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Happy Easter! From Voyager Media

Our Village, Our News

By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

“I think we will still have to do a small RIF…Most of the teachers will get their jobs back and they should know it. And if they don’t know it, they should know it now.” Steve Quigley, school board president

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he plan to potentially lay off more than 400 teachers was shot down by the Valley View School District School Board last week, expecting the administration to come back with far fewer reductions as originally intended. The sometimes slippery slope of contractual obligations such as the Reduction in Force (RIF) process paints a picture far worse than intended, explained School Board President Steve Quigley. At the past board meeting, held March 26, the administration called for the honorable dismissal of first-, second-, third-, fourth-, and fifth-year teachers

APRIL 5, 2012

Vol. 5 No. 36

for reduction-in-force reasons. The RIF process, or layoff process, is a common but complicated occurrence in school districts. The passage of Senate Bill 7 in June 2011 made the process even more cumbersome, said Quigley. In an analysis done by Attorneys and Counselors Franczek and Radelet, teacher layoffs must now be based primarily on performance ratings rather than seniority. The legislation extends honorable dismissal, reduction in force, and recall rights to probationary teachers, and introduces a new procedure for carrying out reductions in force and recall decisions effective for See RIF, page 3


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News

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Easter Bunny to ‘drop in’ for Bolingbrook event By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

The Easter Bunny plans to make quite an entrance this Saturday, as the City of Hope Covenant Church hopes to spread quite a display of goodwill. Gather the kids and baskets and come watch the Easter Bunny arrive by helicopter April 7 at Brooks Middle School at 350 Blair Lane, Bolingbrook. This free event for children, preschool age through 5th grade will open at 10:30 a.m. and an Easter Egg Hunt with 20,000 eggs will begin at 11 a.m. An area for children with special needs will be available. In addition, there will be 20 free new bike giveaways, a bouncy house, pictures with the Easter Bunny, free popcorn, and live music during the event. A special performance by pop artist Bobby Lee will be given. According to Pastor Al Jones, this is the first year the church is hosting this event, but plans

“Our church really believes in serving and giving back to our community and this is just some of the ways we are doing that,” Pastor Al Jones, City of Hope Covenant Church are to make it an annual event. Pastor Jones explains that every summer, the church sponsors a three-day, “Serve

the City” event, in which it conducts a 5,000-bag food drive and volunteers to serve along side other community

organizations and host a free community festival. The church also will be hosting a Back to School Movies in the Park event in the fall where attendees will be asked to bring a donation of school supplies that will benefit students of the Valley View School District. “Our church really believes in serving and giving back to our community and this is just some of the ways we are doing that,”

said Pastor Jones. The Egg Drop is sponsored by a variety of businesses including A & A Property Solutions, A & M Aviation, Bolingbrook’s Clow International Airport, H20 Heart Haven OutReach, and Rentals Unlimited. The church congregation meets weekly on Sundays at Brooks Middle School. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com


THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012 3

Fire Department reduces response time By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Despite receiving the most calls in its history, the Bolingbrook Fire Department was able to reduce its response time in 2011. Fire Chief David Litton and the department recently released the 2011 annual report, which summarizes the work of the fire department and the services it provides. Response time to incidents— from the time the dispatch center receives a call to the time the responders arrive—improved to 3 minutes, 28 seconds. This is a 5-second improvement from the previous year. Litton reports that the average response time has dropped from 5 minutes, 6 seconds in 2007 to the current 3 minutes, 28 seconds. This is an overall reduction in response time of 1 minute, 38 seconds over the

RIF Continued from page 1 the 2011-2012 school year. According to the review, the legislation creates four specific tasks that districts must complete when making reduction in force and recall decisions, categorizing teachers based on legal qualifications and job descriptions and different groupings based primarily on performance evaluation ratings. School districts must determine the sequence of dismissal within each grouping, with the first grouping’s sequence based on the district’s discretion, the second grouping’s sequence based on performance evaluation ratings, and the third and fourth groupings’ sequences based on straight seniority unless an alternative method is established. This sequence of honorable dismissal list must be distributed to the applicable bargaining representative at least 75 calendar days before the end of the school term, however teachers can be moved from one group to another until 45 days before the end of the school term. What this change essentially does is contractually obligate the district to RIF a larger number of teachers. Quigley explained

four-year period. “In terms of response and for the person in need of assistance, 1 minute and 38 seconds can seem like a lifetime,” Litton said. He attributes the reduction to several factors, including technological improvements and improvements in the department’s process. Litton said that the human factor has also helped reduce overall times, mentioning that dispatch time was reduced from 1 minute, 30 seconds to 49 seconds. “Our personnel take great pride in providing quick,efficient and professional service to the citizens of Bolingbrook,” Litton said.“Our staff is second to none in providing this service, and we look forward to improving this standard in the years to come.” “The addition of the new computer-aided dispatch, electronic mapping, call handling procedures at the

dispatch center and turnout time of our personnel have all improved during the period,” Litton said. “Our average response time continues to be well below the maximum time allowed by the National Standards.” Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital has also played a large part in helping to reduce “in service” time—the time it takes to respond to the scene and deliver victims to hospitals for treatment. Approximately, 94 percent of all patients were transported to ABH, which is a continuing trend since the hospital opened. “Our call to ‘in service’ time has decreased again to just over 9 minutes,” Litton said. “This is a 6-minute improvement from last year and down an amazing 42 minutes since 2007. What this means is that our personnel are

that, by contract, a pink slip must be sent to everyone in that category. The district is looking to revamp its driver’s education department, which may require the district to lay off personnel, contributing to the larger number of RIF notices. It does not mean the entire department would be laid off, but the majority of teachers would receive a pink slip in order to reach the teachers that may need to be laid off. Coupled with the change in driver’s education are lower enrollment projections for next year, leading to the proposal by administration to make the notifications. However, Executive Director of Human Resources Sharon Hawks indicated that of the 400 or more teachers to be sent notices, all but approximately 40 would be rehired. Met with considerable protest from representatives of the teacher’s union, who came out in full force to share their concerns, the school board opted to reject the administration’s proposal and asked them to revisit the proposal. Currently negotiating a contract with the union, Quigley said the board has met with the union and is working on an agreed proposal and is confident a solution will be forthcoming. However, he also said that some

layoffs would be inevitable. “We chose not to do it that day, enrollment is still down,” said Quigley.“I think we will still have to do a small RIF…Most of the teachers will get their jobs back and they should know it. And if they don’t know it, they should know it now.” Teachers are recalled one person at a time in order of seniority, meaning that the Valley View Human Resources Department must wait for a response from one individual before moving on to the next name on the list. In 2009, the school district sent 136 RIF notices to first– year teachers, predicting that more than two–thirds would be recalled once the totals were in on voluntary resignations, involuntary transfers and other vacancies. The district eventually rehired all but seven. In 2010, the school district recalled all but five of 157 Valley View School District 365U teachers who received pink slips in April of that same year. Last year, no teachers were sent RIF notices because the number of retirees made up for the loss in enrollment. A decision regarding reduction in force is expected at the next school board meeting on April 16. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com

kept in town, and are available for the next emergency much sooner than before, when we were transporting the majority of our patients to Naperville.” According to the report, the department’s call volume in 2011 jumped by nearly 15 percent—a total of 7,923 calls— over 2010. Litton attributes the increase to special incidents such as activated trouble fire alarms and notifications. Service calls, including elevator alarm activations, lift assists for citizens, and unauthorized burning of leaves and refuse, also made up a number of 2011’s calls. The annual report statistics show that the department responded to 144 fires, about 1.81 percent of calls; with the highest number of calls, 47.54 percent, for rescue and EMS incidents. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Rezin Orthopedics offers 2012 Petitions available grads college scholarships for independent The physicians and staff of Rezin Orthopedics and Sports Medicine are pleased to announce its tenth annual call for scholarship applicants. Two $1,000 scholarships will be given to individuals living in the counties of Grundy, Kendall, LaSalle, Livingston, and Will who will be graduating in the spring of 2012 from high school or who are currently enrolled in a university or community college. Eligible

applicants must be enrolling in or be enrolled in the field of medicine which includes, but is not limited to, pre-med, physical therapy, occupational therapy, sports medicine, athletic training, medical technician or nursing. Last year, Ali Stevenson and Jon Scholtes were selected as the 2011 scholarship winners. Stevenson and Scholtes were each awarded $1000 to be contributed towards their

education. Stevenson is currently pursuing a nursing degree at Illinois Wesleyan, while Scholtes is attending Joliet Junior College, studying Political Science with a long term goal of becoming an orthopedic surgeon. Applications for the scholarships are available at www.rezinortho.com. Completed applications must be received by July 30, 2012.

