Page 1

INSIDE

Sports Zaremba, Spartans headed to state Page 13

www.romeovillebugle.com

News East side Metra plan in works Page 4

Our Village, Our News

Sports Romeoville gears for first place Minooka Page 14

JANUARY 27, 2011

Vol. 5 No. 27

Archdiocese unveils strategy for Catholic schools By Laura Katauskas Staff reporter

As schools nationwide celebrate Catholic Schools Week, the Diocese of Joliet is celebrating a new strategy to move its schools forward, taking steps into unknown territory to not only survive but to thrive in a world that has changed vastly over time. Enrollment in Catholic schools has declined drastically over the years and now is at practically half of the student numbers of the 1970s. More lay teachers are needed as interest in vocations has dropped. The affects of a lagging economy have taken a toll on those able to afford tuition. Taking all those factors into consideration, it was time for the diocese to make a change. Beginning in 2008, under the leadership of Bishop Peter Sartain, it was determined that a strategic plan for Catholic See CATHOLIC, page 2

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File photo

St Andrew Catholic School is seeking to increase its enrollment. The Diocese of Joliet has created an initiative to increase enrollment in all of its schools.


NEWS 2

THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

Scenes from St. Andrew

submitted photos

CATHOLIC Continued from page 1 schools within the diocese was needed. The desire for a strong and thriving Catholic school system for the future as well as concerns about declining enrollment, demographic shifts and financial strains provided the impetus for the decision. This past November, that strategic plan was unveiled and according to Superintendent Fr. John Belmonte, who is charged with implementing the plan, progress is ready to be made. The Diocese of Joliet is the 21st largest district and among the top 40 in the country. The diocese is comprised of 170 Catholic school systems in seven counties including DuPage, Will, Kankakee, Ford, Grundy, Iroquois, and Kendall. “This is an exciting time for us, we haven’t had a plan like this put in place in the history

of the Catholic Schools Office,” said Belmonte who took on the position of superintended in July 2010. While the business world typically operates off such a plan, the concept was foreign to this diocese. Mirroring the plan of other dioceses across the country, the strategic plan sets out to build enrollment, increase retention, improve facilities and better serve the underserved populations of the diocese; and that required a broad consensus around a comprehensive plan. One of the most intriguing issues facing the Catholic schools is the change in population, says Belmonte who points to the fact that enrollment in Catholic schools peaked in the late 1960s at about 4 million nationwide and is now at 2 million. One area that poses a difficult growth edge is to engage the Latino population, 400,000 strong but not registered with See CATHOLIC, page 3


THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011 3

CATHOLIC

For more insight on the schools strategies see Page 5

Continued from page 2 the church or its schools. While Latinos may attend Mass, they do not necessarily enroll in Catholic schools. Belmonte says there has been a long-standing belief among this sector that attending the school was only for the elite and the wealthy. “We have to build a bridge to the Latino community,” said Belmonte. “We are starting to reaching out to them with community outreach programs.”

The numbers But enrollment issues aren’t all the same across the system, rather depending on the area and its own population. For instance, St. Andrew Church in Romeoville is in a unique position as being the only school and parish in the area and has a community of about 3,200 families; Fr. Belmonte says there is a huge potential for growth. As part of the strategic plan and its guiding principles, the school has expanded its preschool offerings, from half-day to fullday, five days a week, allowing parents to choose which days works for them. The preschool enrollment jumped from 22 to 60 and now has a waiting list. Fr. Belmonte says this bodes well for the future, suggesting that enrollment early on will transpose into higher enrollment numbers in each class. So is the case at St. Dominic’s School in Bolingbrook as well, where they are currently expanding its preschool program and hopes to take it five days a week. According to Principal Sr. John Mary Fleming, the school has not lost enrollment in the past year, feeding from parishioners from St. Francis parish as well, which does not operate a separate school. “We have been heavily looking into our academics and I think that has boosted enrollments,” said Sr. Fleming. “We are a small school with a family heart.” Fleming says the school is in a healthy position because it is the only Catholic school in Bolingbrook and doesn’t face problems like that of the schools in Joliet who have to compete with one another for enrollment. This competition inspired St. Mary Nativity in Joliet to

