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INSIDE

NEWS Fighting despair during the holidays

SPORTS Raiders off to a 5-1 start

www.bolingbrookbugle.com

Page 11

Page 3

Our Community, Our News

STATE NEWS

DECEMBER 19, 2013

Vol. 7 No. 23

TRANSPORTATION

Illiana clears another hurdle Public hearings scheduled for January By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

STORY & Photos By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter A FOID card isn’t enough to prepare a person for concealed carry, officials say. Illinois residents will be able to apply for a license to carry a concealed firearm at the cost of $150 for a five-year license.

“Illinois’ new law is arguably amongst the most restrictive of all the state laws when it comes to the background investigation (and) training and places a permit-holder is restricted from carrying.” - Will County Board Member Don Moran, D-Romeoville

See the full story & More photos on page 4

Plans for the Illiana Tollway cleared another hurdle Dec. 12 as an Indiana planning agency approved the project. The Northwestern Gov. Pat Quinn Indiana Regional Planning Commission voted to include the Illiana Corridor as a fiscally constrained project in their 2040 Comprehensive Regional Plan.This follows Chicago Metropolitan Agency for P l a n n i n g inclusion of http://www.illianacorridor.org/ this project into their long range plans last October. This vote allows the Illinois and Indiana departments of transportation to continue

WEB LINKS

See ILLIANA, page 18


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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

Two survive pond crash Two women were rescued from an icy pond after a car broke through the ice of a pond at Avalon and Lindsey in Bolingbrook. Lt. Mike Rompa send police received several calls that a vehicle

News Briefs

was seen leaving the roadway, landing on the ice at approximately 6 p.m.Monday,Dec.16.After a short time the vehicle broke through the ice and became partially submerged in the water. A 36-yearold Bolingbrook woman who was the driver of the car and a 46-year-

old woman who tried to save her were rescued by Bolingbrook police and fire rescue teams. Both were taken to Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital and are in stable condition being treated for hypothermia.

Military News Air Force Airman Pawel Leszczynski graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an

intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Leszczynski is the son of Bogumila Leszczynski of Bolingbrook. He is a 2009 graduate of Bolingbrook High School.

Get Covered event The 2013 VNA Health Care will sponsor am “ A Get Covered!” seminar from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 21, at DuPage Township, 241 Canterbury Lane in Bolingbrook. Certified Navigators from VNA Health Care will be available to help with enrollment in health insurance through the Illinois Marketplace and Medicaid. Navigators can also answer questions and talk about whom is eligible for the newly expanded Medicaid program, what is offered and how to get coverage on the Illinois Marketplace, and other benefits available.VNA Health Care is a grant-funded Get Covered Illinois partner organization with 50 Navigators on staff to provide free assistance with Illinois Health Insurance Marketplace and Medicaid enrollment. There is no charge to attend. For more information, contact Claudia Lopez at 630-978-2532, ext. 3210.

Manley extends office hours Understanding how hectic life can get during the holiday season, state Rep. Natalie Manley, D-Joliet, is extending her office hours to increase accessibility during certain weekends in December. “During the busy holiday season, I understand how some errands can get pushed to the side while other activities take priority, like spending time with family,” Manley said. “It can be very frustrating trying to take off work to visit a government office during normal hours. My extended office hours are a convenience, at no extra cost to the state, and will help busy residents access state services.” On Saturday Dec. 14, and on Sunday, Dec. 22, Manley’s office will be open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Her constituent service office is located at 2701 Black Road, Suite 201, in Joliet. Normal operating hours are Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.Appointments for evening hours are also available, by request.


News community

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013 3

Fighting despair during the holidays

Area churches in Bolingbrook, Romeoville are offering services dedicated to simply letting people know they are not alone painful.” Aiming to take notice and acknowledge the hurt, area In a time when everything is churches in Bolingbrook and to be merry and bright, for those Romeoville are offering services who are feeling anything but, dedicated to simply letting people local churches are reaching out know they are not alone. with services offering hope to St.Benedict Episcopal Church in those that Bolingbrook need it. ishostingBlue if you would like to For those Christmas; attend the service ... who may a service of have lost a healing and “Light in the Midst of loved one, comfort at 5 Darkness” face financial p.m. Dec. 22 Good Shepherd Church, ELCA struggles, at the church 4 p.m., Dec. 22 divorce, located at 25 Alexander Circle loneliness or 909 Lily Romeoville, IL 60446 depression, Cache Lane. 815-886-4354 weeks of The service merriment is a time are often met with a resigned and place to acknowledge, own, dread. and offer up everything that “There is such an expectation feels contrary to the “ merry” by society that this is the time to festivities. be joyful and full of wonderful “This service recognizes that thoughts and plans, but what sometimes it is not all bells and if your mom just died or your joy and in its place is hurt, but spouse of 20 years asks for a we are there to go through it divorce.What if you don’t know if together,” said Bauman. your child is going to make it out In its second service of its of rehab, this the third time,” said kind, Good Shepherd Church Margaret Bauman of St. Benedict’s in Romeoville will host “Light in Church in Bolingbrook. “The sad the Midst of Darkness,” at 4 p.m., and the hard stuff doesn’t go away Sunday, Dec. 22. The special just because the calendar says we service is offered especially for are suppose to be happy. People those who have experienced still die; spouses fight and parents the loss of a loved one in the fret over their children, and it can past year, those who deal with By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

www.welcome432.org

depression and anxiety during the holiday season, and those who are struggling with various issues of the body, mind or spirit. “We know that this time of year can be particularly difficult for those who have lost loved ones or for whom this season brings a sense of loneliness and

depression,” said Pastor Suzanne Hurdle.“We invite people to come and join us as we offer a little light in the midst of their darkness. The service, while taking time to remember loved ones lost, will offer a sense of hope and a reminder that they are not alone.” The service is aimed at reminding those individuals that there can be joy in the midst of sorrow while acknowledging the hurt. Those in attendance will hear reflections and reminders from Scripture and in song about the “Light of the World, that brings

“This service recognizes that sometimes it is not all bells and joy and in its place is hurt, but we are there to go through it together.” - Margaret Bauman of St. Benedict’s Church in Bolingbrook

hope in the midst of despair and peace in the midst of chaos.