Waste Management gives 12k to Salvation Army, Community center Waste Management presented a $12,000 check recently to the Salvation Army Joliet and Will County Corps Community Center. The gift is the fulfillment of a pledge toward the recently expanded Joliet and Will County Corps Community Center. In response to the growing population of Will County, one of the fastest growing counties in the country, The SalvationArmy quadrupled the size of its community center, adding a gymnasium, computer lab, teen center and a permanent space for an Emergency Disaster Services mobile canteen. The expanded center opened in September 2011. “We are so deeply appreciative of the corporate support of Waste Management,” Lieutenant Claudia Simmons said. “There is so much we can do with this money.This community center is a safe place for children to have fun and learn. “When we receive support, that investment goes right back to the community in enrichment and character-building programs for young people after school, as well as programs and services for people of all ages who are in need.” Lisa Disbrow, Waste Management’s director of public affairs in Illinois and Indiana, added, “Waste Management operates two facilities, the Prairie View and Laraway recycling and disposal facilities, and collects recyclables and municipal trash in Will County. We believe it is important to support and give back to the communities

we serve. We are pleased to support The Salvation Army and are looking forward to the community center serving as a great recreational and education resource for Will County residents.” In addition to the new gym, computer lab, teen center and mobile canteen, the center offers social services, ESL courses, computer classes, senior programs, GED classes, health and nutrition classes, and more. The Center has a particular focus on programs for youth such as recreational, creative,

character-building and educational activities after school. The proximity of the Joliet and Will County Corps Community Center to local schools and the need for after-school programs was a major inspiration for The Salvation Army’s expansion. The recent community center renovation and addition was a $3.25 million project, made possible by the support of local residents, businessmen and the receipt of several substantial estate gifts to the Army. For more information, visit www.jolietsalvationarmy.org.

candidates

Will County Clerk, Nancy Schultz Voots, announces that petitions will be available for New Party or Independent Candidates wishing to be placed on the ballot for the General Election to be held on November 6, 2012. The following county-wide offices and County Board districts are up for election: Circuit Clerk, Recorder of Deeds, State’s Attorney, County Auditor, Coroner, Chief Executive Officer (one for each office, four-year terms); along with all 13 County Board districts (two members for each district, terms vary). Petitions will also be available for one Trustee (four year term) in the Lockport Heights Sanitary District.

Petitions and all necessary forms, including signature requirements, will be available at the County Clerk’s Office at 302 N. Chicago Street, Joliet. You may request a Petition Packet on the website or by e-mailing elections@ willcountyillinois.com. Petitions for federal, state and judicial offices will be available from the State Board of Elections. The first day to file petitions will be Monday, June 18, 2012. The last day is Monday, June 25, 2012 until 5 p.m. Petitions received by mail in the County Clerk’s Office before June 18th will be returned. Please visit www. thewillcountyclerk.com for this and other election related information.


THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012 5

Dental patients’ smiles shine for local foundation Sherri Dauskurdas Staff Reporter

Patients who frequent the Shorewood Family Dental Care Clinic are getting clean teeth for a great cause next week, as the local dental office hosts a benefit event for Joliet OncologyHematology Associates Foundation. On April 13 from 3-7 p.m., the dental hygienists will offer professional cleanings in return for a $30 donation as part of the Wiggin’ Out benefit. JOHA is a multi-physician practice in Joliet with satellite offices in Morris, Flossmoor, Bolingbrook, and Glen Oaks. Currently JOHA has more than 100 employees to provide care to more than 5,000 patients. As an offshoot of the practice, The JOHA Foundation was formed in 2000 to help bridge the gap during treatment and recovery by providing support and education to cancer patients and their families. The hygienists at the center hope to raise enough funds through cleanings and other donations to pay for five wigs for women in need. The wigs range in price from $200-300. Reservations are requested and a donation holds the appointment. According to the clinic, only a few spots remain.

“It’s a really great opportunity to help out some women who don’t have insurance, or who are underinsured,” Hygienist Meredith Holcombe, Joliet Oncology Hermatology Associates Foundation “It’s crazy how much support we are getting,” said hygienist Meredith Holcombe. “It’s a really great opportunity to help out some women who don’t have insurance, or who are underinsured.” Holcombe said the dental center takes part in a variety of charitable activities throughout the year, and that the idea for this one came out of a desire to do something for mothers in need around Mother’s Day. The entire hygiene team at Shorewood Family Dental has been involved in the project, and reservations have hit 45 of 48 appointments they need to fill to hit their goal professional cleanings for the benefit of the foundation. For more information, contact the Shorewood Family Dental Care practice at (815) 725-5991.

Svitak parents welcome James Peter Svitak Tracy and James Svitak of Bolingbrook, are proud and overjoyed to announce the new addition to their family. James Peter Svitak was born January 15, 2012. He weighed in at 4 pounds 8 ounces and measured in at 18 inches long. His maternal grandparents

Peter and Janice Tinaglia and uncle Peter Tinaglia are from Bolingbrook. His paternal grandparents are James and Barbara Svitak and aunts Amy Svitak-Gay and Emily Svitak and uncles Ian Svitak and John are from Downers Grove. Plus a large extended

family on both sides that are excited he’s here!


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THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Police

blotter

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Bolingbrook Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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Brian Jeong, 21, 2611 Fairhauser Road,Naperville, was arrested at 10:34 p.m. on March 21 and charged with DUI and improper lane usage, following a traffic stop at Weber Road and I-55.

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Gerardo MelendezLaboy, 21, 870 E. Vuelta Suave, Tucson, Ariz.; Fernando Hernandez, 24, 458 E Roger Road, Tucson, Ariz.; Juan Villela, 29, 460 E. Yavapai Road, Tucson, Ariz.; Erick Costas-Delagado, 20, 6161 E. Grant Road, Tucson, Ariz.; Ismael Assalia-Jacott, 22, 36 Sabanas Ave., Las Praderas, Hermosillo, were all arrested at 5 p.m. on March 22 at Bass Pro, 790. N. Janes Ave., after attempting to purchase an ATV with fraudulent gift cards.

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Kelly Cazares, 46, 237 Northridge Ave., was arrested at 11:33 p.m. on March 23 and charged with domestic battery, resisting a peace officer and assault, following a call to the residence for a disturbance.

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Derek Banicki, 30, 314 Northridge Ave., was arrested at 11:52 p.m. on March 23 and charged with an in-state warrant.

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Kelly Cazares, 46, 237 Northridge Ave., was arrested at 10:11 p.m. on March 23 and charged with disorderly conduct, following a call to the residence for a disturbance.

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Francisco Galindo, 24, 306 Woodcreek Drive, was arrested at 1:50 a.m. on March 24 and charged with an in-state warrant.

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Two apartments were burglarized on the 300 block of Woodcreek Drive sometime between 3:30 and 5:27 p.m. on March 24. Entry was made through an attic and the suspect(s) cut a hole in the

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ceiling to enter the secured residence. A laptop, piggy bank, High School diploma, gold crucifix necklace and a social security card were taken.

Antonio Flores-Guillen, 21, 366 Tarrington Way, was arrested at 5:07 p.m. on March 25 and charged with three instate warrants.

Anthony Rataiczyk, 36, 537 Walker Drive, was arrested at 12:16 p.m. on March 26 and charged with domestic battery and aggravated assault, following a call to the residence.

Aldo Gamez, 33, 420 Hallmark Lane, was arrested at 11:36 p.m. on March 25 and charged with an in-state warrant at 11:36 p.m.

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Rodrigo Perez, 19, 1516 Trails End Lane, was arrested at 4:08 a.m. on March 25 and charged with hit and run and driving too fast for conditions.

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400 block of Devonshire Court for the report of a residential burglary. Speakers and an amplifier were taken between March 25 and March 26.Loss valued at $750.

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Eduardo Flores-Figuero, 43, 204 Galewood Drive, was arrested on March 26 and charged with aggravated battery. The victim was transported to Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital for their injuries.

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Vaneekia Miller, 20, 230 Williamsburg Court, Romeoville, was arrested at 5:25 p.m. on March 27 and charged

Alejandro Figuero-Rivas, 29, 855 Tamms Lane, was arrested at 3:10 p.m. on March 25 and charged with domestic battery and aggravated battery. Officers were called to the

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with retail theft at Meijer, 755 E. Boughton Road. Anastasia Page, 30, 1256 Fairwood Drive, was arrested at 2:52 a.m. on March 28 and charged with DUI, illegal transportation of alcohol and no insurance, following a traffic stop on the 700 block of W. Boughton Road.

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Tremell Buis, 21, 137 Lilac Lane, was arrested at 11:10 p.m. on March 28 and charged with an in-state warrant, following a traffic stop on the 200 block of N. Weber Road.

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Forum

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

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Guest Columnist

From the desk of Rep. Jim Sacia The Illinois Budget. - This is an effort to simplify a very complex problem involving billions of dollars. Our annual budget this next fiscal year is approximately $58 billion - of that amount, you the taxpayers are expected to send us $33 billion 719 million in tax dollars. The difference between those two numbers is money we receive as reimbursement from the federal government and some other sources. It is predominately motor fuel tax that is specifically designated for such things as roads and bridges. It is tax money that you pay each time you pull up to the pump and put gas in your car. It is not part of what

we call GRF or General Revenue Fund. Of the $33,719,000,000 GRF that you will send us, here is the breakdown of how it will be spent. First and foremost is non discretionary spending.These are obligations that must be made. Number 1 - Our pension obligation is $5.1 billion (this is the state’s portion of the pension expense not including the employee contributions). Number 2 is statutory transfer out money equaling $2.1 billion. This is money that we have collected and we owe a percentage back to local governments such as sales tax revenues.

