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bolingbrookbugle.com

MARCH 6, 2014

Vol. 7 No. 34

schools

March PriMary

Valley View to increase student fees Fees will be initiated in graduated phases over the next few school years By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

BUSiNESSmaN BERt millER

CURRENt StatE REp. DaRlENE SENgER

CONSERvativE talk SHOw HOSt iaN BaYNE

gRUNDY COUNtY BOaRD mEmBER CHRiS BalkEma

DISTRICT 11 CANDIDATES

11th District now covers Kane, Kendall, DuPage, Will and Cook counties >>> See the full story on page 3

GRAPHIC ILLUSTRATION BY SHELLEY HOLMGREN | BUGLE NEWSPAPERS

Valley View School District is proposing to raise fees across the board at all schools in graduated phases over the next few school years. The primary changes for these school years include a $5 increase each year in the registration fee. At the middle school level, the cocurricular athletic participation fee would be raised by $10 for the 2014-15school year to $60 per sport and remain unchanged for the 2015-16 school year. The maximum per student would be $150 each year.At the high school level, the cocurricular non-athletic/non-competitive club and activity participation fee is >> see fEES | page 5


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THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

News business

New restaurants to open in area Options include IHOP, Oberweis, That Burger Joint, Connie’s Pizza By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

More choices for dining out are coming to Bolingbrook, covering breakfast and sweet treats. A new IHOP, International

House of Pancakes, is set to be built at 730 N. Janes Ave., next to the Meijer store located near the Promenade. The proposed building will be a 24-hour, fullservice, sit-down restaurant. In addition, an Oberweis Dairy restaurant is to be constructed at 860 E. Boughton Road and will also feature That Burger Joint and Connie’s Pizza. The 6,220 square-foot restaurant will be developed

in the currently vacant lot in the Boughton Woodward Commercial Center. Outdoor seating is being proposed and the hours of operation would be from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Jim Oberweis is a member of the Illinois Senate, representing the 25th district since January 2013.

state news

Quinn announces $151,000 investment to develop bicycle path in Bolingbrook Will County Forest Preserve District will receive funds to develop two trails at Whalon Lake Governor Pat Quinn announced an investment of $151,000 to help develop a bicycle path in Bolingbrook. The matching grant is part of a $1 million investment to develop or improve 42 miles of bicycle trails in Illinois. The announcement is part of Governor Quinn’s commitment to green transportation and healthy lifestyles in Illinois. “This investment will provide more opportunities for people to get out, get healthy and enjoy what Bolingbrook has to offer,”Governor Quinn said. “Bicycling is an ideal activity for young and old, and this path will make biking safer and more convenient.” The Will County Forest Preserve District will receive $151,000 to develop two sections of trail extending north and south from the existing loop trail at Whalon Lake Forest Preserve off Royce Road in Bolingbrook. These trails will connect the Bolingbrook Bridge and trails south of the DuPage River to the Naperville and DuPage County trails north of the river. Funds for the Bicycle Path Grant Program, administered by the Illinois Department of Natural

Resources (DNR), are for the acquisition of land or development of facilities for bicycle paths. The Bicycle Path Grant Program was approved by the Illinois General Assembly in 1989 and funding comes from a percentage of motor vehicle title fees. The program provides up to 50 percent of the total approved project cost. “Illinois’ growing system of multi-use trails provides Illinois children and families with the perfect opportunity to get outside and connect with nature,” DNR Director Marc Miller said.“As these new trails are completed, they will provide an economic boost because communities that offer diverse recreational opportunities become more attractive to new families and businesses.” A total of 21 applications were initially received, representing a combined request of $2.7 million. Combined with previous years’ funding, DNR has awarded grants that helped develop approximately 982 miles of local government bicycle trails in Illinois since 1990. “Not only do new recreational opportunities enrich the lives of those living in the surrounding community, supporting the

development of desirable green space also has an important economic impact,” Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno (R-Lemont) said. “Business owners place a premium on communities that boast a variety of leisure options and outdoor activities. Embracing these types of improvements is an important way we can boost the region’s economy.” “This bike trail will enrich the quality of life in northern Will County,” State Senator Pat McGuire (D-Crest Hill) said. “Cooperation like this between the State of Illinois, the Forest Preserve District of Will County, and the Village of Bolingbrook epitomizes how government should work.” “The development of this bicycle path within the Will County Forest Preserve area will provide people of all ages with increased opportunities for active recreation,” State Representative Ron Sandack (R-Downers Grove) said. “The paths will also allow residents with new opportunities to connect with nature and to enjoy the beautiful scenery along the new sections of trail.” “This new bicycle will path will not only make the Bolingbrook area more connectable, but will also serve as a way more area residents can get out on their bikes for daily exercise or reduce their carbon footprint by biking to work,” State Representative Emily McAsey (D-Lockport) said. “I am encouraged by projects like this that are putting Illinoisans back to work and helping our local economy by providing muchneeded jobs for construction workers.”


News cover story

4 GOP candidates make competitive run for House 11th District now covers Kane, Kendall, DuPage, Will and Cook counties By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

In what is becoming the most highly watched race in the Illinois primary, four GOP candidates are making a competitive run for a seat in the U.S.House of Representatives 11th Congressional District. Grundy County Board Member Chris Balkema, businessman Bert Miller, current state Rep. Darlene Senger and conservative talk show host Ian Bayne are seeking the Republican nomination in the March 18 primary election to determine who will run against Democrat Bill Foster in the general election this November. In a game-changing race, Foster ousted veteran Republican Judy Biggert in the l1th Congressional District in November 2012. Biggert claimed a Republican stronghold in the area for more than a decade, beginning her reign in 1999. However the new 11th District now stretches through Chicago’s western suburbs and covers five counties: Kane, Kendall, DuPage, Will and Cook. It includes the following communities: Aurora, Montgomery, North Aurora, Oswego, Plainfield, Darien, Downers Grove, Naperville, Lisle, Willowbrook, Woodridge, Bolingbrook, Crest Hill, Joliet, New Lenox, Romeoville, Shorewood and Burr Ridge.

chris balkema Balkema said as a leader at Caterpillar for 20 years, he is running for Congress, “because we need to save our country” and is eager to use his experience to do so. Repealing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is a priority as well as term limits. “We must repeal and replace it (ACA) with free market health care principles, like allowing insurance to be sold across state lines and eliminating the bureaucratic ‘insurance exchanges,’” said Balkema. “…We need term limits to get rid of narcissistic career

politicians that hurt our nation. I will lead the charge to pass a law that restricts these folks from creating political careers on the back of American tax payers.” He believes he is the best candidate on the ballot and the best for the job. “I have won five elections on the Minooka High School Board and Grundy County Board,” said Balkema. “I delivered results to voters. With the voters’ help, I will provide leadership that is desperately needed in Congress. The residents of District 11 will be my boss, and I expect to be held accountable for my performance.” Miller can sum up the reason the running for Congress in one word—jobs. His primary focus will remain on job creation and reducing the nation’s debt. “We need to balance the federal budget and get our debt under control while creating an economy that supports job growth and capital investment,” said Miller. “Last year’s shutdown of government was the tipping point for me. I decided I could no longer sit back and complain; I must try to do my part to make things better.”

bert Miller Miller believes America needs leaders who are willing to work together without bipartisan fighting to get results for the American people. “As I travel throughout the 11th Congressional District, the number one issue on the minds of voters is the economy,” said Miller. “Illinois has the third highest unemployment rate in the U.S., and we’ve recently seen the slowest job growth in the last three years because President Obama and Congressman Foster’s support for higher taxes and more regulations.” “He said he is not a politician, but is president of Phoenix Closures, his Naperville family business that has existed for more than a century and “employs

hundreds of workers with good pay and healthcare.” He said his experience as the former Chairman of the Illinois Manufacturers Association and a current board member of the National Association of Manufacturers gives him a genuine understanding of the impact bad government policy and regulations can have on the manufacturing industry.