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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

News cover story

CONCEALED CARRY But gun owners also have to pass a background check and complete 16 hours of training. Gun owners without a license would still be prohibited from carrying a concealed firearm. To apply, you must be at least 21, possess a valid FOID card, or meet requirements of a FOID card; complete the required firearms training course; not have been convicted of two or more DUI violations within the last five years or completed court-ordered addiction treatment; have no active warrants for your arrest and must not have been charged with a misdemeanor involving the use or threat of physical violence. “Illinois’ new law is arguably amongst the most restrictive of all the state laws when it comes to the background investigation (and) training and places a permitholder is restricted from carrying,” said Will County Board Member Don Moran, D-Romeoville, president of the Illinois State Rifle Association. Previously, Moran has stated, “The biggest danger I see coming from the new legislation is that there are so many places where carrying is prohibited, it will be difficult to for a permit- holder to navigate around them without inadvertently crossing the border of one.” And the rules for one state may not apply to others. Illinois Concealed Carry License holders who want to conceal and carry in other states are responsible for researching the state laws to where they are traveling.This will be determined by the laws of the 49 other states. It is in part because of such reasons that two west suburban

police sergeants, Chris Burne and Tom Hogan, decided to create their own curriculum and training, forming GSSI, Granite Security Services Inc. The pair teaches a course dedicated to not only teaching the proper firearm use during range time but the ins and outs of the law, covering the consequences of being a firearm carrying-citizen. Police Sgt. Chris Burne strongly suggests finding a cozy spot and reading the 180-page act, focusing on what he calls the holy trinity of carrying a gun and take that powerful step whether to shoot: Is it reasonable? Is it justifiable? Is it necessary? Coming from what he says is a unique position, he can see the perspective from a police officer’s standpoint as well as an

instructor, having been through it himself, knowing what will be asked if someone did have to fire a weapon. He explains State Police dictate what needs to be covered in the curriculum, but that what sets GSSI apart is the experience and training a police officer has in the use of force. “Pretty much anyone can teach someone to be proficient with a firearm, but we have much more depth of knowledge of what is going to happen if you get involved in an use of force incident and what to expect when you encounter police right afterwards,” said Burne. “We feel we are a little bit better at explaining the law, due to our training and experience, and about teaching not just how to


News ConCealed Continued from page 4 shoot but when to shoot, which may be more important. That decision-making process is the real key, and we want our students to walk away feeling confident in deciding when to shoot and how it is governed. We go above and beyond what is expected in the class, and that’s for our students’ benefit.” Ex-military man,Andreas Stachel, who took the two-day course, said he got just that, an understanding of the law that went beyond the guidelines. “I like being able to carry a weapon, and I believe it is my right by the Constitution,” said Stachel. “You hear the crime, you see it—they’re a lot of bad people out there. You want to be able to protect yourself. But I don’t want to hurt anyone. I want to be able to use it as a deterrent. This was a good class with excellent instructors who told us what we need to know. ” The 16-hour course includes range qualification time and covers firearms safety instruction; basic principles of marksmanship instruction – a minimum of three classroom and range hours; care, cleaning, loading and unloading of a Concealable firearm Instruction- a minimum of three classroom hours; all applicable State and Federal Laws Relating to the Ownership, Storage, Carry and Transportation of a Firearm Instruction- a minimum of for classroom hours; and Weapons Handling – a minimum of four range hours. In addition, all applicants must pass a live fire exercise with a concealable firearm 10 rounds from a distance of 5 yards, 10 rounds from a distance of 7 yards, and 10 rounds from a distance of 10 yards at a B-27 silhouette target approved by the ISP.

Throughout the course, Burne stresses that even what is considered “reasonable” is subject to interpretation. He said each incident is unique, and that the better way of looking at the matter is to focus on what is going to govern their actions and their thought process on whether or not they should choose to use deadly force. He says with the law being so new, policies have yet to be developed and they can change from one agency to another, one town from town another and that those wishing to carry need to know how to protect themselves. “How can they be responsible owners without knowing what they have to do and what the consequences are—we would be doing the students an injustice if not teaching that,” said Burne. “Anyone wishing to do this should do their research on their instructor and the class as much as possible.” When it comes to the basics of the law, there are many rules and regulations to follow involving prohibited places and how, when and where a person is allowed to carry and many caveats that go with it. For instance,what Burne himself calls one of the most severe intrusions of privacy, robbery or residential burglary, the law states that just because someone breaks into your home, does not mean

you have the right to shoot him or her. In the eyes of the law, you can use deadly force (using your weapon) only for forcible felonies that include infliction of death or great bodily harm.Would a strongarm burglary warrant someone pulling a weapon? By law, no. If

For more information about GSSI check out www. granitesecurityservicesinc.com and for more information about the Concealed Carry Act check out http://www.isp.state.il.us/

the burglar had a weapon, yes. But it is never that cut and dry, and it is how you articulate the events that occurred that matters in court. “The outcome doesn’t matter if you just fired to scare them off or if you killed him; it matters that you used deadly force,” Burne told his class. “You may have the right to use your weapon, but you are using deadly force, you have to justify it.You have to articulate it. “It is up to you to articulate what you believe their intentions are. Is it reasonable, justifiable and necessary to shoot someone in the back while they are running out with you 60-inch plasma. No. Is it worth taking a human life? Ladies

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013 5 and gentleman, use your brain; use common sense.” Paying attention to your postincident actions if you have used a handgun to defend yourself is crucial. You need to immediately report to law enforcement the incident, offer aid if needed and remember you are a professional witness at this point. Burne explains that though you may not have committed a criminal act, until an officer on the scene determines for his or herself what happened, expect for your weapon to be taken away and to be handcuffed. “For you, point out any evidence and witnesses to what happen. You may want to have a lawyer present and you should generally wait two to three sleep cycles before you give a statement to avoid inconsistencies,” warned Burne.“… I say this for your own benefit because it is not a matter

of if you are going to get sued, it is a matter of when. Even if you did everything right, you still need to take measures to protect yourself in post-incident actions.” Above all, Burne says the first step in being a firearm-carrying citizen,“Is to be able to de-escalate a confrontation. You have a duty to get away from it so that you are able to say using my weapon was the last resort.” In 2012, the Illinois Firearm Public Awareness Task Force was enacted to examine the impact of passing a concealed carry law, comparing the expectations of such a law against other states of similar size, geography and demographics. Findings dictated that at worst, there would be no change in violent crime in Illinois and at best a reduction. In addition, concealed carry has been in effect in every other state with no state considering repealing it.


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Police Blotter

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

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The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Bolingbrook Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

1

Kenneth O’Donnell, 64, 286 Sunshine Drive, was arrested at 4:30 p.m. Nov. 29 and charged with aggravated assault on the 300 block of W. Briarcliff Road.

2

Kirk Payton, 36, 502 Dubois Circle, was arrested at 3:44 a.m. Dec. 1 and charged with DUI, no insurance and speeding, on Winston and Boughton Road.

3

Salvador Vargas, 25, 176 N. Lancaster Drive was

arrested at 4:07 a.m. Dec. 5 and charged with two in-state warrants following a traffic stop at Briarcliff Road and Schmidt Road.