take a more creative approach to increasing enrollment. The school mailed brochures to parishes without schools of their own, placed ads on bus benches in Joliet, and on the Fourth of July hired a plane to pull an advertisement banner over the city. The school also hired the Macklin Group to revamp its website. The Jan. 30 Winter Wonderland Open House is another program the school conducts to market itself. Joan Matejka, principal at St. Mary Nativity, said she felt that the creative advertising methods were responsible for a doubling enrollment. In Fall 2010 enrollment was 237, as opposed to Fall 2009 when the school held only 148 students. While many students come to Catholic schools for the religious education, it’s not always the first reason, said Sr. Fleming. “Some come to us because of safety,” said Fleming. “All the children know one another which makes parents and children feel safer. We also offer a more academically challenging curriculum. Our academics in math, reading are stronger.” Overall in fact, a recently released study by the National Catholic Educational Association show that the students who attend Catholic high schools are more likely to graduate and go to college. Catholic secondary schools report a graduation rate of 99.1 percent, compared to 73.2 percent in public schools. “Our students do well academically but we try not be text book driven, said Matejka. “We encourage self-learning. We challenge students to go out and learn more on their own.”

Price tag for education But with a Catholic education, comes a price tag. Tuition costs on average in the Joliet/ Bolingbrook/Romeoville area is $3,427 for elementary students and $8,400 for high school. Fr. Belmonte says the diocese is cognizant of the role a failing economy has affected parents but also says parents are willing to pay for value. He says as part of the strategic plan the diocese is researching ways for schools to build or start better endowment funds and that it is dedicated to helping all students have an opportunity for a catholic education despite their socio-economic status. “When you begin to talk to parents and ask them if they can afford $75 a week or skip the Disney vacation, they begin to see that maybe they can make it work,” said Fr. Belmonte. “It becomes about priorities.” What many parents do not realize is that the actual cost of tuition is closer to $5,000, with the rest of the tuition cost being picked up by the parish. A factor that has been outlined by the strategic plan is that problems begin when the parish is subsidizing more than 25 percent of the school costs. “A school needs to meet three criteria: be able to attract enrollment, collect tuition and be able to have fund raising in place to be viable,” said Fr. Belmonte. Unfortunately this year as in years past, the diocese saw the closings of and mergers of five schools. “Closings are painful,” said Fr. Belmonte. “But while we are

non-profit, we also are non-debt. We have to pay our bills,” While the closings were hard, the process helped the overall picture. For the first time in seven years, due to the closures and mergers, the diocese sane a decline in enrollment that was less than 1 percent last year. “The closures stop the bleeding,” said Fr. Belmonte.“But the strategic plan is in place so that we can avoid closures in the future.” He said the diocese is working from the top down, using resources and best practices from the Catholic universities

and high schools that already have plans in place. The goal is to share information and work on a cohesive process that all schools can identify with. Belmonte calls the plan just the torso of the project. He has future plans that involve adding arms and legs to the plan, with adding a financial, marketing, and implementation plan to further the success of the Catholic school system. Confident in the process, Belmonte said stay tuned for more excitement. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

Transportation funding still an issue for VVSD By Laura Katauskas and Rick Kambic Staff reporters

