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NEWS Minooka man arrested for Bolingbrook fire

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SPORTS Nixon named to AllArea first team

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Your Community, Your News

bolingbrookbugle.com

APRIL 3, 2014

local

valleY vIeW

Pension costs shrink proposed revenue

BreaKING DoWN The NUMBers

>> see the full story on page 8

ANALYSIS OF READING AND MATH PERFORMANCE DATA ON THE MAP ASSESSMENTS SUGGESTS THAT THE INSTRUCTIONAL CHANGES WERE SUCCESSFUL IN ADVANCING A GREATER NUMBER OF STUDENTS TOWARDS COLLEGES AND CAREER READINESS THIS YEAR OVER LAST YEAR. GAINS WERE SEEN IN CCR RATES FOR ALL STUDENTS AT ALL GRADE LEVELS IN READING AND MATH.

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Village wants to dip into bond funds to cover costs associated with pensions By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

The village of Bolingbrook is proposing a balanced budget that dips into bond funds to cover costs associated with pension and health insurance costs, a main cause of increased expenditures for the village. Expenditures for the total proposed 2014-2015 fiscal budget are projected at approximately $119. 3 million, while total Jim bOan estimated revenue is Village attorney $112.2 million. The $7.1 million difference will come from bond funds ($5.5 million); and accumulated fund balances in Wastewater ($641,319); debt >> See PEnSiOn | page 5


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THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

News local

Minooka man arrested for Bolingbrook fire Michael S. Smith, 40, was found sleeping inside A Minooka man was arrested after he was found sleeping inside a Bolingbrook business that he allegedly set on fire. Bolingbrook Police and Fire responded to a call of a structure

fire that was found at the front of a business at 9:13 a.m. March 30 in the 400 block of W. Boughton Road. The fire was extinguished and while checking the building for security Michael S. Smith, 40, was found sleeping inside. As officers approached the subject they observed numerous empty beer bottles next to him and one full, opened bottle. Smith was uncooperative and attempted to

leave the building. He then struck one of the officers, resisted arrest and was subsequently taken into custody. The investigation revealed materials from within the business where Smith was located were used to create the fire and a lighter was found in his possession. Smith was charged with criminal damage to property and aggravated battery.

local

Pedestrian struck, killed on March 27 Crash is still under investigation By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

A 33-year-old Bolingbrook man was killed after being

struck by an SUV late Thursday, March 27, on Route 53, just north of Enterprise Drive. Romeoville Deputy Chief Steve Lucchesi said a blue 1998 Ford Explorer driven by Victor Garcia, 19, of Joliet, was traveling south on Route 53 when it struck pedestrian

Gilberto Damian. Garcia refused medical treatment at the scene. Damian was transported to Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries. The crash is still under investigation by the Romeoville Police Department.


News schools

THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014 3

Retiring Harding credits her staff for VVSD success Under Harding’s guidance, Valley View has always been among the first in the state to institute new safety procedures She started her Harding took a VVSD career with Valley bus driver job in 1976 View School District when classes were held as a bus driver more year-round and the than 36 years ago. district was flexible in Now,as she prepares allowing her to work to retire at the end of the 45 days that her kids the current school were in school and stay year,VVSD Director of home the 15 days they Transportation Lucy Lucy Harding were home. VVSD Director of Harding is singing the Transportation Three years later she praises of her team became the secretary/ and looking back fondly on her dispatcher for the entire department’s many successes. Transportation department, “We’re a very proactive district working out of a three-room when it comes to transportation,” trailer on 135th Street near what the longtime Romeoville resident is now Martinez Middle School, said.“We want up-to-date vehicles a position she held for a few and we make sure we’re doing years until she was promoted to everything by the book so we “coordinator” (assistant manager) can keep our kids safe.” and ultimately to manager of Under Harding’s guidance, transportation. Valley View has always been “I liked the payroll aspects of among the first in the state to it and I liked dispatch. I also liked institute new safety procedures. helping people,” she recalls. “I A perfect example: VVSD didn’t was kind of in the right places at wait for the state to require seat the right time.” belts for children on buses. A In 1992, Harding, who admits staff member had them installed to being an “A” type personality before the law was passed. in need of a challenge, decided “We provide safe transportation to take a job as Manager of the with a great safety record,” she Westmont terminal for Vancom. said.“That’s what I’m proudest of.” The privately-owned school bus

company soon recognized her talent and made Her Director of Safety for their 21 Illinois terminals. Already armed with infinite knowledge about bus safety, regulations and personnel, it was with Vancom that Harding added her outstanding logistical knowledge, serving for four months as the coordinator of 2,000 buses and 4,000 drivers that shuttled volunteers and some athletes between sites at the 1996 Atlanta Summer Olympics. “It was a very rewarding, educational experience for me,” Harding said.“I don’t regret doing it but I won’t ever do it again.” When she returned home from the Olympics, Vancom was sold to Laidlaw and she was put in a financial management position “that wasn’t for me.”So she left and worked for a short time at Cook Illinois/Kickert Bus Lines before starting her own transportation consulting business. In the summer of 1999, she returned home. “I heard there was a director opening in Valley View,” she recalls. “I was so fortunate to come back.” Harding calls herself “the mother” of a group of Chicagoarea school transportation officials who share ideas with each other. More accurately, she

“I’m ready to retire.This department is in a position for me to do that because I know the people here will serve the community just as well as we have done for all these years,” she said. is the “dean” of the group…the veteran with vast knowledge. She was the first female president of the National Association for Pupil Transportation. She says “I’m not an expert” but if she doesn’t know the answer, she always knows where to go to get the answer. In fact Harding will put that expertise to use once she retires by resurrecting her consulting business. “I’ve already got some jobs signed up,” she said.“I’ll continue to share my knowledge.” Oh sure, she may travel a little, especially to make leisurely visits to her four kids, eight grandchildren and eight great grandchildren. But don’t look for her to develop any of the traditional retirement hobbies.

“I need a challenge that requires me to do my homework,” she said.“I don’t think I’m going to get that from bowling or anything like that.” As for advice for whoever is chosen as her successor, “always say please and thank you” when asking the staff to do something. Oh yes…and show respect, trust, listen, and smile and laugh more than you frown or grumble. “I’m ready to retire. This department is in a position for me to do that because I know the people here will serve the community just as well as we have done for all these years,” she said. “This isn’t one person’s doing. It’s all the people who have worked here. There’s no way I could have done this on my own.”


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THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

News

school briefs

Mitchem to serve on panel exploring education trends, funding Other panel members: State Superintendent, Illinois Education Association President Valley View School District 365U Superintendent Dr. James A. Mitchem Jr. has been asked to serve on an April 1 statewide panel of experts exploring the critical relationship between efforts to improve educational opportunities for students and funding for those efforts. The panel discussion will take place during the Large Unit District Association’s Education Legislative Institute in Springfield. Other panel members will include State Superintendent

Chris Koch, Illinois Education Association President Cinda Klickna, and State Senator Andy Manar.

Bridges to a New Day honoring King as outstanding community partner Bridges to a New Day, a not-forprofit organization dedicated to empowering children and adults who have experienced trauma and/or violence in their lives, will honor Irene King Elementary School at their 10th anniversary spring brunch Sunday. Principal April Vacik will accept an award on behalf of the school which is being given to King for being an “outstanding” community partner that has

helped in the growth of the agency. “We are grateful to receive this honor because Irene King has had a partnership with Bridges for over seven years,” said Principal Vacik. “I feel like we should be honoring Bridges for all they have done to support our students in a positive and caring way.” Bridges to a New Day conducts a social lunch group for several students at Irene King on a weekly basis. The agency’s mission is “to provide prevention, intervention and educational services which foster non-violence in the lives of children and adults.” The brunch will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Broken Arrow Golf Course in Lockport.

