Page 1

INSIDE

Sports Spartans volleyball ends at regionals Page 17

www.romeovillebugle.com

News Local election results Page 5

Our Village, Our News

Two more years for AJ

News McAsey keeps firm hold on state seat Page 4

NOVEMBER 4, 2010

Vol. 5 No. 15

Rick Kambic/Bugle staff

AJ Wilhelmi accepts congratulations Tuesday for his win over Republican challenger Cedra Crenshaw. With 172 of 172 precincts reporting, Wilhelmi received 61 percent of the vote . See Page 4 for full story.

Visit www. buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010


NEWS

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010 3

Operation Christmas returns to Romeoville By Laura Katauskas Staff reporter

In a time when families everywhere are feeling the economic crunch, affording Christmas begins to play on their minds. Once again this year, the village of Romeoville is sponsoring Operation Christmas and pulling the community together; those in need and those that can afford to offer just a little bit more.

If you are in need you must register and meet certain requirements including being a resident of Romeoville; children must qualify for the free/reduced lunch program through the School District (a copy of the letter confirming participation in free/reduced lunch program must be attached to registration form. The letter can be obtained from the School District or the Illinois Department of Health and Human Services. You must

also participate in the Illinois Department of Health and Human Services Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP. In-person registration is required and only available on the following dates: • Sunday, November 7: 1-3 p.m. at Romeoville Recreation Center, 900 W. Romeo Road, Art Room • Thursday, November 11: 9:30 -11:30 a.m. and 4-6 p.m. at Romeoville Recreation Center,

900 W. Romeo Road, Celebration Room Organizers say Operation Christmas brings joy and hope to needy families throughout the community and it would not succeed with the help of others. To adopt-a-family, the village is asking the following be purchased for each family: • 1 new outfit (shirt and pants) for each child ages 12 and under • 1 clothing gift certificate in the amount of $30 for each child

13 - 18 • 1 new toy for each child 12 and under • 1 gift certificate for $20 for each child 13 - 18 For information on registration, adopting a family or dropping off a donation/gift please call (815) 886-6337 or emailDawn Caldwell, at dcaldwell@romeoville.org or Pastor Suzanne Hurdle at revhurdle@sbcglobal.net. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com

Remembering those who fight for freedom By Laura Katauskas Staff reporter

Residents,veterans and families can come together on Nov. 11 to honor America’s veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good. The public can come out to honor Veteran’s Day with the village of Romeoville at its Veteran’s Day Ceremony at 10 a.m. Thursday, November 11, at Veteran’s Memorial Garden, 11 Montrose Drive. Veteran’s Day calls to mind a duty to support those that have supported us and is a reminder of how it all started. Veteran’s Day brings to mind a duty to support those that have supported us and is a reminder of how it all started. According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs,

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Veteran’s Day is rooted in World War I. World War I, “The Great War,” officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919. However, fighting had ceased seven months earlier when an armistice between the Allied nations and Germany

went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, Nov. 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.” In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed Nov. 11 as the first commemoration of

Armistice Day. “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…’”Wilson said. The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades and public meetings and a brief suspension of business beginning at 11 a.m. A federal act approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November of every year a legal holiday. Armistice Day was

primarily a day set aside to honor veterans of World War I. But in 1954, in the aftermath of World War II and the Korea War, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting in its place “Veterans.” With the approval of this legislation on June 1, 1954, November 11 became a day to honor American veterans of all wars. Veterans Day continues to be observed on Nov. 11, regardless of which day of the week it falls on. For more information about the village’s celebration, call the Romeoville Recreation Department at (815) 886-6222.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

Wilhelmi holds on to Illinois Senate seat By Laura Katauskas Staff reporter

Vowing that finding a solution to the state’s budget crisis and focusing on job creation are his top priorities, Democratic incumbent A.J.Wilhelmi took the 43rd District Senate seat with approximately 61 percent of the vote (172 of 172 precincts reporting). “It’s time to roll up our sleeves and get back to work,” said Wilhelmi. “It isn’t about Democrats or Republicans, it is about working together—that is what is going to get us to a solution…It feels great to have won and I have had such an amazing campaign team who walked door to door with me to get the message out.” He said the biggest challenge ahead is the budget crisis and that part of the solution involves job creation.

Wilhelmi said his goal is to allow for every able-bodied man or woman who needs a job to find one, and that A.J. e m p l o y m e n t Wilhelmi levels affect the state and the tax base on every level. “I will continue to make job creation a priority,” said Wilhelmi. Wilhelmi’s opponent Cedra Crenshaw,will not be out of the picture. While she contends she may step back a bit to be with her family she is not throwing in the towel. She has long been a proponent of fudiciary and education reform and plans to continue to do so. Crenshaw said she feels that her campaign has brought attention to matters of the budget that

need focus and review. “Of course, we wish it went in our favor, but we believe we ran a good campaign. I am proud of our campaign and our volunteers and the support we were shown-I think the state of Illinois will be better for it.” Crenshaw fought hard for her spot in the election, first being ousted from the ballot on a perceived technicality which was later overturned by the Will County court. Wilhemi added that the election came down to three things, jobs, the budget, and government reform. He was a key player in the passing of the first bi-partisan capital bill, passed last year saying that it brought needed funds and jobs to Illinois. He helped pass a $31 billion jobs bill for roads, bridges, schools, mass transit, and community development, including a new interchange at I-55 and Weber Road and two

new schools in Joliet. A close second priority for Wilhelmi is education funding. Throughout his career he has believed in education reform. He has fought for early childhood education, to restore funding cuts to schools throughout the community, to increase funding for after-school programs and to restore the MAP grant program. He defeats newcomer Republican Cedra Crenshaw, a stay-at-home mother, education reformer, and professional accountant who ran a tough campaign fighting for a fiduciary audit and a complete overhaul of Illinois politicians. Wilhelmi is a native of Will County who is proud of his Joliet roots, saying he believes in the people of the community because he is one as well as a dedicated family man that honors hard work. In his past term, Wilhemi has

sponsored legislation to ensure construction of a second Joliet Intermodal facility, which will result in 15,000 jobs; twice stopped the closure of Stateville Correctional Center and led the charge to allow construction of the Illiana Expressway as a public-private partnership. Wilhelmi has served in the Illinois Senate for more than five years and is said to be respected on both sides of the aisle. He has held positions within the senate including Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and ViceChairman of the Agriculture and Conservation Committee and serves on the Transportation, Gaming and Criminal Law Committees. He is a partner in the law firm of Murer, Brick & Wilhelmi, LLC, with a focus on real estate, business law, corporate law, and strategic planning and solutions for medium-sized companies.

McAsey fends offs Oliver to keep state rep post By Debbie Lively Staff reporter

Democratic incumbent for state representative in the 85th District Emily McAsey (D-Lockport) pulled out a tough fight against Republican newcomer Maripat Oliver (R-Bolingbrook) McAsey, a former prosecutor, had pegged her opponent as a candidate that would bring more of the same type of politics to Springfield. And while Republicans won several offices throughout the nation, the 85th District was not one of them. With 88 of 88 precincts reporting, McAsey won the race with 61 percent of the vote.

T h e incumbent was known for adamant door knocking in her district, which includes c o m m u n i t i e s Emily l i k e McAsey Bolingbrook, Lockport, Crest Hill and Joliet. She said she planned to win the race by getting out into the community to meet her constituents at their front door, which was a regular part of her weekly regimen. McAsey said her primary question to residents was to ask them about their concerns. The freshman representative,

who unseated incumbent Brent Hassert in 2008, received a law degree from Loyola University Chicago School of Law, taught eighth-grade social studies for several years and then worked for a time as a criminal prosecutor with the Will County State’s Attorney’s office. McAsey said that she takes pride in the fact that she has sponsored 13 bills, all of which have become law — including three bills protecting children from predators. The candidate received the endorsement of State Senator A. J. Wilhelmi in the race. Wihelmi, who also won reelection against Democratic candidate Cedra Crenshaw, described McAsey as

“friend” when he supported her for re-election. Oliver touted that she was the candidate who would best relate to middle-class families. Last year, Oliver launched her campaign against McAsey. During the race Oliver said she that she wanted to bring her advocacy skills to the state, a talent she said she developed during the years of fighting on behalf of her children — three of whom have special needs. As results rolled in Oliver conceded the race to McAsey at about 9 p.m. on Tuesday thanking her constituents who came to support her at the Bolingbrook Golf Club. “It’s not about the destination,

it’s about the journey,” Oliver told her followers.“The good news is that I would do it all over again.” she said. Oliver, 43, said even as the loser in the race that she remains concern about issues like doubledigit unemployment in the Will County. And that she would not rule out running again for the office, but right now she’s keeping her prospects open for the future. The Republican candidate received an endorsement from the Illinois Federation ofTeachers Union local 604, an educational institution that backed McAsey in 2008, as well from the Chicago Tribune. dlively@buglenewspapers.com


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010 5

Deck pages of gift guides with family photos, recipes Now that the pumpkins are carved, Voyager Media parent company of The Enterprise is looking towards the holidays. Each year, the annual Holiday Gift Guide is published to help readers find unique gifts and introduce them to new businesses. This year readers will receive two separate gift guides. One the week of Thanksgiving to get in the holiday shopping spirit and then in December for those last-minute shoppers or stocking stuffer ideas.

