View School District 365U. Claar’s wife, Pat, is a retired Bolingbrook High School Assistant Principal. Their daughter, Lindsey, is a 2000 graduate of BHS. Both Pat and Lindsey were instrumental in the founding of Heart Haven Outreach, an organization that continues to serve the youths of Bolingbrook, including many BHS students. Pat is currently the organization’s pro bono director.

‘Roger and Pat Claar Family Auditorium’ Amid Wednesday evening’s celebration of the arrival of the new acoustic sound shell at Bolingbrook High School, Valley View School District 365U Board of Education President Steve Quigley announced his fellow board members have decided to name the BHS auditorium “The Roger and Pat Claar Family Auditorium.”


News WILL COUNTY

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

9

Memorial celebrates freedom during 72nd anniversary of Lidice

Adam Georgiou tells story of Lidice in new documentary By nick reiher managing editor

nreiher@buglenewspapers.com @JolietILNews

As their children played in a nearby garden or later quietly in the pews at Crest Hill’s Theodore Street Lutheran Church, you could almost see their parents wondering what if would be like if someone burst into their homes, told them to get out and then separated them forever. Especially when they saw a documentary showing the faces of the children cast forever wideeyed as statues in a memorial in Lidice, in the Czech Republic. Or when they heard from the now-old aged children of Lidice who managed to survive the massacre of their people and the destruction of their small town by Nazis on June 10, 1942.

Chances are, they never will forget those images.And that’s the idea: Never forget what happened to Lidice.The story goes like this: Germany had taken over Czechoslovakia, along with the rest of Eastern Europe, in 1939.To keep locals under control, Hitler put in charge one of his favorite officers, by many accounts, as cold-hearted as the Fuhrer himself. When Hitler heard the officer had been killed by two members of the Free Czech movement, he went even crazier and ordered that Lidice, a little town outside of Prague, be wiped off the map. Beginning June 9, 1942, the Nazis came into Lidice and ordered residents from their homes. On that day and the next, 173 men over 16 years of age from the village were murdered; the rest of that age who were not in town were later found

PHOTOS BY JOHN PATSCH/FOR THE BUGLE

People gather at the Lidice Memorial in Crest Hill to remember the 72nd anniversary of the massacre in Czechoslovakia.

and murdered. Hundreds of women and children were sent to concentration camps, where many of them later died. Fewer than 200 women and children returned to the town after the war. But not exactly to the town they had left. There was little remaining after the Nazis were

done with Lidice in 1942. A new Lidice was built next door, leaving the old site as a memorial, now with a large rose garden linking them. Adam Georgiou from Inspired Film and Video, Ltd., of Stoke-onTrent, England, was able to fill in many of the gaps of what people usually heard during the annual

Lidice Memorial event, held June 8 in Crest Hill. Three years ago, he told the group, after reading a story in a local newspaper, he and others from his film company heard of the inspiring story of how their town literally helped rebuild Lidice following the atrocities that June 72 years ago. Georgiou and his company were so moved, they spent two years working on a documentary, “Lidice: A Light Across the Sea,” to remind residents of Stokeon-Trent of the town’s critical role, including helping to raise 32,000 pounds (about $1 million today) during the rationing and bombing in their own country, to help rebuild Lidice. He showed the hour-long documentary in the sanctuary of Theodore Street Lutheran Church following lunch and the memorial event held annually just north of the church. >> to see the full version of this story, check out buglenewspapers.com


10

taKe 5

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

Aries

mARcH 21 to APRIL 20

Get stoked. Your passions may be stirred by a new enthusiasm or challenges in the first half of the week, but don’t let them boil over. Keep your temper in check and wait to make changes and decisions.

gemini

m AY 2 2 t o J U N E 2 1

Judiciously reserve judgment. You could make critical mistakes in the first half of the week. Wait until everything simmers down before you make irrevocable decisions or life altering changes.

leo

J U LY 2 3 t o A U g U S t 2 1

A little self-discipline goes a long way. You may not be able to control circumstances or other people, but you can control yourself. Both good habits and small economies pay off this week.