Write to us! You are invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. Please email your letter to Matt Honold, managing editor, at mhonold@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

Publisher & Editor Rich Masterson publisher@buglenewspapers.com Managing Editor Matt Honold mhonold@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Sherri Dauskurdas Rick Kambic Laura Katauskas Debbie Lively Jonathan Samples Sports Reporters Mark Gregory mgregory@buglenewspapers.com Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication Letters to Editor: 9 a.m. Friday sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

www.buglenewspapers.com Vice President of Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Production Manager Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Sales sales@buglenewspapers.com Voyager Media Group, Inc. P.O. Box 1613 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 3 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 3 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

Number 3 is our group insurance obligation totaling $1.2 billion. This is the state’s portion of the state workers’ insurance programs not including the employee contributions. Number 4 is our debt services or our obligation for money we have borrowed, both principle and interest, totaling approximately $2.2 billion. Number 5 is Medicaid. You the taxpayer are on the hook for $6 billion 638 million. (Our total Medicaid obligation this year is approximately $15 billion including federal reimbursements). Yes, you are right – tax payers are on the hook for all of it.

The above five “must be made” expenditures total approximately $17.2 billion. There is another $219 million in non-discretionary expenditures bringing the total to $17.419 billion. If you do the math that leaves $16,300,000,000 for the five appropriations committees to divide which is close to $1 billion less than available funds last year. If your eyes haven’t yet glazed over here is how it allocates out. Elementary and Secondary Education Appropriations receive 39.8 % of funding totaling $6 billion 491 million, a cut of $363 million.Higher Education receives 12.1% totaling $1.978 billion,a cut of $110 million. General Services

Illustrated Opinions

receives 7.1% or $1 billion 165 million dollars, a cut of 65 million. Human Services appropriations (Medicaid removed) receives 31.2% of funding totaling $5 billion 87 million, a cut of 284 million dollars. Public Safety appropriations receives 9.7% of funding or $1 billion 576 million, a cut of $88 million. There will not be a happy agency in Illinois government but this is where the rubber meets the road. As always, you can reach me, Sally or Barb at 815/232-0774 or e-mail us at jimsacia@aeroinc.net. You can also visit my website at www.jimsacia.com. It’s always a pleasure to hear from you.


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THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Schools

Rotary seeking families to host international student

Submitted Photo

‘Pushing up the sky’ Kristy DeGroot’s second graders at Oak View Elementary School figure out a way to work together in their rendition of “Pushing Up The Sky,” which was performed for parents recently.

Free bird Tibbott Elementary School maintenance supervisor Robert Wojcieszek frees a bird from a bush near the school’s busboarding area. The bird’s leg had become entangled in some string. Wojcieszek’s efforts saved the bird, which flew away to cheers from the children.

The Rotary Club of Bolingbrook is now seeking applicants to host an international exchange student from Denmark for the 20122013 academic school year. Families are being sought to host this outstanding young man for three 3-month periods from mid August 2012 to midJuly 2013. This is a wonderful opportunity to experience another culture and share a valuable exchange of ideas and languages. Youth exchange is a rewarding opportunity to make a lasting impact on our planet and in our community. Any family structure from empty nesters to households with young children to single parents is invited to apply. There is no strictly predefined “ideal” structure for a host family.The main criterion is the ability to provide a nurturing environment. An informational guide and pre-application can be found by visiting www. bolingbrookrotary.org. The only financial obligation a host family is undertaking is the food and shelter for the student. All other expenses, such as clothing and education are paid either by the student’s natural parents or by Rotary. Rotary even covers the student’s

pocket money (monthly allowance). The Rotary Club of Bolingbrook is very active in the student’s activities and has been facilitating youth exchanges in Bolingbrook for the past three decades.

About the Rotary Club of Bolingbrook Founded in 1975, Rotary Club of Bolingbrook meets each Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at Ashbury’s on Boughton Road. Like all Rotary Clubs, the purpose is to help community leaders get involved in their communities, connect with other professionals, share their time and experience with young people, and use skills to help others.

About the Rotary Scholarship Program The Rotary Club of Bolingbrook has donated over $800,000 in scholarships to Bolingbrook students over the past 35 years. The Top Ten dinner is held annually in the month of May honoring the Top Ten percent of the year’s graduating class.


Calendar ONGOING Peep Diorama Contest.March 26-April 9 at the Fountaindale Library. Use peeps to create a diorama inspired by your favorite book, movie, video game, or other media. Submissions will be accepted March 26-April 9. Check out all the submissions on April 12 all day in Meeting Room B, or attend the Peeps Award Ceremony at 6 p.m. Pick up the complete rules and entry forms at any library service desk beginning March 23. Bolingbrook Amateur Radio Society (BARS). The Bolingbrook Amateur Radio Society (BARS) meets on the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Fire Station #5, 1900 W. Rodeo Drive in Bolingbrook. All ham radio enthusiasts are invited to attend. Meetings usually include a presentation and refreshments. VE testing is held prior to each meeting at 6:30 p.m. for those wishing to take any level of license exam. Candidates must bring a photo ID, any pending Certificates of Successful Completion, and the test fee of $15. For more information, visit www.k9bar. org. Concert Series. 3 p.m. on the third Sundays of February, March, April and May at Friendship United Methodist Church, 305 E. Boughton Road, Bolingbrook. Performers include current church members, former

members, and guest artists. Family storytime. 7-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the Fountaindale Public Library. On Tuesday evenings, get the family together to hear stories and sing songs in the storytime room. Knitter’s Nest. 10 a.m. to noon at the Fountaindale Public Library. Weekly drop-in knitting and crochet group in the library’s board room. Fly tying. 7-8:30 p.m. at Outdoor World, 709 Janes Ave., Bolingbrook. Join master fly tier Bob Davenport in the Fly Fishing Department for some great tips on fly tying and to answer any questions or concerns you may have. For more information, call the store at 630-296-2700. Fish feeding frenzy. Thursdays and Saturdays at 10:30 a.m. at Outdoor World’s Fresh Water Aquarium. Bring the kids and join the fun feeding the fish in the main tank, then come to the trout pond to feed from the bridge. For more information, call the store at 630-296-2700. Birth After Cesarean. Meet other moms who are planning their natural birth after cesarean section. Come for encouragement, support and information to plan your next birth. Meetings are held at noon the first Monday every month in Romeoville.  Call Melanie at 253-

861-5897 com

-VBACesarean@aol.

Need a Job or GED Classes? Education Service Network NFP Inc.’s Career Seekers GED/ Workforce program, a program of the Regional Office of Education is located at 179 North Chicago St. Joliet, Illinois 60432. We offer GED classes/resume preparation/job placement for participants between the ages of 16 and 21. Classes meet Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon; Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 1 to 3 p.m. We also offer GED classes at our satellite site at the Friendship Centre at HighPoint, 175 South HighPoint Drive, Romeoville on Monday and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Equal Opportunity Employer/Program Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. For more information call 815-774-8902 or 815-7748922. Employment. Will County Workforce Services host its free weekly Career Café for job seekers at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday in Room 519 of the JJC Renaissance Center, 214 N. Ottawa St., Joliet. Reserve a spot by calling 815-727-4444, Ext. 122, or emailing bwashington@ willcountyillinois.com. Weekly Food Pantry Open. Power Connection’s Extended

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012 Food Pantry is open 3 days a week. Mondays(*), Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to Noon. For a $10 donation, you can fill up your grocery bag and select from  fruits, vegetables, desserts, breads and meat when available. Our  Clothing Pantry is open during the same hours. All Illinois residents are welcome and there is no income verification required. Power Connection is located at the intersection of Remington Blvd and Veteran’s Parkway, 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook, IL  60440.  You can call us at (630) 6796899 or visit our website at www.thepowerconnection.org for more information on other services.

APRIL 7 Anime Club. 6:30-8 p.m. at the Fountaindale Library. Do you like anime and manga? Anime Club is for teens looking for a place to watch anime and make new friends. For grades 6-12. Register at www.fountaindale.org.

APRIL 10 Adventure on the Titanic. 2-3:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Library.This program is a fun and interactive look at the Titanic’s voyage, including trivia and games to take kids back to 1912.

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Audience members will act as Titanic travelers while they learn about the ship and what happened to it.Vintage costumes and appearance encouraged. For grades K-5. Register at www. fountaindale.org.

APRIL 11 Yu-Gi-Oh! 4-5 p.m. at the Fountaindale Library. Grab your Yu-Gi-Oh cards and play for fun with your fellow teens. For grades 6-9. Register at www. fountaindale.org. Beginning Genealogy. 7-8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Library. New to genealogy and don’t know where to start? Learn new skills and find the answers you need with this free beginning genealogy class. Register at www.fountaindale.org. Horror book club. 7-8 p.m. at the Fountaindale Library. Discussion will be on “Zombie, Ohio,” by Scott Kenemore. Pick up a copy of the book at the third floor information desk.

APRIL 12 Spring break movie. 10:3012:45 p.m. at the Fountaindale Library. Come into the library See CALENDAR, page 10


He said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” In the week to come, you might be called upon to tackle problems in unique ways.

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jokes in stride. In the week ahead, you will find that your business aspirations get a boost and the work you’ve done to improve your public image begins to pay off.