Darlene senger In 2008, Senger of Naperville, won an uphill battle against her Democrat opponent, to win her position as state representative. Her campaign materials boast in Springfield she “has fought for the taxpayers, families, seniors, young adults and children of our communities and will take her strong work ethic and common sense approach to problem solving to Washington, D.C., where she will work to reduce government waste while continuing to provide needed safety net programs, protect Social Security 100 percent and reduce the regulatory burden on job creators to help them create more jobs.” Senger has supported an amendment to the state Constitution requiring the General Assembly to pass a balanced budget. Failure to do so would suspend lawmaker’s pay. “I believe we should do the same in Congress.We need to rein in spending, lower the country’s debt and stop mortgaging our children’s and grandchildren’s future,” said Senger. She also believes, having seen it firsthand, “that you cannot tax your way out of a budget hole. In fact, higher taxes can often lead to less revenue. I will fight against all tax increases and work to lower taxes in order to foster growth and job creation.” Senger holds similar beliefs that job creation and economic growth should be the top and that cutting back on burdensome,unnecessary and unrealistic regulations is the first step towards creating jobs. >> see HOUSE | page 4

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THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

>> HOUSE, from page 2 Calling for a health care overhaul, she believes that costs of health care need to be lowered by creating competition in a free market setting, not through government mandates.

Ian Bayne A concern for Bayne as well, he believes the ACA should be repealed and is running to “restore lower taxes, less spending and freedom to the American people.” Bayne said, “The district faces catastrophic loss of jobs and opportunity due to failed economic policy that is being supported by establishment politicians in Washington. Opposing and defeating people with bad ideas is very important because these bad ideas are causing the American people to suffer.” Bayne believes “as a free market conservative, I know that the government cannot do anything better than people can do acting without government. Our families, our schools, our businesses,

our finances, our health— government has no right to tell us how to live or behave, or weigh in on these issues.” He is opposed to gun control and is a supporter of the 2nd Amendment and the right to bear arms. Bayne is in favor of reducing federal control of schools, placing control back in the hands of local elected officials and teaching American exceptionalism in schools. Bayne also is a proponent of small business, and believes small business is the backbone of the American economy and should be freed from unnecessary regulation. He plans to oppose overregulation of small business. Craig Robbins recently withdrew his candidacy. He said while he remains dedicated to serving the community, Illinois and the country, changes in his professional and military service obligations in 2014 will make it too difficult to commit the time necessary to run a successful campaign through the general election in November.

News School District 365U

Making adjustments to security an ongoing effort at Valley View District also will work to increase connections with community Following two recent incidents that resulted in lockdowns in Romeoville and Bolingbrook schools, Valley View School District 365U has re-doubled its efforts to ensure the safest possible environment for children and staff. “We are taking the incident at Bolingbrook High School, as well as the incident that occurred in the Romeoville community near two of our schools, very seriously,” said Valley View Superintendent James Mitchem who today announced several changes throughout the district. “We have already met with local authorities to determine the best way to work together to handle

similar situations in the future.” Mitchem detailed several changes, including an increase in both the number of lockdown drills as well as the times of day during which the drills will take place. “We plan on holding drills before and after school and during lunchtime in all of our schools, as well as during passing periods in all of our middle schools and high schools,” Mitchem said. “We want to make sure everyone is prepared for as many scenarios as possible.” Valley View also will work to increase connections with the community by re-establishing the successful Friends and Neighbors Supporting Students program (FANSS) in both high schools and at all five middle schools, and by placing an emphasis on establishing proactive student support groups.

At Bolingbrook High School: ●A new alarm system has been installed that alerts the staff of a hard lockdown and contacts the police, without needing to use the intercom system. ●In an effort to prevent students from opening exit doors during the day without an alarm going off, exit door alarms are being installed on doors 8, 10, 11, 14. These doors have been identified as off-limits for use during the school day.This will decrease the chances of an intruder entering the building unnoticed. ●An exterior strobe light system is being installed on the exterior of the building at doors 1 and 17 that will alert anyone outside the building when the school is in a hard or soft lockdown. ●The frequency of random searches will be significantly increased.


News state news

Foster calls on Congress to raise minimum wage Raising the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour would raise wages for 16.5 million people wages for 16.5 U.S. Rep. Bill million people, Foster, D-Naperville, according to a joined Congressional press release Democrats last week from Foster. in filing a discharge In Illinois, petition requesting an which has a immediate vote to raise minimum wage the federal minimum of $8.25 per wage to $10.10 per hour, a full-time hour. minimum wage “As a businessman who U.S. Rep. Bill Foster, worker makes started a high-tech firm D-Naperville a p p r o x i m a t e ly that provides hundreds $16,600 a year. of good manufacturing jobs in the Midwest, I know the The federal poverty line for a value in paying workers a living family of three is $19,790. Foster said that businesses wage,” Foster said. “It doesn’t just help workers struggling in Illinois face continuous to support their families, it competitive pressure from low-wage states, and a federal supports economic growth.” Raising the minimum wage increase in the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour would raise would help level the playing >> fees, from page 1 lowered and combined into the registration fee. Assistant Superintendent Gary Grizaffi said by combining the fees, the district can streamline the number of fees being charged. The move would allow students to become involved in the many diverse clubs offered at the high school level without having to pay any additional fees regardless of the number of activities they have interest in. A co-curricular non-athletic participation fee would remain at $50 for competitive activities

like mathletes, scholastic bowl and chess.This is due to the costs associated with transportation and judging officials. Grizaffi said the increase in fees is comparable and in some cases lower than neighboring school districts. One parent spoke out, calling for an end to the increase in fees, noting fees were already raised last year and that though fees may be comparable within other districts, income levels are not the same in Valley View as others. The late charge, which was instituted in 2011, would remain in place and be

field. Foster signed the Bishop (NY) discharge petition to force consideration of H.R. 1010 – the Fair Minimum Wage Act. A discharge petition is a mechanism to avoid leadership gridlock in Congress by requiring the House to consider the legislation once a majority of Members of Congress (218) have signed it. H.R. 1010 amends the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to increase the federal minimum wage for employees to $10.10 an hour over two years. After three years, the minimum wage amount will be indexed to inflation. Additionally, H.R. 1010 will increase the federal minimum wage for tipped employees to $3 an hour during the first year, while providing a formula for subsequent annual adjustments.

applicable to those households that fail to register by the designated registration day deadline. The primary benefit of implementing a late charge is encouraging all students to attend the Back to School registration in order to reduce the long lines of students registering and paying fees on the first day of school. Grizaffi reported a modest decrease in the number of students waiting to register until the first week of school. An action report is expected to be brought before the school board at the March 10 meeting for final approval.

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Police Blotter

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The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Bolingbrook Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

1

Kathryn Hiero,15655 116th Ave., Orland Park, was arrested at 2:22 a.m. March 12 and charged with DUI, failure to signal and no insurance,following a traffic stop at Boughton Road and Aspen Drive.

2

Michael Braxton Jr., 21, 1531 Shagbark Drive, was arrested at 11:17 p.m. March 13 and charged with speeding, traffic signal violation, driving on a suspended license and an equipment violation, following a traffic stop in the 200 block of N. Weber Road.

3

Robert Stafford, 23, 364 Kirkwood Circle, was arrested at 7:56 p.m. March 13 and charged with failure to signal,obstructed windshield and illegal transportation of alcohol. Gregory Branch, 36V Fernwood Dr.,was charged with obstructing justice, an in state warrant, and illegal transportation of alcohol, following a traffic stop in the 100 block of E. Boughton Road.

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Christopher Brevard, 20, 149 Monterey Dr., was arrested at 6:55 p.m. March 13 and charged with speeding, no insurance and a warrant, following a traffic stop on the intersection of Northridge Avenue and Malibu Drive.

5

Officers were called to a residence on the 100 block of Sycamore Drive for the report of a theft. Several pieces of jewelry were taken from the

bedroom between Feb. 13 and 14.

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Tyree Nettles, 22, 2642 Forest Way, Woodridge, was arrested at 8:10 p.m. Feb. 13 and charged with resisting a peace officer, no driver’s license and traffic sign violation, following a traffic stop in the 400 block of N. Bolingbrook Drive.