Across

Down

1 HomE to IRAN’S IRoN AgE mUSEUm 7 LIkE SomE cLoSEt FINdINgS? 15 tImE’S 1986 WomAN oF tHE YEAR 16 FLoAt, IN A WAY 17 mIx UP 18 tHE JokER oR tHE PENgUIN 19 StEEP-ANgLE SHot 20 kUALA LUmPUR NAtIVE 21 SAILoR’S dIREctIoN 22 HERo WHo FIRSt APPEAREd IN 1912 24 NEEdLE PoINt? 25 HUStLES 27 cARd, E.g. 28 SHoRtEN, mAYBE 30 JELLYFISH RELAtIVES 32 YEAR IN NERo’S REIgN 33 UNIVERSItY oF WYomINg cItY 34 gUAtEmALAN cURRENcY, oR tHE coLoRFUL BIRd It’S NAmEd FoR 38 cAPItAL oF 35doWN 39 RAtAtoUILLE INgREdIENt 40 QUAkER IN tHE WoodS 43 NExt IN LINE 44 REVIVAL FIgS. 45 StARZ comPEtItoR 46 tAPPEd tREES 48 RISk 49 WAItS 52 BIt oF WISdom 54 HoW WoRLd SERIES WINNERS cELEBRAtE 55 JAZZ PIANISt HANcock 56 Not ANYmoRE 57 LIkE SomE BIBLIcAL BoARdERS 58 PLAY AREAS 59 dIREctS

1 moNUmENt oN tHE YAmUNA RIVER 2 mAkER oF FLAVoRSPLASH BEVERAgES 3 PIEcE oF cRUmmY AdVIcE 4 kIdS 5 SoUNd, mAYBE 6 BALLEt-dANcINg mUPPEt 7 LoWLIFES 8 dEFENSIVE FIBER 9 2-doWN ALtERNAtIVE 10 WAtER __ 11 LAx LIStINgS 12 oNE SEEkINg tHE WAY? 13 Not tENSE 14 “cAmELot” LYRIcISt 20 1957 R&B cHARt-toPPER INSPIREd BY A ScHooLtEAcHER 23 HALL oF FAmE 26 URBAN AIR PRoBLEm 28 PARIS PREPoSItIoN 29 gRAcEFUL 31 It mIgHt BE A WARNINg 32 moNEY

34 BEE oUtPUt 35 HWANgE NAtIoNAL PARk SEttINg 36 PREcEdINg 37 dRAggINg 39 gENtLE BREEZES 40 AgREEmENt 41 1862 BAttLE SItE 42 dIStILLERY WAStE 43 1980S mIddLEWEIgHt cHAmP 46 oNE IN A HUmmINg SWARm 47 BEAt 50 coLUmN-LINEd WALkWAY 51 FAIR SIgHt 53 dEco PSEUdoNYm 55 PRESLEY’S “__ LAtESt FLAmE” Tribune Content Agency 2014

librA

SEPtEmBER 24 to octoBER 23

Knowing the difference between passion and love could become essential in the week ahead. Performing routine duties as agreed may show others that you’re true blue and reliable.

sAgittArius

NoVEmBER 23 to dEcEmBER 22

Good sailors follow the wind. If the seas begin to get rough head for a safe harbor of familiar faces and places. Avoid entering into new contractual obligations in the week ahead.

AquArius

JANUARY 21 to FEBRUARY 19

Spinning wheels may lead to fortune or a fall. You may go nowhere without outside help. You’re enthusiastic and are anxious to make a change, but could lose traction in the first half of the week.

Sudoku

tAurus

A P R I L 2 1 t o m AY 2 1

A token of love doesn’t need to cost a lot. Gentle, harmony loving Venus is in your sign and may stir up feelings of affection. Romantic overtures get a better reception late in the week.

cAncer

J U N E 2 2 t o J U LY 2 2

Cold hard facts clear the air. Balance the checkbook or perform other detail oriented tasks early in the week. Exercise thrift this week and you will be sure to maintain a handle on financial security.

virgo

AUgUSt 22 to SEPtEmBER 23

Spare the rod and spoil the child. Your inner child may pine for an avenue of expression, but is stifled by restrictions this week. Bide your time and immerse yourself in beauty and refinement.

scorpio

octoBER 24 to NoVEmBER 22

The story of the “little engine that could” offers a valuable lesson. The most insurmountable obstacles can be conquered if you’re patient. Wait until the second half of the week to make your move.

cApricorn

dEcEmBER 23 to JANUARY 20

You may be challenged by ambitions that conflict with your relationships this week. Keep your promises and don’t be tempted to break off a relationship over a simple misunderstanding.

pisces

FEBRUARY 20 to mARcH 20

A penny saved is a penny earned. This isn’t the time to gamble with your spare change or emotions. You may be titillated by flirtatious experiences from an unexpected source this week.