Submitted Photo

Principal Ted Warpinski watches as B.J. Ward 2nd graders Angelica Mata, Kayla Heath, Olivia Smith, Kendal Hunter Hale and Luisa Arenas write about actions or behaviors that have caused them to smile. The activity was part of the Bolingbrook elementary school’s Pay it Forward 365 campaign.


THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014 5

WILL COUNTY

Ag Secretary sees County’s operation first-hand Vilsack noted agricultural exports are at a record high, setting new record in 2013 By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

Will County farm officials long have said the agricultural community is under-appreciated. U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack told them March 28 that’s true throughout the nation. “Very few people realize the importance of agriculture,”Vilsack said to a crowd in a chilly truck garage at the DeLong Co. in the Joliet CenterPointe Logistics Center. “But it represents 5 percent of our Gross Domestic Product. One-twelfth of the jobs in the nation are connected in some way to agriculture and food processing.”Those workers make >> PENSION, from page 1 service ($649,413); and other minor fund adjustments. Village Attorney Jim Boan said in his summary that “while financial times are better, neither the village nor ‘Main Street America’ have fully recovered. Housing prices are not back to pre-recession levels, foreclosure levels haven’t come down and state revenue reimbursements and distributions are still months behind. Revenues are better than they were, but expenses have increased at a more rapid pace than revenues.” The general fund budget is set at approximately $54.9 million, a 7.8 percent increase over the 20132014. In his summary, Boan said if you remove the public safety pensions that are collected in the general fund and then transferred to pension funds, there is a decrease in the funding level of $1.7 million over last year. With the exception of a possible increase in ambulance fees, there are no additional increases in fees, taxes or fines. Twelve positions -- nine in public works, two in public safety and one in finance -- that are vacant or will become vacant this year will be eliminated from the budget, reducing the number of full and part-time village employees to 342 from 356. There has been a 20 percent reduction in the workforce since 2007. Boan said capital expenditures have been kept to a minimum.

goods accessible and affordable for the entire nation, he said, something not a lot of other countries can say. Vilsack also noted agricultural exports are at a record high, setting a new record in calendar year 2013 at $144.1 billion. Last year, Illinois shipped $8.3 billion in agricultural products overseas. And he got an earful from Will County agricultural and business leaders Friday on just how much the area is responsible for that. “We wanted him to know the cooperation between corporate and business leaders and agriculture is how Will County has become the largest inland port in North America,” said Will

County Executive Larry Walsh, who helped bring Vilsack to Will County for the March 28 meeting. As an example,The DeLong Co., which ships grain and ethanol byproducts worldwide, is part of one of a growing number of intermodal centers in the county that make Will County the largest inland port in North America. DeLong buys DDGs from ethanol plants and grain from farms throughout the Midwest and resells to companies and countries abroad. Vilsack said he could see on the way in to Will County Friday morning the trucks coming in to DeLong filled with dried distillers grain (DDGs) coming from various Ethanol plants.The biofuel derivative, stripped of all its sugars, is a highly coveted, high protein source for livestock feed. What

Highlighted projects include the conversion of street lamps to LED heads, the completion of the 95th street bridge, a traffic signal at Joliet Road and St. James Gate, Bolingbrook Clow Airport runway costs and the replacement of 10 patrol cars, half paid from seizure funds. Boan explained that despite an 8.5 percent increase in the village portion of the property real estate tax bill, none of it covers village operations, merely public safety pensions, debt service and refuse removal. Combined with IMRF pension payments of $1.4 million and approximately 32 percent of the

property tax levy going toward police and fire pensions, the village is paying out more than $7.1 million in employer pension obligations. Boan further explained that it would take the taxes of half the homes in Bolingbrook to cover just the public employees’ pension obligations mandated by the state without any input from local municipalities. Health insurance also continues to be burden for the village, he said, as is the structural integrity of Fire Station #3, for which an engineering study is being conducted to determine whether the building is repairable.

PHOTO BY NICK REIHER/MANAGING EDITOR

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack speaks to a crowd at the DeLong Co. in Joliet March 28, as, from left, Brandon DeLong, logistics manager at the Joliet plant, and Robert Flider, Illinois Agriculture Director, look on.

DeLong and other companies get in on trucks, they ship out on the intermodal’s trains.

>> to see the full version of this story, check out buglenewspapers.com


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Police Blotter

THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

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The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Bolingbrook Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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Evan Panozzo, 21, 227 Elkhorn Court, was arrested at 2:57 p.m. March 11 and charged with speeding, muffler violation, illegal transportation of alcohol and possession of drug equipment, following a traffic stop.

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Officers were called to the 100 block of Lily Cache Lane for the report of a theft that took place between March 9 and

March 12. Empty product bins were taken from the rear of the building. Loss valued at $1,750.

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A 1996 Nissan Maxima was taken from the parking lot on the 300 block of Woodcreek Drive between March 12 and March 13.

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Jermel Lofton, 25, 416 Gainsborough Court, and a 17-year-old were both arrested at 8:42 p.m. March 13 and charged with resisting a peace officer at Wal-Mart, 200 S. Bolingbrook Drive.

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Officers were called to the 800 block of Tam O’Shanter Circle for the report of a burglary to motor vehicle. A

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heart monitor, IPod, IPhone and GPS unit were taken between March 13 and march 14. Loss valued at $1,000.

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Fabian Perez, 28, 156 Maplewood Drive, was arrested at 5:07 a.m. March 16 and charged with theft of services, aggravated battery, resisting a peace officer and an in-state warrant, following a call of a fight that occurred after the offender refused to pay for cab service.

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Rebecca Haney, 36, 429 Independence Lane, was arrested at 11:36 p.m. March 16 and charged with DUI, speeding, improper lane usage, failure to report an accident and no

insurance, following a traffic stop. Michael Defranscesco, 32, 301 Robinhood Court, was arrested at 10:24 p.m. March 16 and charged with a traffic signal violation, improper lighting and DUI, following traffic stop at Robinhood Way and Route 53.

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Dezhon Crockett, 19, 1454 Hawk Drive, was arrested at 6:13 p.m. March 17 and charged with criminal trespass to residence on the 1400 block of Hawk Lane after entering an open garage

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Rashad Owens, 28, 458 Seneca Lane,was arrested at

2:31 a.m. March 18 and charged with improper lane usage, driving on a suspended license, no insurance, an in-state warrant and illegal transportation of alcohol, following traffic stop at Janes Avenue and Sheffield Lane. Reymundo Zavala, 18, and Arnold Zavala, 23, both of 449 Salem Square, were both arrested at 11:37 p.m. March 18 and charged with illegal transportation of alcohol, following a traffic stop on Lot D of Beaconridge Drive.

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Laura Guzman, 23, 210 Karen Ave., Romeoville, was arrested at 9:05 a.m. March 19 for a warrant in the 200 block of Orchard Drive.

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ForuM Post your thoughts!