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Officers were called to the 100 block of Delmar Drive, for the report of a residential burglary. The homeowners discovered a snow blower and four bicycles were taken from the garage between Dec. 15 and Feb. 15.

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Nathan Vargas, 22, 726 Rogers Road, Romeoville, was arrested at 3:33 a.m. Feb. 15 and charged with improper lane usage, too fast for conditions, no insurance and DUI, following a

traffic stop on the intersection of Lawton Lane and N. Frontage Road.

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Robert Lenning, 44, Romeoville, was charged with possession of controlled substance and possession of drug equipment and Kevin Thompson, 25, Plainfield, was charged the possession of controlled substance, possession of drug equipment, in state warrant, resisting a peace officer, aggravated battery and possession of cannabis. Christopher Riley, 28, 921 S. Church St., Princeton, IL was arrested at 12:43 a.m. Feb. 17 and charged with possession of a controlled substance and Brittany Debeck, 22, 114 N. Locust Dr., Fairbury, IL was charged with possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug equipment, a warrant and

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possession of cannabis, following a traffic stop in the 100 block of E. North Frontage Road. Megan Kuehl, 24, 636 Jordan Ave., Romeoville, was arrested at 7:10 p.m. Feb. 18 and charged with an in-state warrant, following a traffic stop on the intersection of Lily Cache Lane and Plainview Drive.

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Sergio Fernandez, 28, 644 W. Briarcliff Road, was arrested at 10:54 a.m. Feb. 19 and charged with an in-state warrant, following a traffic stop Creekside Drive and Lily Cache Lane.

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Eileen Seaton, 41, 1109 Ohio Street, Glenwood, was arrested at 12:56 a.m. Feb. 19 and charged with improper lane usage and DUI, following a traffic stop on the intersection of Boughton Road and Schmidt Road.

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ForuM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy! Just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred. Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

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Guest coluMn

OUR HOUSE

witH REp. NataliE maNlEY (D-JOliEt) 98tH DiStRiCt

Taking a closer look at the people in the Will County area: the families, the schools, the businesses, the neighborhoods, the roads, the challenges, the accomplishments, the issues, the opportunities their county’s Last week in growing heroin Springfield, I attended problem. the state’s first Young Testimony from Adults Heroin Use Task as far north as Lake force hearing. This County and as far bipartisan, bicameral south as Macoupin committee of legislators County was heard, -- along with those and all agreed holding gubernatorial appointments, and the REp. NataliE maNlEY that tackling this immense issue Department of Human (D-JOliEt) 98tH would require a longServices -- gathered at DiStRiCt term, collaborative the Capitol for the first effort from all levels in a series of hearings addressing the heroin epidemic of the community. I was very glad when Dr. Joseph Troiani, that has erupted Illinois. Several experts on the subject Ph.D. CADC, the director of gave testimony to the task force, behavioral health programs created by HB 0946 and officially from the Will County Public became law in August 2013. Health Department, stepped Testimony from educators, law up to the podium as the last enforcement, state’s attorneys, expert to testify. He was able and leaders in the field of mental to not only corroborate what health and addiction provided the others believed -- that yes, testimony to the committee. it would take the efforts of an Throughout the testimony, we entire community -- but he was listened to the experts describe also able to explain what the

WEB LINKS Have a question or comment about this column? feel free to send us an email at nmanley@buglenewspapers.com

greater Will County community has been doing since 2011 to address this issue and report early signs of success as a result of this intense collaboration. In 2012, Will County Coroner Pat O’Neil reported we were averaging one death a week, not to mention that first responders were administering Narcan (Naloxone Hydrochloride), the anti-overdose drug that immediately reverses the harmful effects of opiates (like heroin), approximately once a day. Pat O’Neil said, “If every person that overdosed was not given Narcan and died, the county morgue would not be able to accommodate those numbers.” Through Will County’s united efforts to educate, generate >> see OUR HOUSE | page 18

Guest coluMn

Speaking up against the R-Word General Manager V.P. Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Managing Editor Nick Reiher nreiher@buglenewspapers.com Assistant Managing Editor Jonathan Samples jsamples@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Manager Pat Ryan pryan@enterprisepublications.com

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A question to answer: Where and when is a good time to say something? Daniel Smrokowski Guest Columnist

The word “retard(ed),” or the “r-word” as I call it, is a word that is really hurtful for all of us with special needs and our families and friends. Just like many of my fellow Special Olympics athletes, I don’t really like to drive. Yes, there are some who do drive (and I used to about six years ago), but many of us take public transportation. A couple years ago, I was taking the train home from college. On this particular evening commute, the train was packed, and I couldn’t find a seat. So, I had to stand (and hold on to the train) amid the

crowd of other commuters. As I usually do, I put my earbuds in and pretended like I was listening to a podcast, when all of a sudden, one of the conductors was in the doorway of the train talking with some of the other commuters. I heard the train conductor use the r-word multiple times during this train ride. It was hard for me to say anything because it just hurt too much to hear him use the word. After I got home safe and sound, I wrote a letter to the train company and later talked with one of the workers at the rail ticket counter in my hometown. The train company had eventually emailed me back and apologized.

web connect ENgagE iN tHE DiSCUSSiON ONliNE aBOUt tHE ‘R-wORD’

#SCPChat @EndtheWord Facebook.com/ EndtheWord SpecialChronicles .com/EndTheWord I haven’t heard anything from this train conductor since, but I hope and pray he learned a lesson about how the r-word hurts all of us with special needs. Fast forward a couple years to present day--Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014, at 7:04p.m. I was riding the train back home with a >> see R-wORD | page 18


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THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

Schools

School District 365U

Watch for acts of kindness during Pay It Forward 365U Activities for the week will include an antibullying poster contest, daily dress-up themes For the second straight year, schools in Valley View School District 365U will engage in random acts of kindness over the next few months as part of the VVSD Pay It Forward 365 campaign. “Our goal is to have students experience the positive feeling of giving and receiving kindness,” said Michele Bochnak, Valley View Community Outreach Coordinator. “How students feel about themselves is very important in the classroom and in the school community.” Among activities planned: During ISAT testing March 4-7, kindergarten through 2nd grade students at Hermansen Elementary School in Romeoville will show their support for 3rd through 5th

graders by creating posters, letters and banners of encouragement. In April, the older students will show their support by creating books using their younger counterparts as characters. Romeoville High School will “Take A Stand” the week of March 10-14. Activities for the week will include an anti-bullying poster contest,daily dress-up themes,daily announcements and the tracing of hands on a giant poster March 14 as students pledge to “lend a hand, take a stand.” A common theme heard throughout the week will be “if you witness something you wouldn’t want to happen to you, let the people involved know that’s not OK at our school.” From March 17 to 28 at Oak

View Elementary School in Bolingbrook, students will write thank you notes to members of the Bolingbrook police and fire departments. They will also conduct a food, shampoo, soap, shaving cream and toiletry drive for Power Connection and will “pass a smile forward” to nursing home patients and staff by creating special messages about their school and themselves. From March 19-21, students at B.J. Ward Elementary School in Bolingbrook will learn about Pay It Forward 365 through classroom presentations that will include lists of related activities and books for children. Throughout the following three weeks (not including Spring Break) students will be encouraged to document and submit any behaviors or actions they see that cause them to smile. Not only will all of the documentation be posted in the

hallway for all to see, but three of the top contributing classes will also be direct participants in a tobe-determined fun reward during an all-school assembly on April 24. Beverly Skoff Elementary School in Romeoville has a variety of activities planned during the week of March 24. On Monday of that week families will launch a drive for non-perishable food items for a local food pantry, while teachers conduct “read-alouds” using books related to acts of kindness. On Tuesday, students will make kindness cards. Thursday they will fill out “what would you do?” sheets explaining how they would help a friend in various situations. And on Friday, each class will come up with a random act of kindness they can perform to make someone else’s day brighter. Pay it Forward Week will be April 21-25 at Jonas Salk Elementary

School in Bolingbrook. On Monday, students will be given “Pay It Forward” bracelets when they do something kind for someone else. Thursday will feature a “kindness pledge.” Friday students will be asked to bring in at least one canned or dry good for the DuPage Township Food Pantry. On Tuesday students will write down names they have been called that made them feel bad. Those names will be shredded and disposed. Students will then write on paper links names that make them feel good. The links will become part of a school-wide “kindness chain.” Wednesday is “Building a Kinder School” Day. Students will receive a paper brick and will be asked to write down what they can do to make the school a kinder place. The bricks will be used to build a wall in the school cafeteria.