Jumble

PreviouS Puzzle’S anSwerS

PreviouS Puzzle’S anSwerS

PreviouS Puzzle’S anSwerS

Jumbles:

• FUSSY • VIPER • BEHAVE • INJURE

Answer:

WHAt tHE tEEN PRomISEd to do WHEN HE ASkEd FoR tHE cAR -- RISE ANd SHINE


INSIDE: Handwork tabbed Player of the Year; Bolingbrook duo named to all-area team, page 13

bolingbrookbugle.com

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

11

Raiders fall to Naperville Central in sectional semis By mike sandrolini For the bugle

mike@buglenewspapers.com @voyagersport

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Megan Lotarski and Bolingbrook fell to Naperville Central 6-1 Tuesday in an Oswego East Sectional semifinal.

During the Raiders’ Oswego East Sectional semifinal game June 3 against Naperville Central, senior Brie Smith was hoping Bolingbrook would follow its season-long protocol of turning it on as the contest progressed. This time around,however,there would be no offensive outburst, no dramatic home run like Olivia Simpson hit May 31 that helped the Raiders oust powerhouse Benet Academy and capture the first regional championship in school history. The Raiders did outhit the Redhawks, 6-4, but they committed nearly as many errors (five) as they had hits.Those errors led to four unearned runs and a 6-1 loss to Naperville Central that concluded what was a historymaking spring at Bolingbrook. “We out-hit them and we had a lot more errors,” said Bolingbrook coach Jean Ryan-Moak. “This was not Raider ball; this was not the team that I saw on Saturday (May 31). “Our hits were not placed where the needed to be placed. They didn’t drop where they needed to drop. We out-hit them; we should have won this ballgame.” Naperville Central’s Maddi Doane led off the game with a single, but ended up advancing to third following an error and a passed ball. She scored on a groundout to make it 1-0. The Redhawks took advantage of two more Raider errors in the third to plate another run and lead, 2-0. But the Raiders cut the margin to 2-1 on Smith’s RBI double that scored Simpson, who reached on an error. “I definitely love my team,” said Smith, one of two seniors on >> see FALL | page 12


12

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

Sports >> FALL, FROM PAGE 11 the squad. “We do this in every game; we start out really slow and we don’t pick it up until about halfway through the game.” Naperville Central (28-7)—which won the sectional title by shutting out Downers South 4-0 last Saturday—again made the Raiders pay after they committed two more errors during the fifth inning. The Redhawks upped their lead to 5-1 after getting RBI double and single en route to a three -run inning. “It’s how the cookie crumbled today and unfortunately the cards were not in our favor,” Ryan-Moak said. “On any given day anybody can win, and it was their day.” Smith is the only senior in the starting lineup, so the immediate future is looking bright for the Raiders, who finish 18-12. “Nobody expected us to make it this far,” Smith said. “I’m proud of them for making it this far and know they’ll do good things next year, too. “We’ve got a really young team

and they’ve got a lot of work to do, but they’ve got a couple of years to get it together and I know they’re going to go places. It’s been really fun. I love the coaching staff at all four levels; it’s just been great and I’m going to miss them a lot.” Ryan-Moak also is very optimistic about the Raiders’ prospects for another banner season in 2015. The top of their lineup—freshman third baseman Dani Cinquepalmi, sophomore shortstop Gianna Esposito, junior first baseman Jen Jacobson, Simpson (the team leader in home runs) and starting pitcher Megan Lotarski—remains intact. Cinquepalmi and Jacobson each had two hits versus Naperville Central. “We have a young team so it’s to the point where we still need to kind of come together with ourselves and with our abilities,” she said.“But at the same time, the potential is just so there. If they come together like I know they can, and they play like I know they can consistently, we’ll be fine.”