To make the guides special, Voyager Media is asking its readers for photos of their favorite holiday photos. The photos can be of baby’s first Christmas, a child’s expression when he opens that most wanted gift or simply the family hanging ornaments on the tree. “By adding the photos, it gives our readers a more homey, nostalgic feeling,” said Laureen  Crotteau, Voyage Media marketing coordinator. The Last-Minute Gift Guide

will feature recipes. “Holiday recipes are the best,” said Crotteau. “Every year I try to find something new to make to serve at a party and I’m sure many of our readers do too. Recipes from readers can be used for the holidays or throughout the year.” To have your photo or recipe included, please use the following guidelines.   Digital or print photos may be submitted. If you scan a photo, be sure it is scanned at the highest resolution

possible. The photos may be black and white or color. Original photos may be picked up at the office after Nov. 26. Be sure to include your name, address, phone and email address. List all people’s names in photos from left to right and give a description such as son’s first Christmas, dinner at grandma’s etc. and the year taken. Deadline to submit photos is Nov.  5. Recipes submitted must be typed and include name, address, phone and email address. Only

name and town will be published in the guide. Copyright recipes cannot be accepted. If there is a story behind the recipe, please include it and it may be published along with the recipe. Deadline for recipes is Nov. 26. To send in your photo or recipes, you may email   lcrotteau@ enterprisepublications.com, drop off at The Voyage Media office located at 23856 Andrew Rd., Plainfield, IL 60585 or mail to P.O. Box 1613 Plainfield, IL 60544.

Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka (Republican) 57% David E. Miller (Democrat) 36% R. Erika Schafer (Green) 3%

Lockport Heights Sanitary District Trustee Roy Adcock (nonpartisan) 47% James Gorecki (nonpartisan) 53%

Robert “Bob” Baldwin (Republican) 14% Christine Boban Merriman (Republican) 15% Peter R. DeLaney (Republican) 15% Stephen M. Wilhelmi (Democrat) 21%

District 85 Emily McAsey (Democrat) 61% Maripat Oliver (Republican) 39%

Treasurer Robin Kelly (Democrat) 39% Dan Rutherford (Republican) 56% Scott K. Summers (Green) 3%

Will County Board Candidates (District 3) Diane Benjamin (Democrat) 18% Ann Dralle (Republican) 23% Suzanne Hart (Republican) 25% Laurie McPhillips (Republican) 23% Anil Saxena (Democrat) 11%

U.S. Representative in Congress District 13 Judy Biggert (Republican) 60% Scott Harper (Democrat) 40%

Unofficial election results Election results will not be official until Tuesday, Nov. 23, when canvassing of votes is completed and after absentee ballots postmarked by midnight, Nov. 1, and provisional and grace period ballots are counted on Nov. 16. Bold-faced names are winners.

State-wide races Governor & Lieutenant Governor Pat Quinn/Sheila Simon (Democrat) 41% Rich Whitney/Don W. Crawford (Green) 3% Bill Brady/Jason Plummer (Republican) 50% Scott Lee Cohen/Baxter B. Swilley (Independent) 5% U.S. Senator Alexander “Alexi” Giannoulias (Democrat) 41% LeAlan M. Jones (Green) 3% Mark Steven Kirk (Republican) 52%

Will County races Will County County Clerk Nancy Schultz Voots (Republican) 100% Will County Treasurer Pat Mcguire (Democrat) 48% Steve Weber (Republican) 52% Sheriff Paul J. Kaupas (Republican) 51% Peter “Pete” Piazza (Democrat) 49%

Attorney General David F. Black (Green) 2% Steve Kim (Republican) 35% Lisa Madigan (Democrat) 61%

Regional Superintendent of Schools Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant (Democrat) 51% Ron Pemble (Republican) 49%

Secretary of State Robert Enriquez (Republican) 29% Jesse White (Democrat) 68%

East Joliet Sanitary District Trustee Eddie King (Nonpartisan) 28% Jessie Morales (Nonpartisan) 31% Jerry D. Ross (Nonpartisan) 41%

Will County Board Candidates (District 5) John F. Argoudelis (Republican) 19% Lee Ann Goodson (Republican) 21% Mike Hilliard (Democrat) 11% Judith A. McDermott (Democrat) 16% Tim Reilly (Democrat) 14% Brian J. Smith (Republican) 19% Will County Board Candidates (District 8) Steve Chamblee (Republican) 26% Denise E. Winfrey (Democrat) 74% Will County Board Candidates (District 9) Walter G. Adamic (Democrat) 17% Joseph M. Babich (Democrat) 18%

State Senator District 43 Cedra Crenshaw (Republican) 39% Arthur “AJ” Wilhelmi (Democrat) 61% Representative in General Assembly District 11 Deborah “Debbie” Halvorson (Democrat) 44% Adam Kinzinger (Republican) 55% District 81 John F. Unhoch (Democrat) 25% Renée Kosel (Republican) 75% District 82 Matthew T. Mostowik (Democrat) 23% Jim Durkin (Republican) 77% District 84 Tom Cross (Republican) 69% Dennis Grosskopf (Democrat) 31%

District 86 Ryan Eggert (Republican) 40% Jack McGuire (Democrat) 60% 12th Judicial Circuit Judge Gary S. Mueller (Democrat) 45% Michael J. Powers (Republican) 55% District 01 Robert P. Livas (Republican) 100% Sub Circuit Judge- Judgeship A District 03 John Anderson (Democrat) 50% Ray Nash (Republican) 50% District 04 Carmen Goodman (Democrat) 53% Wayne M. Kwiat, Sr. (Republican) 47% Sub Circuit Judge- Judgeship B District 05 Brian Barrett (Democrat) 35% Raymond E. (Ray) Rossi (Republican) 65%

‘Rumor mill’ turns regardging Dist. 202 budget by Sherri Dauskurdas Staff reporter

After Plainfield School District 202 announced it was seeking input from taxpayers as to how it will relieve a coming $6.7 deficit, the rumors started. Fueled by emotion and supposition, it appeared some residents believed decisions had already been made about where cutbacks would take place. “The Board has not received or discussed — much less decided -— anything yet,” said Tom Hernandez, director of community relations for Dist. 202 in a recent special release, adding that the administration plans to make its budget deficit recommendation to the Board of Education some time this fall or

early winter. “Please ignore the rumor mill,” Hernandez said. “Trust me, you will know when the administrative recommendation is made and being discussed.” The school district budget has been a hot topic in the news recently, amidst such budgetary issues as raised student activity fees and possible spending on football field turf. Facing the $6.7 million deficit, the district opened up an online survey in early October,on which residents could offer their opinions on which aspects of public school spending were adequate, what could be reduced, suggest possible savings and share your thoughts. “[Responses] are coming in fast and furious,” Hernandez

said. “The comments run the gamut, but in general, they favor protecting the academic program and classroom related elements.” Schools and other agencies across the state have faced budget upheaval the last couple of years, as Illinois itself has had trouble meeting its financial obligations. Non-profit services have had budgets slashed, and many schools have had to wait much longer than expected to receive promised funds. “It assumed that we’re going to get everything from the state we’re supposed to get — based on the best information we had at the time,” Hernandez said. “In other words, we didn’t build our budget around ‘rumors’ that the state was going to cut funding.

But we did build parts of it on information suggesting that this fund or that fund may be less than last year.

Residents seeking to complete the budget survey can do so by visiting the district website at http://www.psd202.org


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

Bike removed from unlocked garage The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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Residential burglary A resident in the 100 block of Azalea Circle reported a residential burglary at 12:45 p.m. on Oct. 23.A Mongoose bike was taken from a garage that had been left open and unattended. Estimated cost of the bike is $100.

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A resident in the 600 block of Superior reported a residential burglary reported at 9:53 p.m. on Oct. 24. An air compressor was removed from a garage that had been left open and unattended. Estimated cost of the air compressor is $300.

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An employee at a business in the 600 block of Edwards reported the theft at 10 a.m. on Oct. 26. An air compressor with a nail gun and hose were taken from the maintenance room located in the business. Estimated cost of the items taken is $285.

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Burglary from motor vehicle

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A resident in the 500 block of Fair Meadows reported a burglary from a motor vehicle at 7:17 p.m. on Oct. 24. An amplifier and speakers were removed from a vehicle that was parked in the general use parking area. Estimated cost of the items taken is $610.