Serving more than 11,000 students daily, the Spangler Transportation Center operated by the Valley View 365U School District is a vital component of the district and its community, yet funding for transportation continues to be lopped off the State of Illinois’ priority list. Even though regional school districts have already adjusted their budgets to cover a major cut in reimbursable transportation expenses from the state, waiting for the remaining money promised to them has put budgets back in the red. According to Assistant Superintendent Gary Grizaffi, the district, in a typical year, should receive $7.2 million in state reimbursement for its expenses incurred in fiscal year 2010.The governor in August reduced the regular transportation

reimbursement component by 42 percent, or $1.18 million. In addition, says Grizaffi, the indication was that districts were only going to receive 25 percent of these categorical payments in the current fiscal 2011 school year. “This meant that in what typically would have been budgeted revenue of $7.2 million, was being reduced and prorated to only $1.52 million or a negative difference of $5.6 million from the previous year, said Grizaffi.“The only good news was that we have been paid our full uncollected transportation payments from Fiscal Year 10 totaling $1.9 million.” The school district currently has 172 vehicles covering more than 900 daily routes, transporting to 21 in-district and 34 out-ofdistrict schools. The daily operation provides services for regular and special education students, parochial, outof-district programs, the

Phoenix, Premier and Wilco Educational programs as well as field trips and after school activities. Article 29, section 3 of the Illinois School Code requires school districts to provide free transportation for students who live more than 1.5 miles from the school they’re required to attend, unless “adequate transportation for the public is available” and can be confirmed by the State Board of Education. Schools also have to provide transportation to students who do live within a 1.5-mile radius of a school, but their path to the building poses a “hazardous risk” such as construction, train tracks, busy intersections, or anything else deemed unsafe by the school board. Comptroller Dan Hynes regularly admits to being frustrated by the position the General Assembly has put him in, and jokingly says that he often starts most conversations with an apology.

“The state of Illinois currently has a $5.2 billion backlog for bills of all types,” said Carol Knowles, press secretary for the comptroller’s office.“About $1.1 billion of that is for K-12 schools.” She said the comptroller’s office faces the same problems that school districts face: having more expenses than income. “The state has been paying general state aid to school districts on time, twice each month, but the many grants school districts receive have been part of the backlog,” Knowles said. “It isn’t that we don’t want to make the payments.” Most schools encountered four-month lags in reimbursements last year, but Knowles said the delays this year will be at least six months. Cash reserves have been the most common way to cover such shortfalls. At the time Valley View passed its budget, it was anticipated that the unpaid Mandated Categorical

payments for fiscal year 2011 would total $12.7 million, of which $4.5 would be for transportation. “This is a huge reduction in our bottom line and almost doubled the budget deficit for this fiscal year, making it almost impossible to operate without using our reserve funds to meet the obligations of daily operations,” explained Grizaffi. The district has had to cut back on activity routes at the middle school and high school levels by offering reduced routes, but still offer activity buses every day there are activities scheduled. “We continue to look at operating as efficiently as possible, with very streamlined routes for our 172 bus fleet,” said Grizaffi. “If the reduced funding reimbursement from the state were to continue, there could be serious longterm implications to the transportation component of our operations,” Grizaffi pointed out.

East side Metra plans ready to pull out of the station By Laura Katauskas Staff reporter

Capitalizing on a future Metra station to be built on Romeoville’s east side, the village is now pursuing a plan to redevelop the area into a transit-oriented hub. Possibilities are numerous with many unknowns as to what type of development would make sense for the mainly industrial area. In what is the first step in the planning process, the village entered into a technical assistance agreement with the Regional Transit Authority (RTA), which will provide a $100,000 grant to pursue development opportunities in this area. The village would be responsible for 20 percent of the cost. “A lot has recently come together, starting with an agreement for the land for the Metra station and then acquiring the CMAQ grant for

station construction has helped us move along with a plan for the east side of Romeoville,” said Mayor John Noak. “There are several hundred acres of land there that has potential. A lot of people forget that there is history there, this is where Romeoville began.” According to the project description, Romeoville was first established on the east side of the village. Before incorporation in 1895, Romeo as it was then called, was known for its train stop, focused on the railroad, the canal, and stone quarrying. From 1956 onward the focus shifted to development along Route 66, now known as Route 53. In the past 40 years, development in the village has moved steadily westward and has been entirely auto-focused. The older east side remained heavily industrial with the CITGO refinery and the Midwest Generation coal-fired power