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

CALENDAR Continued from page 9

multi-sensory playtime. For ages 2-6 with an adult. Register at www.fountaindale.org.

You can enjoy The April Fools’ joke sentiments without drowning in is notmore on you. Someone might try to incorporate functional moves information or sponsorship sentimentality. In the upcoming week, you persuade you to accept poor advice or a badDerek to keep your range of motion opportunities please call can keep your head above water and maintain situation in the week to come. The joke will be on that AARP harmony Driver Safety and reflexes sharper than ever. Cazeau at 630-312-6006. - as long as you don’t fall prey to a bid for person when you don’t fall for it. Program. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at For adults aged 50 and over. Be your sympathy.

APRIL 17

Author Fair. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. the Fountaindale Library. Cars sure to bring a bottle of water. Great Reads Book Club. 7-8 Across Down Fountaindale Library. Join Register at www.fountaindale. p.m. in the Fountaindale Public and enjoy a screening of “Pete’s 35 Swelled head at the 1 Burn badly 36 “For Me and have changed, and so have traffic 1 Nintendo to fight another can turn into Myauthor __” 38 T-bone the library’s annual rules, driving conditions, and theLive org. Library’sHorns Videoconferencing Dragon” (G, 128 min.) Forwith all a in atcompetitor 6 The lightning day. You may fight through a few bad halos. Your loved ones might escape 37 Gives the nod 2 Start up the warm, red center bolt on Harry roads. Brush up on your driving Meeting Room. Discussion of ages, preschool with an adult. fair. days to get to the good ones in the week ahead. your understanding off and on during the week 39 Postal sackful mountain 42 Colorful card Potter’s APRIL 25 right and wrong may be skills toYour stayperception safe. Costofiswhat $12isfor “Bookand ofpassion, Tomorrow” bywill Cecelia Drop-in. to come. Your dedication however, 40 Layered haircut 3 Italian violin game forehead, e.g. challenged(must by others. Freemaker hearing screening. 1-4bus AARP members have card), Great Reads Book Club. Ahem. For harmony. more information highlight and7-8 augment your essential 41 Crosstown 43 Lends a hand to 10 Squirrel away alternative 4 Chaney horror at theofFountaindale Public $14 for non-members. Register p.m. in the Fountaindale Public visit the library. Spring break movie. 2-3:45 p.m. 44 Lecture rooms 14 “__ World”: 45 AutoLions finish 5 “Spring ahead” The Bolingbrook at www.fountaindale.org. Library’s Videoconferencing p.m.ticklish at the Fountaindale Library. 45 Abel’s assassin Library. protection hrs. Sometimes PushJUNE on past 4 the is hosting hearing Meeting honesty Room. Discussion of “A Come to the library 47 and enjoy Jazzy horn a Club Muppet’s 46 Height: Pref. 6 Witch trials towna free as the best policy is just too honest. It pitfalls. Some people are never more APRIL 19 48 Lass awed by Forbird more information, Night to Remember” by Walter Look Good, Feel Better. 5 screening The Mighty Ducks screening. “Sesameof Street” 47 Chilly powder? 7 Whooping may be wise to play your cards close to your righteous than when they are in the wrong. By 48 What the nose Advanced city, call8 Entirely Ron Richards at 630-730Glamour Lord. For more visit guns p.m. Adventist (PG,segment 106 min.) For the allbigages, vest. In the coming week, you may feel pressured to information sticking to your in theatweek ahead, youBolingbrook will be knows 9 Kanga’s kid maybeadult. 8540. 15 Woody Workshop. 7-8:30 p.m. at the the crisis. library. Hospital, 500 Remington Blvd. preschoolers with an keep your head in the midst of family able to overcome adverse situations. 49 “Circle of 10 Vain walks 54 Bright Guthrie’s son This program is designed for Drop-in. Friends” writerFountaindale Library. Spring is 11 In the loop 55 Sis’s sib 16 Candy that APRIL 15 MAY 7 in the air, and now’s the time to newly diagnosed cancer patients. Binchy 12 Anglican parish 56 IM offerer comes in twos 50 Newspaper byespruce up your wardrobe and priest Lookinstances, Good,a Feel Better. 5 Learn how apply makeup Teen book exchange. In some Make atofresh start each 58 He “runs2-4 Titanic: A historical look 17 Winter lines? 13 Flames that through documentaries. update your look. Register at p.m. at Adventist Bolingbrook and manage hair and wigs p.m.Olympics at the Fountaindale Library. pawn is more powerful than a king. day. In the week ahead, make sure you through the 51 Seize (from) have cooled? Don’t let the little things thatHospital, cause aggravation never go to during bed with changes unresolvedin arguments town ... Day in his 1-5:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale 500 Remington Blvd. appearance Celebrate Teen event with gates Literature 52 Gathered, as www.fountaindale.org. 18 Box for practice take control of your emotions in This the week to come. is designed brewing in the Someonetreatment. might hide Each nightgown” 20 Invoice fig. exchange fallen leaves 19 Horse’s hair a century, For the program for background. during cancer with a book in the Library. Remain vigilante; money can slip away. their anger or pretend to accept your views. 63 Thomas __ 21 Place for inks or 53 Orleans’s river 24 Spice Girl APRIL 21 Titanic has fascinated the public newly diagnosed cancer patients. participant will receive her own Vortex. For grades 6-12. 54 Exchange Halliwell Edison oinks with its tragic sinking on April Genealogy Day. 9:30 a.m. Learn how to apply makeup sample bag of free makeup. Light 57 Ogle 64 Tater __: Ore-Ida 25 Ashram 22 Subtle vibes APRIL 13 15, 1912. Over 1,500 of her to 5 p.m. at the Fountaindale and manage hair and wigs refreshments will be provided. 59 India Inc.? authority product 23 One stalking 60 Gehrig who Library. A day-long genealogy during changes in appearance Sign up for this free program by 26 Store posting Spring Wii gaming. and crew perished 65 Big tractor namepassengers lions orBreak tigers played with Ruth 27 Craving 2:30-4:30 p.m.at the Fountaindale calling 630-856-7525. 66 Movie house in the icy waters of the North program featuring four speakers. during cancer treatment. Each 28 It.’s continent 61 Credit card 30 Sch. in Big D suffix 29 Raw rocks Library. Come play video games Atlantic. Come watch users a series participant will receive her own may be Handouts, prize drawings, and 31 Commandment Allergy trigger, of count 30 “Octopus’s JUNE 27 with your friends at67the library. documentaries profiling this sample bag of free makeup. Light asked for them,fabulous resources are available often Garden” singer briefly 32 Hubbub For all ages, preschool with an sensational historical event. all day. Attendees are asked to refreshments will be provided. Great Reads Book Club. 7-8 68 Passover dinner 33 Painting Ringo 62 Society page bring a bag lunch. Brooks Café adult. Drop-in. Sign up for this free program by p.m. in the Fountaindale Public word reproduction 33 Talk show APRIL 16 (located in the library) offers calling 630-856-7525. Library’s Videoconferencing 34 Schoolboy ©2012 TRIBUNE MEDIA guest’s blatant SERVICES, INC.at APRIL 14 Nifty @ Fifty. 10-11 a.m. box lunches on a pre-order basis. Meeting Room. Discussion of 35 Slippery fish promotion MAY 23 Humane Haven Bowling the Fountaindale Library. Join Beverages and light refreshments “The Honk and Holler Opening P r e v i o u s p u z z l e ’ s a n s w e r s Fundraiser. Check in is 9:30 Debbie Caputo and Annette are provided. Register at www. Bolingbrook Hospital Soon” by Billie Letts. For more p.m. at Brunswick Zone, 1555 Damron as they take you fountaindale.org. Foundations 2nd Annual information visit the library. W. 75th Street Woodridge. All through a low impact cardio and Golf Classic. Registration is at APRIL 22 money collected will go toward resistance exercise class that will 7 a.m. and tee-off is at 8 a.m. at helping homeless animals at the incorporate functional moves Earth Day. All day at the the Bolingbrook Golf Club, 2001 shelter. Humane Haven is a non- to keep your range of motion Fountaindale Library, see how Rodeo Drive, Bolingbrook. The profit facility in Bolingbrook. $20 and reflexes sharper than ever. many environmentally-friendly Bolingbrook Hospital Foundation per person includes 2 games of For adults aged 50 and over. Be features you can find at the raises funds to advance Adventist Scotch Doubles and one “crazy sure to bring a bottle of water. library and share your own ideas Bolingbrook Hospital’s mission Previous puzzle ’s answers game”. For more information Register at www.fountaindale. for how to make the world a of extending the healing ministry call 630-378-4208 or visit our org. greener place. Enjoy the library’s of Christ. Proceeds raised from website at www.hhas.org. books and board games for some the 2012 Golf Classic will Teen writers group. 6:30- unplugged fun. benefit patient care services at Sensory storytime. 10:30- 7:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital. APRIL 23 11:15 a.m. at the Fountaindale Library. Are you a writer? Here’s Golf Classic participants will Previous puzzle ’s answers Library.This storytime is open to your chance to improve your Nifty @ Fifty. 10-11 a.m. at enjoy 18 holes of golf, golfer all preschoolers, but is tailored to creative writing skills. Join teen the Fountaindale Library. Join gift, breakfast, lunch,Jumbles: beverages, those with sensory integration author Megg Jensen for this Debbie Caputo and Annette course contests, auction, • HOUSEand • TROTH • BEAVER • SINGLE issues.The senses will be engaged brand new writing group. For Damron as they take you awards. Shotgun startAnswer: – best ball, through music, stories, and grades 6-12. Register at www. through a low impact cardio and 4 golfers per team, $225.00 When theper siblings opened the shoe repair shop, they activities, including a 15-minute fountaindale.org. resistance exercise class that will person / $800 per foursome. became --For “SOLE” BROTHERS

SUDOKU

TOP POP ALBUMS March 18 through March 24 TITLE

Up All Night 21 Greatest Hits Wrecking Ball Passion: White Flag Whitney: The Greatest Hits Take Care Now 41:That’s What I Call Music

Making Mirrors Some Nights

TOP DVD RENTALS March 18 through March 24

TOP COUNTRY ALBUMS March 18 through March 24 ARTIST

One Direction Adele Guns n’ Roses Bruce Springsteen Passion Whitney Houston Drake Various artists Gotye Fun.