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Criminal damage to property At 3:04 p.m. on Oct. 22, an employee at a business in the 800 block of Schmidt Road reported criminal damage to property. A sharp object was used to scratch the employee’s vehicle that was parked in the company’s parking lot. Estimated cost to repair the vehicle is $500.

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A resident in the 200 block of Two Rivers Court reported criminal damage to

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property at 5:06 a.m. on Oct. 24. A brick was used to damage the exterior of a vehicle that was parked in the driveway of the residence. Estimated cost of the damage is $200.

Possession of cannabis Roger Arreola, 20, 1815 Arbor Lane, Crest Hill, was arrested at 10:18 p.m. on Oct. 2 and charged with the possession of cannabis after being stopped

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near Weber Road and Creekside Drive.

Retail theft Trevor Simonds, 20, 505 Kate Lane, Coal City, Il was arrested at 5:52 p.m. on Oct. 14 and charged with retail theft on the 200 block of Weber Road.

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Theft A resident in the 400 block of

Melissa Circle reported a theft of a cell phone at 12:37 p.m. on Oct. 26. Unknown persons removed the cell phone from the residence’s mailbox. Estimated cost of the cell phone is $250.

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Traffic Arrests Daniel Wolzen, 26, 560 Belmont, was arrested at 7:56 p.m. on Oct. 20 and charged with driving with a defective

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windshield and without a driver’s license near Goldenrod and Ontario. Juan Tecalero, 42, 2103 Scoville Ave, Berwyn, was arrested at 12:39 p.m. on Oct. 23 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license and a failure to secure a child under 8 years after being stopped near Weber Road and Normantown Road.

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FORUM THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

Our view

More for to-do list

It has been a busy week for everyone. In the mix for Will County residents were Halloween events and the final push for Tuesday’s elections. In the midst of all this Voyager Media, parent company for Bugle Newspapers, moved it offices. For anyone who has ever moved a long-standing business or residence, the logistics can be overwhelming: setting up the phone and satellite services; deciding what to keep, what to toss; organizing the staff/family members for the move;physically moving while maintaining a level of operation/normalcy. The reality was even worse. The move was not easy, nor is it finished despite it being a week. The furniture is not all in, the boxes are still on the floor and many things are not yet organized. It has however been a real lesson in team building. There was no hierarchy during this endeavor. Everyone, no matter their title, rolled up their sleeves and got to work packing, moving, cleaning, installing. That’s how it must be for this latest batch of elected officials. After what has become a rather

Publisher Rich Masterson publisher@buglenewspapers.com Editor-in-chief Andrew Schneider aschneider@buglenewspapers.com Managing Editor M. Grace Tucker gtucker@buglenewspapers.com Sports Editor Rob Valentin rvalentin@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Sherri Dauskurdis Rick Kambic Laura Katauskas Debbie Lively Sports Reporters Mark Gregory Scott Taylor Staff Photographer Robert Bykowski Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication Letters to Editor: 9 a.m. Friday

contentious election season with less than stellar displays of character from many, it’s time to get back to work. However without knowing the official counts and results, one thing is for certain: Winning a senate seat or county board membership is only the beginning. The victors face a long to-do list in order to set this area, this state back to rights. After all the negative campaign ads put out by both political parties, it can only be hoped that differences can be set aside for the greater good: the needs of the people of this area, of this state. There no doubt about it, given the current financial state of Illinois, there is a long hard slog ahead for our latest elected officials. However, working together gets the job done more effectively and more efficiently than constantly being at loggerheads. Meanwhile our team is working to get settled in. At some point, very soon, Voyager Media/Bugle/ The Enterprise newspapers at 23856 W. Andrew Rd. will be ready for visitors as well. Readers can still call 815-436-2431, or they can fax 815-436-2592.

Vice President of Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Sales sales@buglenewspapers.com Published by Voyager Media Group, Inc. P.O. Box 1613 23856 W. Andrew Rd. Plainfield, IL 60544 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 www.buglenewspapers.com news@buglenewspapers.com Office hours Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 3 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. (Except holidays & special sections.) Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at noon Monday.

Illustrated Opinions

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SCHOOLS 8

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

Freshmen making link between school and success Fifteen members of the Romeoville business community will soon begin mentoring several dozen Romeoville High School freshmen in an effort to help them link the importance of a good education with being successful in life once they graduate. Planned in cooperation with the Romeoville Area Chamber of Commerce Partners In Education program, each mentor every five weeks will spend a half hour with one, two or three students during their Freshman Advisory class time. (Freshmen Advisory is a daily home room program

designed to help freshmen make the difficult transition from 8th grade to high school.) “These students may or may not be doing well academically but may need that extra connection with an adult to motivate them,” said RHS guidance counselor Katie Schley, who is one of three Freshman Advisory coordinators. “We keep saying college, college, college to some students but it may not dawn on them soon enough,” added Math Department Chair Diane Tretter, who is also a Freshman Advisory coordinator.“We’re hoping these business people will help them

make the connection between academic life in high school and what that means for their futures.” Schley, Tretter and fellow Freshman Advisory coordinator Julie Wright all agree that life after high school may not necessarily mean a four-year college for all of the students who are being mentored. It could mean junior college, the trades or technical school, they say. But their goal is to open the eyes of some of these freshmen to all the possibilities early-on in their high school life. “We just want them to see that

there is a reason for why they’re here,” Schley said. Plus there is an added bonus to Romeoville High School and the Valley View School District. “We love to have members of our business community visit our school so they can witness first-hand the great things that are going on here,” Tretter said, adding that more mentors are needed for the remainder of the school year. Community mentors who will work with RHS freshmen include Susan Grask of Argonne Credit Union, Debra Glanton of Illinois Welding School,

Heidi Munsey of Joliet Junior College, Millian Toms of Millian M. Toms CPA, Gigi Brindis of Rasmussen College, Patrick Irelan of Enviro Flow Inc., Pete Colarelli of Citgo, Ron Daley of Midwest Generation, Richard Stokes of First Midwest Bank, Patty Perez of Lewis University, Elizabeth Kaufman of Wilco, Christine Morgan of PNC Bank, Pat Fiaccato of Nancy’s Pizza and Symon Hopson of AAA Chicago. More information on the program is available by contacting the Chamber of Commerce at 815-886-2076.

‘Tidal wave of enthusiasm’ for singing at Hill Elementary Singing is cool at R.C. Hill Elementary School in Romeoville. Just ask the more than 90 third through fifth grade students who comprise the largest elementary school choir in Valley View School District and possibly the largest in the southwest suburbs. “It’s a tidal wave of enthusiasm,” said music teacher David Rice, who launched a much smaller version of the Hill Choir (30-some students) last spring.“These kids feel it. It’s a contagious thing.” “They’re finding singing is fun,” adds first-year Hill music teacher

Rebecca Battista-Sullivan. “This builds their confidence plus it’s a place they can go after school and share their love for music with others while they socialize, which is something kids this age need to learn to do.” Because VVSD elementary music teachers generally spend the first semester in one school and move to a different school for the second semester, it’s difficult to maintain any kind of continuity in any type of extracurricular music program. But Battista-Sullivan and Rice are hopeful they will be able to find a way to keep the Hill Choir

together after they’ve both moved on to Skoff and King respectively later this year. “We’ve had trouble getting momentum in the choral program at the elementary level,” said Rice, who also sponsors a successful choir at King. “We want to see this grow through middle school and into high school so when our high schools have big musical productions, they can choose from kids who have been singing since third grade.” Both of the Hill music teachers will be participating and bringing the R.C. Hill and

Irene King choirs to the first VVSD elementary and middle school combined choral festival in the spring of 2011. Festival details will be announced in the months ahead. “This is a dream a lot of our district music teachers have had for a while,” Battista-Sullivan said. Singing in a choir is a dream come true for Hill 4th grader Harley Worcester who admits “when I’m happy or sad, I always go home and make my own songs.” The same holds true for 5th grader Afua Owusu-Ansah who

says “I’ve been in lots of talent shows and concerts. I just love to sing.” Parents are proud of the choir as well. “I think choir is great,” said Toni Pelekoudas, mother of 4th grader Linsey. “I love R.C. Hill. They have a lot of great programs and this is one of them.”  When will the community get a chance to hear this magnificent choir? Their biggest performance of the year will be the school’s Holiday Concert on Dec. 9 at Romeoville High School. Rice promises “a big production with our biggest close ever.”