GUesT colUMN

THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

OUR HOUSE

witH rEP. nataLiE manLEy (d-JOLiEt) 98tH diStrict

Manley offers peek into Committee process

correcTIoN A March 26 column in the Joliet Bugle by Managing Editor Nick Reiher incorrectly listed the number of Will County Board members.There are 13 Democrats and 13 Republicans. The Bugle regrets the error.

General Manager V.P. Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Managing Editor Nick Reiher nreiher@buglenewspapers.com 815-436-2431 ext. 117 Assistant Managing Editor Jonathan Samples jsamples@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Manager Pat Ryan pryan@enterprisepublications.com

facebook.com/thebuglenewspapers twitter.com/buglenewspapers instagram.com/buglenewspapers

Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Enterprise Newspapers, Inc. 23856 Andrew Road #104 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication sweditor@buglenewspapers.com www.buglenewspapers.com Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 12 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 12 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

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It was a hectic week in with those who support the bill, Springfield, as March 28th was the and often times that is done with deadline for House bills to move the individuals or groups who out of committee. have brought the House bills are first original idea to the assigned to “Rules” legislator. committee, to be In many cases, reviewed by several there is opposition to senior, high-ranking the bill … for varying members from both reasons. So, included parties. Those members in the committee decide if the bill should process, is the move forward, and if opportunity to work so, they then determine with all those in favor to which of 46 House rEP. nataLiE manLEy and all those opposed, (D-Joliet) 98th committees, it should be DiStrict and to responsibly assigned (then perhaps compromise and a subcommittee – more tweak the language to on that later). Once in committee, make the original bill even better. there is an opportunity for All concerned individuals can testimony, either in favor or in attend the committee hearings opposition, debate ensues, and to voice their opinions about then finally votes are cast by the bill. Those in support give committee members on whether your measure more validity and the bill is worth consideration by increase the likelihood that the the entire House floor. bill will pass. So the week prior to the deadline, Unfortunately, no matter how everyone was scrambling to try much “give and take” might and move his or her bills forward, occur, there are those times that lest their legislation be stranded no amount of compromise gets in committee for the entire year. everyone on the same page. If This week has seen additional there is strong opposition, and the committee hearings at all hours of middle ground on the issue seems the day and night, and extended miles apart, even after numerous committee hours. meetings and conversations, The committee process can and it still seems like both sides be complicated and frustrating. have dug their heels in and are It includes meeting with each not budging … this is when you member of the committee to realize that it will be up to the explain why a particular bill is committee to decide the fate of important, and rallying support the impending legislation. for the cause. The committee Even with strong opposition, a process also includes working legislator can still “work the bill”

and get it passed. Most of that work to get other legislators on board (rallying support,explaining merits, answering questions) happens on the House floor every day. A few others nuances regarding the “red-tape” involved with the committee process that I have observed as a freshman legislator: (1) the committee chairperson has total discretion and is not required to call your bill. Nothing happens automatically. A good chairperson will, however, explain the reasons the bill is not being called and offer to work with you in the future. (2) You may re-file your bill again during another session and hope the chairperson might be more willing to entertain the subject matter at that time. So, the bill may live to fight another day. (3) Sometimes the bill gets sent to a subcommittee (unfortunately, this is most often a place where your bill goes to die … very few bills make it out once they get there) and (4) That dreaded ambush of opposition … sometimes the opposition doesn’t appear until the moment you walk into the committee hearing … meaning, there is no time to prepare a response to their comments or negotiate. But if that’s the case, that usually means that they were never going to compromise anyway. Not all bills that land in committee make it out. However, the committee process allows for a unique exchange of ideas, allows for legislation to transform, to evolve into a better concept.

leTTer To The eDITor

Senger’s record also includes… ‘Senger is a right-wing, social conservative who was handpicked by the national Republican Party’ Laura Katauskas’ article in the March 27 publication mentions what state Rep. Senger did for the state. The reporter forgot to mention a few things that Senger also did, such as she voted against a woman’s right to choose, against marriage equality, against common sense reforms to prevent gun violence

and she repeatedly introduced anti-Obamacare legislation in Springfield. She said her focus is to repeal Obamacare. Tell me what happens to the millions of Americans that have signed up for the Affordable Care Act? Senger hasn’t said what she would do for those Americas. Illinois state Rep. Senger is a

right-wing, social conservative who was handpicked by the national Republican Party. The article mentions that U.S. Rep. Foster was a rubber stamp when it came to voting. One of the toughest things for Foster, while serving in the U.S. House, is sitting through the relentless barrage of illogical talking points from the Republican majority. Thank you, Richard Oswald Plainfield


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THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

Schools

cover story | valley view

District makes gains in science, reading scores Assistant Superintendent Rachel Kinder confirmed district is moving in right direction By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

New data shows the Valley View School District is making gains for all students in both reading and math, and in some cases, surpasses national trends. In a presentation on academic progress that compared data from fall and winter Measures of Academic Progress (scores), Assistant Superintendent Rachel Kinder confirmed the district is moving in the right direction showing many positive indications that students are improving with continued growth. “We are grounded in reshaping the educational experience for all students,” said Kinder. “We are showing alignment to our strategic plan, connecting instruction from one grade to the next and helping students for that point when they leave

us, preparing them for their secondary life after Valley View.” Kinder said the results also point to data that holds building administrators, teachers and senior leadership accountable for the success of their students, while also ensuring staff is provided with the support needed to make those gains. “This is real data, and what came out of this, is that we saw growth—valuable growth—and that is awesome,” said School Board Member Leo Venegas.“We have stood up to the plate and delivered. The results speak for themselves— that is the truth, and at the end of the day, we should be congratulating our teachers and building leaders for definitely moving in the right direction.” Director of data and assessment Kelly Gilbert reported the district’s MAP scores, when compared

nationally, are outperforming other districts. Kinder credited the success to a number of initiatives, including an increased level of expectation, co-teaching and the use of reading specialists. “The bottom line is that we have made a positive impact on learning,” said Kinder.“When we are looking at improvement, we are in a much different place than before implementing common core and various strategies now in place.” Data was gauged for grade kindergarten through eighth grade. High school-level grade 9 and 10, data is not taken in the winter. MAP data will be collected for the high school level in the spring. “We are in a better place from fall to winter than in previous years,” said Kinder. “We are supporting our students to new levels, and it is because of the tremendous effort made by teachers and administrators and the hard work that has gone into this.”

“The bottom line is that we have made a positive impact on learning,” said Kinder. “When we are looking at improvement, we are in a much different place than before implementing common core and various strategies now in place.” The key to evaluating the data, said Kinder, is assessing growth, looking mid-point at how much each student is expected to grow at every level, be it Tier 1 (students at performance level of 50 percent and above), Tier 2 (25 to 49 percent) or Tier 3 (1 to 24). The most prominent findings show that learning rates have increased at all achievement tiers in reading and math for general education, ELL, and special education students. In addition, evidence shows that continued high growth has occurred for all Tier 2 and Tier 3 students with significant improvement seen in the growth rates for Tier 1 students in both reading and math.

In all, the percent of students meeting college and career readiness (CCR) in reading and math in all grades has increased from last winter to this winter. The district uses the CCR benchmark in alignments with matching skills (at the 65 percentile) deemed necessary for post-secondary success. Significant gains have been made at the Tier 1 level, where there has been a shift in thinking, focusing on continuing growth for students that may have reached a level of expertise.Tier 1 students are no longer stagnant, but showing continued growth. In addition, the second-year of all-day kindergarten is reaping its benefits with significant gains, above national standards.