New STEP president is an ‘advocate for students’ VVSD’s Secondary Transition Experience Program reaches out

Matt Kalis is a go-getter. His brain constantly churns out ideas. That’s why the 20-year-old young man is Student Council President for VVSD’s Secondary Transition Experience Program (STEP). “I want to make school a better

place by making it fun for students,” Kalis said. “I want everyone to come together because we are one big family.” “Matt is a very motivated student. That’s why he was selected to be President,” said Sandra Jones, who serves as advisor to the STEP Student Council.“He rallies around the other students. And he’s kind and helpful.” Kalis is a life-long product of the VVSD system, starting out at

the Valley View Early Childhood Center, and then attending Jonas Salk, Humphrey and Bolingbrook High School. He will graduate from the STEP program next year which means he’ll likely serve another term as Student Council President when he’s done with the current term. His dream is to own his own restaurant or catering service. “I love to cook,” he said with a big smile.

As a key player in STEP’s “Dinner Is Ready” program, Kalis gets lots of experience cooking and serving meals to staff at five different VVSD schools. He also is at the forefront of Student Council’s “Snack Shack” which sells various types of snacks to students during the lunch hour. “It’s important to him to help bring money into the program because of what the program has meant to him,” Jones said.

STEP’s Student Council isn’t the traditional governing body one might find in a middle school or a high school because many of the students are out of the building most days on work assignments. “It’s really to get students involved in their school,” Jones said. “I’m a good advocate for students,” Kalis said. “Last year we didn’t have anyone, so I’m stepping up this year.”


Take 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Babbling waterway 6 Pillow covers 11 Healthful facility 14 Nocturnal primate with a ringed tail 15 Squiggle in “pi-ata” 16 Make a mistake 17 *1972 hit with the line “The day the music died” 19 Feel sick 20 Sharp turn 21 Auction cry 22 “I’m innocent!” 24 Pennsylvanie, par exemple 26 *County fair prize 29 Receding tide 31 On edge 32 Sambuca flavoring 35 Place for a polar bear 37 Street shaders 40 *Home-based business 43 __ II razor 44 Tells in a bad way 45 Biblical beasts

Down 46 Blue gem, for short 48 “I __ you one” 49 *Beef-braisedwith-tomatoes dish 53 Jones with a locker 57 Cagney’s TV partner 58 Spring bloomer 60 Go head-tohead 61 Prefix for the birds 62 Green Bay Packer fans ... and a hint to the answers to starred clues 66 Pince-__ glasses 67 Prefix meaning “sun” 68 Krupp Works city 69 Afternoon ora 70 Bagel flavoring 71 “Star Wars” surname?

1 Burn brightly 2 Send a money order, say 3 Alpha’s opposite 4 “__ Man in Havana”: Graham Greene novel 5 Barbra’s “A Star Is Born” co-star 6 Delay on purpose 7 Many an Indian, religiously 8 The Eiger, e.g. 9 Start of the 16th century 10 Greeted and seated 11 Vehicle safety devices 12 First-class 13 Former senator Specter 18 __ salad 23 Excessively preoccupied 25 Precedent setter 27 Boarding school jackets 28 Bassoon vibrator 30 “But I don’t wanna __ pirate!”: “Seinfeld” 32 Do some film

work 33 Partner of neither 34 Highlight in print, in a way 35 Banquet 36 Put a match to 38 G.I. grub 39 Part of TBS: Abbr. 41 Pinot __ 42 Detroit labor org. 47 Film with a classic shower scene 48 Sooner State migrant 49 Bias 50 Have second thoughts 51 Five-letter song refrain 52 Felonious fire 54 Salt’s “Halt!” 55 Audio counterpart 56 Like “Will you marry me?” questionwise 59 Storage building 63 Clucker 64 Yale alum 65 Suffix with Brooklyn

THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

Horoscopes Actions speak louder than words. You may put too much emphasis on appearances and charm this week, when it’s what you actually do that concerns people the most. Performing a kind act for someone will get you further than meaningless sweet-talk.

Don’t pick favorites. To satisfactorily strike a compromise in the week ahead, you must find a solution that benefits everyone equally. Beware of those who may try to buddy up to you just to get a bigger slice of the pie.

Don’t jump to conclusions. When a situation may have those around you ready to take immediate action this week, it may be wiser to adopt a wait-and-see approach. Don’t allow uncertainty and fear to spur a poor decision.

There are two sides to every story. Don’t accept someone’s viewpoint as gospel simply because that was the one you heard first. Make sure you have all the facts at your disposal before reaching any conclusions in the week ahead.

Accentuate the positive. Make an effort to focus on the good things going on in your life during the coming week. Being optimistic will make you more appealing to others and soon you’ll find the dice rolling in your favor.

There’s no shame in taking a short-cut. You shouldn’t wear yourself out in the upcoming week when you can achieve your goals with minimal effort. Use free time to socialize and share ideas with those around you.

Enjoy tea for two. While you may not be ready to declare someone your soul mate, you can spend a pleasant afternoon in the week ahead with a person you’re proud to call a friend. Don’t plead poverty when it comes time to pay the tab.

Good friends don’t cost a thing. With that in mind, you’d be well served by spending the day with your inner circle of close pals rather than going on a shopping spree. The best way to spend money this week is to not spend it at all.

Make sure that the only toes you’re standing on are your own. You may be able to accomplish your goals with ease, but in doing so you may infringe upon someone else’s territory. Think things over before taking action in the week ahead.

Change your perspective. You may be too close to a matter to see things objectively, so it may be in your best interest to get some distance so you can look at the situation from a different angle. Ignore unfounded suspicions this week.

The only thing to fear is fear itself. In the week ahead, you may find that your doubts are the only thing holding back your progress. Be careful that those with whom you’ve placed your trust are truly dependable.

Ignoring a problem won’t make it go away. In fact, the longer you leave a situation to fester on its own, the worse it will get. In the week ahead, take immediate action to set things right before they get out of hand.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Content Agency 2014

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • GRIME • HAVOC • DAHLIA • HELIUM

Answer:

What the lottery winner did when he bought the penthouse -- LIVED “HIGH”

9


10

THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014


INSIDE: Lewis men earn tournament bye despite loss, page 12; Lewis women look to repeat as GLVC champs, page 13

bolingbrookbugle.com

THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

11

Raiders claim SWSC title By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

With already owning the outright SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue Division title, looking ahead to the playoffs and the game being senior night, the recipe was there for a letdown game for the Bolingbrook boys basketball team Friday night against Sandburg, but the Raiders did not let any of the distract them as the ended the regular season with the 54-51 win. The Raiders started an allsenior lineup that consisted of Ray Gonzalez, Kenny Williams, Shakur Triplett, Josh Dillingham and Ryan Wynn and despite the altered rotation, got off to a quick the start on five firstquarter points from Gonzalez. “It was senior night and we started some of the seniors that don’t always start and we got out quick,” said senior Gage Davis. Sandburg stayed in the game primarily on the shooting of Niko Kogionis, who scored a game-high 17 points, hitting five of 11 three pointers. Bolingbrook fought off the Eagle runs to hold out for the win behind 12 points from Williams and 11 from Davis. “I thought on Tuesday (a loss to SWSC for Lockport) we didn’t play hard in all stretches, tonight I thought we played hard, but didn’t play right in a couple stretches,” said Bolingbrook coach Rob Brost. “We need to enjoy this win and the conference championship and then be ready to go.” The outright conference title is the first one for Bolingbrook since 2008-09. The Raiders earned a share of the title in 2006-07 with Joliet and won