plant taking over the areas around the railroad and canal. The village hopes to use the grant to keep momentum of the Metra station going by establishing the goals, objectives, guidelines, and transit funding priorities that it will need to reconnect to its past and once again have rail service. The scope of the project points to several complicating factors in the area that the village hopes to address with this study. In the area immediately adjacent to the new station are incompatible land uses of which the village needs to know how to work around or to incorporate. The study will look at available vacant land within a half of a mile of the new station and what new development would like and how to merge the old with the new. Perhaps the toughest question of the study is how to address the lack of connectivity between

the station area and the area designated for the Romeoville Downtown redevelopment, roughly at the corner of Route 53 and Normantown Road. Finding a way to provide transit connections between the new station and the existing PACE express bus service in the downtown and how to provide transit, pedestrian, bicycle, and para-transit connections between the new station and the west side of Romeoville is equally paramount. As outlined in the project description, there will be two main areas of focus. The first is to the east of the proposed new station and includes what remains of the original town from before suburban development began in the late 1950s. The second area revolves around the proposed downtown area at the corner of Normantown Road and IL 53. The PACE express bus to

downtown (Route 855) and the Joliet-Downers Grove line (Route 834) also stops in this area. While this area is too far from the new station to be a transit-oriented development, the village believes that these two areas can be connected and will foster a greater use of transit throughout the village. The mayor said the design and planning of this area is important and pointed to the recent changes to the Joliet transit hub as a possible model. He also referred to new ideas that haven’t been explored in the area. “It’s an exciting time and a move that is long overdue in establishing us back to our roots,” said Noak. The village will be interviewing potential groups to conduct the study and expect to make a recommendation by midFebruary and expect six months to a year for planning time.


THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011 5

Strategic plans for Catholic schools commended As Catholic schools begin to embrace the diocese’s new strategic plan, focusing on best practices, the expertise and knowledge seen at the higher education level is beginning to trickle down the system. Robert Bergman, instructor of marketing in Lewis University’s College of Business, recently was honored by Saint Andrew the

Apostle School in Romeoville for developing a marketing plan for the elementary school and for creating a DVD for recruiting purposes to assist them in better reaching the community. Bergman was commended for partnering with a Catholic school to improve its outreach in the community and strengthen its focus on recruiting to assure

continued success of the institution. “Quality education is important to me,” commented Bergman. “I enjoyed working with the people of St. Andrew the Apostle School. It is also very fulfilling to know that my expertise can assist others.” “Professor Bergman has created a DVD option to parents to

showcase the benefits of private, Catholic education for their children and to acquaint them with Saint Andrew the Apostle School,” added Brother James Gaffney, FSC, president of Lewis University. “Students now will have easy access to information on a local Catholic option for elementary education.” Lewis University is a Catholic

university offering distinctive undergraduate and graduate programs to more than 6,000 traditional and adult students. Lewis offers multiple campus locations, online degree programs, and a variety of formats that provide accessibility and convenience to a growing student population. — Laura Katauskas

St. Andrew looks to marketing plan, strategies for help As catholic schools begin to embrace the diocese’s new strategic plan, focusing on best practices, the expertise and knowledge seen at the higher education level is beginning to trickle down the system. Robert Bergman, instructor of marketing in Lewis University’s College of Business, recently was honored by Saint Andrew the Apostle School in Romeoville for developing a marketing plan for the elementary school and for creating a DVD for recruiting

purposes to assist them in better reaching the community. Bergman was commended for partnering with a Catholic school to improve its outreach in the community and strengthen its focus on recruiting to assure continued success of the institution. “Quality education is important to me,” commented Bergman. “I enjoyed working with the people of St. Andrew the Apostle School. It is also very fulfilling to know that my expertise can

assist others.” “Professor Bergman has created a DVD option to parents to showcase the benefits of private, Catholic education for their children and to acquaint them with Saint Andrew the Apostle School,” commented Brother James Gaffney, FSC,

president of Lewis University. “Students now will have easy access to information on a local Catholic option for elementary education,” he stated. Lewis University is a Catholic university offering distinctive undergraduate and graduate programs to more than 6,000

traditional and adult students. Lewis offers multiple campus locations, online degree programs, and a variety of formats that provide accessibility and convenience to a growing student population. — Laura Katauskas