RHS staging ‘Harvey’ Spartan Sparkles shine on sidelines Josh Damore is the loveable Elwood P. Dowd in the Romeoville High School Thespian production of “Harvey” which will be staged Nov. 5-7 in the RHS Little Theatre. The production, based on the Jimmy Stewart movie of the same name, features a six-anda-half foot tall imaginary rabbit named Harvey, and follows the mix-ups and relationships that evolve. Lydia Montemayor plays Elwood’s sister, Veta, and Rosa Terracciano is his niece, Murtle. Other characters include Marlena Pierzchala (Betty Chumley), Kelsey Saflarski (Miss Johnson), Adeola Adelabu

(Mrs. Ethel Chauvenet), Elise Kuchenbeker (Ruth Kelly), Chris Garcia (Duane Wilson), Cayle Higgins (Lyman Sanderson), Elijah Ternoir (William Chumley), Melanie Washington (Judge Gaffney), Damitri Taylor (E.J. Lofgren), Jasmine Nassar (nurse/ maid), Callah McLeod (Doctor extra) and Harvey as himself. The play is directed by Genevieve Chelmecki with Student Director Ashly Solis. Chuck Niebling is Technical Director, Ashley Beushausen is Crew Manager and Amy Zajda is Assistant Manager. Show times are 7 p.m. Nov. 5 and 6, and 2 p.m. Nov. 7. Tickets are $5 at the door.

With basketball season right around the corner, members of Romeoville High School’s special needs cheer team, the Spartan Sparkles, are hard at work practicing for their 2010 indoor debut after a successful football cheering season. “We have lots of ways at RHS for our special needs students to get involved at school,” said Lyndsey Banser, the adult advisor for Spartan Sparkles, “But there really weren’t any sports-type activities where they could show their spirit.” Banser, coach of the RHS varsity cheerleading squad, came up with the idea of a special needs cheer team last year

after witnessing similar squads operating under the guidance of parents through cheer clubs in area gyms. “I asked myself why isn’t this happening in schools where coaches have the background?” she said. With varsity cheerleaders providing all of the guidance including routines tailored to the Sparkles’ abilities, the Sparkles cheered at home basketball during their inaugural season last year. This year, football cheering has been added. “Having our varsity cheerleaders work with them has created a great buddy

relationship for all of them,” Banser said. “This gives the kids an opportunity to be a part of their school and feel a part of the great comraderie here.” Sparkles team members include Aeriale Black, Jessica Littrell, Brooke Oko, Miranda Way, Griselda Chavarin, Taylor Barcus, Jaquelin Littrell, Paulina Mucha, Emily Golibrzuch and Jennifer Welch. Varsity cheerleaders who work with Sparkles include Emily Golibrzuch, Jennifer Welch, Kaila Schuster, Elaina Caron, Chemonae Savage, Taylor Palomar-Barajas, Brittany Accoveli and Jessica Kniep.


CALENDAR THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

ONGOING GED classes. Education Service Network, a program of the Regional Office of Education, Career Seekers GED/Workforce program, is currently offering GED classes for participants between the ages of 16 and 21 at the Premier Building, 51 W. Jackson St., Joliet, Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon. Classes are also being offered at two new satellite sites at Friendship Centre at HighPoint, 175 South HighPoint Drive, Romeoville, on Monday and Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. For more information call (815) 774-8902 or 815-7748922. Career Café. Will County Workforce Services host its free weekly Career Café for job seekers at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday in Room 519 of the JJC Renaissance Center, 214 N. Ottawa St., Joliet. Reserve a spot by calling (815) 727-4444, ext. 122 or emailing bwashington@ willcountyillinois.com. Volunteers wanted. If you are 55 years or older and want to share your talents and help someone in need, the Retired Senior Volunteer Program of Catholic Charities needs you. RSVP is seeking volunteers to provide assistance at a variety of local organizations. You can deliver a nutritious meal to a homebound senior, mentor a child, visit lonely seniors in nursing homes or help coordinate craft projects at a senior center. Catholic Charities will match your interests with available volunteer opportunities. Catholic Charities will provide supplementary insurance, mileage and meal reimbursement during volunteer service. Please contact Barbara at 815-933-7791 ext 125 if the time is right for you to help. Mortgage Counseling. Home Equity Conversion Mortgage counseling offered at no cost by the Will County Center for Community Concerns. Homeowners ages 62 years or older can supplement their incomes, pay off debts or make needed home repairs. Call the center at (815) 722-0722 ext. 209 or ext. 221 to learn more about a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage. Financial literacy class. The Will County Center for

Community Concerns offers a financial literacy class on budgeting, money management and credit. At the end of each class the participant will have a bank account opened for them with $100 deposited by Will County Center for Community Concerns. To be eligible, each participant must: be at or below the 20 percent poverty level, have a child in the household 16 years old or younger (bring in proof of children’s age: birth Certificate or medical card), provide proof of 90 days income, proof of Will County residency (mortgage statement, deed to your home, rental lease, or utility bill) and Social Security cards for everyone in the household. For more information call (815) 722-0722 and ask for the CSBG department.

Sports, 15148 S. LaGrange Road in Orland Park. On-site registration is also available for a flat fee of $30. For more information, contact Home Helpers/Lockport at 815-836-2625.

NOVEMBER 5

NOVEMBER 8

Wine Tasting. 7 p.m. at the Gaylord Building, 200 W. 8th St. in Lockport.Admission is $18 for members of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and $20 for non-members. Guests must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Reservations are required, no later than Oct. 29. For additional information, call 815-838-9400

Word 2010 Basics. 2-3 p.m. at the Romeoville branch of the Des Plaines Valley Library. Learn how to create a document, edit, format your text, and copy and paste. Basic computer skills are required prior to taking this class. Registration is required. Call, visit, e-mail, or instant message the Adult Services Desk to register, 815-886-2030 or askalibrarian@ dpvlib.org

Live music. Yardies – Reggae at 10:30 p.m. $7 cover charge. The Department Restaurant and Liquor Lounge at 205 N. Chicago St. in Joliet, 815-714-2280 www. thedepartmentjoliet.com

NOVEMBER 6 Autobahn 5K. See the Autobahn Country Club of Joliet from the ground up and help raise funds to support the Will County Senior Services and Meals on Wheels when the road racing circuit at Autobahn hosts the Home Helpers Autobahn 5k Plus Run/Walk event. All proceeds will benefit local seniors and helps to assure the Meals on Wheels program continues in the area. The Run/Walk event will step off at 8 a.m. at the Autobahn Country Club located at 3795 South Patterson Road in Joliet. The course will follow the Autobahn’s entire road racing circuit, which is a total of 3.56 miles. The entry fee for preregistration is $25 and assures you will receive a free runner’s t-shirt. Participants can preregister at www.signmeup.com. Pre-event packet pick-up is on November 3 through 5 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Human Race

Diabetes awareness day. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Meijer will be presenting an in-store healthy living event at all store locations. In support of the cause, each Meijer location will feature a sampling demonstration of diabetic friendly food. Free glucose testing will be provided by a trained Meijer Pharmacy Technician in the pharmacy department. Customers are also encouraged to pick up a free Meijer “Healthy Living Naturally” booklet containing recipes and life style tips to prevent and manage diabetes.

Teen crafts. 6:30-8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch library. Make your own camera, mp3 player, or wallet case out of shock resistant foam. Sign up at the reference desk. Program is for grades 7-12.

NOVEMBER 9 Smart Holiday Shopping. 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Romeovile branch of the Des Plaines Valley Library. Maria Tiongco Ramos, owner of My Chicago Mommy, will share money saving tips on everything from decorations, to groceries, to holiday gifts. More effective and efficient Black Friday shopping will also be covered. Event will meet in the downstairs community room. Call, e-mail, or stop by the Adult Services Desk to register.

NOVEMBER 10 Book Discussion. 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Romeoville branch of the Des Plaines Valley library.This lively group will be discussing the popular bestseller, Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson. For more information or to pick up a copy of the book, ask the staff at the Romeoville reference

desk. Diary of a Wimpy Kid. 6-7 p.m. at the Romeoville branch of the Des Plaines Valley Library. Fans of Jeff Kinney’s series are invited to come celebrate the book’s Nov. 9 release. The event will be in the Community Room, for grades 4-6. Please register by contacting the Children’s Services desk at 815-886-2030 or kgotches@dpvlib.org Bolingbrook Women’s Club. 7:30 p.m. The Bolingbrook Women’s Club will hold its general monthly meeting at the Bolingbrook Golf Club, 2001 Rodeo Drive in Bolingbrook. All area women are invited to come and learn about the club’s social activities such as Ladies Night Out, Book Club, Craft nights and more. New members are welcome. Start your holiday shopping. Purses and jewelry will be available during the meeting. For more information call Jean Kelly, President, at (630) 254-2741. ESL Conversation Class. 6-8 p.m. at the Romeoville branch of the Des Plaines Valley Library. Free conversational English class for adult non-native English speakers. Registration is required.This program is offered by the Romeoville Branch library in conjunction with Joliet Junior College and is made possible by a grant awarded by the Illinois State Library, a division of the Office of the Secretary of state, using funds designated for literacy.