TITLE

Tailgates & Tanlines My Kinda Party Own the Night Chief The Band Perry Footloose Halfway to Heaven Four the Record Spring Break 4... Suntan City

Family Man

ARTIST

Luke Bryan Jason Aldean Lady Antebellum Eric Church the Band Perry Soundtrack Brantley Gilbert Miranda Lambert Luke Bryan Shooter Jennings

TITLE

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Tower Heist Jack and Jill The Muppets The Adventures of Tintin Footloose Young Adult Happy Feet 2 The Three Musketeers In Time

LABEL

Columbia Pictures Universal Pictures Columbia Tristar Walt Disney Pictures Paramount Pictures Paramount Pictures Paramount Pictures Warner Bros. Summit Entertainment 20th Century Fox


Take 5

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012 11

H o ro s c o p e s

Across

1 Burn badly 6 The lightning bolt on Harry Potter’s forehead, e.g. 10 Squirrel away 14 “__ World”: ticklish Muppet’s “Sesame Street” segment 15 Woody Guthrie’s son 16 Candy that comes in twos 17 Winter Olympics event with gates 20 Invoice fig. 21 Place for inks or oinks 22 Subtle vibes 23 One stalking lions or tigers 28 It.’s continent 29 Raw rocks 30 “Octopus’s Garden” singer Ringo 33 Talk show guest’s blatant promotion

35 Swelled head 38 T-bone with a warm, red center 42 Colorful card game 43 Lends a hand to 44 Lecture rooms 45 Abel’s assassin 47 Jazzy horn 48 Lass awed by the big city, maybe 54 Bright 55 Sis’s sib 56 IM offerer 58 He “runs through the town ... in his nightgown” 63 Thomas __ Edison 64 Tater __: Ore-Ida product 65 Big tractor name 66 Movie house suffix 67 Allergy trigger, often 68 Passover dinner

Down

1 Nintendo competitor 2 Start up the mountain 3 Italian violin maker 4 Chaney of horror 5 “Spring ahead” hrs. 6 Witch trials town 7 Whooping bird 8 Entirely 9 Kanga’s kid 10 Vain walks 11 In the loop 12 Anglican parish priest 13 Flames that have cooled? 18 Box for practice 19 Horse’s hair 24 Spice Girl Halliwell 25 Ashram authority 26 Store posting 27 Craving 30 Sch. in Big D 31 Commandment count 32 Hubbub 33 Painting reproduction 34 Schoolboy 35 Slippery fish

36 “For Me and My __” 37 Gives the nod 39 Postal sackful 40 Layered haircut 41 Crosstown bus alternative 45 Auto finish protection 46 Height: Pref. 47 Chilly powder? 48 What the nose knows 49 “Circle of Friends” writer Binchy 50 Newspaper bye lines? 51 Seize (from) 52 Gathered, as fallen leaves 53 Orleans’s river 54 Exchange 57 Ogle 59 India Inc.? 60 Gehrig who played with Ruth 61 Credit card users may be asked for them, briefly 62 Society page word

You can’t just say you are free of prejudices, you must be free of them. During the first half of the week, you may be challenged by others to perform at the optimum and criticized if you aren’t politically correct.

Communication conquers discord. Information is something you can distribute, but communication is getting through. There may be days in the week ahead when you can sidestep a serious misunderstanding.

Think like Einstein. He said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” In the week to come, you might be called upon to tackle problems in unique ways.

Take April Fools’ Day jokes in stride. In the week ahead, you will find that your business aspirations get a boost and the work you’ve done to improve your public image begins to pay off.

You can enjoy sentiments without drowning in sentimentality. In the upcoming week, you can keep your head above water and maintain harmony - as long as you don’t fall prey to a bid for your sympathy.

The April Fools’ joke is not on you. Someone might try to persuade you to accept poor advice or a bad situation in the week to come. The joke will be on that person when you don’t fall for it.

Live to fight another day. You may fight through a few bad days to get to the good ones in the week ahead. Your perception of what is right and wrong may be challenged by others.

Horns can turn into halos. Your loved ones might escape your understanding off and on during the week to come. Your dedication and passion, however, will highlight and augment your essential harmony.

Sometimes honesty as the best policy is just too honest. It may be wise to play your cards close to your vest. In the coming week, you may feel pressured to keep your head in the midst of family crisis.

Push on past the pitfalls. Some people are never more righteous than when they are in the wrong. By sticking to your guns in the week ahead, you will be able to overcome adverse situations.

In some instances, a pawn is more powerful than a king. Don’t let the little things that cause aggravation take control of your emotions in the week to come. Remain vigilante; money can slip away.

Make a fresh start each day. In the week ahead, make sure you never go to bed with unresolved arguments brewing in the background. Someone might hide their anger or pretend to accept your views.

SUDOKU

©2012 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • HOUSE • TROTH • BEAVER • SINGLE

Answer:

When the siblings opened the shoe repair shop, they became -- “SOLE” BROTHERS


12

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Bolingbrook resident helping Lewis win, page 16; Young volleyball team gaining experience early on,

page 17

13 THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Tuck ends career as All-American By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

After ending her career at Bolingbrook and before her departure to the University of Connecticut, Morgan Tuck played in a pair of the most elite all star games in the nation.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Tuck first played her final prep game in the state of Illinois when she competed in the McDonald’s All-American Game at the United Center in Chicago. “The only time I really see the United Center is when I am watching the Bulls play and when I watch Derrick Rose play on that floor, so to get to play where he plays is a great honor,” Tuck said. “It was a pretty good game out there, I was really nervous at first and I think that is how a lot of us were. But talking to everyone on the bench, we were able to calm down.” In that game, Tuck tallied 18 points and sparked the West team in a second-half rally that saw them fall 79-78 when University of Tennessee-bound Bashaara Graves hit one of two free throws after she was fouled

with 0.3 seconds left. Tuck and fellow Voyager Media standout Jewell Loyd combined for a key basket late in the second half that pulled the West to within two points at 66-64. Loyd came up with a steal on the defensive end and fed Tuck for an basket inside hoop. “You just have to go out there and play,” Tuck said. “I am on a team with the best players in the country and we can go out there and play and do what we do best and just play the game.” It was only the second time in the history of the McDonald’s All-American Game that no male players from the state of Illinois were selected to compete, leaving the Illinois torch in the hands of Tuck, Loyd and Janee Thompson from Whitney Young, the team that eliminated Bolingbrook from the state playoffs in a four-overtime supersectional game.Thompson was on the winning East team at the McDonald’s game. “I told Janee that she got me twice in the same year,” Tuck said. “I wish she could have been on the same team as me and Jewell, but it was cool See TUCK, page 14

Mark Gregory/Bugle staff

Bolingbrook’s Morgan Tuck fakes Brittany Sykes (20) and future UCONN teammate Breanna Stewart as she goes up for two of her 18 points at the McDonald’s All-American Game.


14

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

TUCK Continued from page 13 having three people out there from Chicago. To be one of the three players from Illinois was a great honor.” Tuck was able to guard McDonald’s Player of the Year Breanna Stewart, who will join Tuck at UCONN next season. Stewart hit a few athletic shots over Tuck late in the game. “I didn’t want to let her score, that’s for sure,” Tuck said. “But when she elevates it is hard to stop her and it will be fun to play with her next year. It was fun, we were talking on the court. We knew we would be guarding each other the whole

game and that was fun to play her because you don’t see a Breanna Stewart every day.” Tuck joked that the West team was at a disadvantage being blinded by the neon orange uniforms the East team was wearing, while Tuck and the East players were in camouflage uniforms with neon yellow numbers, similar to those wore by the Baylor University men’s team in the NCAA tournament. “The orange was bright,” Tuck laughed. “We got used to them. They are great uniforms. The best I ever saw. Adidas did a great job with them.” Tuck had the chance to play with Stewart as well as future teammate Moriah Jefferson at the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association High School All-

Vote for the...

ATHLETE OFTHE MONTH VOTE ONLINE!