Take 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Piece of fruit? 8 Time capsule ceremonies 15 Barhopping 16 Awkward at gatherings, say 17 Big oaf 18 “I need an answer now!” 19 __-Locka, Florida 20 Shortens again, as a board 22 Medieval fight club? 23 Move, briefly 25 Frozen Four org. 26 Pequod coowner 27 Give up a seat 29 Pianist Schnabel 31 Ivy League nickname 32 Wild West 34 Prefix with -syllabic 35 NBAer Artest who changed his name to Metta World Peace 36 Youngest male

Down tennis player to be No. 1 in the ATP Rankings 40 Guy 41 Short remnant 42 Cagy 43 Battle of Shiloh monogram 44 Erect 46 Bollywood garments 50 Bedroom label 52 Some brothers 54 Having a single channel 55 NYC train, familiarly 56 Historic events 58 16th-century date 59 Certain tie 61 “Now, listen ...” 63 As good as it gets 64 All-purpose 65 Covent Garden locale 66 Fuddy-duddy

1 Deep sleeps 2 Hot under the collar 3 Syllables sometimes said with one’s fingers in one’s ears 4 1940s arena: Abbr. 5 Queen who is also a humanitarian activist 6 Keepsake 7 Mississippi source 8 Show known for its slow-motion shots 9 Capitalizes on 10 Sigur __: ethereal Icelandic band 11 “Where __ from ...” 12 Wartime signal 13 Loyal friend of Gawain 14 Alabama Slammer ingredient 21 Duel personality? 24 Words someone 15-Across loves to hear

26 Hunts 28 Mani-pedi spot 30 Rugged vehicles 33 Incredulous accusation 36 Stop looking for a rescue plane 37 Recliner features 38 Where most hits wind up 39 Start of Popeye’s credo 40 Seconds ago 45 Turn a corner, in a game 47 The Joker portrayer 48 Like comic Eddie Izzard, at times 49 Alone 51 Unspoken 53 Symbol of strength 56 “Happily Divorced” actress Drescher 57 Cellphone button 60 Cockney abode 62 Mag mogul

THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

Horoscopes Today’s New Moon falls in your sign and indicates the start of several weeks during which you’re more cognizant of what’s really important to you and brings happiness. Do what gives you joy to be successful.

Resistance to change is futile. You tend to hold onto the old as long as it’s viable and only reach out for the new when it’s inevitable. You have a tendency to spend freely in the upcoming week, but it’s all for fun.

Some changes are for the better. New acquaintances might sweep into your life like a breath of fresh air and alter your perceptions in the week ahead. As part of the global community everyone you meet is related in some way.

The proof is in the pudding. Major changes may bring the prospect of big rewards in the week ahead, but could cause unexpected consequences, too. Ensure that the results of a desired change are worth the trouble.

Tense circumstances require tender loving care. The week ahead might present several challenging situations. Keep your cool and don’t go off halfcocked. The new lunar cycle might offer a chance to entertain unusual ideas.

Train an educated eye on ways to increase your net worth. Finances might be affected by social or government changes in the week ahead. As things break down, you might be able to pick up the leavings.

Gridlock might lock you out. The New Moon falls in your solar house of partnerships, so relationships might be of interest during the next several weeks. Tensions that begin to build now might last several weeks.

Deal with little criticisms or mistakes that crop up before beginning something new. A wave of enthusiasm might tempt you to make large expenditures, but this is not a good week to initiate major purchases or changes.

Starting something new this week might seem like an uphill climb. It’s a far better idea to contend with existing situations and keep your money in your pocket. Be prepared for unexpected bills or cash outlays.

A bad case of media frenzy might grab your attention in the week ahead. Move forward with business as usual and don’t get caught up in political situations. Avoid starting key projects or making crucial decisions.

Affection, not perfection, matters. In the week to come, you’re better off working side by side with others than trying to go it alone. When you notice someone’s faults, remember that nobody is perfect.

Focus on your future in the week ahead. Take a vacation from mass production by eating more food that grows naturally on fewer highly processed products. Grow healthy, wealthy and wise.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Content Agency 2014

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • NAIVE • COVEY • SWIVEL • APPEAR

Answer:

What the sailor with the noisy bunkmate wanted when the ship docked -- “SNORE” LEAVE

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THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Pair of Brooks Middle School coaches earn state honors,

bolingbrookbugle.com

page 12; Final basketball stats, page 17

THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

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Nixon All-Area first teamer, O’Mara POY By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Last year Benet’s Sean O’Mara was a first team Voyager Media Publications All-Area selection in helping the Redwings advance to a sectional final. This year he took his game to the next level. The 6-foot, 9-inch senior averaged 23 points and 13 rebounds and shot better than 60 percent from the field for Benet. For his accomplishments, O’Mara has been named the 2014 Voyager Media Publications Boys Basketball Player of the Year. “I’ve been working all summer and on our off days,” O’Mara said. “I’ve been trying to get away from my junior habit. I watched a lot of film on myself and I would step and fade away and take jumpers. I’m 6-9, I shouldn’t be taking jumpers, especially when I can get to the bucket like I can. That has been the focus for me this year.” “He has great feet and great hands and he really understands how to play,” Benet coach Gene Heidcamp said. “He has really been a dominant player on the high school level. His game has improved every year, but this year he has been dominant from his ability to score and pass the ball.” O’Mara showed solid athleticism throughout the year, running the court well for a fastpaced offense. “My teammates do a great job of pushing the ball up the floor and getting the ball to me,” O’Mara said. “I have to make it count and take it strong to the hoop. It is nice to increase your shot percentage when you are dunking the ball.” “Offensively he has had an unbelievable year,” Heidcamp said. “He is shooing in the 60 percent and he just a dominant

low post player. Not only scoring but also his ability to draw attention and pass out of it and free up our shooters makes us difficult to defend. “He is very unselfish. He is not just a big kid. He is a big kid with a skill set and understands how to play. He has good hands and good feet and add unselfish to that and that makes a really good player.” He is continuing his playing career at Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH, where he signed to play at earlier this year. “It was phenomenal,” O’Mara said of signing with the Musketeers.“It was a great day in my memory. It’s hard to explain. The process is kind of draining and you build relationships with a lot of people. Being able to sign with Xavier helped me to focus on this season and to go as far as we can.” O’Mara’s hard work has paid off so far, and now he hopes it pays off at the next level. “It is great to have the opportunity to play at the next level,” O’Mara said.“It helps with all the hard work I’ve put in and my coaches and teammates have put in with me at practice. You can’t take it for granted, you have to keep working. You have to prepare yourself for the next level as well. I’m working on things you might not see at the games, but hopefully you will see it next year.” The rest of the Voyager Media Publications All-Area first team are:

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Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Bolingbrook’s Prentiss Nixon is a Voyager Media first-team All-Area player.


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THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

Sports

Brooks Middle School coaches honored When the Illinois Basketball Coaches Association holds its annual Hall of Fame banquet at Illinois State University on April 26, there will be a pair of Brooks Middle School coaches honored. This season eighth grade girls basketball coach Alan Hampton and seventh grade boys coach Patrick Meginniss were both named as District 9 Co-Coach of the Year by the Illinois Basketball Coaches Association. Hampton took the Bulldogs to the state quarterfinals and an overall record of 20-3, while winning a regional and a sectional championship. “It was a pleasant surprise for me,” Hampton said. “I wasn’t

expecting it at all. We put in all the work and at the end of the day, we are not looking for a c c o l a d e s , Alan Hampton but to get one feels nice. It is nice when someone thanks you for giving back. That is why I coach, me being a basketball player, the opportunity to give back to the kids and show the ropes is fulfilling for me.” Meginniss led the boys to a 20-3 record and a fourth-place finish in the IESA state playoffs.