it outright in 2005-06, the first year of the conference. In fact, this is the first season Homewood-Flossmoor has not had any part of the conference title. The Vikings won the Blue Division outright the last three seasons and tied for the Blue the two years prior. The first four years of the SWSC, H-F was in the Red Division and won it every season. Not only did Bolingbrook win the conference title on the varsity side, but also claimed the sophomore championship, something that has never been done in the league’s nine years. “This feels really good,” Davis said. “This was a good win after that loss on Tuesday. We really wanted to come out and end on a win heading into the playoffs.” “This was a great way to end the regular season,” Williams said.“To go into playoffs coming off a win is great. It feels really good. We have a lot more goals and we are just taking this one game at a time.” The Raiders opened the playoffs Tuesday and with a win will play for a regional title at 7 p.m. Friday at Plainfield East. “For the second year in a row we won 20-plus games, we were outright conference champions and we feel like we have some momentum going into the playoffs,” Brost said. “We have the deepest regional in the state by far. Other regions might have a couple better teams at the very top, but our region is 11, 12, 13, 14 teams deep. The regional and sectional is really, really deep and we can get beat on any night if we are not prepared. Everybody is 0-0, so let’s play.” Follow Mark @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Gage Davis and the Raiders claimed the outright SWSC title.


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THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

Sports

Flyers fall, still earn tournament bye By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Despite a season-ending home loss to Wisconsin-Parkside, Lewis was still able to secure a first round bye in the Great Lakes Valley Conference tournament. The No. 4 seed Flyers (21-5, 135) will open in the quarterfinals at noon March 7 against No. 6 Southern Indiana (22-5, 13-5) at the Ford Center in Evansville. “We have to win a game, we have to win,” Lewis coach Scott Trost said. “We’ve had a good year but I don’t think anything is guaranteed. We have to find a way to get a win and we have to play better regardless of who we play.”

Lewis won the earlier meeting at home 73-63, but the Screaming Eagles are playing in their hometown this time around. The top three seeds in the tournament are the defending NCAA Division II champ Drury (24-2, 16-2), Wisconsin-Parkside (22-5, 15-3) and Indianapolis (23-3, 15-3). “I think the tournament is wide open,” Trost said. “I don’t think there is a dominant team. I think there are a bunch of really good teams who are capable of winning it and I certainly include us in that mix.” The key for the Flyers is to get back to its level of play earlier in the season when it opened

the season with 10 straight wins and had four straight wins to open February. “We haven’t played great lately,” Trost stated. “We need to play better. I don’t think we’ve played great lately. We need to get back to being consistent for 40 minutes and see what happens. We have to make shots and layups.” The eight-day break between games gives the Flyers time to work on some things during practice as well as get some rest. “Having a few days off and letting the guys take a little break might be good for this team,”Trost said. The GLVC Tournament is huge for Lewis, which sits No. 7 in the Midwest Region rankings. The top eight teams qualify for the NCAA D-II tournament. Even with two wins the prior week, Lewis dropped in the rankings from No. 6 to No. >> see BYE | page 15

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Julian Lewis and the Flyers earned a bye in the GLVC tournament.


Sports

THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

Flyers look to defend league title By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

The Lewis women’s basketball team is set to defend its title this weekend at the Great Lakes Valley Conference Tournament. The Flyers (22-4, 16-2), after getting a first round bye, open play at 6 p.m. March 6 at the Ford Center in Evansville, IN. They are the No. 2 seed in the tournament and will be facing No. 7 Truman State (19-8, 12-6). Earlier this year the Flyers beat Truman 98-72 at Lewis. The Flyers enter the tournament on a three-game winning streak, coming off a 69-56 win over Wisconsin-Parkside to end the regular season. “I think momentum is a huge thing at this time of year,” Lewis coach Lisa Carlson said.“We need to feel good about what we are doing, especially at the defensive end. For us to play better defensively is a good momentum push for us.” “It’s huge,” Lewis forward Mariyah Henley said. “We didn’t want to walk into the conference tournament, we want to charge into the tournament and we came out strong tonight. It gives the whole team confidence and we’re ready to play.” A week break for the Flyers gives them time to rest up and heal for the postseason run. “We’re going to take care of our bodies and come Monday we’ll be ready to go,” Henley said. “We’re used to having a target on our backs. I think it is going to be fun protecting our title. Defense will definitely be the key.” “I think the break is huge for us,” Carlson said.“We don’t go deep in our bench for extended minutes, so the first five or six kids play a lot of minutes. An extra day or two off is really good for them.” Lewis was the No. 1 seed last year en route to the title.This year it is No. 2 to Drury, but both enter the tournament with the same GLVC record. The Flyers are also returning several members from last year’s squad. “Nothing is going to catch us by surprise,” Carlson said. “We know what to expect.We came into the tournament last year as the No. 1 seed and had the target on our back last year as well. It won’t be any different this year.We won’t be the No. 1 seed, but we are coming off the tournament championship

last year. Being there last year will help calm some of those nerves.” For the Flyers to have success in the tournament, they simply need to be themselves. “We need to be who we are,” Carlson stated. “If a team can beat us at what we do, then we tip our hat to them. I think we have probably the best post combination in the league, so we are going to try to get it in to them. We like running in transition and we’re going to try to do that.We’re going to focus on being good at what we do.” The conference tournament will go a long way in determining the regional rankings. Currently Lewis sits No. 2 in the Midwest Region and are in a great shape to advance to the NCAA Division II playoffs (top eight teams). However, the top seed in the region gets to host the regional. Considering the Flyers have won 25 straight at home, that would be a nice advance. “I think there is always that chance if you are sitting in one of those top couple spots and you win out,” Carlson said of getting the No. 1 seed.“Drury sits there right now and some of it will depend on what they do. I don’t think this team is looking at where we play. I don’t care if you put us on a bus or bring us home. We’re going to continue to play basketball.” The Flyers’ 25-game home winning streak is the second longest in the women’s D-II level “The kids take a lot of pride in playing at home,” Carlson said. “It has become something that is more publically known with the streak but the kids are comfortable on the floor and they kind of embrace that. We’ve played our best basketball here the past couple years and it has been a big part of our success. All the good teams protect their home court.” “We like keeping that streak alive,” Henley said. ”We just think about protecting out home court because we don’t want to let anyone come into our gym and knock us out of what we want to do. We just think about taking care of our home court.” Henley scored 29 points and pulled down 12 rebounds in the win over Parkside Feb. 27, her 22nd double-double of the season. Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@buglenewspapers.com

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Steve Woltmann/Lewis University

Mariyah Henley and the Flyers look to repeat as GLVC champions.


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THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

er b m u N

BOYS BBALL Points Per Game Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East George Sargeant, Maine South Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Jalen Jackson, JCA Grover Anderson, Lockport Andrew Palucki, Maine South Evan Hines, Niles West Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Corey Evers, Plainfield South Romeo Magliore, Niles West John Campbell, Lockport Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Ahmad Gibson, Niles West

sPorts

7

s r e h c Crun

12

24.0 19.3 16.8 16.6 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.7 13.3 13.1 12.8 12.7 12.6 12.4 12.0 12.0

Jake Nowak, Plainfield North Devin Blake, Downers North Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Ray Greco, Downers North Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Kevin Krieger, Plainfield North Shane Ritter, Plainfield South Kelly, Westmont Jake Smith, Minooka Shane Murray, Lisle Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Little, Westmont Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle Nick Novak, Plainfield East Jojo Rios, Niles West Joe Butler, Minooka Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West

Stats based on coach submissions. Don’t see yours? Send to staylor@buglenewspapers.com 11.6 11.6 11.2 11.1 11.1 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.6 10.5 10.2 10.1 9.8 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2

Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South Robbie Brooks, Plainfield Central Logiurato, Westmont Adam Alexander, Minooka Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Rebounds Per Game Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle Devin Blake, Downers North Zach Trussell, Lisle Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North George Sargeant, Maine South John Campbell, Lockport Shane Murray, Lisle Miles Snowden, Plainfield South