4

Jasmine Harris, 19, 371 Kirkwood Circle, was arrested at 8 a.m. Dec. 6 and charged with theft at Quality Inn, 175 Remington Boulevard, after taking a television.

5

Rory Steinbach, 29, 205 Hadleigh Road,was arrested at 11:21 p.m. Dec. 6 and charged with speeding and two counts of DUI, following a traffic stop at Rockhurst Road and Route 53.

6

Monique Davis, 33, 700 Lakewood Farms Drive, was arrested at 7:17 p.m. Dec. 7 and charged with retail theft

at Wal-Mart, 200 S. Bolingbrook Drive.

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Joshua Green, 20, 1486 Somerfield Lane, was arrested at 1:52 a.m. Dec. 8 and charged with resisting a peace officer and criminal damage to property on the 1400 block of Somerfield Lane, after breaking a basement window.

8

Steven Erickson, 30, 120 Butternut Drive, was arrested at 3:29 a.m. Dec. 8 and charged with traffic signal violation and DUI, following a traffic stop at Brook Court and Bolingbrook Drive.

9

Marylisa, Uccadri, 52, 8203 Sawyer Court, Darien, was arrested at 11:13 a.m. Dec. 8 and charged with improper lane

usage, no insurance, possession of drug equipment and man/ del of controlled substance, following a traffic stop at Lot W of Fernwood Drive. Liz Romero, 22, 10P Fernwood Drive, was arrested at 1:59 p.m. Dec. 9 and charged with in-state warrant, revoked registration and driving on a revoked license, following a traffic stop at Remington Boulevard and Woodcreek Drive.

10

Taurus Weeks Jr., 27, 2512 Forest Drive, Woodridge, was arrested at 1:56 a.m. Dec. 10 and charged with in-state warrant, failure to signal, driving on a suspended license and no insurance on Boughton Road and Lyons Circle.

11

Michael Rasmussen, 22, 3354 Legacy Drive, Lockport, was arrested at 2:12 a.m. Dec. 10 and charged with disorderly conduct on the 500 block of Territorial Drive.

12

Matthew Quick, 19, 8200 S. Newland Ave., Burbank and Benjamin Massey, 20, 9405 W. Ash Ave., Mokena, were both arrested at 4:40 p.m. Dec. 10 and charged with delivery/ possession with intent to deliver, following a traffic stop on the 100 block of E. North Frontage Road.

13

Kendra Coleman, 19, 1942 Norwich Lane, was arrested at 3:01 p.m. Dec. 11 and charged with retail theft at Kohl’s, 1138 W. Boughton Road.

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foruM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy! Just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred. Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

General Manager V.P. Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Managing Editor Nick Reiher nreiher@buglenewspapers.com Assistant Managing Editor Jonathan Samples jsamples@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Sue Baker Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Manager Pat Ryan pryan@enterprisepublications.com

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Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Enterprise Newspapers, Inc. 23856 Andrew Road #104 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication sweditor@buglenewspapers.com www.buglenewspapers.com Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 12 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 12 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

Illustrated Opinions

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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

News

POLICE

Lombard Man slams into squad car Suspect in custody after slamming into a Bolingbrook squad car during a domestic disturbance on the 300 block of Lakeside By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

A 30-year-old Lombard man, Erik M. Granillo, is in custody after slamming into a Bolingbrook squad car during a domestic disturbance on the 300 block of Lakeside Dec. 11. Lt. Mike Rompa said police

responded to the area at 8:45 p.m. after a call about an exboyfriend’s attempt to get into the 23-year-old victim’s home. Officers found Granillo driving a silver Ford Focus and attempted a traffic stop. Granillo did not stop and continued to drive to I-355. Bolingbrook officers had

dispatchers notify Lombard Police in an effort to locate him. Rompa said Granillo then allegedly contacted the victim and informed he was on his way back to the residence with a gun claiming to shoot the victim and any police. Bolingbrook officers continued to monitor the neighborhood and one while one officer was at the front door of the victim’s home, Granillo, driving at a high rate of speed, deliberately crashed into the

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front of the unoccupied squad car, which was parked in front of the residence. The impact pushed the squad off of the street and onto the front yard of the residence. Granillo exited his vehicle and officers attempted to place him into custody. He fought with officers, a Taser was deployed and he was then secured. Bolingbrook Fire Department arrived on scene and transported Granillo to Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital,

where he was treated for minor injuries and released. Two officers also were treated and released for nonlife threatening injuries. The squad car suffered extensive damage. Granillo faces charges of attempted murder, fleeing and eluding, assault, aggravated battery, criminal damage to state supported property and DUI. Final charges are under review by the Will County State’s Attorney’s Office.


Take 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Saw point 6 Etching fluid 10 Touches affectionately 14 Prenatal exam, for short 15 Body part that smells 16 Jump in a skater’s short program 17 Legend with an ax 19 Actress Hayworth 20 Dinner pair? 21 Like cough syrup 22 Indigenous New Zealander 23 Legend with a clarinet 26 Alcove 29 Not at all welldone 30 “Let’s Get __”: Marvin Gaye hi 31 Udder parts 33 Jamaican genre 36 Legend with a vine 40 Animal on Michigan’s state

Down flag 41 Coffee shop cupful 42 Fishing tool 43 “Your Majesty” 44 It includes a bit of France 46 Legend with a bat 51 Betting every last chip 52 Hat-borne parasites 53 Toward the rudder 56 Charlatan, e.g. 57 Legend with a bathrobe 60 Sour 61 Actor Morales 62 Dutch pianist Egon who taught Victor Borge 63 Lime beverages 64 Holiday song 65 Important word for 17-, 23-, 36-, 46- and 57-Across

1 Packer’s need 2 Arab League member 3 Burden 4 Up to, briefly 5 Bindle carriers 6 Former U.N. chief 7 How some flirt 8 Life-cabaret link 9 Place to relax 10 Where to see floats 11 Self-evident truth 12 Flashy tank swimmer 13 Like many characters in Shakespeare’s dramas 18 Catering hall dispensers 22 Dashing inventor? 23 1885 Motorwagen maker 24 Reduce to small pieces 25 Inauguration Day pledge 26 Customary observance 27 Reference list abbr. 28 Bulletin board

material 31 Icon on a pole 32 Immature newt 33 Goad 34 “Felicity” star Russell 35 Like the Flying Dutchman 37 “In space no one can hear you scream” film 38 Not, quaintly 39 On the safer side 43 Bypasses 44 Chickenpox symptom 45 Expletive replacements 46 Sicily neighbor 47 Epic that ends with Hector’s funeral 48 County on the River Shannon 49 Pond plants 50 Zero, to Nero 53 Prefix with war or hero 54 Forest floor flora 55 High school math class 57 Feathery layer 58 Club for GIs 59 “... but __ are chosen”

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

Horoscopes What’s right is not always popular and what’s popular is not always right. In the week ahead, take time to ensure that what you are doing is something of which you can be proud.