“It is a great recognition,” he said. “We don’t do it for the recognition, it is all about the kids Patrick Meginniss and I think this award more shows what the kids were able to accomplish on the court and in the classroom. When I was told about the award, I was happy and it put a big smile on my face, but it is really about the kids and what they do every day.”

VOLLEYBALL Thanks to strong net play, great serving and excellent allaround defense, Brooks Middle School blasted Homer Junior High 25-16 and 25-7 Monday night to advance to the Illinois Elementary School Association Class 4A 8th grade volleyball state quarterfinals. The Bulldogs (12-9) will meet either Channahon or Martino (New Lenox) at 10 a.m. Saturday at Rochester Junior High School. The winner advances to a 1 p.m. semifinal contest. The third place and championship games are at 5:30 and 6:45 p.m. respectively March 25, also at Rochester.

Thanks to setter Gabby Gallucci (9 assists), outside hitter Julia Lentz (9 kills) and middle hitter April Lowery (7 kills including 4 blocks) Brooks kept the Mustangs’defense on its heals all night, while Soha Khan (10 serving points including 4 aces), Alexis Johnson (nine serving points) and Hallie Hall (7 serving points) were dead-on from the service line. After shaking off a case of some early nerves that gave Homer (11-4) an early 5-1 first set lead, two great passes by Lowery, sets by Galluci and kills by Hall got the Bulldogs going. They finally tied it at 9 when Brooke Patterson blocked a spike attempt and then got the follow-up kill on a set by Gallucci. Hall served for three straight, including a Lowery kill and Kahn nailed a down-line spike to put Brooks on top for good 15-13. Lowery served four straight including a soft ace to the back line. Two Lentz kills, a Claire Jaskowiak kill to the back line and a Patterson block made it 23-16. Lentz ended it with a spectacular unassisted kill when Homer made a bad pass over the net. The Bulldogs wasted no time in the second set grabbing an 8-3 lead behind Lowery (3 kills including two blocks) and Gallucci (2 blocks, a tip and two aces). Kahn followed it up by serving for 5 straight points, aided by 3 Lentz kills at the net, and a Lowery block and a kill off a great pass-set from Hall and Gallucci. It was 15-7 when Johnson served for 8 more points including two aces and a block and a solo kill by Lentz. Lentz’ tip won the game. Other Brooks team members include Allie Hayes, Taryn Noble, Claire Jaskowiak, Liz Macias, Sierra Perez, Melody Raices, Natalie Mitchem and Asia Owens. Isaiah Gray, Xavier Diaz and Tyson Noble are the managers. Molly DeSerf is head coach and Peter Pietruszewski is assistant coach. The Jane Addams Middle School 7th grade girls volleyball squad battled all evening before dropping a 25-22 and 25-17 Illinois Elementary School Association regional final volleyball match to South Middle School of Arlington Heights >> see COACHES | page 13


Sports >> COACHES, from page 12 Thursday. The top-seeded Mustangs (149) fell behind by 10 or more points in each game but never gave up, rallying to make the Cardinals think twice about the possibility they might not advance to Monday’s sectional final against either Homer Junior High or Oak Prairie Middle School. Addams got off to a quick 4-1 start in game one behind the serving of Natalie Bond. But South utilized strong serving themselves (8 aces in all) to rally for 19 of the next 27 points and take a 20-12 lead. Bond served for four points, including an ace, and Gabrielle Marasigan served for three points

to make it 23-21. But that’s as close as they could get. Three Skylar Aprati aces early in game two made it 4-3 Addams before the roof caved in with South rolling off 13 straight points, including nine aces, two kills and a block. It was 20-7 when Bond got the Mustangs back in the contest with seven straight service points, including three aces and a Kaelyn Erickson kill. But the Cardinals held off Addams the rest of the way for the match victory. Other Mustangs squad members include Metzli Bazan, Charlize Cramer, Jasmine Doguin, Amanda Hess, Heaven Jose, Megan O’Donnell, Damia Patton and Andrea Weaver. Maryann Fafara is the Addams coach.

WRESTLING Two Valley View School District 365U middle schoolers won titles at the Illinois Kids Wrestling Federation state championships over the weekend in Rockford. Jane Addams Middle School 8th grader Juwan Robinson won the IKWF 138 pound Senior Division state crown. Robinson, who was also a member of the 7th grade Jane Addams 4x200 meter relay team that qualified for the IESA state track finals last spring, wrestles for the Bolingbrook Junior Raiders. Humphrey Middle School 7th grader Juan Bazaldua won the Novice 95 Pound Division and was also named the outstanding wrestler in the entire Novice Division.He wrestles for Martinez Fox Valley Elite Wrestling Club.

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Sports >> ALL-AREA, from page 11 University of Illinois, Jordan led Plainfield East with 18.8 points and 4.2 rebounds. The junior also shot 84 percent from the foul line, made 43 steals and 59 three pointers. “When teams scout us, they realize they have to limit him as much as possible,” Plainfield East coach Branden Adkins said. “In the offseason he needs to keep getting stronger and become a more dynamic player. He can take guys off the dribble and has the pull-up jumper. He is close to eclipse the 1,000-point mark. He did a lot of great things for us this year.”

work extremely hard to take his game to an even higher level. He has 10-12 D-I scholarship offers.”

GEORGE SARGEANT The 6-7 junior, who’s also a wide receiver for the Maine South football team, has become one of the area’s top big men this season. He led the Hawks in both scoring (17.1 points per game) and rebounding (6.9) this winter. “He’s kind of taken that role where we’ve always have that post player who’s dominant,” Maine South coach Tony Lavorato said. “He’s really talented and he’s still scratching the surface. He’s got a huge upside.”

PRENTISS NIXON

TREVOR STUMPE

Junior guard averaged 17 points, three rebounds and three assists for Bolingbrook. “Prentiss is known for his scoring, but he brings so much more to the table,” Bolingbrook coach Rob Brost said. “He defends well, can handle it, his motor never stops, and he is coachable. The best part is that I know he will continue to

T h e Plainfield North junior filled the stat sheet for the Tigers this year. He averaged 23.3 points, six rebounds, 2.8 assists, 1.9 steals and .83 blocks per game. “Trevor is a player that does everything for our team,” Plainfield North coach Robert Krahulik said.“He led us in every

statistic except assists. He had several big games that he kept us in games or took over the game for us. He is a player that can go either way on the drive, and is a great finisher with his left hand. He also is a great shooter who is able to create his own shots. Trevor got better defensively as the season went on.”

Second team JONAH COBLE J o l i e t C e n t r a l senior was the leading scorer for the Steelmen posting 14.9 points and 4.0 rebounds per game. “Jonah has been a three year varsity starter who has been a staple of the program and what we have been trying to accomplish,” said Central coach Jeff Corcoran. “He has been known as a scorer that can get to the basket and finish or knock down the three.  He has grown as a player at both ends of the floor for us and been a leader for us in his time at Central.”