9.2 9.1 8.8 8.8 8.6 8.4 8.3 9.5 9.0 7.4 7.2 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.0 6.8 6.8

Joe Butler, Minooka Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Josh Smith, Plainfield East Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Kelly, Westmont Matt Mahlke, Downers North Josh Dillingham, Bolingbrook Kevin Krieger, Plainfield North Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Brad Hund, Plainfield Central Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Assists Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Grover Anderson, Lockport Logiurato, Westmont Sean Maloney, Maine South Andrew Palucki, Maine South Jonny Butler, Minooka Myles Ward, Plainfield East Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Little, Westmont Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook Corey Evers, Plainfield South Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Joe Butler, Minooka Neal Tyrell, Minooka Jon Arenas, Maine South Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Nick Novak, Plainfield East Ralph Blakney, Lockport Kelly, Westmont Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Delvin Harris, Plainfield South John Campbell, Lockport Tim Doll, Westmont Isaiah Webster, Plainfield North

6.3 6.0 5.9 5.6 5.3 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 4.9 4.8 4.8 80 75 66 61 59 57 57 56 55 53 51 49 46 45 44 43 43 43 42 41 40 39 39 39 38 36 35

D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Deiondre Taylor, Lockport Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South Johnny Kostelz, Plainfield Central Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Steals Corey Evers, Plainfield South Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Grover Anderson, Lockport John Campbell, Lockport Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Logiurato, Westmont Andrew Palucki, Maine South Romeo Magliore, Niles West Jon Arenas, Maine South Ralph Blakney, Lockport Jonny Butler, Minooka Neal Tyrell, Minooka Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Joe Butler, Minooka Nick Novak, Plainfield East D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Shane Ritter, Plainfield South Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Deiondre Taylor, Lockport CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook Myles Ward, Plainfield East Tim Doll, Westmont Josh Smith, Plainfield East Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Little, Westmont Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Adam Alexander, Minooka

33 31 29 28 25 49 42 40 37 36 34 33 31 29 28 28 28 27 26 26 24 24 23 22 22 21 21 21 20 19 18 18 17 17 17 16 16

>> see StatS | page 16


Sports >> BYE, from page 12 7, while Michigan Tech of the GLIAC, the other conference in the Midwest Region, lost a game by more than 20 points that week, yet jumped the Flyers. “I don’t understand it,” Trost said.“The only thing you can do is worry about yourself. I think we’re certainly capable and worthy of being a regional team, but I quit trying to figure it out.” No matter what happens in the two conference tournaments, it is almost guaranteed that at least one team with just six losses will miss the tournament.

In the Lewis loss to Parkside, Jeff Jarosz scored 19 points and Julian Lewis pulled in 18 rebounds for the Flyers. “We just didn’t play good enough,” Trost said. “Offensively it was a struggle for us all night. We never got into any rhythm. I thought we did a pretty good job on their perimeter. I thought we competed, but there were a lot more issues offensively than there were defensively. We had a hard time scoring. It is disappointing, but we’re not discouraged. We just have to bounce back.” Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

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16

Sports

THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

>> STATS, from page 14 Sean Maloney, Maine South Field Goal % Shane Murray, Lisle George Sargeant, Maine South Julian Torres, Bolingbrook Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Tristin Esker, Plainfield East Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Matt Hund, Plainfield Central Devin Blake, Downers North Ray Greco, Downers North Romeo Magliore, Niles West Bowen Marks, Downers North Adam Alexander, Minooka Mark Geers, Minooka Davis Neilands, Maine South Jeff Washington, Joliet West Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Justin Windt, Plainfield Central Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Josh Dillingham, Bolingbrook Jaylandt Gilmer, Lockport Free Throw % Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Odi Audisho, Niles West Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East George Sargeant, Maine South Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Andrew Palucki, Maine South Emin Ademi, Niles West Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Grover Anderson, Lockport Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Connor Bielat, Lisle Romeo Magliore, Niles West Cappel, Minooka

16 .667 .640 .630 .602 .595 .590 .577 .573 .570 .550 .543 .539 .535 .533 .530 .530 .520 .520 .515 .513 .510 .500 .500 .500 .980 .833 .824 .820 .820 .790 .778 .773 .771 .770 .760 .757 .750

Brodric Thomas, Bolingbrook Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Torrens, Westmont Ralph Blakney, Lockport Robbie Brooks, Plainfield Central Neal Tyrell, Minooka 3-pointers Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Shane Ritter, Plainfield South Jalen Jackson, JCA Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Nick Novak, Plainfield East Evan Hines, Niles West Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Andrew Palucki, Maine South Johnny Kostelz, Plainfield Central Dwight Watkins, Plainfield Central Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Ray Greco, Downers North Neal Tyrell, Minooka Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Jojo Rios, Niles West Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Jake Smith, Minooka Joe Butler, Minooka Sean Maloney, Maine South Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Tim Doll, Westmont GIRLS BBALL Points Per Game Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Jaida Green, Downers North Emily Schramek, Benet Emily Eshoo, Benet Erin Heide, Minooka Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Chantell Mack, Joliet Central Sarah Costello, Downers North Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Peyton Winters, Downers North Hailey Schoenman, Maine South

.742 .740 .720 .718 .710 .710 48 46 41 37 32 31 25 25 25 25 24 23 23 21 21 19 18 18 18 17 15

18.5 15.8 15.1 14.8 14.3 13.8 12.5 12.3 12.5 12.2 11.8 11.3

Monica Barefield, Joliet West Elanta Slowik, Maine East Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Kathleen Doyle, Benet Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Lexi Marin, Romeoville Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Destiny Hollins, Lockport Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Nina Anderson, Maine South Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Rebounds Per Game Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Sarah Costello, Downers North Chantell Mack, Joliet Central Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Cherish Smith, Romeoville Peyton Winters, Downers North Maria Protic, Maine East Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Kyla Creal, Lockport Sydney Arlis, Minooka Elanta Slowik, Maine East Ty Battle, JCA Adriana Acosta, JCA Jenae Rowe, Joliet West Nina Anderson, Maine South Ally Fink, Plainfield South Rachel Sutphin, Plainfield South Laurel Kucharski, Lockport Jaida Green, Downers North Assists Sarah Costello, Downers North Jaida Green, Downers North Bre Sobotka, Resurrection Juatece McNear, Joliet Central Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Kelly Kons, Maine South Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Monica Barefield, Joliet West Sam Fagenholz, Maine South

11.0 10.6 10.6 10.8 10.5 10.2 9.8 9.5 9.4 9.0 8.9 8.6 8.2 8.2 12.0 9.7 9.5 8.8 7.9 7.6 7.6 7.0 6.9 6.8 6.3 6.0 5.8 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.4 5.2 5.1 4.9 4.8 4.8 4.6 4.6 120 76 72 70 69 62 59 57 56

Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Erin Heide, Minooka Nina Anderson, Maine South Lexi Marin, Romeoville Skyle Osborne, Romeoville Sydney Arlis, Minooka Christina Ekhomu, JCA Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Kathleen Doyle, Benet Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Megan Roberts, Maine South Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Gabriella Galassini, Resurrection Jnaya Walker, JCA Bethany Bachmann, Minooka Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Peyton Winters, Downers North Kailey Foster, Joliet West Monica Nunez, Resurrection Emily Schramek, Benet Bethany Bachmann, Minooka Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Ty Battle, JCA Steals Sarah Costello, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Kianna Campbell, Lockport Jaida Green, Downers North Destiny Hollins, Lockport Bre Sobotka, Resurrection Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Jnaya Walker, JCA Kailey Foster, Joliet West Naomi Mayes, Lockport Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Nina Anderson, Maine South Christina Ekhomu, JCA Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Elanta Slowik, Maine East Jenae Rowe, Joliet West Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Kelly Kons, Maine South Monica Barefield, Joliet West Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Kathleen Doyle, Benet

52 49 45 41 39 37 36 36 35 33 33 33 32 31 31 30 27 26 25 25 25 24 24 23 82 62 54 53 50 49 43 41 41 40 40 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 34 32 30 29 29 29