Sports

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

13

Keeping it in the family: Handwork tabbed POY By Scott Taylor sports editor

staylor@enterprisepublications.com @Taylor_Sports

It is never easy to replace a 39goal scorer. It is even harder when the player everyone expects to step up is the former player’s younger sister. For Plainfield North’s Heather Handwork, she was able to duplicate her sister Ashley’s achievements. Not only did the Tigers repeat as regional champions, Heather was able to hit the 30-goal plateau as well, finishing the season with exactly 30 goals despite playing much of the season in the midfield. And, she has concluded her season with the same award her sister won last year, the Voyager Media Girls Soccer Player of the Year. “It’s exciting,” Heather said. “It’s great for the family and is awesome for me to get this award.” “Heather has been the most dominant player in the area this year, and the best player on the field in each game we have played,” Plainfield North coach Jane Crowe said. “She has 30 goals, and has played many games in the midfield. She has led our attack, and has been able to score in a variety of ways. She can shoot from distance, beat defenders off the dribble and score in the air off of restarts.” While there was pressure on Heather, a senior, she was able to handle that well. “I felt a lot of pressure,” she said. “It was weird not playing with her and took some time to get used to. I felt like I dealt with it well. I really stepped up. I was happy with scoring 30 goals, I think I scored 18 last year.” There was also pressure on the team as they were looking for players to fill the scoring void.As a team, they were able to make the appropriate adjustments to clinch a sixth straight undefeated Southwest Prairie Conference season. “Everyone was nervous coming into the year, but everyone played well and we played a little differently,” Heather said. “We attacked from the outside and up the middle. Our other captains, Sara Stevens and Shayna Dheel, stepped up a

lot as well.” Heather improved her game in the summer by playing against older competition, as well as top competition. She played up in age in club season and went to the national camp in California where she competed with the U-18 team. Now she will be reunited with her sister at Marquette University. “I am looking forward to it,” Heather said.“I had that one year off and I am looking forward to playing with her again. We have good chemistry together.” The rest of the Voyager Media All-Area team includes:

KATHIA ARRENDONDO

A junior midfielder for Joliet Central, she scored four goals and had 11 assists on the year. “Kathia was our playmaker and starts our offense.  She was our best all-around player,” said Joliet Central coach Eduardo Contrares. “She is good with either foot and when she is on the field, the girls feel very confident that they were going to win the game.  She was our team general on the field.  She made first team All-Conference in the SWSC.  She was injured for two weeks and that was when we were blown out of games. She will even be better next year.”  >> see ALL-AREA | page 14

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Plainfield North’s Heather Handwork scored 30 goals and is the 2014 Voyager Media Girls Soccer Player of the Year.


14

Sports

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

>> ALL-AREA, FROM PAGE 13

RACHEL BERNICKY Bernicky was the anchor to the defense on the sectionalfinalist Benet squad. “Rachel is a two-year AllConference player who anchors our defense as one of our center backs,” Benet coach Bob Gros said. “Her combination of speed and size allow her to provide excellent cover behind our other defenders and clean up any mistakes that may occur in the back. Rachel is a very steady dependable, and strong defender who is a major reason why we have earned a school record of 17 shutouts.”

PAIGE FULLER The Plainfield Central junior

tallied six goals and 12 assists on the season. “She is the heart of our team,” Plainfield Central coach Ken Schoen said. “She does a great job controlling the midfield. She has great skill on the ball and does a tremendous job creating scoring opportunities for both herself and her teammates. She has contributed to 50% of our goals this season.”

MARISOL GALVAN Senior from Minooka tallied seven goals and two assists. She was an All-Sectional and All-Conference selection this season and will play next year at Northern Illinois University.

JAMIE HANSEN Freshman

defender

scored

two goals, both game winners, for Lockport this season. “She is athletic, great on 1-on1 situations, and her abilities allowed us to play three in the back vs. Nikia Smith, the most dangerous forward we came across this year,” said Lockport coach Todd Elki.“It is very exciting to have Jamie back for three more years, I believe she could end up being one of the top defenders in the state by her senior year.  This season she was an All-Conference and All Sectional selection.”

JACQUIE KAUFMAN A junior forward from Benet, Kaufman totaled six goals and 12 assists. “Jacquie is a dynamic force as a winger in our 4-3-3 formation,” Gros said. “She has become one

of our most dangerous offensive players throughout the season and is currently second on our team in assists after leading our team in assists last year. Jacquie draws a lot of attention from opposing defenders because of her speed, opening up more space and opportunities for her teammates to operate offensively. Her pace and work ethic have allowed her to consistently get behind opposing defenses and serve quality crosses into the box or slotted balls on the ground to create scoring chances for us.”

KELSEY KRETMAN The Lisle High School junior forward is a three-year varsity player who fired in a team-high 20 goals, added nine assists and was an all-Interstate Eight

Conference selection.

NICHOLE LOPATIN When Niles West scoring leader Vicki Tirovolas suffered a season-ending torn ACL, coach Brett Clish was looking for someone to pick up the slack. The sophomore forward filled the void and then some, setting single-season school records for most goals (19) and most points (46).