You might feel somewhat out of your element. Wait until late in the week to make key decisions or changes that could affect your bottom line. Hold off on plans for holiday business gift-giving.

Put business ideas on the back burner until late in the week. You’ll do better if you focus on education, travel and self-improvement. Find ways to put your money to work to improve your surroundings.

If you can’t beat them, join them. Turn denial into acceptance and chaos into order in the upcoming week. You can turn a deficit into an asset by visualizing things from a different perspective.

Pay attention to the educated opinions of others. In the week ahead, honor the wishes of others and focus on creative activities. You may be released from the chains that have been holding you back.

The greatest gift you give someone is your time. When you give your time, you’re giving a portion of your life that you’ll never get back. Be generous toward others in the week ahead.

Keep a life jacket handy because you might be tempted to go overboard. What you consider a smart business move could prove otherwise especially in the first half of the week.

Some people may hear you speak thousands of words and still not understand what you’re saying in the week ahead, while others understand when you don’t say a word.

So many distractions, so little time. You may find firmer ground as the week unfolds, but you can’t risk making an important change of direction. Hold off on major financial decisions.

Some days are so dull you’d prefer to watch turtles crossing the road for excitement. This week you may find time to take advantage of newly won freedoms and to escape the monotony.

If money is burning a hole in your pocket spend it on something tasteful and worthwhile. Good advice can come from a close companion in the week to come so keep your eyes and ears open.

Change your luck. Give in to whims and spin the wheel of chance in the week to come. By altering your outlook and studying ways and means, you can improve your buying power or earning ability.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Content Agency 2013

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • HANDY • DIRTY • JUMBLE • GALLEY

Answer:

What Grandpa did when candles covered his birthday cake -- MADE “LIGHT” OF IT

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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Local wrestlers battling through obstacles, page 12; Raiders learning on the go, page 14; stats, page 15

www.bolingbrookbugle.com

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

11

Bolingbrook moves to 5-1 on season By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Usually six games into the season if a team has posted four different starting lineups it is a sign the season is off to a bad start and the team is searching for an identity. For the Bolingbrook boys basketball team, it simply means that have that many players who are able to be a starter. “This is our sixth game and we have had four different starting lineups,” said Bolingbrook head coach Rob Brost. “We are interchangeable at a lot of spots. When we are in foul trouble, we can bring guys in that we are really confident in that may be starting at different schools. To our guys credit, they have had great attitudes and that is the way I expect it to stay.” That number of different starting lineups will soon increase by one again, as it won’t be long until senior center Kenny Williams is inserted into the top five. Williams has been out six months with a meniscus injury and made his return to the Raiders’ lineup Friday night in an 85-73 win over Joliet West in SouthWest Suburban Conference play. “Getting KDub back is going to help,” Brost said of Williams. “Tonight we were trying to go one or two minutes at time with him since it was his first time back. He did a solid job, but he will just keep on getting better. He has had a great attitude while he has been out and he has really been a team player for us.” Williams made his return to a loud ovation from the Raider faithful midway through the first quarter and within less than a minute registered a resounding blocked shot marking his return.

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Gage Davis scored 13 points in Bolingbrook’s 85-73 win over Joliet West Friday.

“It felt real good to be back on the floor with my team,”Williams said. “It felt really good (to hear the crowd). It showed how much support I have. I wanted to come in and help the team the best I could.” Williams suffered the meniscus tear of his right knee, ironically at a Derrick Rose League game over the summer. “It happened six months ago in Cicero at the D-Rose league,” Williams said. “I tore it and had surgery two weeks later and hit therapy hard iced my knee and did everything the therapist

asked me to do. Therapy was a hassle. It was really hard and my therapist knew I wanted to come back fast so he pushed me harder than I ever would have expected him to. It was based on the swelling of my knee and if I could walk and run without a limp. I knew I was ready.” Although he was ready physically, Williams had to get ready mentally as well. “I knew I was ready and I had to get ready mentally too because I didn’t want to play timid and scared,” he said.“But when I first came in I had first game jitters,

every player does.” Williams was able to ease back into the lineup because his teammates can pick him up. Prentiss Nixon paced all scorers with 30 in the game, while Gage Davis and Devon Sams each had 13. “We can score.” Brost said. “We just have to defend better. We need to do even a better job of sharing the basketball. There were times when we over dribbled and over penetrated, but those are things we can correct and be a pretty good ball club.”

Sams, a sophomore, said it is easy for a lot of players to score in the flow of the offense. “The team was just running the offense and the ball came my way and I finished,” he said. He added that if the Raiders play defense the way they want to, it is good that the players are interchangeable because they need a break every few minutes. “We play hard man to man defense so if we are playing the right way we are going to need one after a few minutes.” Sams said. mark@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

Sports

Inexperience, injuries the story for Valley View wrestlers By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Both Valley View School District high school wrestling programs are missing names and faces this season for different reasons, but either way, both programs are not using that as an excuse as they work during this season. For Romeoville, they are missing state qualifiers Caleb Ramos and Naquan Hardy, a pair of wrestlers who graduated after last season after being faces of the program for the past four seasons. With them leaving, the Spartans are an inexperienced team. “We are very young,” said Romeoville coach Bill Normand said. “We have a lot of juniors on the team and if we can get them their wins now and learn the lessons they need to learn, we will look for big things from them next year. “We have to build for the next Caleb Ramos and the next Naquan (Hardy) and they are up for the challenge.” Normand said although the star power is gone, the team itself may be deeper this season than last. “Obviously when you take two superstar quality kids out

of the lineup it hurts with their experience and leadership.” Normand said. “I think we will be a little deeper than we were last year.” Senior Evan Stingily is the key returner for the Spartans, but there are others that Normand thinks will be in the fold. “Alex Heston at 120 is pretty good,” Normand said. “We have sophomore Dan Careno at 160 is really impressive. Carreno won over 10 matches as a freshman on varsity last year and we wrestle a tough schedule in our conference and our tournament schedule is tough.” Normand knows that no matter how physically ready the young wrestlers are, the mental aspect will be what the young athletes need to do. “Wrestling is a mental game as well as physical and you can win some matches before you even step out there because you are prepared mentally,” Normand said. “Hopefully they are up for the challenge.” So far this year, the Spartans are battling. “We have had a lot of close duals. The young guys are starting to get a lot better,” Normand said.“This is a growing process and we are getting better every day.”