NOVEMBER 13 National Gaming in Libraries Day. 2-4 p.m. at the Romeoville branch of the Des Plaines Valley Library. Celebrate National Gaming in Libraries Day by playing a ton of games In Romeoville. Board games, video games, card games, and more for all ages plus door prizes. Craft and Vendor Fair. 9 a .m.4 p.m. Plainfield American Legion

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Auxiliary Craft and Vendor Fair at 24741 W. Renwick Rd., Plainfield. Handmade crafts and a variety of vendors available for excellent holiday gifts. All proceeds made by the American Legion Auxiliary are used to support our veterans!

NOVEMBER 16 Do’s and Don’ts of Buying a Computer. 7- 8 p.m. Are you looking to buy or upgrade a computer, but don’t know how to start? The Des Plaines Valley Public Library District is giving a free presentation on the “Do’s and Don’ts of Buying a Computer”. Learn about computer components, what to look for and where to buy, and check out some sample systems. The presentation will be held at the Lockport Branch. For more information, please call the library at (815) 725-0234. ACT 10 Question Challenge. 7-8 p.m. at the Romeoville branch of the Des Plaines Valley Library. In this 1-hour workshop, students will try 10 tough SAT or ACT questions and learn 10 winning strategies to help them succeed on test day from Kaplan.

NOVEMBER 18 Do’s and Don’ts of Buying a Computer. 3- 4 p.m. Are you looking to buy or upgrade a computer, but don’t know how to start? The Des Plaines Valley Public Library District is giving a free presentation on the “Do’s and Don’ts of Buying a Computer”. Learn about computer components, what to look for and where to buy, and check out some sample systems. The presentation will be held at the Crest Hill Branch. To register or for more information, please call the library at (815) 7250234.

DECEMBER 3 Live music. Nojo – Pop and Jazz at 9:30 p.m. The Department Restaurant and Liquor Lounge at 205 N. Chicago St. in Joliet,


TRAVEL 10

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

Cruising through Scandinavia Travel on a luxury liner stuffed with saunas, smorgasbords, and shopping You can cover a lot of territory in Scandinavia without ever checking into a hotel. Overnight luxury cruise liners stacked with saunas, smorgasbords, and duty-free shopping sail nightly between Stockholm and Helsinki. Imagine enjoying a Scandinavian feast with a vista of archipelago scenery. Budget travel rarely feels this hedonistic. Two fine and fiercely competitive lines, Viking and Silja, connect the capitals of Sweden and Finland. Each line offers state-of-the-art ships with luxurious meals, reasonable cabins, plenty of entertainment (discos, saunas, gambling), and enough duty-free goodies to sink a ship. Of the two, Viking has the reputation as the party boat. Silja is considered more elegant (but still has its share of sometimes irritating and noisy passengers). The Pepsi and Coke of the Scandinavian cruise industry vie to outdo each other with bigger and fancier boats. The ships are big - at 56,000 tons, nearly 200 yards long, and with 2,700 beds, they’re the largest (and cheapest) luxury hotels in Scandinavia. Which line is best? You could count showers and compare smorgasbords, but both lines go overboard to win the loyalty of the 9 million duty-free-crazy Swedes and Finns who make the trip each year. Viking has an older, less luxurious fleet, but caters better to low-budget travelers, offering discounts to students, seniors, and railpassholders; selling cheap “ekonomi” cabins (shower down the hall); and allowing passengers to pay for deck passage only and sleep for free on chairs, sofas, and under the stars or stairs. Both Viking and Silja sail nightly from Stockholm and Helsinki. In both directions, the boats leave about 4:30 or 5:30 p.m. and arrive the next morning

Photo by Rick Steves

Boats between Stockholm and Helsinki offer the delights of a luxury cruise ship at an affordable price.

around 9:30 or 10 a.m. For exact schedules, see www.vikingline.fi or www.silja.com. During the first few hours out of Stockholm, your ship passes through the Stockholm Archipelago. The third hour features the most exotic island scenery - tiny islets with cute red huts and happy people. Going in this direction, I’d have dinner at the first sitting (shortly after departure) and be on deck for sunset. Fares vary by season, by day of the week, and by cabin class. Mid-June to mid-August is most crowded and expensive (with prices the same regardless of day). Fares drop about 25 percent off-season for departures Sunday through Wednesday. In summer, a one-way ticket per person for the cheapest bed that has a private bath (in a below-sea-level, under-the-cardeck cabin) costs about $125. Couples will pay a total of about

$375 for the cheapest double room (with bath) that’s above the car deck. If that sounds expensive, remember that you’re getting overnight lodging, a fun scenic cruise, and substantial transportation to boot. The fares are reasonable because locals sail to shop and drink duty- and tax-free. It’s a huge operation - mostly for locals. The boats are filled with about 45 percent Finns, 45 percent Swedes, and 10 percent cruisers from other countries. The average passenger spends as much on booze and dutyfree items as for the boat fare. The boats now make a midnight stop in the Aland Islands, a part of Finland that’s exempt from European Union membership, to preserve the international nature of the trip and maintain the dutyfree status. While ships have cheap, fast cafeterias as well as classy, romantic restaurants, they are

famous for their smorgasbord dinners. Board the ship hungry. Dinner is self-serve in two sittings, one at about 6 p.m., the other a couple hours later. If you pay for both the dinner buffet and breakfast buffet when you buy your ticket, you’ll save 10 percent. The price includes free beer, wine, soft drinks, and coffee. Make sure to reserve your table, not just your meal; window seats are highly sought after. Smorgasbord translates to something like “bread and butter table.” It has evolved over the centuries to the elaborate spread seen today. The key is to take small portions and pace yourself. Begin with the herring dishes, along with boiled potatoes and knackebrod (Swedish crisp bread). Next, sample the other fish dishes (warm and cold) and more potatoes. Move on to salads, egg dishes, and various cold cuts.

Don’t forget more potatoes and knackebrod. Now for the meat dishes - it’s meatball time! Pour on some gravy as well as a spoonful of lingonberry sauce, and load up on more potatoes. Other roast meats and poultry may also tempt you. Still hungry? Load up on cheese, fruit, desserts, cakes, custards, and coffee. Europe’s most enjoyable cruise, between Stockholm and Helsinki, features dramatic archipelago scenery, a setting sun, and a royal smorgasbord dinner. Dance until you drop and sauna until you drip. The next best thing to being in these Scandinavian capitals is cruising there.

Rick Steves (www.ricksteves.com) writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and public radio. Email him at rick@ricksteves.com.


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010 11


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010 1 Faction 5 Aromatic conifer 10 “__ Sanctorum” 14 Sixth Hebrew month 15 Clay-and-straw brick 16 Satiate 17 Healthful 19 Prevalent 20 Dallas sch. 21 Too boring 23 Ways of acting 25 Liquor used in grog 26 Transport 28 Stuffed pastas

33 Ram of the zodiac 34 Lone 35 Pinta’s sister ship 36 In need 37 Supplied hints to 38 Frosts 39 Burden

Never ask a question unless you know the answer. In the upcoming week, you might be constrained or feel limited by your concern with the opinions of others. You do not have enough information to make decisions.

To change the world, you must be part of the world. Early in the week ahead, you might be hard pressed to act sociably because you feel there are too many responsibilities clamoring for attention.

Take an aspirin and call someone in the morning. Sympathizing with another’s headache will not alleviate the pain of your own. During the week to come, tend to your own problems first.

Apply due diligence. Whether you are dealing with money or a relationship, you must act responsibly so you can avoid criticism in the week to come. A wee bit of extra effort will keep you in high regard.

You might meet someone who rocks your world later this week. Right now, however, you could be depressed about the future and erroneously view new contacts as your salvation.

Contrasts count. You must view both light and shadow to gain a clear perspective. In the week ahead, you might find you are more grateful for kindness after experiencing rudeness from others.

You are a paragon of political correctness. Because you are so busy watching out for other people’s toes, however, you tend to stumble when pursuing your own interests this week. Focus on your goals this week.

Charm the wild beast. In the business world, you might feel like the lowliest performing seal early in the week. When dealing with your loved ones, children or the public, however, you are the star of the show.

Curb your enthusiasm. You would like to dive headfirst into a project or idea in the week to come, but might run into opposition or obstacles if you do. Keep a lid on your somewhat touchy temper.

Fairy tales can come true. Your name might not be Rumpelstiltskin, but by forming a new relationship in the week ahead you could learn how to turn your straw into gold or otherwise profit.

When you inspire trust you gain ground. In the week ahead, an ability to appear trustworthy is an asset that attracts people like moths to the light bulb. Doubt gives you a chance to prove worthiness.

Remain mindful of the future. When you moan and groan about the past, you waste precious time that could be spent paving a plentiful path forward. This week, spend more time planning, less time moping.