Lexi Marin, Romeoville Ty Battle, JCA Jamari McAfee, Lockport Monica Nunez, Resurrection Jazlene Gonzalez, Maine East Skyle Osborne, Romeoville Treanna Perry, Joliet West Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Laurel Kucharski, Lockport Emily Eshoo, Benet Cherish Smith, Romeoville Field Goal % Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Ty Battle, JCA Peyton Winters, Downers North Emma Hlavin, Benet Sydney Arlis, Minooka Kyla Creal, Lockport Jenna Martin, Benet Kendall McDermott, Benet Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Free Throw % Autumn Lawson, Joliet Central Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Emily Eshoo, Benet Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Faith Heitman, Romeoville Alexis Pease, Minooka Emily Schramek, Benet Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Kelly Kons, Maine South Jnaya Walker, JCA 3-pointers Emily Schramek, Benet Emily Eshoo, Benet Erin Heide, Minooka Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Jaida Green, Downers North Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Sarah Costello, Downers North Nina Anderson, Maine South Kelly Kons, Maine South Kennedy Weigt, JCA Monica Barefield, Joliet West

28 28 26 26 25 25 25 24 24 24 24 23 22 .610 .580 .570 .560 .530 .520 .510 .500 .460 .860 .780 .780 .770 .758 .750 .740 .730 .720 .719 .695 .690 .681 58 45 44 37 37 36 32 30 29 26 25


buglenewspapers.com/basketball

THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

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Joliet Catholic holds off Bishop Mac for sectional crown By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

The Joliet Catholic Academy girls basketball players and coaches knew all about Khadaizha Sanders and Bishop McNamara and knew despite winning twice this season, the Irish were not going to lie down in the finals of the Lincoln-Way West Sectional Thursday. A year ago, it was Bishop Mac that upset the Angels in the opening round of the Peotone Sectional after JCA had won both regular-season match-ups. This year, the Angels came ready to play, using a huge first eight minutes and withstood a second-half Irish flurry to win 78-70 and advance to the Lewis University Supersectional, which took place March 3. Michigan State-bound senior Jasmine Lumpkin scored 17 points in the first quarter without missing a shot to pace the Angels to a 32-14 lead at the end of one. “I was focused and I just really came to play,” Lumpkin said. “My teammates believed in me and they were getting me the ball and I wasn’t going to shy away from it, I was going to attack the basket. I am a senior and I have to play like every game is my last.” Sanders scored 22 of her gamehigh 35 points in the second half as Bishop Mac cut the lead to single digits. As the Irish defense focused its efforts on Lumpkin and sophomore Nicole Ekhomu, senior Christine Ekhomu stepped up and scored all 13 of her points in the second half. “They really put an emphasis on shutting down the middle so I couldn’t get the pass to Jasmine and if I went left, they were trying to shut down Nicki so I couldn’t get the pass to her,” Christine said. “So, I figured if I attacked the middle it would open it back up.” Lumpkin finished the game with a team-best 27 points, while Nicole Ekhomu added 22 points.

With the win, Christine helped the Angels become the first girls basketball program to reach a supersectional since St. Francis Academy and Joliet Catholic merged in 1990. As St. Francis Academy, the Angels fell 52-44 to East Aurora in 1983-84. The following year, the two met again and the Angels defeated East Aurora 62-59 to advance to the state quarterfinals. A 65-58 loss that year to Richwoods stopped that run in the final eight, the best finish ever for an Angel team. “It feels good to be a part of making history,” Christine said. “JCA has been around for a long time and they have had some great players like the Quigley sisters and it feels good to stay I am a part of that, but we are trying to get further.” A win Monday at Lewis would make this year’s team the firstever to advance to the state Final Four. Only two Joliet teams have ever reached the IHSA girls final four, as Joliet West won the firstever girls state title in 1977-78 and Joliet East was third in 197980. A game earlier, JCA used the hot early shooting of sophomore Nicole Ekhomu and a 7-0 run to open the second half to take a 78-67 win at Lincoln-Way West over Morgan Park. “Coach told us at halftime that the first three minutes of the half was going to be the game,” Nicole said. The teams battled back and forth all first half and JCA found itself trailing at the end of the first quarter and were trailing in the closing seconds of the first half before a Christina Ekhomu three-pointer put the Angels up one at the break. As one of the starting seniors, Christina said she was not going to let the team lose in the sectional opener again. “We are taking it one game at a time and when we got to this game, I looked at Jazz (fellow senior Jasmine Lumpkin) and

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Nicole Ekhomu scored 22 points in JCA’s 78-70 win over Bichop Mac to win the Lincoln-Way West Sectional title.

said, ‘this is where we fell last year,’ “ Christina Ekhomu said. “At halftime, I told her, this is our last go-around, so let’s go get it. It

feels really good to get past this hump.” The Angels were paced by 26 points from Nicole Ekhomu, 23

from Lumpkin and 14 from Ty Battle. Follow Mark @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

Real Estate & Business

dave says

Check cashing for the ‘unbanked’ family Check cashing businesses not nearly as abusive as payday lenders Dear Dave, I know you hate payday loan companies. Do you feel the same way about checkcashing companies? Brian Dear Brian, Check-cashing companies are not a good deal, but they’re nowhere near as bad as payday lenders. All check-cashing businesses do is charge a fee to cash a check. Honestly, it’s kind of silly to me that places like this can make money when all you have to do is walk into a bank and open an account. But there’s a percentage of our population that people in financial circles call “unbanked.” This means they avoid banks for whatever reason, but in the process they leave themselves susceptible to bad deals like this. So I don’t feel the same

>> our house, from page 7 awareness and bring together community resources, the 53 reported heroin deaths of 2012 dropped to 38 in 2013. Those leading the charge to battle this killer that has infiltrated and devastated the lives of so many people (many of them in their early 20s and younger), are inspired by the drop in heroin deaths and have vowed to work even harder to make sure the numbers in 2014 decline even more. Dr. Troiani, who has been working in the field of mental health and substance abuse since 1970, was very clear as he described the purity of today’s heroin and that it can now be smoked or snorted (no needles) and thus, is more appealing to middle-class suburban kids. In the past 14 months, I have attended benefits for the parents who have ultimately lost their children to heroin but not before their financial resources were depleted trying to pay for medical care and treatment. I’ve attended and hosted forums,

way about checkcashing companies as I do about payday lenders. It’s still not a financially smart move to pay a storefront operation a fee just to cash a check, but these businesses aren’t nearly as abusive as payday lenders. —Dave

Letting kids make money mistakes Dear Dave, My 6-year old son has saved up $400. He said he wants to buy a motorcycle with it someday, but he recently changed his mind and wants to buy a computer tablet. Is it okay for him to change his mind like this, and how should I handle things? Christina

listened to frightened parents, the lawyers, the judges, the addiction specialists, and the addicts talk about the horror and the struggle. We need to provide treatment for those who are fighting for their lives, and keep others from using heroin by using education as our weapon of choice. After repeatedly hearing that we need to reach our young people before they are tempted to use heroin and give them the medically accurate, age appropriate information, I immediately filed HB 4542, which expanded the scope of the task force to include children grades 6 through 12. Experts agree: Waiting to educate a child about heroin until they reach high school may be too late. Pat O’Neil said, “What we learn from the deceased can help those that are still with us.” What we learned from those who have been lost is that heroin is no longer an “inner city only” problem. It’s here in Will County, and it’s killing our children.