GIANNA MARCONI Marconi, a Colorado State recruit, finished the season with 21 goals and 18 assists, leading Downers North to the regional championship game. “She was a senior captain >> see ALL-AREA | page 15


Sports >> ALL-AREA, FROM PAGE 14 that led the team both on and off the field,” Downers North coach Bob Calder said. “Gianna understood that she would need to score for the team this year, and successfully did just that. She will be dearly missed next year by our team; Colorado State is getting an outstanding individual.”

MICHELLE MOREFIELD Benet’s team leader, Morefield finished the season with 11 goals and 17 assists. “Michelle is a four-year varsity soccer player who is the heart and soul of our team, leading us in both goals and assists this season,” Gros said. “She demonstrates exceptional leadership on and off of the field as one of our captains and is the type of player that makes everybody around her better. As our center midfielder, Michelle sets up the timing of our offense with her passing, decision, making, and ability to hold possession of the ball. She has the skill and the vision to set up numerous scoring opportunities for her teammates. In addition, she strikes the ball extremely well, allowing her to shoot

from distance and consistently provide accurate and driven services from corner kicks and free kicks.”

and facing the goal. She has been a big part of our 11 shutouts this season. She has also scored five goals this year off of restarts.”

EMILY O’GRADY

KELSEY PRUETT

Maine South coach J.J. Crawford jokingly calls O’Grady “spider woman” because he says, “She just makes saves that most keepers, male or female, can’t make, but she can and that’s just a testament to her.” Another testament to O’Grady’s outstanding play her senior year—she notched seven shutouts and 154 saves—is that she was named all-state by the Illinois High School Soccer Coaches Association this season. The senior will be playing collegiately at Iowa State.

The senior forward from Plainfield South tallied 14 goals and six assists. She is headed to SIU-Edwardsville next year.

BROOKE POLONUS Polonus helped lead Plainfield North to a sixth straight SPC title, finishing with five goals and four assists as a defender. “Brooke is the anchor of our defense,” Crowe said. “She has played almost every minute this season, and is the leader in the back. She is outstanding at winning balls in the air, and disrupts the opposing team’s attack. Brooke is also very good at keeping forwards from turning

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014 “Kelsey has been the top offensive player for PSHS the last few seasons,”Plainfield South coach Dave Brown said.“She is a tenacious player with great quickness, vision and ability. Kelsey is a four-year SPC All-Conference performer, two-year All-Sectional first team,and two year All-Sectional honorable mention.”

MARY ROUNCE

15

Rounce finished the season with 5 goals and 7 assists for Downers North. “She was a senior that was extremely skilled and versatile,” Clader said. “We moved Mary all over the field and she successfully embraced every >> see ALL-AREA | page 16


16

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

Sports >> ALL-AREA, FROM PAGE 15 role. She has a bright future and I’m sure she will find success playing at Michigan State next year.”

JESSICA SCHMIDT Maine South’s senior midfielder, who is off to DePaul on a soccer scholarship, missed all but one game of the 2013 season after dislocating her kneecap, but returned to be one of the team’s leaders this season. Schmidt (four goals, five assists) was an all-CSL pick as well as an all-sectional selection.

RACHEL SCHNEIDER Bolingbrook senior made a huge return this season after suffering a torn ACL last year. She posted eight goals and nine assists this year and was an AllSectional selection and was All-Conference for the second time. She will play next season at Illinois Wesleyan.

NIKIA SMITH Bolingbrook senior made a position change this season and scored 19 goals and had 13 assists in her first year as a striker. A defender by trait, she was four-time All-Conference, two years All-Sectional and this season was named to the AllState team. She will continue

her career at Northwestern University.

SARA STEVENS Stevens had 18 goals and seven assists this year for Plainfield North. “She has a true forward’s mentality,��� Crowe said. “She is extremely strong on the ball, and goes hard to goal. She has elevated her level of play this year and is a big reason that we have had a successful season. Her combination of speed and strength is difficult to defend. She is dangerous going to goal with either foot. Sara will play at Grand Valley State next year.”