40 Despise 41 Afrikaners 42 Rapid decline 44 Bonus

45 Fierce mythical bird 46 Winter coat? 47 Successful 52 Chit 55 Panache

56 Health-giving 58 Brummell or Bridges 59 Drive out 60 Subterfuge 61 Matched groups 62 Tender spots 63 Mach+ jets

1 Insolent rejoinder 2 City on the Ijsselmeer 3 Defamatory 4 Play about Capote 5 Dana of “Wayne’s

29 Toward shelter 30 Libertine 31 Motionless 32 Impertinent 34 Eastern European 37 Resorts to tricks

11 Advertising award 12 Vegetarian’s staple 13 Those in favor 18 Portends 22 Letters for drunk drivers 24 Excessively staid

49 Decree 50 Stephen King’s dog? 51 Caesar’s direction 53 Expel 54 Applications 57 Federal tax agcy.

World” 6 McClurg and Brickell 7 Means of access 8 Adjoin 9 Booked 10 Rancorous

26 Fowl choice 27 University of Maine location 28 Customary line of travel

41 Push upward 43 Gunslinger Holliday 44 Spreads news of 46 Strong-arm tactics 47 Wanes 48 Unobstructed

©2010 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Last Week’s Answers Jumbles: ADAGE JULEP SPLEEN WAITER Answer: The model was as pretty as a picture ‘cause she was WELL PAINTED

SUDOKU


www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

Spartan Setback Rianna Wagner serves during Romeoville’s three-set loss to Downers South. page 17

Mark Gregory/Bugle staff

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

Spartan soccer shows improvement By Scott Taylor Sports reporter

A year after winning just two games, Romeoville had something to prove. The Spartans did just that pulling out 11 victories and winning a regional quarterfinal game over Oswego East.

BOYS SOCCER “This is one of the best seasons for Romeoville High School,” Gustavo Moreno said. “We won our first playoff game, which is a great improvement. We knew how they played from the first time and it helped the second time.” “We played a lot better this year than we played in past years,” Luis Castillo added. Included in the improved season was a six-game winning streak leading up to a 2-0 regional semifinal loss to No. 2 Naperville North. “Coach came up with a new line-up,” Sergio Miranda said. “It made us play better and more like a team.That’s one thing I like about the team. We don’t have any all-stars. We all play together and rely on each other.” First-year coach Nick Cirrincione brought in a new attitude which benefitted the Spartans. “It’s a big improvement from

last year,” Ernesto Chacon said. “Our coach was a big difference. He pushed us to keep doing better. Those sprints pushed us till the end.” “I’ve played four years on varsity and this was one of the best,” Dennis Palacios said. “All of the hard practice paid off. We put in hours and hours of practice in and it all paid off towards on the end.” As much success as Romeoville had, it could have been a lot better. Out of 22 games, Romeoville’s largest loss was by two goals, which happened three times. The other eight games the Spartans lost by a single goal. “There were a lot of goal scoring opportunities we didn’t put away,” Miranda said. “It kind of hurt us throughout the season with all of the close games.” “All of our games were like a one-goal loss or a two-goal loss,” Moreno said. “Our coach really helped. We play a lot better in the second half. The first 10 minutes of games really killed us this season.” Romeoville hopes it can take that next step next year as seven starters will likely be back, to go along with Castillo in net. “Next year we’re going to take it to the next level,” Castillo said. “I’m going to be playing year round (to keep getting better).” staylor@buglenewspapers.com

Scott Taylor/Bugle staff

Luis Castillo will return next year for the Spartans in goal.


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O’Malley ends season at sectionals By Scott Taylor Sports reporter

It was a strong end to the season for Romeoville’s Megan O’Malley. The junior finished the season with her third trip to sectionals as she placed 89th at the strong Lockport Sectional with a time of 21:59.

GIRLS X-COUNTRY “It went really good I think,” O’Malley said. “It’s a really tough course. There’s a lot of hills. You’re going downhill, then you’re going straight back uphill. “I just wanted to run my best. It mattered what place I came in, but I wanted to run my hardest and try. I really think I ran and tried my hardest. I really think I did good.” It was that strong competition that motivated her along through the challenging terrain. “It definitely pushed me harder,” O’Malley said of the competition. “We have some really tough teams out here like Downers Grove (North) and Lockport. They are really good schools, so they really push the pace.” With all of the hills on the

course, it was important for her to have a solid opening mile. “Definitely my start was good,” O’Malley stated.“Towards the end it was harder because you’re going through all those hills. But the ending was flat, so I was good to go.You try to save energy going downhill. When I go uphill, I’m really pumping my arms.” She also used her local knowledge of the course to her benefit. “Our home course is here,” O’Malley said.“I think I definitely took it to my advantage. I knew what I was coming up to.” With one more year left, O’Malley hopes there is still a trip to state left in the cards. Even though the timing wasn’t right for her this year, it was still a good season. “Next year I hope I push myself even more,” O’Malley said. “Hopefully I’ll progress and make it to state. I’ve been improving each time at sectionals over the years. I’m going to take a few days off and start up for track and then go right back to cross country. It wasn’t my best season, but it was one of my better seasons and I’m happy with the way it finished.” staylor@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory/Bugle staff

Megan O’Malley had a time of 21:59 for Romeoville at the Lockport Sectional.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

Flyers Fall The Lewis University men’s soccer team was unable to solve the riddle of Indianapolis goalkeeper Justin Roberts, as the junior netminder turned away 14 shots to help propel the eighthseeded Greyhounds to the 3-0 upset win over the Flyers in the Great Lakes Valley Conference First Round match Sunday. The 14 shots on frame ties the

LEWIS Flyers’ second-biggest output of the season, while Roberts’ 14 saves ties him for the secondmost in the GLVC this season for a single-game. Indy sophomore forward Bobby Adkins served as the offensive catalyst for the Greyhounds on Sunday, as he assisted on all three scores. The first goal came at the 35:37 mark,as Adkins found Roger Lee in front of the net to give the Greyhounds the 1-0 advantage. Less than four minutes later, the Greyhounds scored again, as Adkins connected with junior Micah Uemura off a corner kick to extend UIndy’s lead to 2-0 in the 40th minute.


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Volleyball season ends at regional By Mark Gregory Sports reporter

For the Romeoville girls volleyball team, their 29-27, 1325, 20-25 loss to Downers Grove South in the opener of the IHSA Class 4A regional was symbolic of the entire season.

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL “Tonight was very, very fitting of the entire season,” said Spartan coach Melanie Rellstab. “When they want to work hard and they play together, they are unstoppable. They are a very talented volleyball team. But, when they get low, they get low and they don’t mesh.There is no middle ground with this group. It is all 13, all or nothing, good or bad.” The players understood that as well. “We really fed off each other all year and when one person goes down,” Vicky Arriola said. “We all do, It is like dominoes, we all start to fall down.” “We all feed off each other, when one was up, we were all up,” Hannah Canniff said.“When one was down, we were all down.” In game one, the Spartans and Mustangs battled back and forth, with the teams knotting the game at 24-24. From that point, Romeoville never trailed again, eventually gaining the necessary two-point advantage for the

win. Any momentum they should have had after that game was not there as Downers Grove South win the second game easily by 12 points The Mustangs opened the second game with a 7-1 advantage and stretched it to 19-8 before capping the win, forcing the deciding third game. “In game two, we were dead silent on the floor,” said Jackie Nudelman. “There really was no communication.” In game three, Romeoville appeared to have an upper hand, running out to an 18-15 lead. Downers Grove South’s Courtney Conrad served nine straight points to all but salt the game away. The Spartans would rattle off five straight points of their own, but could not get any closer. “We are a really good team and it is disappointing we couldn’t pull it out tonight,” said Catie Crnkovich. “We are a really strong offensive team and I think that is where we struggled in a way this year,” Canniff said.“We were more offensive than defensive and we didn’t have a balance of both.” For the seniors, it was their final game together as Spartans. “It is really hard for the seniors because we have played together so long, but we played with our hearts,” Arriola said. mark@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory/Bugle staff

Vicky Arriola sets a ball during Romeoville’s three-set loss to Downers South in a playoff opener.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

SPC teams renew rivalry By Scott Taylor Sports reporter

The Ridge Road rivalry will be renewed Friday night at Plainfield South. This time, the stakes will be much higher.