Monay Crawford, Maine East -Voyager Media All-Star MVP

Morgan Tuck, Bolingbrook -Female hoops player of the year

Sidney Prasse, Benet -First team All-Area, 14.9 ppg

Marlon Johnson, Joliet West -Voyager Media All-Star MVP

Vicky Vodicka, Romeoville -Three goals in season-opener

Ed Presniakovas, Plainfield South -Male hoops player of the year

Vote

for your winner for the Athlete of the Month for March online at www.buglenewspapers.com up until April 16. The winner will be announced in the April 18/19 issue.

Sports American Game at the Pepsi Center in Denver. Tuck hadTuck had eight points and five rebounds as her White beat the Blue, 74-62. Loyd, who also was on the white team, was game MVP with 18 points. mark@buglenewspapers.com


Sports

Lacrosse wins 18-11 The North Central College women’s lacrosse team took the University of Puget Sound’s best shots at Benedetti-Wehrli Stadium Sunday evening, then pressed on and finished with a scoring surge that decked the Loggers, 18-11, and gave the Cardinals their second win of the season.

NORTH CENTRAL North Central (2-5) saw the Loggers trim a large early deficit to a single goal early in the second period, but closed the game by outscoring the visitors, 8-2, over the final 20 minutes to post its first win over Puget Sound in four attempts. The Cardinals made their bid to put the game out of reach early by scoring the first six goals. Puget Sound (1-10) bounced back and closed the gap to 7-5 after scoring four unanswered goals in a 10-minute stretch. North Central’s Danielle Fiala and Jacqui Morgan scored successive goals in the final two minutes, but the Loggers

responded with two goals in the final 31 seconds to leave the halftime score at 9-7 in the hosts’ favor. Caroline Gully scored the initial goal of the second half, but the Loggers scored twice to cut North Central’s lead to 10-9. The Cardinals began the decisive rally of the night with 20:02 to play as Mallory Bahr scored off a pass from Morgan. North Central then got successive goals from Morgan and Rachael Houp in an

18-second span to gain some breathing room. North Central held the Loggers scoreless for the final 12:02, capping off the game with another goal from Bahr and two scores from Fiala. Fiala scored a game-high five goals for the Cardinals, while Morgan tallied four goals and Gully finished with three. Shannon Prince collected five ground balls and caused five turnovers, while Alison Musur recorded four draw controls.

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

15


16

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Sports

Bolingbrook’s Brauer helps Flyers win Lewis baseball split a doubleheader with No. 21 Missouri S&T on Saturday (March 24) afternoon at Brennan Field. The day was highlighted by a straight steal of home by Lewis senior Mike Bolling (Chicago, Ill./Guerin Prep/Triton) and head coach Tim McDonough’s 100th career victory. Lewis took the opener 8-7 before falling in game two 2-1.

LEWIS “It’s great,” McDonough said of winning his 100th game. “Obviously the players are the ones out there winning the games, certainly not me.” Game one pitcher sophomore Tom Helwich (New Lenox, Ill./ Lincoln Way Central) started the day on the wrong foot by walking the first two batters of the game. He entered the contest with two walks on the season. Missouri S&T scored twice in the inning. However thanks to a pair of runs in the bottom of the first the game was even at two following an inning.

Lewis opened it up with three runs in the bottom of the second. Sophomore Kyle Kapka (Mount Prospect, Ill./Prospect) led the inning off with a solo home run. It was his second of the season. A sacrifice fly by Andrew Brauer (Bolingbrook, Ill./Montini/College of DuPage) scored sophomore Drew Buddle (Bartlett, Ill./South Elgin) for Lewis’ fourth run. Then things got fun when Bolling took off from third base and stole home. He easily beat the tag from the Missouri S&T catcher. “We talked about before if the opportunity comes up it’s something we might be able to do and we had the right guy out there in Mike to do it,” McDonough said. Brauer recorded an RBI in the fourth and Buddle added an RBI in the fifth to make it 7-3. It stayed that way until Missouri S&T scored four runs in the top of the eighth. It could have been worse as Missouri S&T left runners at second and third. The Missouri S&T rally meant

Helwich, who started the eighth, would get a no-decision. Helwich finished with the contest allowing six runs on nine hits in 7.1 innings. Lewis took the lead back in the bottom of the eighth on a two-out RBI single by Brauer. It scored Buddle who led the inning off with a single. Freshman Phil Warner (South Elgin, Ill./St. Charles North) entered in the ninth to pick up his third save of the season. Junior Kegan Banks (Dripping Springs,Texas/Dripping Springs/ Blinn CC) earned his first win in a Lewis uniform to push his record to 1-1. Bolling finished game one 3-of-3 with three runs scored and a walk. Brauer had three RBI on three hits. While game one saw 15 combined runs scored. Game two would see only three runs scored. It was Missouri S&T getting on the board first with run in the second. Lewis tied it in the third when Buddle, who started the inning with a double, scored on wild pitch.

Missouri S&T took the lead

See FLYERS, page 18


Sports

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

17

Young Raiders gaining experience By Scott Taylor Sports Reporter

After falling to local power Plainfield North 25-15 in the first set, the inexperienced Raiders could have thrown in the towel. But Bolingbrook did not, coming back from four point deficits on multiple occasions before coming up short, 25-22, in the second set last Wednesday at Plainfield North.

BOYS VOLLEYBALL The Raiders were down 12-8 and tied it at 12-12. Then they were down 16-12 and came back to tie it again and had it to 2321 before North finished it off. Service and hitting errors were a big reason why they couldn’t get over the hump. “The second set the started coming together more,” Bolingbrook coach Andrea Bercot said. “In the first set we had some lineup changes. We were working through that. The second game I think they were more comfortable and swinging harder. The errors (made a big difference) and I think a lot of that is contributed to nerves.” Bolingbrook is young and athletic, and the hope is early experiences against Plainfield North and Minooka will help them come conference time. “I want to maximize our athletic ability,” Bercot said. “I think if they do that and are consistent, the wins are going to come. We need to get comfortable playing each other who have never seen the varsity court. A lot of it right now is nerves.” The will the players have should be a big plus as they seem to be buying into the system. “I think they have the mentality that they want to improve,” Bercot said.“They aren’t satisfied until they are playing the way they know they can.” Right now it is about the Raiders capitalizing on their offensive potential to get over the hump against the better teams. “We need to work on our consistency with our offense,” Bercot stated. “We have guys who can jump and who are big. We’re just not putting away balls that need to be. If we can get our offense going and consistently serving, you will see a change

Scott Taylor/Bugle staff

Bolingbrook’s Chris Ales goes up for a hit against Plainfield North.

when we come to conference play.” Bolingbrook opened its season by placing fourth out of 16 teams at the Plainfield North Invite Saturday, March 24. They

took first place in their division to advance to Gold division play. There the Raiders lost to Minooka, the eventual champs, in straight sets before losing to

Lincoln-Way North in three sets in the third place match. “Our goal was to make it to the Gold (division) and they did,” Bercot said. “It’s definitely been a good start to the season and it

was a little bit of a confidence booster. I know they were very nervous that first match. They also have a Plainfield East win under the belt.” staylor@buglenewspapers.com


18

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

sPorts

FLYERS Continued from page 16

BASEBALL 1. Joliet Catholic 2. Downers South 3. Plainfield North 4. Lockport 5. Maine South 6. Minooka 7. Niles West

SOFTBALL 1. Benet 2. Downers North 3. Lockport 4. Plainfield Central 5. Minooka 6. Downers South 7. Plainfield East

GIRLS SOCCER 1. Downers South 2. Plainfield North 3. Plainfield Central 4. Lockport 5. Maine South 6. Plainfield South 7. Bolingbrook

BOYS VOLLEYBALL 1. Downers North 2. Benet 3. Plainfield North 4. Downers South 5. Minooka 6. Maine South 7. Romeoville

BOYS TRACK 1. Plainfield South 2. Minooka 3. Maine South 4. Niles West 5. Plainfield North 6. Joliet West 7. Benet

GIRLS TRACK 1. Downers South 2. Plainfield North 3. Downers North 4. Bolingbrook 5. Lockport 6. Niles West 7. Maine South Rankings are compiled by Mark Gregory and Scott Taylor.

back in the top of the fourth thanks to a single run. It would stay 2-1 the rest of the way. However Lewis had their chance in the sixth when they loaded the bases with one out.A fly out and a strikeout followed to end the inning. Lewis finished game two with just four hits. “We just didn’t make adjustments at the plate in game two,” McDonough said. “When you don’t make adjustments those one-run games are going to go the other way.” Senior Pat Lahey (Downers Grove, Ill./Downers Grove South) pitched a complete game seven innings in the loss. His record is now 2-1. He struck out five while allowing seven hits. Missouri S&T is now 13-4 (3-1 Great Lakes Valley Conference). Lewis is 11-5 (4-2 GLVC). The Flyers welcome Drury to Brennan Field on Sunday for a noon doubleheader. Earlier in the week, Lewis baseball split a doubleheader at UIS on Wednesday afternoon. The Prairie Stars won the opener 9-6 while Lewis responded with an 8-7 victory in game two. While Lewis and UIS are both members of the Great Lakes Valley Conference, the games were played as non-conference games. Things started great for the Flyers in game two. Lewis scored three runs in the first inning and chased the UIS starter before he earned a single out. The Flyers scored the three runs without a single multi-base hit. Lewis made it 4-0 in the second when freshman Anthony Baldassano (Woodridge, Ill./Nazareth) scored on a two-out wild pitch. Lewis put another three spot on the board in the third. The big hit in the inning was a two-RBI triple by junior Brian Norwood (Medinah, Ill./Lake Park). Norwood came around on a single by Baldassano to make it 7-0. All this went on while Lewis starter Phil Warner (South Elgin, Ill./St. Charles North) was cruising. He allowed no runs, no walks and three hits while recording five strikeouts in five innings. He was lifted to start the sixth and that’s when things got rocky. Back-to-back Lewis relievers allowed seven straight UIS batters to reach base. Junior Matt Frahm (Olympia, Ill./

Mark Gregory/Bugle staff

Bolingbrook’s Andrew Brauer helped the Lewis University baseball team earn wins last week.