CALLI TOMKO The freshman forwardmidfielder was a mainstay on a Lisle Lions squad that reached the Class 1A sectional finals and went 16-6-2. Mark Gregory and Mike Sandrolini contributed


sPorts

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

17

TOP 10 oF the weeK WiTH FATHeR’S dAy THiS WeekeNd, mARk lookS AT THe BeST FATHeR/SoN ComBoS iN SPoRTS

tweetS oF the week miKe hollenbecK @mikeholly02

This is too good to be true. Grew up dreaming of playing for the @whitesox my whole life. I gotta pinch myself! ihsa state

loCkPoRT

SOCIAL

hUb Q & A with local athletes

Naomi Mayes BASKETBALL

@ihsastate

1

BOBBY & BRETT HULL “Both won Hart Trophy”

2

BOBBY & BARRY BONDS “300 HR/400 SB each”

3

ARCHIE,ELI,PEYTON MANNING “All Pro Bowlers” DALE & DALE EARNHARDT JR “Top drivers among fans” KEN & KEN GRIFFEY JR. “All-time best”

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

RICHARD & LEE PETTY “Both top 50 drivers” KEN & KEN NORTON, JR “Boxing, football champs” GORDIE & MARK HOWE “Played together in Hartford” HOWIE,CHRIS & KYLE LONG “Boys following dads lead” CECIL & PRINCE FIELDER “Both 50 HR seasons”

disagree with mark? Tweet your top 10 to @Hear_The_Beard

#Voyagertop10

@plainshs wins 2014 #IHSA Class 2A #Baseball #State Championship! @byronhsad placed 2nd, @FCHS_Supt & @ Sentinels201 tied for 3rd (rain pbrillinois

@pbrillionois

IL: Former @minookasports and @usfbaseball All-American RHP Jake Butler gets drafted in 29th round by #Tigers. #MLBDraft liZ busby

@bballmom10

@jolietslammers @Andrew_ Busby10 Congratulations to the Slammers on a great win! Proud of Buzz on his first pro win!!! Keep it going! inside nortwestern @insidenu

#Northwestern announces that Malin Jones will transfer. Was one of their better 2012 recruits but buried on RB depth chart.

Favorite social media outlet that you use? Instagram How often do you use social media? Who is your favorite person to follow? Inspirational quotes - always something uplifting being posted. What do you use social media for? Communications, news updates Who is your favorite pro athlete? Why? Stephen Curry; Perceived to be one of the hardest workers in the NBA. How many followers do you have and how often do you tweet? About 4 - 5 hundred; I tweet about 50 times a month. Your most memorable sports moment? Being chosen to play in an All-Star Game.


18

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

Real Estate & Business

Interpersonal Edge

Get your kids ready for real work world Give kids increasing responsibility to help the family as they get older By Dr. Daneen Skube Tribune Content Agency

www.interpersonaledge.com

Q. My teens are getting ready to go to college, and I see 20-year-olds having a terrible time getting jobs. Are there some tips you can give to help me get my kids ready for the real world of work? A. As much as we parents love to coddle kids, the rest of the world will not be fair or nice to our babies. Preparing kids for the reality of working for a living means raising them without entitlement, expectations of fairness or special treatment. Because so many parents today were raised with no emotional support, this generation of parents is often

-Give kids increasing raising kids with tons of emotional support and very responsibility to help the few limits. Kids may be led family as they get older. In the to believe that everything is beginning, having your small negotiable and authorities will children “help” is more work for you. However, care about their feelings. in the long run When these kids get a these kids learn a first job, they are in for a work ethic. rude surprise! -As your Here are practical children become parenting tips you can teens, make use from 18 months on sure they have that will help your kids jobs where they thrive in their future are expected work: to be punctual, -No means no, and the interpersonal consistent and home is not a democracy. edge Parents clearly indicate Dr. Daneen Skube h a r d w o r k i n g . Even if the job is that all decisions are not negotiations and that mom and once a month, kids learn that work equals money and money dad makes the rules. -Logical consequences apply requires problem solving for an when kids want to oppose the employer. -Pay bills with your kids rules. No clean room means no park time. No homework means and let them see that life is no playtime with friends. Kids expensive. Your teens will learn that making bad decisions appreciate your financial results in things they like going support and understand they can’t live at home forever. bye-bye.

-When there are problems with teachers or employers, please attempt to side with the authority unless you really disagree. Teens need to be able to accept and work with rules they don’t like. If you protect them from everyone that is slightly “mean,” your kid won’t grow up. As much as we adore our children, one of the most precious lessons we can teach them is to be high-functioning in the world. When we never allow them to suffer, they don’t develop tenacity, resiliency and the ability to fight for their optimal future. As rewarding as it is to swoop in when our kids are struggling, we don’t teach problem solving if kids don’t struggle.As good as it feels to always side with your kids when they are upset, we don’t teach them to cope with adversity when we pity them. Many kids are in school systems that try to adapt to

all sorts of differences in children’s learning styles. Most work places won’t provide this extensive support. If your child struggles now in any area, help them realize they will definitely have to work harder than others, and that business settings will not prepare special programs.