FOOTBALL The two teams will be fighting for a right to advance to the third round of the playoffs.And for the Cougars, that would be a first in program history. “It doesn’t matter (who we play),” South’s John Magee said. “It’s game to game. We’re going for the one goal and that is a state championship. (We have to play) the same way we beat them last time. We have to go out hard and execute and get the win.” “It’s going to be a tough game,”

South’s Sheldon Magee said. “It’s hard to beat a good team twice, but that’s the goal.” The Cougars (9-1) defeated Minooka (9-1) 41-31 in week five of the regular season. “This is do-or-die for us,” South’s Alex Flores said. “We always dreamed about going to state as seniors and we have an opportunity to do it. We can’t give up or let up.” In the earlier win South had four plays of over 60 yards. Dantrell Wright was the big playmaker in the game with six catches for 162 yards, while Flores added 124 all-purpose yards. The combination of Sheldon Magee and Austin Howarth had 301 yards passing. The second-seeded Cougars See SPC, page 20


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

SPC Continued from page 18 advanced to the second round of the playoffs with a 34-14 win over seventh-seeded BradleyBourbonnais Friday at South. The Cougars struggled at times on both sides of the ball, but forced five turnovers in the game. “Today wasn’t a good game for us,” John Magee said. “We didn’t execute on most of our stuff. But we came away with the win and that’s all that matters. Next week we’re going to have to buckle up against Minooka probably and do the best we can. We have to practice hard.” The game got off to an inauspicious start with Bradley recovering an onside kick. That set up a touchdown and it was a quick 6-0 lead for the guests. South marched right back down the field though and scored on a Sheldon Magee five-yard run to give the Cougars a 7-6 lead. Bradley drove back down the field, but failed to convert on fourth down from the South 27. The Cougars were stuffed on third-and-short on the ensuing possession and a bad snap on the punt led to an interception as John Magee was left scrambling. However, South got it right back when Alex Flores picked off a pass and raced 40 yards to the Bradley 35. “They were just going down the seams,” Flores said. “I read it perfectly. I knew they were going to No. 2 (JoVaughn Shivers) because that was his favorite receiver. I just picked

the ball and took it back as far as I could.” John Magee capped the short drive with a five-yard touchdown run for a 14-6 lead late in the first quarter. Bradley drove back down the field, but Dondre Adams picked off a pass inside the 10-yard-line. Darrell Collins picked off a Bradley pass on the next drive and South was in business at the Bradley 22. Sheldon Magee found Dantrell Wright for a three-yard touchdown pass to give the Cougars a 20-6 lead. With less than a minute remaining in the half a Bradley receiver thought he scored a touchdown so he began to celebrate, but he was only at the three-yard-line. Alertly Collins made the tackle, the ball popped loose and Sheldon Magee recovered in the end zone. Bradley got the next score in the game midway through the third quarter and a two-point conversion made it 20-14. South again responded as Sheldon Magee scored from two yards out. He put the game away in the fourth quarter on a 44yard touchdown run. “The front five were great,” Sheldon Magee said. “Ryan Powers, Tony Melton, Sergio Reyes, Eric Wos and Alex Sibley did a great job of making the holes and I just did my best to get in the end zone. I will do whatever it takes to help my team out. If I have to fight for yardage I will.” Sheldon Magee finished with 142 yards on 21 carries, while John Magee added 86 yards on 15 attempts. staylor@enterprisepublications.com


FOOD

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

A pumpkin recipe from Wolfgang Puck’s X-Files When you’re making dessert for a holiday season meal, it’s always so much fun to come up with something surprisingly different - a recipe that not only makes people take excited notice from the moment you serve it, but also continues to win happy “oohs” and “ahs” all the way to the last bite. That’s certainly what happened a couple of years ago when I made a special pumpkin dessert during an appearance on the “Live with Regis and Kelly” show. My assistant for that cooking lesson was guest co-host David Duchovny of “The X-Files” fame, and he definitely added a surreal and funny spirit to the proceedings. I wanted to make a pumpkin cheesecake. But the last thing I wanted it to be was the usual kind with a crumb crust. So I decided, instead, to show a crustless cheesecake. In a way,a crustless cheesecake is similar to a classic egg custard, or flan, only with cream cheese and sour cream added. So, I thought, why not give my

pumpkin cheesecake the same delicious flourish that a classic European-style flan often has: a coating of rich caramel, that lines the sides of the pan in which it is molded and then covers and runs down the sides of the dessert after unmolding. So that’s what David Duchovny and I proceeded to do. First, be sure to use a heavy pan for making the caramel. Clip to its side a candy thermometer that will help you judge the moment the caramel is done, so it won’t overcook and burn, turning bitter. And always be especially careful when handling hot syrups, which can spatter and cause injury. And bake the cheesecake in a water bath, the easy preparation of which I describe in the recipe. This provides an especially gentle, moist cooking environment, which will help your pumpkin cheesecake cook evenly to a smooth, tender consistency. One of the many great things about this dessert is that it works even better if you make it a day or two ahead, keeping it covered in the refrigerator. That time lets the cheesecake firm up a bit more and allows the caramel to melt, resulting in even easier unmolding.

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UPSIDE-DOWN PUMPKIN CARAMEL CHEESECAKE Serves 8 to 10

1/2 cup water 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1-1/2 pounds organic cream cheese, at room temperature 1/2 cup light brown sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1/4 teaspoon grated orange zest 5 large cage-free eggs, at room temperature 1 can (15 ounces) organic pumpkin puree 1/2 cup organic sour cream Lightly whipped cream, for garnish • Put the water, 2 tablespoons of granulated sugar, and lemon juice in small, heavy saucepan. Cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until the sugar dissolves. When the mixture begins to simmer, continue cooking undisturbed until it turns a caramel-brown color and reaches about 340 degrees F. on a candy thermometer. Immediately remove the pan from the heat and pour the mixture into a 9-inch (22.5-cm) round cake pan, swirling the pan to coat its bottom and sides with the caramel. Set aside to cool. • Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Bring a kettle of water to a boil. • In the bowl of a stand mixer, or in a large mixing bowl, put the cream cheese. With the paddle attachment of the stand mixer, or with a hand-held electric mixer, beat the cream cheese on low speed until smooth. Add the remaining granulated sugar, brown sugar, cinnamon, ginger, and orange zest; continue beating on low speed until smooth, about 2 minutes longer. • One at a time, beat in the eggs until thoroughly blended, stopping after each addition to scrape down the side of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add the pumpkin, beating it in until thoroughly combined, and then scrape down the bowl again. Finally, add the sour cream, beat it in until smooth, and scrape down the bowl. • With the help of the spatula, transfer the mixture into the caramel-coated pan. Place the pan inside a larger roasting pan. Pull out the middle shelf of the oven and place the roasting pan on the shelf. Carefully pour boiling water into the roasting pan until it comes about halfway up the side of the cake pan, forming a water bath.Very carefully slide the oven shelf into the oven and bake until the cheesecake is slightly firm to a light touch, about 1 hour. • Carefully remove the roasting pan from the oven and lift out the cake pan. Leave at room temperature to cool for about 1 hour.Then, cover loosely and chill in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours or up to two days. • To unmold the cheesecake, invert a flat 12-inch plate or platter over the pan. Firmly hold the pan and plate together and invert them.Then, carefully lift off the pan. Serve cut into wedges, garnished with whipped cream. (c) 2010 WOLFGANG PUCK WORLDWIDE, INC. DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.


REAL ESTATE & BUSINESS 22

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

Stemming tide of rudeness in workplace Q. What is up with the increasing rudeness in the workplace, and how do I get people I deal with to quit treating me like an object rather than a human being? A. What’s up with increasing rudeness is that most people are about one inch from hysterical most of the time these days. When our brains are flooded by anxiety, most of us deteriorate to reacting from our primitive brain ... and the way we react is more reptile than civil. While many of us were waiting for “things to go back to normal,” change has become the new normal for the work world.What

this means is that all of us are daily presented with problems where the old solutions aren’t working. The amount of resiliency, creativity and risk taking that is being demanded of us really wasn’t expected when we joined the work force. Add rising divorce rates and health challenges, and throw in in-laws or teenagers, and you can see why so many people attack first and ask questions later. The place you have leverage,

since you can’t hand everyone a calm life, is to make sure that if people are acting badly, one of them isn’t you. When coworkers are ranting, don’t defend, don’t counterattack, instead repeat back what they are saying until they calm down or run out of steam. When people throw a power struggle, and send you an RSVP, don’t react. Take a deep breath, let your coworkers be right, and focus instead on what they want and what you want rather than defending yourself. In general, anytime you find yourself defending yourself, stop! No one is listening, and the more you talk, the guiltier you look.

When coworkers blame you, simply say, “You may be right, and what do you want me to do right now?” By requiring people around you to quit whining and start problem solving, you’ll spend less time listening to blame from others. Lastly, realize that we have a cultural crisis of narcissism. People can see what they want, but they can’t see how they affect you. Until we develop a magic wand to transform our workplace into empathic environments, appeal to your coworkers’ needs, if you want a kinder, gentler workplace for yourself.

The final word(s) Q. I’ve been offered a promotion but I don’t want to work longer hours. Am I nuts? A. Nope, sometimes getting ahead in the big picture means staying behind.