BOLINGBROOK Unlike Romeoville, Bolingbrook does have key returners back in the form of junior Elijah Bavarro, a returning state qualifier. “Elijah Bavaro is great to have back for sure,” said Bolingbrook coach Dan Bullivant. “Titus Wonsey is back this year. Eli Carbajal is back and he will be tough. He is in on time this year from football. Mitch Murray will be back and he was a junior last year.” Other Raiders who were expected to be in the lineup were lost before the year got started, most of them likely to be lost for the entire season. “We have had some injuries before we even started,”Bullivant said. “Victor Armond separated his shoulder, Clarence Golden broken hand, Josh Alexander has a torn ACL. Gage Goodwin is out with a finger injury. He wasn’t with us last year, but he was one of our club kids.” Bullivant said the injuries will keep the Raiders experience level down this season. “We were super young last year,” he said. “We are a little older this year, but we are still young and will be a young team.”


Sports

Brooks in quarterfinals Brooks Middle School is headed to Saturday’s Illinois Elementary School Association’s 8th grade girls state basketball quarterfinals after holding off Homer Junior High 32-26 to win a sectional championship Wednesday night. The Bulldogs (20-2) spotted Homer (14-11) an 8-2 first quarter lead beforeTsimba Malonga’s drive at the buzzer ignited a 15-1 run that gave Brooks a 17-9 halftime advantage. Francesca Aniceto hit a pair of three-pointers and Malonga (16 points, 5 steals and 8 rebounds) added a three-pointer of her own during the spurt which also included a marvelous weaving drive by Jayden Marable. The determined Mustangs slowed things down, opening the third quarter with 7 straight points to come within one of a Brooks squad that missed seven of its first eight shots in the period. A Taylor Robinson (9 rebounds) steal and lay up and three buckets by Malonga in the final 46 seconds made it 25-20 after three quarters.

Auriel Saunders opened the fourth quarter with a shot from the corner and a coast-to-coast effort to put the Bulldogs on top 29-20 and Nzuzi Malonga sealed it with a pair of free throws with 1:34 left. Brooks will meet either Joliet Washington or Summit Hill at 11:30 on Saturday at downstate Rochester Junior High School. If they win, they will advance to the state semifinals at 5 p.m. The finals are in Rochester Dec. 19 at 6 (3rd place game) and 7:30 (1st place game) p.m. Other Brooks team members include Michaela Francia, Marisa Manning, Amber Armstrong, Maya Harmon, Hannah Smith, Marvena Rocket, Ngozi Edeh and Joyce Tipe. They are coached by Alan Hampton.

LEWIS The National Soccer CoachesAssociation of America announced on Friday (Dec. 13) that Lewis University senior

goalkeeper Alec Pickett (Mokena, Ill./Providence ) has been named to the NSCAA/Continental Tire NCAA Division II Men’s Soccer All-America Second Team. He is the first Flyer to be recognized by the NSCAA since Nestor Hernandez claimed Third Team accolades in 2009. Last week, Pickett was selected to the Daktronics NCAA DIvision II Men’s Soccer All-America Third Team. Pickett was a key component of Lewis’ nationally-ranked defense that propelled the No. 15 Flyers to a berth in the 2013 ‘Sweet 16’.The 2013 GLVC Defensive Player of the Year was third in the country with a 0.51 goals-against-average, and the Flyers were second in the nation with a 0.49 GAA. He notched 10 solo shutouts and was a part of 13 whitewashes, which helped Lewis to the country’s best shutout percentage of 0.62. Pickett had an .869 save percentage, which was the best in the GLVC and sixth in the nation.

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

Sports

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Bolingbrook’s Ryaen Johnson is contributing this season.

Raiders learning on the go By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

After only three games of the season, Bolingbrook coach Chris Smith is ready for the Raiders to shed the training wheels and start riding, although he knows there will be falls along the way. “The potential is there, but at some point you have to eliminate the P word and the potential has to turn into better performance,” Smith said. “And right now we are not there.” That is coming on the heels of an 53-36 win over Joliet Central in their first game in Illinois this season. “We have a long way to go,” Smith said. “It is a work in progress. We saw some good things, but we have work to do. We are still trying to get everyone together on the same page.” Smith said he is happy with way the underclassmen are playing and he knows the youthful errors will work themselves out.

“The juniors are really aggressive,” he said.“They make a lot of silly mistakes, but they are inexperienced and young. Their eyes are going to get big like they did today. But over time as they get games under their belts during the season I think you will see a difference.” Aysia Bugg paced the Raiders with 13 points, while Ryaen Johnson tallied eight. “Aysia was the only that came back with varsity experience.” Smith said. Bugg knows her role on this year’s team is different than it was a year ago. “I try and be a leader,” Bugg said. “This is a very young team, so I am put in a position where I have to lead by example and by telling them but they are very open to listening. That is a role I have to take on. I am enjoying it. Last year I was shooting the ball more. I worked on my game over the summer and I am trying to be able to do whatever the team

asks of me.” Bugg is confident in the talent of the team. “We have a really talented team, it will just take time,” she said. She is also the lone player who had a key role under both head coaches and she says there is a lot different, but a lot the same. “They are way different but with the same mentality,” Bugg said. “(This year) coach has let me do what I want within the lines.” Just as in the past, Smith employs a pressure defense, but Bugg said the new stricter hand check rules make it more difficult to play. “With the rule changes and not allowing the hand checking, we have to adjust for that, but we are still a defensive team,” she said. Smith said he knows it will all come in time, as he said although he is ready to eliminate the word potential from the vocabulary, he does not want to add the word peak either. “As upset I am of the way we played, I also don’t want to peak right now,” Smith said.“We have a lot of room for improvement and I think we will get there. I am confident this group of girls will get there.”

BOYS BOWLING Gio Montecinos took home the individual title Saturday at the Lincoln-Way East Invite. Montecinos fired games of 276, 238, 246, 178, 248 and 240 to shoot a total of 1,426. The Raiders placed sixth as a team with a 6,188. Minooka won with a 6,606. mark@buglenewspapers.com


sPorts

BOYS BBALL Points Per Game Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook George Sargeant, Maine South Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Andrew Palucki, Maine South Jake Nowak, Plainfield North Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Shane Murray, Lisle Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Jon Arenas, Maine South D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle Kevin Krieger, Plainfield North Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Julian Torres, Bolingbrook Devon Sams, Bolingbrook Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Kostelz, Plainfield Central Rebounds Per Game Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Zach Trussell, Lisle Shane Murray, Lisle Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook George Sargeant, Maine South Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Joshua Dillingham, Bolingbrook Julian Torres, Bolingbrook Hund, Plainfield Central Assists Caleb deMarigny, Maine South CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook Denzel Leslie, Joliet West Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Jon Arenas, Maine South Sean Maloney, Maine South D’Vonta Jones, Joliet West Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Brodric Thomas, Bolingbrook D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Zach Trussell, Lisle Steals D’Vonta Jones, Joliet West Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook Gage Davis, Bolingbrook D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Jeff Washington, Joliet West Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Kyle Hendzel, Lisle Field Goal % Shane Murray, Lisle Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Jeff Washington, Joliet West Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Julian Torres, Bolingbrook George Sargeant, Maine South Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Devon Sam, Bolingbrook Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Free Throw % Caleb deMarigny, Maine South George Sargeant, Maine South Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Davis, Plainfield Central Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Connor Bielat, Lisle Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Brodric Thomas, Bolingbrook D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West 3-pointers Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Kostelz, Plainfield Central Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Caleb deMarigny, Maine South