GAGE DAVIS S e n i o r g u a r d averaged 14 points, four rebounds and two assists for Bolingbrook. He has committed to Division-I IPFW. “Gage provided an offensive punch for us throughout the year,” Brost said. “He can score in bunches, shoots it with range and can finish around the rim.  Gage has come a long way as a person, a student and as a player.  I am fortunate to have coached him and wish him the best at IPFW.”

JALEN JACKSON One of four starting sophomores for Joliet Catholic A c a d e m y, J a c k s o n averaged 14.7 points, 2.1 assists and 2.3 rebounds per game. He shot 48 percent from >> see ALL-AREA | page 15


Sports >> ALL-AREA, from page 14 the field and 40 percent from three-point range, helping the Hilltoppers to a Class 3A Sweet 16 berth. “Even though every team we play keys on Jalen he always comes through with a solid performance and that’s remarkable for a sophomore,” said JCA coach Joe Gura.

JOE MOONEY The Notre Dame junior helped fill a leadership vacuum after the Dons lost their entire 201213 starting lineup to graduation, including Mooney’s older brother, Matt. But he did a lot more than just provide leadership. Mooney emerged as one of the top players in the ESCC,averaging 18 points, four rebounds and three assists per game in his first varsity season. “I had no one that started a varsity basketball game (going into this season),” Notre Dame

coach Tom Les said.“Joe has kind of settled us in. “He’s been the leader. He’s been the guy (whom) we’ve put the ball in his hands when it’s crunch time.”

LOGAN VELASQUEZ T h e Plainfield Central senior posted 14.9 points and 10 rebounds per game. He also set the school’s c a r e e r rebounding record, finishing his career with 622. He also shot 54 percent from the floor on the year. “He is just a basketball player and I’m proud of him,” Plainfield Central coach Steve Lamberti said.“The amazing thing about it was that it was really in just two years. His sophomore year he had 75 rebounds. He works so hard and is such a nice kid. “When it is all said and done, to be one of the best basketball players in school history, we are proud of him for that.”

Third team GROVER ANDERSON Do-it-all senior led Lockport in nearly every major category. He averaged 13.4 points per game, while leading the Porters in assists (92), steals (53) and blocked shots (17). He was also second on the team with 130 total rebounds. “Grover Anderson did an outstanding job in accepting whatever role the team needed from him on each night.He was team player on both ends of the floor,” said Lockport coach Lawrence Thompson, Jr. “Individually he improved his offense to lead us in assists and scoring. He did that with, on most nights, guarding the opposing teams best perimeter player. His attitude toward being the best teammate he could be meant a lot to our team this year.”

DEVIN BLAKE Sophomore standout for Downers North averaged 13

THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014 points and eight rebounds per game, while shooting 50 percent from the field. “Devin is considered one of the top sophomores in the area,” Downers North coach Jim Thomas said. “He led our team in both points and rebounds. His passion for the game will propel him this offseason for a great 2014/15 season.”

PAUL ENGO III The senior from Downers South averaged 14.8 points and 4.6 rebounds per game. He also had 36 steals and made 47 threepointers. “Paul Engo III’s outside shooting and defense was huge for our team this season,” Downers South coach Kristopher Olson said. “He started every game and we barely

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ever took him off the court. Paul probably was our most improved player from the time he was a freshmen until his senior year. When Paul entered high school, he was on our freshmen B team and was not an outside threat. Paul’s all round game was very important to us this year.”

ANDREW PALUCKI The senior is a three-year varsity player and two-year starter at Maine South who’s been part of three regional title teams. Palucki does a little bit of everything for the Hawks, with averages of 12.2 points, 3.5 rebounds, 3.3 assists and a team-best 1.6 steals per game. “ H e ’ s grown up a lot this year,” Maine South coach Tony Lavorato said. “He’s taken a leadership role and he’s really kind of the heart and soul of our team.” >> see ALL-AREA | page 16


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THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

Sports >> ALL-AREA, from page 15

DANNY SPINUZZA Spinuzza tallied 14.1 points and 3.7 rebounds per game for Downers South. He contributed 68 assists, 40 steals and 39 threepointers. “Danny Spinuzza was a three-year varsity starter,” Downers South coach Kristopher Olson said. “Danny started every game and we only took him out when he was in foul trouble. Danny was our floor general and he set our offense up. Danny also made the big shot when necessary. He was our best ball handler and we had no back up for him.”

Fourth team JOHN CAMPBELL Campbell averaged 12.9 points per game and paced Lockport with 194 rebounds. He was also second in steals (48) and blocks (13). “ J o h n Campbell improved his overall game this year stepping up to lead our team in rebounding and second to Grover in scoring,”Thompson said. “John was the pulse of the Porters this season, he played with great passion and love for the game. John’s hard work and passionate play help us compete at a high level this season and I think that meant a lot to the Porters this season to know that every night he was going to give it all for Lockport.”

ANTONIO DYSON Senior rejoined Joliet Central after moving back from Kentucky and led the Steelmen in rebounds with 7.4 per game, while being the No. 2 scorer on the team with 10.2 points per game. “Antonio Dyson is a long, athletic wing player who helped us tremendously at both ends

of the floor,” Corcoran said. “He was able to block shots, rebound, run the floor, finish at the rim and defend players that are smaller than him.  He is also a good shooter that can score in bunches.”

ROMEO MAGLIORE A senior, Magliore averaged nearly 12 points per contest for Niles West this year and led the club in rebounding (4.6 per game), field-goal percentage (53.4 percent), three-point shooting percentage (36.4) and steals (47). “Every game this year,he’s been a great leader for us,” Niles West coach Bob Williams said. “He’s kind of one of those renaissance men.Whatever needs to be done he does it.”

COLLIN PELLETTIERI S e n i o r averages 11 points and 3.8 assists per game for Benet Academy along with hitting a team-high 83 three-point field goals. “He has been our best threepoint shooter,” Heidkamp said. “He has 83 made threes and that is a really high number and not easy to do. He adds another dimension, not only as a shooter, but as a point guard. His game has evolved and he handles pressure well and gets us into our sets. He has also improved defensively.”

MILES SNOWDEN Plainfield South senior averaged 12 points, seven rebounds and three blocks per game. He had a school record with 20 rebounds in one game. “Miles has a very high basketball IQ,” Plainfield South coach Tim Boe said. “He is a great all-around player that can block shots, rebound, pass, and score in the paint.” Mark Gregory and Mike Sandrolini contributed


sPorts

BOYS BBALL Points Per Game Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Sean O’Mara, Benet Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Joe Mooney, Notre Dame George Sargeant, Maine South Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Paul Engo, III, Downers South Jalen Jackson, JCA Danny Spinuzza, Downers South Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Grover Anderson, Lockport Evan Hines, Niles West John Campbell, Lockport Devin Blake, Downers North Corey Evers, Plainfield South Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Andrew Palucki, Maine South Romeo Magliore, Niles West Kelly, Westmont Jake Nowak, Plainfield North Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Little, Westmont Collin Pellettieri, Benet Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Kevin Krieger, Plainfield North Jake Smith, Minooka Shane Murray, Lisle Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Shane Ritter, Plainfield South Jacob Buchner, Plainfield South Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Robbie Brooks, Plainfield Central Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle Nick Novak, Plainfield East Jojo Rios, Niles West Joe Butler, Minooka Myles Farley, Downers North Ray Greco, Downers North Adam Alexander, Minooka Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Jon Arenas, Maine South D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Logiurato, Westmont Rebounds Per Game Sean O’Mara, Benet Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle Devin Blake, Downers North John Campbell, Lockport Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Zach Trussell, Lisle Miles Snowden, Plainfield South George Sargeant, Maine South Shane Murray, Lisle Joe Butler, Minooka Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Kelly, Westmont Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Josh Smith, Plainfield East Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South Josh Dillingham, Bolingbrook Kevin Krieger, Plainfield North