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www.interpersonaledge. com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2014 INTERPERSONAL EDGE, DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.


THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 740 Westwind Drive Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (Single Family Home). On the 26th day of June, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee on behalf of the Certificateholders Park Place Securities, Inc. Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2005-WCW1 Plaintiff V. Juana Contreras; Ruben Nieto; Alomar, Inc.; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Juana Contreras, if any; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Ruben Nieto, if any; Unknown Owners and Non Record Claimants Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 2985 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: Wirbicki Law Group 33 W Monroe Suite 1140 Chicago, IL 60625 312-360-9455 312-572-7823 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 5/29, 6/5, 6/12

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 718 ADAMS STREET BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENCE). On the 3rd day of July, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-13CB, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-13CB, Plaintiff V. RICARDO PEREZ AND TERESA PEREZ, MIDLAND FUNDING, L.L.C. AND STATE OF ILLINOIS, Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 4868 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: Wirbicki Law Group 33 W Monroe Suite 1140 Chicago, IL 60603-5332 312-360-9455 312-572-7823 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 6/5, 6/12, 6/19

19

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 176 N. Pinecrest Rd. Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (single family residence). On the 10th day of July, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR LONG BEACH MORTGAGE TRUST 2006-WL3, Plaintiff V. PALMIRA N. GONZALEZ and JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS PURCHASER OF THE LOANS AND OTHER ASSETS OF WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO LONG BEACH MORTGAGE COMPANY, BY OPERATION OF LAW, Defendant. Case No. 09 CH 5638 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 6/12, 6/19, 6/26


20

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014


THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

21


22

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee on behalf of the Certificateholders Park Place Securities, Inc. Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2005-WCW1 Plaintiff,

THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-13CB, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 200513CB, Plaintiff,

vs. Juana Contreras; Ruben Nieto; Alomar, Inc.; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Juana Contreras, if any; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Ruben Nieto, if any; Unknown Owners and Non Record Claimants Defendant. No. 10 CH 2985 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 6th day of July, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 26th day of June, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: LOT 238 IN CINNAMON CREEK UNIT 3, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOTS 3 AND 6, IN SCHOOL TRUSTEE`S SUBDIVISION OF SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 19, 1971 AS DOCUMENT NO. R71-5667, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 740 Westwind Drive Bolingbrook, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 12-02-16-102-007 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Wirbicki Law Group 33 W Monroe Suite 1140 Chicago, IL 60625 312-360-9455 312-572-7823 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 5/29, 6/5, 6/12

vs. RICARDO PEREZ AND TERESA PEREZ, MIDLAND FUNDING, L.L.C. AND STATE OF ILLINOIS, Defendant. No. 11 CH 4868 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 7th day of March, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 3rd day of July, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 51 IN CINNAMON CREEK UNIT 2, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOTS 3 AND 6, IN SCHOOL TRUSTEE’S SUBDIVISION OF SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN THE VILLAGE OF BOLINGBROOK, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 718 ADAMS STREET BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENCE P.I.N.: 12-02-16-108-004 A/K/A 02-16108-004 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Wirbicki Law Group 33 W Monroe Suite 1140 Chicago, IL 60603-5332 312-360-9455 312-572-7823 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 6/5, 6/12, 6/19

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE BOLINGBROOK PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL ) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR LONG BEACH MORTGAGE TRUST 2006-WL3, Plaintiff, vs. PALMIRA N. GONZALEZ and JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS PURCHASER OF THE LOANS AND OTHER ASSETS OF WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO LONG BEACH MORTGAGE COMPANY, BY OPERATION OF LAW, Defendant. No. 09 CH 5638 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 3rd day of April, 2014, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 10th day of July, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: Lot 20, in Block 31 in Bolingbrook Subdivision Unit Number 6, being a Subdivision in Sections 11 and 12, in Township 37 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded November 25, 1962 as Document 970256, in Will County, Illinois. Commonly known as: 176 N. Pinecrest Rd. Bolingbrook, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: single family residence P.I.N.: 12-02-12-307-003-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 6/12, 6/19, 6/26