Olympia) was brought in and while got Lewis out of the inning four batters later; all seven of the Prairie Stars to reach base had come around to score and tie the game up. The seven run sixth meant Warner couldn’t earn his first collegiate victory in his first collegiate start. While he didn’t get the decision Warner stays nearly unhittable in 2012. In his five appearances, he has allowed only four hits and hasn’t walked a batter in 10.0 innings Lewis didn’t let the shock of giving up a seven-run lead get them too down as Brauer singled to start the seventh. He stole second but after back-to-back strikeouts it looked like he may be stranded in scoring position. Then stepped to the plate senior Mike Wido (Downers Grove, Ill./Downers

Grove North). Wido singled to score Brauer and give Lewis an 8-7 lead. Frahm pitched a 1-2-3 seventh to earn the win and move his record to 2-1. Norwood finished game two with three runs knocked in. Brauer had three hits, two runs scored and an RBI. “Phil pitched extremely well,” Lewis head coach Tim McDonough said. “Mike had the big two out hit that we needed.” The win in game two came after a three-run setback in game one. Lewis put a run on the board in their half of the first, only to see UIS score four in the bottom of the first. Lewis came back in the second to score four runs of their own and chase the UIS starter. Bolling, who scored Lewis’ run

in the first inning, knocked in a pair of runs in the second with a bases loaded single. Sophomore Drew Buddle (Bartlett, Ill./ South Elgin) scored to tie it at four, before Brauer knocked in Bolling to make it 5-4. It would be Lewis’ final lead of the game as UIS scored five runs in the bottom of the third. Lewis plated one in the fifth but also left two runners on. The Flyers left one on in the sixth and two in the seventh to end the game. Senior Michael Schroeder (Crown Point, Ind./North Newton/Triton) took the loss for the Flyers. He allowed seven runs (four earned) in 2.0 innings. His record is now 1-1. “We did not play well today and we are going to have to play much better this weekend,” McDonough said.


www.buglenewspapers.com/madness

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

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Gladstone, Kentucky winners

STANDINGS Edward Gladstone 105 Scott Taylor 101 Katie Hartanovich 98 Chris Askew 98 Briana Wilder 98 Joe Sparaciao 90 Dan Leach 88 Gary Taylor 79 Marge Taylor 77 Tom Harper 77 Brian Dudczyk 76 Dave Hartanovich 74 Brian Dunn 73 Note: Bold not eligible for top prizes By Scott Taylor Sports Reporter

Congratulations to Edward Gladstone of Romeoville for winning the 2012 Voyager Media Madness contest. Gladstone picked Kentucky to win it all and finished with 105 points. For his efforts he is the winner of the $100 grand prize. I finished in second place with 101 points, but am not eligible for a cash prize. That makes it a big tie for second place, with Plainfield’s Brianna Widler and Katie

Ohio State (2)

(1) Kentucky (2) Kansas

(1) Kentucky Champion (1) Kentucky (4) Louisville Hartanovich and Westmont’s Chris Askew, all of who picked Kentucky as well. Each contestant will win $25. To claim your prize please go to the Voyager Media Office at 23856 Andrew Road in Plainfield. A photo ID is required to prove you are at least 18 years of age. As for the NCAA championship, John Calipari finally broke through and won the NCAA title. This Kentucky team has been dominant throughout the season. The Wildcats lost just two games all year, despite playing a lot of younger players.

Kansas (2) They stormed through the tournament, never really being in danger of losing, except for a brief moment against Louisville. The question now that will be brought up and already has been is if Kentucky winning the championship with one-anddone players is bad for the game. I personally think it is. While Kentucky fans will be just concerned about the title (as any team would), I feel it hurts the integrity of the game. In essence, you can go out and get the top three one-and-done players every year, and compete for a title, while the other teams

have to fight each other for a few other top talents. Some will say there is nothing wrong with this, especially if he is recruiting players the right way. However, others will argue that this is making a mockery out of the system of having to wait for the pros for a year. Calipari doesn’t even have to do much of the recruiting anymore. He can tell the players that he has a proven track record of sending off top 10 draft picks after the year and competing for championships every year. Granted, he has had the perfect

storm this year; something he was missing all the way back to his Memphis days. They had a dominant gamechanging big man, which was the difference. The young team played defense unlike many other freshmen and sophomores. They also shot free throws and the three-point shot better than the past few years. In the end, it doesn’t mean this will happen every year, but the blueprint is made, so the Wildcats could get all the top players in the future. staylor@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Travel

Changes spice up northern Europe While the countries of southern Europe struggle with financial instability, those living in northern Europe are in stronger shape, thanks to their ability to produce more while consuming less. It remains to be seen to what degree they will continue to bail out their less fiscally responsible neighbors. But one thing’s certain: Travelers to Germany, Switzerland, and Scandinavia will encounter their share of renovations, red tape, and reinvigorated neighborhoods and sights this year. Berlin remains one of Europe’s most exciting and affordable capitals. The city has been busy updating and expanding several communist sights, including the Berlin Wall Memorial, the DDR Museum, with a quirky collection of communist-era artifacts, and the new but underwhelming Stasi Museum, featuring exhibits on East Germany’s state security service. Unfortunately, visitors to the Reichstag - Germany’s inspirational parliament building - must now make an online reservation in advance to tour its impressive glass dome (www. bundestag.de). If it’s not too crowded, you may be able to get in without a reservation, though it’s unlikely. In Munich, the Lenbachhaus, featuring early Modernist art, and the Halls of the Nibelungen at the Residenz remain closed for renovation and are projected to reopen in 2013. In Wurzburg, the opulent chapel at the Residenz is undergoing restoration and should open to visitors in mid2012, while St. Kilian’s Cathedral will be closed for renovation until the end of the year. The classy horse races near BadenBaden have resumed, with three sessions happening in May,

August, and October. Several new walking tour offerings can help spice up your German adventure. In Rothenburg, the country’s best-preserved medieval walled town, you can now do a walking-tour double feature. Start by strolling the town on the Executioner’s Tour, a macabre hour with Georg Lehle costumed as a 14th-century executioner, then follow it up with the long-recommended Night Watchman’s Tour, accompanied by gritty tales of old-time Rothenburg. If you’re saddled with a long wait at Frankfurt’s airport, the Frankfurt Layover Tour offers a unique way to kill time. Offered by Frankfurt on Foot, the tour lasts at least three hours but can be tailored to your interests and time, and includes pick-up and drop-off at the airport. Changes are also afoot in Switzerland, Germany’s neighbor to the south. In the Swiss capital of Bern, the bears are back. Two years ago, Finn (a male from Finland) and Bjork (a female from Denmark) moved into Bern’s terraced Bear Park and got busy; soon afterward they welcomed female cubs Ursina and Berna. In Lausanne, the Olympic Museum will be closed for renovation until late 2013.During this time, you can still enjoy the park and see the Olympic flame. A temporary floating exhibit, moored just across the street from the park, will feature a taste of the museum’s collection. Considering how hot the Mediterranean region is in the summer, vacationing in Nordic

Submitted Photo

Copenhagen’s Kodbyen district is home to a number of trendy eateries, including BioMio, a fresh and 100-percent organic take on a traditional cafeteria, located in the old Bosch building.

Europe has become a hit in July and August. As usual, the biggest changes are taking place in the capital cities. In Denmark, Copenhagen’s Meatpacking District, Kodbyen, is one of the city’s most upand-coming destinations for restaurants and nightlife. Located behind the main train station, the neighborhood is filled with trendy galleries and eateries that mingle with surviving offices and warehouses for the local meatpacking industry. In Oslo, Norway, damaged buildings in the Grunerlokka neighborhood now bear a poignant tribute to the events of July 22, 2011 - when an antiimmigration lunatic killed eight people in the city with a car bomb before shooting and killing 69 more at a Labor Party summer camp. Permanent memorials will

eventually be built at the sites of the tragedies. In 2014, the Swedish capital of Stockholm will welcome a new commuter rail line that’s being built beneath its main train station (until then, expect lots of construction). The city is also welcoming a new breed of tourist: fans of Stieg Larsson’s punked-out computer hacker heroine, Lisbeth Salander, and jaded journalist hero, Mikael Blomkvist. Set in Stockholm and shot here, the Hollywood version of “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” is making the cityscape more recognizable. Just south of the Old Town, the Sodermalm neighborhood is the primary setting of the books. It’s here that fans will find Kvarnen, an oldstyle pub in which Lisbeth hangs out with an all-girl punk band,

and the Mellqvist cafe, where the love-struck Lisbeth sees Mikael kiss his mistress. Fans can also visit the City of Stockholm Museum, which displays Larsson artifacts,features a reconstruction of Mikael’s office at Millennium magazine, and offers Millennium walking tours in English. Despite a few hassles, northern Europe remains one of the easiest places to travel, whether it’s a spring fling to Germany, an alpine adventure in the Swiss Alps, or a summertime swing through Scandinavia. (Rick Steves (www.ricksteves.com) writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and public radio. Email him at rick@ricksteves.com and follow his blog on Facebook.)