23.3 23.0 18.8 18.0 17.1 17.0 14.9 14.9 14.8 14.7 14.1 14.0 13.4 13.3 12.9 12.9 12.4 12.3 12.1 11.8 11.7 11.6 11.5 11.2 11.0 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.5 10.5 10.2 10.2 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 8.8 8.5 8.5 8.2 8.1 13.0 10.0 9.0 7.8 7.5 7.4 7.2 7.0 7.0 6.8 6.3 6.0 6.0 5.9 5.8 5.7 5.6 5.5 5.1 5.0

Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Brad Hund, Plainfield Central Jeff Washington, Joliet West Assists Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Collin Pellettieri, Benet Grover Anderson, Lockport Andrew Palucki, Maine South Logiurato, Westmont Myles Ward, Plainfield East Sean Maloney, Maine South Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Joe Mooney, Notre Dame Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Little, Westmont Ralph Blakney, Lockport Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Danny Spinuzza, Downers South Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Nick Novak, Plainfield East Jalen Jackson, JCA Jon Arenas, Maine South Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Jonny Butler, Minooka Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Corey Evers, Plainfield South Kelly, Westmont CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook Tim Doll, Westmont Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East John Campbell, Lockport Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Jared Whitacre, Downers North Joe Butler, Minooka Neal Tyrell, Minooka Deiondre Taylor, Lockport Jojo Rios, Niles West Isaiah Webster, Plainfield North D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Steals Grover Anderson, Lockport Corey Evers, Plainfield South Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North John Campbell, Lockport Romeo Magliore, Niles West Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Andrew Palucki, Maine South Logiurato, Westmont Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Jon Arenas, Maine South Danny Spinuzza, Downers South Ralph Blakney, Lockport Paul Engo, III, Downers South Nick Novak, Plainfield East Myles Ward, Plainfield East Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Little, Westmont Jonny Butler, Minooka Neal Tyrell, Minooka D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Kelly, Westmont George Sargeant, Maine South Joe Butler, Minooka Deiondre Taylor, Lockport Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Jojo Rios, Niles West Tim Doll, Westmont

4.9 4.9 4.9 105 100 92 90 87 87 86 80 80 77 75 74 70 70 68 64 63 60 58 57 57 54 54 52 51 51 51 47 46 45 44 43 39 38 35 34 34 53 50 50 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 42 40 38 36 32 31 30 29 28 28 28 28 27 27 26 26 26 23 23

Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Sean Maloney, Maine South CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Josh Smith, Plainfield East Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Field Goal % Tristin Esker, Plainfield East Shane Murray, Lisle George Sargeant, Maine South Julian Torres, Bolingbrook Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Davis Neilands, Maine South Tristin Esker, Plainfield East Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Matt Hund, Plainfield Central Romeo Magliore, Niles West Adam Alexander, Minooka Mark Geers, Minooka Jon Arenas, Maine South Ray Greco, Downers North Bowen Marks, Downers North Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Justin Windt, Plainfield Central Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Josh Dillingham, Bolingbrook Odi Audisho, Niles West Devin Blake, Downers North Jordan Reed, Plainfield East Free Throw % Caleb deMarigny, Maine South George Sargeant, Maine South Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Odi Audisho, Niles West Andrew Palucki, Maine South Matt Hund, Plainfield Central Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Grover Anderson, Lockport Connor Bielat, Lisle Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Romeo Magliore, Niles West Cappel, Minooka Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Brodric Thomas, Bolingbrook Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Ralph Blakney, Lockport Torrens, Westmont Myles Farley, Downers North Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Neal Tyrell, Minooka 3-pointers Collin Pellettieri, Benet Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Evan Hines, Niles West Paul Engo, III, Downers South Nick Novak, Plainfield East Jalen Jackson, JCA Danny Spinuzza, Downers South Ray Greco, Downers North Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Jojo Rios, Niles West Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Johnny Kostelz, Plainfield Central Andrew Palucki, Maine South

THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

22 22 21 21 20 20 .684 .667 .660 .630 .600 .595 .590 .577 .573 .560 .540 .540 .534 .530 .530 .520 .518 .515 .515 .510 .510 .500 .500 .500 .500 .500 .940 .840 .838 .810 .806 .790 .790 .773 .761 .760 .750 .757 .750 .747 .742 .740 .734 .720 .717 .715 .710 83 59 50 47 43 41 39 38 37 36 35 33 33 30 28

Shane Ritter, Plainfield South Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Devin Blake, Downers North Romeo Magliore, Niles West Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Neal Tyrell, Minooka Sean Maloney, Maine South Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central GIRLS BBALL Points Per Game Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Jaida Green, Downers North Aysia Bugg, Bolingbrook Emily Schramek, Benet Erin Heide, Minooka Emily Eshoo, Benet Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Jordan Heberg, Plainfield North Sarah Costello, Downers North Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Lexi Marin, Romeoville Peyton Winters, Downers North Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Kathleen Doyle, Benet Monica Barefield, Joliet West Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Elanta Slowik, Maine East Claire Hardy, Downers South Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Ryaen Johnson, Bolingbrook Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Chantell Mack, Joliet Central Destiny Hollins, Lockport Cherish Smith, Romeoville Nina Anderson, Maine South Naomi Mays, Lockport Rebounds Per Game Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Sarah Costello, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Chantell Mack, Joliet Central Claire Hardy, Downers South Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Cherish Smith, Romeoville Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Maria Protic, Maine East Peyton Winters, Downers North Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Ryaen Johnson, Bolingbrook Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Ty Battle, JCA Sydney Arlis, Minooka Nina Anderson, Maine South Kyla Creal, Lockport Jenae Rowe, Joliet West Ally Fink, Plainfield South Rachel Sutphin, Plainfield South Adriana Acosta, JCA Assists Sarah Costello, Downers North Jaida Green, Downers North Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Bre Sobotka, Resurrection

26 26 25 25 24 24 23 23 20

18.2 15.9 15.2 14.9 14.9 14.5 14.3 14.0 13.3 12.3 11.9 11.5 11.4 11.4 11.0 10.5 10.5 10.3 10.2 10.0 10.0 9.8 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.2 8.1 12.5 9.6 9.1 9.0 9.0 8.0 7.9 7.3 7.0 6.9 6.8 6.3 6.0 5.8 5.8 5.3 5.0 4.9 4.9 4.8 4.8 4.8 4.7 149 103 93 85 79