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

Buying new versus old: how to decide? Dear Dave, What things do you advise buying used versus buying brand new? Amy Dear Amy, This is a great question. But I’m afraid there’s not one good, across the board answer, because it all depends on where you are in your financial plan. When it comes to cars, you should always buy good, used vehicles, unless you have a million dollars in the bank. New automobiles drop in value like a rock, so buy smart and let someone else take the hit in depreciation. My advice is to buy used, anyway. Wealthy people

don’t become wealthy by investing in things that go the wrong way. If you’re talking about clothing, and you’re broke or trying to get out of debt, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with shopping consignment stores—especially for kids. They wear things three times, and then they’ve outgrown them. Plus, they still look practically brand new. “Experienced” clothing is a great buy for adults, too.

Of course there are other things, but here’s the deal. As your money situation improves, you’ll be able to buy more new things. The price of “new” will become a smaller and smaller percentage of your financial world. But when you’re broke, deep in debt, or don’t have a big income, any money you spend on anything is a big percentage. At times like this, a $50 washer or dryer on Craigslist can be the best deal on the planet! Dear Dave, The company I work for just told me I have to get a personal credit card for business travel. What’s your advice on how to

respond? Jason Dear Jason, If it were me, I’d sit down with my boss and let him know this is deal breaker. If the company you work for wants to send you out on the road to do business in their name, then they should man up and pay for it. I think corporate America has really pulled a big joke on lots of folks. In some cases, you’ve got these multi-billion dollar companies borrowing money from their employees, and then paying it back—most of the time. Think about it. What happens if they decide, for whatever reason, not to honor an item on

your expense report? You own it, dude.You’re stuck with the bill! I wouldn’t do this, Jason. But if you decide to stick with it, get a debit card and set it up on a separate account only for corporate expenses for which you can be reimbursed. You’ll have to prime the pump, and put a little money in there to get it started, and I’d ask the company for an advance against travel to help fund that account. But the truth is they should just pay the bill when they send you out on the road!

* For more financial advice please visit daveramsey.com.


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1964 Cobblestone Court Unit #2203 Romeoville, IL 60446. On the 1st day of December, 2010, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Fremont Home Loan Trust Series 2006-3 Plaintiff V. Anita Jackson Kuofie a/k/a Anita Adjepong; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 08 CH 4152 of Will County Circuit Court. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours plus interest at the statutory Judgment rate on any unpaid portion of the sale price from the date of the sale to the date of payment. All payments of the amount bid shall be in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (7) and 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amount of any surplus bid will be held by the Sheriff until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming the sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. For Information Please Contact:

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 292 Richmond Drive Romeoville, IL 60446. On the 17th day of November, 2010, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing L.P. Plaintiff V. Felipe Romero; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 570 of Will County Circuit Court. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours plus interest at the statutory Judgment rate on any unpaid portion of the sale price from the date of the sale to the date of payment. All payments of the amount bid shall be in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (7) and 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amount of any surplus bid will be held by the Sheriff until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming the sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. For Information Please Contact:

Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5200 630-794-5203 fax

Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-03429

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published 11/4, 11/11, 11/18

Published 10/21, 10/28, 11/4

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 514 Montrose Drive Romeoville, IL 60446. On the 1st day of December, 2010, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Crown Mortgage Company Plaintiff V. Timothy J. O’Brien; et. al. Defendant.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 2029 W. Helen Dr. Romeoville, IL 60446. On the 1st day of December, 2010, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: PNC MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff V. URVIL MAJMUNDAR, ASHNI MAJMUNDAR, HILL CONCRETE PRODUCTS, INC., and NORTHWIND CONCRETE PRODUCTS COMPANY Defendant.

Case No. 09 CH 2331 of Will County Circuit Court. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours plus interest at the statutory Judgment rate on any unpaid portion of the sale price from the date of the sale to the date of payment. All payments of the amount bid shall be in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (7) and 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amount of any surplus bid will be held by the Sheriff until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming the sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-09-16264 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/4, 11/11, 11/18

Case No. 10 CH 2368 of Will County Circuit Court. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours plus interest at the statutory Judgment rate on any unpaid portion of the sale price from the date of the sale to the date of payment. All payments of the amount bid shall be in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (7) and 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amount of any surplus bid will be held by the Sheriff until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming the sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. For Information Please Contact: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/4, 11/11, 11/18

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. SHERIFF’S SALE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. SHERIFF’S SALE

STATE OF ILLINOIS ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL

STATE OF ILLINOIS ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. SHERIFF’S SALE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. SHERIFF’S SALE

STATE OF ILLINOIS ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL

STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

) )

) )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF ILLINOIS WILL COUNTY GENERAL DIVISION

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF ILLINOIS WILL COUNTY GENERAL DIVISION

BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Countrywide Home Loans Servicing L.P. Plaintiff,

Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Fremont Home Loan Trust Series 2006-3 Plaintiff,

fka

vs. Felipe Romero; et. al. Defendant. No. 10 CH 570 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the aboveentitled cause on the 23rd day of June, 2010, I, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 17th day of November, 2010, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit: THAT PART OF LOT 70 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 5 POD 22, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 12, 1999 AS DOCUMENTS R99-12455 DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 70; THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 35.9 SECONDS WEST, 105.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 32 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 33.54 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 57 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 105.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 32 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST, 33.46 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 292 Richmond Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 P.I.N.: 03-12-407-040 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours plus interest at the statutory Judgment rate on any unpaid portion of the sale price from the date of the sale to the date of payment. All payments of the amount bid shall be in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (7) and 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amount of any surplus bid will be held by the Sheriff until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming the sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-03429 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 10/21, 10/28, 11/4

) )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF ILLINOIS WILL COUNTY GENERAL DIVISION

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF ILLINOIS WILL COUNTY GENERAL DIVISION

Crown Mortgage Company Plaintiff,

PNC MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff,

vs.

vs.

Anita Jackson Kuofie a/k/a Anita Adjepong; et. al. Defendant. No. 08 CH 4152

Timothy J. O’Brien; et. al. Defendant. No. 09 CH 2331

NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the aboveentitled cause on the 19th day of August, 2009, I, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 1st day of December, 2010, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit: UNIT NO. 3532203 IN POINTE AT FIELDSTONE CONDOMINIUM, AS DELINEATED ON A SURVEY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND: PART OF PASQUINELLI FIELDSTONE LLC’S POINTE AT FIELDSTONE, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT OF SUBDIVISION RECORDED 11/14/2003 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2003284928 WHICH SURVEY IS ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT “A” TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED 08/10/2004 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2004-147578; TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS, IN WILL COUNTY ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1964 Cobblestone Court Unit #2203 Romeoville, IL 60446 P.I.N.: 03-13-102-016-1003 03-13-100-012 (underlying)

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours plus interest at the statutory Judgment rate on any unpaid portion of the sale price from the date of the sale to the date of payment. All payments of the amount bid shall be in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (7) and 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amount of any surplus bid will be held by the Sheriff until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming the sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice.

NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the above-entitled cause on the 17th day of February, 2010, I, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 1st day of December, 2010, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit: LOT 8 IN BLOCK 14 IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NO. 2, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF SECTION 33 AND THE WEST 1/2 OF SECTION 34 IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED SEPTEMBER 4, 1958, IN PLAT BOOK 31, PAGE 25, AS DOCUMENT NO. 856059, AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED APRIL 15, 1959, AS DOCUMENT NO. 873653, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 514 Montrose Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 P.I.N.: 02-33-210-010 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours plus interest at the statutory Judgment rate on any unpaid portion of the sale price from the date of the sale to the date of payment. All payments of the amount bid shall be in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (7) and 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amount of any surplus bid will be held by the Sheriff until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming the sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5200 630-794-5203 fax PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-09-16264 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Published 11/4, 11/11, 11/18

Published 11/4, 11/11, 11/18

vs. URVIL MAJMUNDAR, ASHNI MAJMUNDAR, HILL CONCRETE PRODUCTS, INC., and NORTHWIND CONCRETE PRODUCTS COMPANY Defendant. No. 10 CH 2368 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the above-entitled cause on the 19th day of July, 2010, I, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 1st day of December, 2010, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit: Lot 186, in Stone Bluff P.U.D., being a Subdivision of part of the Northwest Quarter of Section 13, Township 36 North, Range 9 East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded February 15, 2005 as Document No. R2005027335, in the Village of Romeoville, Will County, Illinois. Commonly known as: 2029 W. Helen Dr. Romeoville, IL 60446 P.I.N.: 06-03-13-112-016-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours plus interest at the statutory Judgment rate on any unpaid portion of the sale price from the date of the sale to the date of payment. All payments of the amount bid shall be in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (7) and 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amount of any surplus bid will be held by the Sheriff until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming the sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 11/4, 11/11, 11/18


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 4, 2010

FINAL-RV-110410  

News McAsey keeps firm hold on state seat Sports Spartans volleyball ends at regionals Visit www. buglenewspapers.com AJ Wilhelmi accepts co...

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