(c)2012 RICK STEVES DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.


Real Estate & Business

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The real costs of today’s health care This has been a hot business and personal finance topic lately, especially in the wake of “The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act”, better known as “Obamacare”, current Supreme Court hearings regarding the Act’s constitutionality, and this being an election year. I’d put the healthcare costs debate into four categories – medical providers, insurance companies, the legal system, and last but not least… the government.Although each could be a whole article or book, I’ll go easy on the former three here, and to paraphrase Dave Ramsey, punch the latter right in the face. Many people think medical providers are highly paid. In some cases this may be true, but as usual, I have a personal story. A few months ago I had an outpatient procedure that took two preparatory office visits, a two and a half hour surgery plus prep and recovery time, and two

follow-up visits. The highly educated and skilled surgeon billed insurance approximately $5,900. The insurance c o m p a n y disallowed over $4,700 because they can,and the medical providers take it because two-thirds of patients without insurance don’t pay. Insurance only paid $1,100 and my portion is $121 after meeting my deductible with other medical bills. For three hours of that surgeon’s time, minus paying his staff, overhead, malpractice insurance, legal fees, etc., that’s not overpaid in my opinion. I mentioned that insurance companies dictate payments to medical providers, similarly to federal Medicare and state Medicaid. Another major concern

is increasing premiums. As the insured population becomes older and sicker, costs increase. Therefore premiums also increase. Currently when someone has a personal Medicare supplemental insurance policy, which is already structured by the government, they can change companies to get into a new “pool” of policyholders and save premiums. With Medicare, which is partially funded with a mandatory payroll tax on employees and employers, coverage is required, premiums are withheld from Social Security, and the program is administered by the federal government and subsidized with federal general revenues. There is no opt-out, premiums continue to rise,and the trust funds continue to deplete. That’s how our government-run system works so far. The legal system has been scrutinized as a cause for high healthcare costs including

malpractice insurance premiums. In 2005, law professors from Duke Law School published an article titled “Judicial Hellholes: Medical Malpractice Claims, Verdicts and the Doctor Exodus in Illinois”. More recently, in August 2010, the AMA released a study analyzing survey responses from over 5,800 physicians that 42 percent are sued at some point in their career, including 6 of 10 who practice until age 55 or older. By specialty, general surgery and obstetriciangynecology tops the list at 69 percent. Over half of OB-GYNs surveyed were sued twice or more in their careers. However, a Chicago area medical malpractice lawyer disputes the connection to healthcare costs stating that the “Congressional Budget Office reports that medical malpractice amounts to less than two percent of overall healthcare spending.” Unless something changes, the above-referenced Act is fully

effective in 2014. Businesses and individuals will be required to have health insurance or be fined by the IRS. Meanwhile, the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee warned that as many as 16,500 new IRS auditors and investigators, or a 17 percent increase in IRS workforce could be needed to administer and enforce the new health insurance rules. I don’t have the answers, but when you get behind a political candidate this year because of what he or she is going to provide for you, consider what it’s going to cost you, and your children, your children’s children, etc. God Bless America, please! Mike Reid, the self-proclaimed “Money Maverick” is a Registered CPA, a fulltime Advertising Consultant for Bugle Newspapers and Voyager Media Group, and an independent contractor with various entities in the Chicago area, Central, and Southern Illinois.

Is it OK to use a credit card for monthly bills? Dear Dave, I want to keep one of our credit cards open and use the bill-pay option for utilities and other monthly bills. I want to do this so we can continue earning rewards points, and the way I look at it, we’d just be rerouting the money and paying it off every month. My husband doesn’t like this idea and thinks we should get rid of them all. Am I just asking for trouble by wanting to keep the rewards card open? Cheryl Dear Cheryl, Yes, you are. Life never works out exactly the way you think it

will. You can make all the well-reasoned and bestintentioned plans you want, but sooner or later that snake is going to bite you. The only thing I’d consider in a situation like this is a debit card that has a rewards system attached. Lots of debit card programs offer the same kinds of rewards programs offered by credit card companies, with one big exception—you don’t have to go into debt!

You need to stop chasing these stupid brownie points, Cheryl. According to Consumer Reports, 78 percent of credit card airline miles are never redeemed.Studies also show that people spend more when using credit cards as opposed to cash. That extra money you spend on things you don’t need is money you could have been saving and investing. So, where’s the reward? Cut up the card and close the account, Cheryl. You don’t build wealth by using credit cards! —Dave Dear Dave, My wife and I are both active duty Marines. She’s planning to

get out in a few months, but I’m staying in for the long haul. You recommend saving 15 percent for retirement, but how does that apply in my case when I’ll be getting a good pension after 20 years? James Dear James, I’d like to see you do both. Just imagine the money you guys would have for retirement with your military pension and a big pile of cash from having saved 15 percent of your income over the years. Having options is a great thing. Think about all the things you could do down the road if you

save for retirement and have your pension in place.You could pay cash for a home, or even open a business when you retire from the military. And these are things you probably wouldn’t be able to do working with just your service pension. You’ve got a great future if you’ll just keep plugging along and saving, James. Let the military do its thing, and you guys keep pumping 15 percent of your income into Roth IRAs and other pre-tax retirement plans. It’s going to be pretty cool! — Dave * For more financial help please visit daveramsey.com.


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THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 207 Far Hills Drive Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (Single Family Home). On the 18th day of April, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Plaintiff V. Miguel Alvarado; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 5325 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-25411 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 210 Honeysuckle Street Bolingbrook, IL 60490 (Single Family Home). On the 25th day of April, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff V. Anthony Vergara; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 1544 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 704 Melissa Drive, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (Single Family Residence). On the 25th day of April, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES ARSI 2006-M3 Plaintiff V. KIRK ALAN BODEN, LOUISE C. BODEN, ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY, AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS. Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 4495 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: KLUEVER & PLATT, LLC 65 EAST WACKER SUITE 2300 CHICAGO, IL 60601 312-236-0077 312-236-0514 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/29, 4/5, 4/12 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1044 RIDGEWOOD DRIVE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 60440 (TAN ALUMINUM ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME ONE CAR ATTACHED GARAGE). On the 25th day of April, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: ONEWEST BANK, FSB Plaintiff V. LE ROY MUMBOWER Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 3134 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 135,913.06 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-41690 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/29, 4/5, 4/12

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/29, 4/5, 4/12


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THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff,

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES ARSI 2006-M3 Plaintiff,

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Plaintiff, vs. Miguel Alvarado; et. al. Defendant. No. 10 CH 5325 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 4th day of January, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 18th day of April, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 4, IN HUDEK FARM, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN LOT 8, IN SCHOOL TRUSTEE’S SUBDIVISION OF SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 9, 1976 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R76-25130, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 207 Far Hills Drive Bolingbrook, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 12-02-16-218-012 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-25411 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS ONEWEST BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. LE ROY MUMBOWER Defendant. No. 10 CH 3134 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 17th day of January, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 25th day of April, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 13, IN BLOCK H, IN BALSTRODE FARMS, UNIT 2, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 17 AND THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO A PLAT THEREOF RECORDED SEPTEMBER 5, 1973, AS DOCUMENT NO. R73-26998, AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED APRIL 10, 975, AS DOCUMENT NO. R75-8117, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1044 RIDGEWOOD DRIVE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 60440 Description of Improvements: T A N ALUMINUM ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME ONE CAR ATTACHED GARAGE P.I.N.: 12-02-17-202-013 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 135,913.06 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/29, 4/5, 4/12

vs. Anthony Vergara; et. al. Defendant. No. 11 CH 1544 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 11th day of January, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 25th day of April, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 335 IN THE GREENS UNIT 2 OF AUGUSTA VILLAGE FINAL PLAT OF SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF THE WEST FRACTIONAL HALF OF THE NORTHWEST FRACTIONAL QUARTER OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JUNE 13, 2003 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2003135728, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 210 Honeysuckle Street Bolingbrook, IL 60490 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 12-02-18-116-010 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-41690 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/29, 4/5, 4/12

vs. KIRK ALAN BODEN, LOUISE C. BODEN, ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY, AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS. Defendant. No. 11 CH 4495 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 6th day of December, 2011, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 25th day of April, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 1 IN BLOCK 50 IN CHERRYWOOD EAST, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 704 Melissa Drive, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: Single Family Residence P.I.N.: 02-12-331-035-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: KLUEVER & PLATT, LLC 65 EAST WACKER SUITE 2300 CHICAGO, IL 60601 312-236-0077 312-236-0514 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/29, 4/5, 4/12


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Bolingbrook Bugle 4-5-12