24.4 17.4 16.6 15.0 13.0 12.4 11.5 10.5 10.2 10.2 10.2 10.0 9.7 9.4 8.7 8.6 8.6 8.4 8.2 8.0 9.0 9.0 7.2 6.8 6.8 6.0 5.2 5.2 5.2 5.0 29 16 14 14 13 13 13 10 10 9 9 9 9 9 8 12 12 10 10 10 9 9 7 7 7 .667 .655 .650 .600 .586 .570 .566 .500 .500 .940 .890 .860 .846 .800 .790 .770 .765 .760 .740 .727 .720 14 10 9 7 7

D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Nick Massura, Lisle GIRLS BBALL Points Per Game Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Jaida Green, Downers North Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Lexi Marin, Romeoville Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Sarah Costello, Downers North Peyton Winters, Downers North Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Destiny Hollins, Lockport Naomi Mayes, Lockport Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Nina Anderson, Maine South Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Kennedy Weigt, JCA Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Rebounds Per Game Peyton Winters, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Sarah Costello, Downers North Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Kyla Creal, Lockport Laurel Kucharski, Lockport Rachel Sutphin, Plainfield South Cherish Smith, Romeoville Perla Gutierrez, Romeoville Faith Heitman, Romeoville Ally Fink, Plainfield South Jaida Green, Downers North Ty Battle, JCA Assists Sarah Costello, Downers North Kelly Kons, Maine South Jaida Green, Downers North Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Christina Ekhomu, JCA Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Lexi Marin, Romeoville Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Nina Anderson, Maine South Megan Roberts, Maine South Ty Battle, JCA Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Skye Osborne, Romeoville Jalanna Brooks, Plainfield South Jnaya Walker, JCA Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Steals Sarah Costello, Downers North Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Jaida Green, Downers North Naomi Mayes, Lockport Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Nina Anderson, Maine South Destiny Hollins, Lockport Jamari McAfee, Lockport Christina Ekhomu, JCA Kianna Campbell, Lockport Kelly Kons, Maine South Jnaya Walker, JCA Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Field Goal % Kyla Creal, Lockport Ty Battle, JCA Peyton Winters, Downers North Adriana Acosta, JCA Emilie McGuire, Maine South Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Olivia Cattau, Maine South Kennedy Weigt, JCA Jaida Green, Downers North Free Throw % Faith Heitman, Romeoville Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Destiny Hollins, Lockport Kelly Kons, Maine South Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South

6 5 21.3 17.5 15.2 12.4 12.0 12.0 12.0 12.0 10.2 9.7 9.7 9.1 8.6 8.2 7.6 8.8 8.7 7.8 6.9 6.5 6.0 6.0 5.5 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.0 5.0 4.6 4.5 47 31 24 20 16 16 16 13 13 12 12 12 11 11 11 10 10 10 30 24 22 20 20 17 17 16 16 14 14 13 12 12 11 .610 .609 .580 .540 .520 .515 .512 .500 .490 .450 .824 .778 .771 .750 .730 .720 .719

Naomi Mayes, Lockport Peyton Winters, Downers North 3-pointers Kennedy Weigt, JCA

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

.700 .690 15

Jaida Green, Downers North Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Sarah Costello, Downers North Nina Anderson, Maine South

14 13 12 11

Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Destiny Hollins, Lockport Jamari McAfee, Lockport Lexi Marin, Romeoville

15

9 9 9 7


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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

buglenewspapers.com/basketball

Inside-outside game propels Benet By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

With many of the key contributors gone from last year’s sectional finalist team, Benet came into this year a little under the radar. But with a bevy of shooters around 6-foot, 9-inch senior Sean O’Mara,the Redwings have gotten off to a 6-0 start before falling for the first time Saturday, 54-45 to Fenwick. “It’s been a good start for us overall,” Benet coach Gene Heidkamp said. “There’s a lot of room for us to get better, but I think we’ve played very well for the first six games.” “It’s been pretty easy,” O’Mara said of the transition. “There are a lot of new faces, but they are all great players. They all know how to play basketball and they all grew up in the program, too. It’s great. Every year we have more and more good players come in.” A lot of that cohesion took place in the summer. “I think we really put it together in the summer,” Benet senior Collin Pellettieri said. “Then in practice we get after it. We’ve all been playing together, besides Sean, at the freshman and sophomore level. We all thought we could do this.” With O’Mara handling the inside, that leaves shooters open on the outside. If they can knock down their shots, that forces defenses to come out on them, leaving O’Mara one-on-one down low. “Coach says that knocking down shots is a key before every game,” Pellettieri said. “We know we want to play inside-out. Once Sean starts getting doubled he will find us and we start knocking down shots and if we start knocking down shots everything is hard to guard.” It also pays off to have an unselfish big man, who is willing to get his shooters involved even when he gets the ball inside. “We always play inside out, so

establishing an inside game and then work it out,” O’Mara said. “I think part of the reason they give me the ball so much is because they know I’ll kick it back out to them. I like to think that I’m not a black hole in the paint. I can turn and kick it out to a teammate or cutter.” “This is a very unselfish team offensively,” Heidkamp said. “We have a lot of pieces that fit together well. We shoot the ball pretty well and have a dominant inside scorer who will pass the ball out and create shots for our shooters. I think that dynamic works well for our guys.” With the offensive firepower this year, the Redwings look a little different from the teams the past two years. That makes the defensive side of the ball that much more important for future success. “The key for us is how well we defend and rebound,” Heidkamp stated. “When that is there for us we are pretty good. When it’s not there we’re going to struggle. It’s different than how we’ve been the past two years, where we have been more defensive oriented. This year we can score but we need play defense and rebound.” Benet showed off its ability on both sides of the ball in a 68-47 win over previously unbeaten Plainfield North Dec. 10. Benet hit nine three-pointers in the game, including five from Pellettieri, who scored 17 points. O’Mara led the way with 19. “We had a lot of guys play really well tonight,” O’Mara said. “We moved the ball and handled the pressure and rebounded the ball well, too. Our shooters are kind of slept on, but I like it that way.” “We were getting good looks,” Pellettieri said. “They were doubling down on Sean.We were able to set those stagger screens and we were wide open.” O’Mara had a rare test in the paint going up against one of the bigger players he will see this year in 6-7, 255-pound junior

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Benet’s Sean O’Mara scored 19 points in a 68-47 win over Plainfield North.