Aysia Bugg, Bolingbrook Juatece McNear, Joliet Central Kelly Kons, Maine South Monica Barefield, Joliet West Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Sydney Arlis, Minooka Erin Heide, Minooka Skyle Osborne, Romeoville Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Nina Anderson, Maine South Christina Ekhomu, JCA Lexi Marin, Romeoville Bethany Bachmann, Minooka Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Kathleen Doyle, Benet Ty Battle, JCA Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Jnaya Walker, JCA Megan Roberts, Maine South Destiny Hollins, Lockport Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Steals Sarah Costello, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Kianna Campbell, Lockport Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Destiny Hollins, Lockport Jaida Green, Downers North Jnaya Walker, JCA Christina Ekhomu, JCA Elanta Slowik, Maine East Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Aysia Bugg, Bolingbrook Bre Sobotka, Resurrection Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Ty Battle, JCA Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Kailey Foster, Joliet West Naomi Mayes, Lockport Nina Anderson, Maine South Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Skyle Osborne, Romeoville Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Monica Barefield, Joliet West Lexi Marin, Romeoville Kathleen Doyle, Benet Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Jenae Rowe, Joliet West Kelly Kons, Maine South Jamari McAfee, Lockport Monica Nunez, Resurrection Treanna Perry, Joliet West Cherish Smith, Romeoville Field Goal % Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Ty Battle, JCA Peyton Winters, Downers North Emma Hlavin, Benet Kyla Creal, Lockport Sydney Arlis, Minooka Jenna Martin, Benet Kendall McDermott, Benet Free Throw % Autumn Lawson, Joliet Central Emily Eshoo, Benet Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Alexis Pease, Minooka Faith Heitman, Romeoville Emily Schramek, Benet

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78 70 69 68 66 66 60 60 59 57 56 56 55 49 48 43 43 42 42 39 39 35 103 85 78 77 75 70 58 56 54 54 54 52 50 49 46 45 45 45 41 40 39 38 38 38 37 36 35 35 34 32 32 32 .590 .577 .560 .550 .510 .500 .490 .490 .860 .780 .764 .760 .758 .740


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THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

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come to order

Organize your bedroom for a good night’s sleep

If your bedroom is anything but restful, consider spending some time de-cluttering Is your bedroom and other piles of clothing calm and serene, a and pare down what place where you can you don’t or won’t wear. relax and get a restful Be realistic. night’s sleep? Do you keep passing over Or, is it a chaotic a particular shirt or pair place filled with clutter, of pants because another clothes, papers and the one is more comfortable come to order like? or fits better? sue becker If so, move it on to a If your bedroom is new home – either elsewhere in anything but restful, consider your home or to a charity. spending some time de-cluttering Once you’ve moved out what and organizing it so it becomes a you don’t wear, there will be more sanctuary to replenish your mind room to put away the clothes that and soul. previously sat in piles because In addition, organizing your there was no place to put them. bedroom will make getting dressed each day a simple Remove the clutter endeavor rather than a frantic hunt for matching shoes. It’s hard to sleep when piles of laundry, paper and other assorted Pare down your clutter is “staring” at you. clothing I wonder how many Go through your closet, dresser people who suffer from sleep

disturbances would get a more restful sleep simply by removing these stress-inducing items. An easy solution is to stop yourself from bringing anything into your bedroom unless you put it away right away. In addition, if it doesn’t support the activities you do in your bedroom (sleep, read, get dressed, insert your own fun activity here) it shouldn’t be in there. Find another place to store such items – your sleep and your health are too important to ignore this guideline.

Be creative with storage Consider vertical storage (e.g., hooks on the wall) and underbed storage (for out of season clothes, seldom worn shoes, extra bedding) for items that won’t fit anywhere else. Maybe a nightstand, lingerie cabinet or bookcase can give you the functional storage you need

If your bedroom is anything but restful, consider spending some time de-cluttering and organizing it so it becomes a sanctuary to replenish your mind and soul. without taking up much space.

Sustain the serenity Once you’ve turned your muddled mess into a serene sanctuary, you’ll want to be sure to keep it that way. Get a hamper - and use it! Be sure clothes are coming out (i.e., getting laundered) at a faster rate than they’re going in. Make your bed every morning – this simple two-minute task will quickly transform the look and feel of your room. When you bring in your clean laundry, put it away right away – when your closet and dresser are pared down, it should take no

more than five minutes to quickly and easily put things away. Since your bedroom is the first thing you see in the morning and the last thing you see at night, be sure to tidy it up frequently so you can start and end your day calm and relaxed. Pleasant dreams! Sue Becker is a Certified Professional Organizer in Chronic Disorganization who helps individuals and businesses discover the simplicity, harmony, and freedom of being organized and productive. She also speaks to companies and organizations about how to get organized and make the most of their time. Sue can be reached at www.PilesToSmiles.com or 630-7241111.


THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 856 Bonnie Brae Lane Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (Single family). On the 1st day of May, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificate Holders CWABS, Inc. AssetBacked Certificates, Series 2005-16 Plaintiff V. Lawrence St. Luce; Amy St. Luce; Household Finance Corporation III; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Nominee for Home Loan Center, Inc. d/b/a Lending Tree Loans; St. Andrews Woods Homeowners Association Defendant. Case No. 07 CH 1842 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 201 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 4/3, 4/10, 4/17

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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 215 Penny Lane Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (Single Family Home). On the 24th day of April, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Harris N.A. Plaintiff V. Alfonso Corral; Juana Corral; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants, Defendant. Case No. 09 CH 829 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Ehrenberg & Egan, LLC. 330 N. Wabash Avenue Suite 2905 Chicago, Illinois 60611 312-253-8640 312-253-8660 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/27, 4/3, 4/10 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 11 Pennsbury Court, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (Single Family 2 stories). On the 17th day of April, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Green Tree Servicing LLC Plaintiff V. JAYANTHA L. PONNAMBALAM; CHRISTINA L. PONNAMBALAM; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 5925 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/20, 3/27, 4/3


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THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014


THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014

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THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Green Tree Servicing LLC Plaintiff,

Harris N.A. Plaintiff,

vs.

vs.

JAYANTHA L. PONNAMBALAM; CHRISTINA L. PONNAMBALAM; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS Defendant. No. 12 CH 5925

Alfonso Corral; Juana Corral; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants, Defendant. No. 09 CH 829

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 9th day of January, 2014, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 17th day of April, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 29, BLOCK 13 WILLIAMS GLEN SUBDIVISION, UNIT 4, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 2, 1991 AS DOCUMENT NO. R9143636, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 11 Pennsbury Court, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: Single Family 2 stories P.I.N.: 12-02-08-207-008-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/20, 3/27, 4/3

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 11th day of August, 2009, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 24th day of April, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 31 IN BLOCK 1 IN WILLIAMS GLEN SUBDIVISION, UNIT 2, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORD JANUARY 25,1991 AS DOCUMENT NO. R91-03988, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 215 Penny Lane Bolingbrook, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 02-08-426-011-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Ehrenberg & Egan, LLC. 330 N. Wabash Avenue Suite 2905 Chicago, Illinois 60611 312-253-8640 312-253-8660 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/27, 4/3, 4/10

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificate Holders CWABS, Inc. AssetBacked Certificates, Series 2005-16 Plaintiff, vs. Lawrence St. Luce; Amy St. Luce; Household Finance Corporation III; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Nominee for Home Loan Center, Inc. d/b/a Lending Tree Loans; St. Andrews Woods Homeowners Association Defendant. No. 07 CH 1842 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 17th day of March, 2014, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 1st day of May, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 76 IN ST. ANDREWS WOODS, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AND ALSO PART OF LOT 7 (EXCEPT THE NORTH 165.0 FEET IN OLDWOODS FARM) IN THE NORTH 1/2 OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 6, 1979, AS DOCUMENT NO. R79-7489, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 856 Bonnie Brae Lane Bolingbrook, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: Single family P.I.N.: 12-02-02-102-002 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 201 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 4/3, 4/10, 4/17


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THE BUGLE APRIL 3, 2014


Bolingbrook 04-03-14