health & FitNess

By dR. AdAm ARoNSoN

For the bugle/sentinel

www.kidsfirstpediatricpartners.com call (847) 676-5394

WEST NILE VIRUS Since the first outbreak of West Nile virus in 1999 along the east coast of the United States, news media have provided extensive coverage of other outbreaks. Mosquitoes, which usually contract the virus by feeding on infected birds, then bite a human and introduce the infection where it multiplies in the bloodstream. While some infected individuals will remain asymptomatic, most will have just mild symptoms. These include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, body aches and fatigue. In a very small number of cases, less than 1 percent of infected people will develop more severe symptoms such as meningitis, convulsions, paralysis and mental confusion. Though there are no medications that can treat the West Nile Virus infection, the symptoms typically resolve in a few

23

In 2013, West Nile virus activity was reported to CDC ArboNET from the following states.

days. As noted, the vast majority of people will have mild symptoms that require supportive care such as ibuprofen for fever and body aches, rest, and fluids. In more severe cases, patients may be admitted to the hospital for higher levels of support and monitoring. Take measures to prevent exposure. Mosquitoes prefer to gather and lay their eggs in areas of standing water such as stagnant ponds, birdbaths and flowering pots. Avoid these areas and consider removing them from your yard. Mosquitoes prefer to feed at dawn and in the early evening, so remain indoors during these times. When outdoors, apply insect repellent with DEET as noted in the discussion of Lyme disease. The virus cannot be spread from person to person so infected individuals need not be quarantined.

2013

*WNV human disease cases, presumptive viremic blood donors, veterinary disease cases, or infections in mosquitoes, birds, or sentinel animals. †Presumptive viremic blood donors have a positive screening test which has not necessarily been confirmed. graphic courtesy of the center for disease control

graphic courtesy of purdue university

he arrival of warm weather often signals the end of cough and cold season. However, families must be watchful for infections carried by mosquitoes and ticks, such as Lyme disease and West Nile virus. In this month’s column, we will discuss the signs and symptoms of these infections, how they are transmitted and strategies to prevent exposure.

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014

lacounty.gov

cellular view of west nile virus

LYME DISEASE DOCTOR’S RX

During the coming months families need to be aware of Lyme disease and West Nile virus. Should anyone develop symptoms of either infection, they should contact their primary care physician immediately.

Thousands of cases of Lyme disease have been reported since it was first recognized in 1975. A type of bacteria called a spirochete causes the infection. It is transmitted to humans by the bite of infected deer ticks, which are tiny, blackbrown insects about the size of a poppy seed. Infected deer ticks have been found in many parts of the United States, especially the northeastern states; California; and closer to Chicagoland in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Deer ticks live in forests or grassy, wooded areas and are most active from late spring through early fall. People have been exposed and infected during all types of outdoor activities from camping or hiking in secluded forests to their own backyard. Lyme disease can be easily treated with a course of antibiotics, and patients will recover fully. If not recognized and treated, the infection can progress to more serious complications such as arthritis, meningitis and paralysis of facial nerves. Families traveling to, or spending time in areas where deer ticks are prevalent should take note of the following strategies that

have been shown to decrease the chance of exposure. Whenever possible people should stay on cleared paths and avoid the shaded, moist,

wooded and grassy areas where the ticks prefer to live. Using insect repellent with DEET is also very effective. These products are safe for children when they contain no more than 30 percent DEET, and are washed off with soap and water when returning indoors. Children and adults should wear enclosed shoes or boots, and keep arms and legs covered. Wearing a hat can protect the scalp. Wear light colored clothing to make it easier to notice ticks. The most effective way to prevent infection may be doing a complete tick check after returning indoors. Humans are usually infected when the tick has been attached for more than 48 hours, so prompt removal of ticks is critical. If ticks are found attached to the body, the following steps will aid in removal. Fine tipped tweezers can be used to grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible. Try not to squeeze the body of the tick. Pull back slowly and the tick will usually release. The area should then be cleaned with alcohol and antibacterial ointment.

Dr. Adam Aronson, MD is a pediatrician based in Skokie, Illinois. The advice contained in this column is for informational purposes only. Readers should consult with a physician to evaluate any illness or medical condition. Dr. Aronson accepts new patients. Call (847) 676-5394 or: www.kidsfirstpediatricpartners.com


24

THE BUGLE JUNE 12, 2014


Bolingbrook 6-12-14