Cody Conway. “It is nice to get some resistance instead of burying a kid under the hoop,” O’Mara said. “I think I like it more. I am able to use the moves I work on all the time.” The win was just another

against a quality opponent, which there will likely be many more of as the Redwings play another daunting schedule this year. “Any time you play good competition you take it,” O’Mara said. “You look at our schedule

this year, we have no more easy games. I don’t think any of our games so far have been easy. It’s exciting to go up against strong teams every night.” Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@buglenewspapers.com


THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

Real Estate & Business

How to successfully train a touchy employee

Q. I have a new employee that defends herself and feels attacked every time I try to coach on doing her job better. She is adequate at her job but needs to get better at thinking for herself and noticing details. How do I train her without insulting her? A. You can train her by validating that new employees often hear coaching as criticism. Before you try to train her in the future, point out some of the problems that her position needs to solve. Get her feedback about what she sees as the solutions. Then offer her some of your good ideas. If you can engage your touchy employee in a problem-solving conversation where she is already trying to figure out what to do, she’ll be much more responsive to your suggestions.

The four-step plan you are using with a new employee to train them is:

1. Get her to think about the problem before offering solutions. 2. Reassure her that her job is not at risk and that it is normal to need training. 3. Give her both written and verbal simple instructions on what you want. 4. Make it clear what your end goal is to make her job easier.

www.interpersonaledge.com

Be aware that new employees are highly anxious because they have no history with you. Every word out of your mouth can and may be heard as the beginning of the end of their new job. Unfortunately, the period in which a new employee is

terrified about losing their new job is the time during which you have to intensively train the employee. If you want them to listen and learn, you’ll need to assure them their new job is not at risk. Keep in mind that anxiety makes people stupid, and stupid new employees will be extremely hard to teach. The more predictable and specific you can be with the directions for your employee’s job, the better. Notice what her weaknesses are and work to write down protocols she can repeat that are simple. Keep emphasizing that your end goal is to make her job easier. As your employee gets more experience and history with you, she will settle down, lose

track, IDOT and INDOT have both released Request for Qualifications Continued from page 1 (RFQs) to seek a P3 concessionaire for the planning process their portions of and also pursue a publicthe Illiana Corridor private partnership project. concessionaire to design, John Greuling, CEO IDOT officials build,finance,operate and and President of the say they are excited maintain the proposed Will County Center the Illiana Corridor for Economic highway facility. will be the first The plan for the 47-mile Development project in Illinois to Illiana has been on the be financed under a fast track for more than P3. This innovative two years. The estimated financing method $1.5 billion project, likely will bring new a tollway, would span investment dollars from Interstate 55 in into the state Wilmington to Interstate transportation 65 in Lowell, Ind. system and The next steps for IDOT allow IDOT to and INDOT are to publish make further the Draft Environmental Indiana Gov. Mike infrastructure Pence Impact Statement (EIS) improvements and host the project public throughout the region. Indiana hearings.The public hearings are has already experienced success anticipated to take place in early on P3 projects including the 2014. Ohio River Bridges project and After the public comment sections of I-69. period ends, IDOT and INDOT “This represents the final piece anticipate receiving a Record to the regional planning puzzle,” of Decision on the project in said John Greuling, president and spring 2014 which will conclude CEO of the Will county Center the environmental phase for Economic Development. of the project. On a parallel “The project’s addition to the

two regional 2040 plans tells the federal government and potential private partners that there is true regional consensus for the project. We can now move to the next level: federal approval.” Proponents say the lliana will create better ways to distribute the region’s goods, welcome new investment from businesses that depend on a reliable transportation network, and make it easier, safer, and more energy-and-time efficient to travel throughout Illinois and Indiana. In addition, it will create both short-term and long-term employment for thousands, all with low risk for taxpayers, IDOT officials say. Gov. Pat Quinn in a prepared statement said he was pleased with the vote. “The Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission’s vote today is a victory for jobs and economic development in both Indiana and Illinois,” Quinn said.“The Illiana Expressway will greatly improve transportation throughout the region, bring thousands of jobs, reduce congestion, and improve safety, job accessibility and air quality. I salute the Indiana officials who continue to partner with us to

ILLIANA

The more predictable and specific you can be with the directions for your employee’s job, the better. Notice what her weaknesses are and work to write down protocols she can repeat that are simple. her defensiveness and be easier to teach. Realize that you can always measure someone’s level of insecurity in the workplace by noticing how much defensiveness they use. Professionals who feel competent and safe at work are rarely on the defensive.

The last word(s) Q. I’ve been in my industry for 30 years and often attempt to give younger people in my field advice. Most of the time, they listen and go off and do exactly what I told them not to do. Is there a way to make sure I’m not wasting my time before I bother trying to mentor a younger professional? A. Yes, ask if they’d like some

ideas about their situation before you take your time mentor. Most people think free advice is worth the price, so make sure they have to ask for help before you offer.

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2013 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.

I L L I A N A T O L L W AY P R O J E C T

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The plan for the 47-mile Illiana has been on the fast track for more than two years.

$1.5 billion

The estimated $1.5 billion project, likely a tollway, would span from Interstate 55 in Wilmington to Interstate 65 in Lowell, Ind.

2014

The next steps for IDOT and INDOT are to publish the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and host the project public hearings. The public hearings are anticipated to take place in early 2014.

make the Illiana a reality.” Will County Executive Larry Walsh said the support in Illinois and now Indiana endorses the Illiana’s compatibility with broad-based plans for the future growth and vitality of the region. The Illiana, he added, promises to provide greatly from reduced congestion on local arterials, less truck traffic on I-80 and improved safety and mobility overall. “Will County’s 21st-century transportation assets strengthen the region’s competitiveness as a transportation hub and support new job creation and business

growth,” he said. Indiana Gov. Mike Pence also was pleased with the vote. “I believe roads mean jobs, and today’s vote on the Illiana Corridor Project brings us one step closer to more jobs for northwestern Indiana,” he said. “The innovative funding for this project will bring new investment dollars into the state transportation system and allow the Indiana Department of Transportation to make further infrastructure investments that will benefit the region for generations to come.”


THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 509 ROCKHURST ROAD BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 (TWO STORY SINGLE FAMILY WITH A TWO CAR DETACHED GARAGE). On the 16th day of January, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff V. KATHRYN AND NICHOLAS ZYWICA Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 5761 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 251,550.93 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 12/19, 12/26, 1/2

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 257 Douglass Way Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (Single Family Home). On the 9th day of January, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Caliber Home Loans, Inc. Plaintiff V. Sandra J. McConathy; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 13 CH 1004 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 116 Ash Drive Bolingbrook, IL 60490 (Single Family Home). On the 9th day of January, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Plaintiff V. Syed Niaz; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 7330 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-38029 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 12/12, 12/19, 12/26

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1117 BRAMBLE AVENUE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60490 (1 STORY HOME WITH 2 CAR GARAGE). On the 16th day of January, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: CITIBANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR BEAR STEARNS ALT-A TRUST II 2007-1 Plaintiff V. WILLIAM WOKAS Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 1762 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 180,801.38 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-13-05261 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 12/12, 12/19, 12/26

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 12/19, 12/26, 1/2


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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013


THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Plaintiff,

FEDERAL NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff,

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS CITIBANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR BEAR STEARNS ALT-A TRUST II 2007-1 Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM WOKAS Defendant. No. 12 CH 1762 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 3rd day of September, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 16th day of January, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 28 IN BLOCK D IN DRAFKE FARM, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF SECTION 17, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 30, 1975 AS DOCUMENT NO. R75-9970, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Commonly known as: 1117 BRAMBLE AVENUE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60490 Description of Improvements: 1 STORY HOME WITH 2 CAR GARAGE P.I.N.: 12-02-17-301-046 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 180,801.38 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 12/19, 12/26, 1/2

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Caliber Home Loans, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. Sandra J. McConathy; et. al. Defendant. No. 13 CH 1004 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 7th day of August, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 9th day of January, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 2, AREA 56, IN CENTEX-WINSTON CORP., BOLINGBROOK TOWNHOMES, UNIT NO. 4, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 2, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 10, 1972 AS DOCUMENT NO. R72-6394, TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT APPURTENANT TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED REAL ESTATE, AS DEFINED IN DECLARATION DATED JULY 7, 1971 AND RECORDED JULY 7, 1971 AS DOCUMENT NO. R7115260, AS AMENDED, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 257 Douglass Way Bolingbrook, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 02-02-310-068 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-13-05261 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 12/12, 12/19, 12/26

vs. Syed Niaz; et. al. Defendant. No. 10 CH 7330 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 18th day of September, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 9th day of January, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 26 IN WHISPERING OAKS PHASE 1B, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST FRACTIONAL HALF OF THE NORTHWEST FRACTIONAL QUARTER OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN THE VILLAGE OF BOLINGBROOK, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 1, 2000 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2000022127 IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 116 Ash Drive Bolingbrook, IL 60490 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 02-18-113-005 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-38029 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 12/12, 12/19, 12/26

MORTGAGE

vs. KATHRYN AND NICHOLAS ZYWICA Defendant. No. 12 CH 5761 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 13th day of September, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 16th day of January, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 17, IN BLOCK 39, IN BOLINGBROOK SUBDIVISION UNIT NUMBER 6, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN SECTIONS 11 AND 12, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED NOVEMBER 5, 1962, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 970256, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 509 ROCKHURST ROAD BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: T W O STORY SINGLE FAMILY WITH A TWO CAR DETACHED GARAGE P.I.N.: 12-02-12-305-003 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 251,550.93 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 12/19, 12/26, 1/2


Seniors retire smart

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013

23

Be smart about charitable giving during holidays When donating, be sure to verify charities, where the money is being put to use By Jill Schlesinger Tribune Content Agency

Now that the holiday season is in full swing, charities are making their final year-end pitches to raise money. Charity Navigator, a non-profit organization that helps donors give intelligently, predicts that individual donors will give at least $100 billion to charities this holiday season. While the sentiment of giving is wonderful, it is important to be careful about how you give. Begin by verifying the charity’s name. With over one million charities in the U.S., it’s easy to have a case of mistaken identity. For example, there are hundreds of charities with “cancer” in the name, so be sure that your money is going where you want it to go. This is especially important if you’re being solicited on the phone or in person, which is why I advise never to give in these ways, regardless of your familiarity with the organization. Just ask for all materials via snail mail or e-mail, so you can review them without pressure. Once you have the information, check out the charity’s mission, program and finances online. If all seems legit, then it’s time to see whether the organization is efficient, ethical and effective. Charity Navigator provides 0 to 4-star rating system, which includes a review of each charity’s fiscal performance. The site also helps you understand what portion of your donation goes to support overhead vs. going to the cause itself. Most people give to charity for altruistic purposes, not the tax deduction, but Uncle Sam does reward your kindness. That’s why it is critical to know the difference between “tax exempt” and “tax deductible.” Tax-exempt means the organization doesn’t have to pay taxes. Tax deductible means you can deduct your contribution on your federal income tax return. You can check an organization’s tax status at www.irs.gov/app/ eos. If the donation qualifies and if you itemize deductions, charitable contributions made to qualified organizations may help lower your tax bill. (See IRS Publication

Jill Schlesinger’s Website: www.jillonmoney.com IRS’ database on Non-Profits

www.irs.gov/app/eos.

526 for rules on what constitutes a qualified organization.) You have until December 31 to make your donations if you plan to deduct them on your 2013 tax return. To claim the charitable deduction, make sure that you maintain a bank record, payroll deduction record or a written communication from the organization containing the name of the organization, the date of the contribution and the amount given. For text message donations, a telephone bill will meet the record-keeping requirement if it shows the name of the receiving organization, the date of the contribution, and the amount donated. The IRS has more specific rules based on what type of contribution

you make. The general categories include: Cash or property equaling $250 or more: In addition to the written records, the IRS wants to know whether the organization provided any goods or services in exchange for your gift. If so, then you can deduct only the amount that exceeds the fair market value of the benefit received. Stock or other non-cash property: Valued at the fair market value of the property. This stipulation makes the gifting of appreciated assets especially valuable, since you will take a deduction for the fair market value, without ever having to pay capital gains taxes. (There are special rules for donating automobiles.) As with any financial transaction, I have to warn against potential scams. Some red flags to guard against include: the charity refuses to provide detailed information about its identity, can’t provide proof that a contribution is tax deductible; uses a name that closely resembles that of a better-known, reputable organization; asks for donations in cash or asks you to wire money (you should never do either!); or guarantees sweepstakes winnings in exchange for a contribution.

By law, you never have to give a donation to be eligible to win a sweepstakes. Just like investing, the more information you have about charitable giving, the better you’ll feel about it. By educating yourself, your generosity will pay long-term dividends to you and the organization.

(Jill Schlesinger, CFP, is the Emmynominated CBS News Business Analyst. A former options trader and CIO of an investment advisory firm, Jill covers the economy, markets, investing and anything else with a dollar sign on TV, radio (including her nationally syndicated radio show), the web and her blog,“Jill on Money.” She welcomes comments and questions at askjill@jillonmoney.com. Check her website at www.jillonmoney.com) (c) 2013 TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC


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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 19, 2013


Bolingbrook 12-19-13