Dear Christina, I’m not really concerned whether it’s a motorcycle or a tablet, especially if he’s saved his own money. I think the big thing we’re looking for in all this is a teachable moment. Certainly regret is a concern, especially with a kid so young. But the reality is that neither the decision nor the possible regret afterward will ruin his life. If you talk to him and try to advise him beforehand, and he gets upset later because he feels like he made the wrong choice, it gives you the opportunity to step in and gently say, “I’m sorry you think you made a bad choice, but that’s why I wanted you to really think about it first. You had a chance to listen to mom’s wisdom and didn’t. I’m sorry you feel sad now, but I want you to remember it and learn something from this bad decision.” It’s a process of controlled pain and natural consequences. One of my daughters did something similar years ago when we went to an amusement

>> r-word, from page 7 friend who I met via another friend. As we were talking, I looked around to see a man and a woman talking somewhat loudly. These two people had appeared to be drunk. As the 7 o’clock hour struck, I got up from my seat and made my way to the vestibule of the train. When I was waiting for the train to pull into my stop, these two same commuters had used the r-word to refer to the town that we were getting off at. I didn’t say anything because it was too hard, too hurtful. Another reason why I may not have said anything is because maybe it wasn’t a good moment to say anything. This brings up an interesting point: When is a good time to say something? Should you speak up against the r-word each time some says the word even if they appear to be “drunk?” What are your thoughts? Let me know, like how all the

Check-cashing companies are not a good deal, but they’re nowhere near as bad as payday lenders. All checkcashing businesses do is charge a fee to cash a check.

park. All the kids had a set amount of money for the day, and we warned them not to spend it too soon. She turned around and blew all her money on carnival games, then she spent the rest of the day whining while her brother and sister rode the rides and had lots of fun.We didn’t give her any more money, but a controlled amount of pain taught her some valuable lessons that day. She learned to listen to her mom and dad, she learned that carnival games are a rip-off, and she learned to control herself a little bit and think things through. Allowing kids the emotional dignity of making some decisions for themselves is vitally important.You just have to make sure this liberty is supervised and comes with parental

young kids are communicating these days, with the hashtag: #SCPChat What’s the r-word? Why this campaign important? Where to go to take the pledge to end the r-word and to find out more information? Help us to surpass 500,000 online

warnings and protections. Just because they saved the money doesn’t mean they can do whatever they want. It still has to be used in a way that you, as a parent, are comfortable with and deem appropriate. There will be some natural tension in the process, but it’s a great way to teach kids about money, decision making, maturity and life choices! —Dave *Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Ramsey on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.

updates that are 140 characters or less, then a simple “Follow” of the @EndtheWord Twitter page will be the thing to do. And, like all the young kids are doin’ these days, you can join in the conversation with the hashtag: #RWord - on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google Plus, Vine, etc. I haven’t heard When is the 2014 Spread anything from the Word to End the Word this train date? Don’t worry, because conductor r-word campaign Co-Founder since, but I hope and Tim Shriver Jr., breaks the pray he learned a news for us on the Special lesson about how the Chronicles podcast Episode r-word hurts all of us #100, recorded live (to tape) with special needs. on Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014. Additional reporting by Breanna Bogucki, of Cary, Ill., pledges by the 2014 Spread and Georgia Hunter, of Oak the Word to End the Word. Park, Ill. If you’d like more Coverage awareness day. about the R-Word Campaign, The web address is simple: Visit: SpecialChronicles.com/ R-Word.org. Of course, if you are one of tons of the EndTheWord people who are active on the Facebook, you can “Like” Daniel Smrokowski is an Athlete and find out more updates & Global Messenger with Special Olympics Illinois, Founder of by visiting their page at: Special Chronicles Nonprofit New Facebook.com/EndtheWord. Media Company. For those of you who prefer


THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 260 SAINT ANDREWS DRIVE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 (TWO STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH A THREE CAR ATTACHED GARAGE.). On the 3rd day of April, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. SUCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO BANK SOUTHWEST, N.A. F/K/A WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB F/K/A WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB Plaintiff V. JOHN POPESCU; LVNV FUNDING, LLC; ANA POPESCU Defendant. Case No. 13 CH 254 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 444,093.96 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any.

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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 346 DEERFIELD DRIVE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 (ONE STORY, SINGLE FAMILY, BRICK WITH A TWO CAR GARAGE). On the 20th day of March, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff V. TERRY FIDLER AND TAMARA WOZNY Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 3148 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 236,554.94 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/6, 3/13, 3/20

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/20, 2/27, 3/6


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LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. TERRY FIDLER AND TAMARA WOZNY Defendant. No. 11 CH 3148 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 9th day of October, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 20th day of March, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 2, IN BOLINGBROOK SUBDIVISION UNIT 7, A SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 14, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED DECEMBER 4, 1964 AS DOCUMENT NO. 1024021, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 346 DEERFIELD DRIVE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: O N E STORY, SINGLE FAMILY, BRICK WITH A TWO CAR GARAGE P.I.N.: 12-02-14-203-009 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 236,554.94 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/20, 2/27, 3/6

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. SUCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO BANK SOUTHWEST, N.A. F/K/A WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB F/K/A WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. JOHN POPESCU; LVNV FUNDING, LLC; ANA POPESCU Defendant. No. 13 CH 254 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 17th day of December, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 3rd day of April, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 88, IN ST. ANDREW’S WOODS, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AND ALSO PART OF LOT 7 (EXCEPT THE NORTH 165.0 FEET IN OLDWOODS FARM), IN THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 2 IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 6, 1979 AS Commonly known as: 260 SAINT ANDREWS DRIVE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: T W O STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH A THREE CAR ATTACHED GARAGE. P.I.N.: 12-02-02-102-014 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 444,093.96 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/6, 3/13, 3/20


traVel

THE BUGLE MARCH 6, 2014

ricK steves’ euroPe all about good timing Budget airlines typically offer flights for about $50 to $250, but you can find some remarkable, it-must-be-a-typo deals if your timing is right. For example, Ryanair flies from London to dozens of European cities, sometimes for less than $30. To get the lowest fares, book long in advance, as the cheapest seats sell out fast (aside from occasional surprise sales).

Pay attention to arrival locations

LOW-COST AIRLINES Here are some tips about taking advantage of Europe’s discount airlines - the companies that have revolutionized the way we put our itineraries together: By Rick Steves Tribune Content Agency

These days “budget European travel” includes point-to-point flights within Europe. When I started traveling, no one spending their own money bought one-way air tickets within Europe. It was prohibitively expensive. Nowadays, before buying any long-distance train or bus ticket, I look into flying, and routinely, it’s cheaper to fly than to make the trip on the ground especially when you consider all the advantages of flying. Because you can make hops just about anywhere on the Continent for roughly $100 a flight, people think about itineraries differently. Rather than think “where can I drive to” or “where will the train take me conveniently,” you can now

think “where will my travel dreams take me” and lace together a farflung trip that ranges from Norway to Portugal to Sicily, if you please. There was a time when my typical trip plan was what used to be called an “open jaw” itinerary now dubbed a “multiple-city” trip (flying into one European city and out of another at the other end of the Continent) - with all the travel between done by rail pass. That’s when flights were expensive and rail passes really were passes. Now inter-European flights are cheap and rail passes are complicated with lots of limits and extra fees. I generally structure a trip these days with the same multiple-city flights and connect everything in between with a series of car rentals, pointto-point rail tickets and cheap oneway flights.

When booking a budget flight, note which airport it flies into. Ryanair’s flights to “Frankfurt” actually take you to Hahn, 75 miles away. Be sure to factor in the additional time and costs of getting from a faraway airport to downtown. Then again, just getting close to your destination can be a benefit. For instance, if you’re headed for Florence, but there’s no direct cheap flight, you can look for one that goes to Pisa, which is 1-1/2 hours away by train (many flight-search websites have a “nearby airports” option). You’ll pay for the train ticket from Pisa to Florence, but you’ll get to see the Leaning Tower.

Pay attention to arrival locations no refunds and nonchangeable Budget-airline tickets are usually nonrefundable and nonchangeable. Many airlines take only online bookings, so it can be hard to find someone to talk to if problems arise. And, as these are relatively young companies, it’s not uncommon for carriers to go out of business or cancel a slow-selling route unexpectedly.

When booking a budget flight, note which airport it flies into. Ryanair’s flights to “Frankfurt” actually take you to Hahn, 75 miles away. Be sure to factor in the additional time and costs of getting from a faraway airport to downtown. Then again, just getting close to your destination can be a benefit. For instance, if you’re headed for Florence, but there’s no direct cheap flight, you can look for one that goes to Pisa, which is 1-1/2 hours away by train (many flight-search websites have a “nearby airports” option). You’ll pay for the train ticket from Pisa to Florence, but you’ll get to see the Leaning Tower.

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Bolingbrook 03-06-14