POLICE BLOTTER 6

THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

Romeoville man faces battery charge The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

1

Victor Contreras, 48, 303 Richfield Tr., was arrested at 1:20 p.m. on Jan. 9 and charged with battery after an incident on the 300 block of Richfield Trail.

2

Criminal defacement of property was reported at 7:42 a.m. on Jan. 16 by a resident in the 100 block of Spring Hill Court. Spray paint was used to damage the side of the residence. Estimated cost to remove the paint is $500.

4

10

3

A theft took place at 1:20 p.m. on Jan. 17 on the 600 block of Hamrick Ave. A motor vehicle was removed from the driveway of the residence without the owners permission. Estimated cost of the vehicle is $8,000.

12

5

8 3

4

The owner of the property at 0-100 block of Honeybear Lane reported a theft at 10:41 a.m. on Jan. 18 of an air conditioner unit from the outside of the vacant residence. The estimated cost of the unit is $500.

9

2

11

1 6

7

5

Kevyn Powell, 50, 1724 Christopher Court, was arrested at 1:35 a.m. on Jan. 10 and charged with retail theft, aggravated battery and resisting on the 400 block of Weber Road.

6

Bradley Flasza, 29, 1429 Hawk Dr, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 1:15 a.m. on Jan. 5 and charged with DUI, driving with a revoked license, and a failure to signal near Weber Road and Airport Road.

7

Ramiro Eqquivel, 30, 314 McKool, was arrested at

7:06 p.m. on Jan. 11 and charged with driving with a revoked license, hit and run, and failure to reduce speed and to render aid near Airport and Weber Roads.

8

Mauricio Sanchez, 35, 108 Comstock, Joliet, was arrested at 6:39 a.m. on Jan. 12 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license, an uninsured motor

vehicle and a suspended registration near Route 53 and 135th Street.

9

Keith Simmons, 43, 292 Oak Creek Lane, was arrested at 7:41 a.m. on Jan. 13 and charged with driving with a suspended license, improper parking on a roadway, and a failure to wear seatbelts near Taylor and Weber Roads.

10

Araceli Salazar-Flores, 30, 435 Garland, was arrested at 8:57 a.m. on Jan. 13 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license and disobeying a traffic device near Dalhart Ave and R.C. Hill School.

11

Rebekah Miles, 28, 362 Broadway, Joliet, was arrested at 6:35 a.m. on Jan. 14 and charged with an expired

registrattion, no valid driver’s license and uninsured motor vehicle near Taylor Road and Belmont Drive.

12

Joseph Smailis Jr., 29, 702 Halstead Court, was arrested at 7:53 p.m. on Jan. 14 and charged with two active warrants, driving with a suspended license and failure to reduce speed on the 700 block of Halstead Court.


FORUM THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

Commentary

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Boxes of happiness delivered to your door There’s a sweetness in the air. It’s a mix of soothing vanilla, hearty peanut butter and a dash of chocolate mint. Yes, friends, it is Girl Scout cookie season. Across the suburbs smiling youngsters in smocks and sashes are hawking $4 boxes of a Great American favorite. They are at your doorstep, in front of the supermarket, outside the coffee house. And they are tempting you. I must say up front that I am currently a Brownie leader and a former scout, so my take on this season may be skewed to the positive, but still I delight each year when the cookies cross my doorstep, like a little piece of delicious childhood wrapped in

a cardboard box. I remember the days of my own youth, selling cookies door to door in my neighborhood.Thirty years ago, we were allowed to sell our wares as far as our little feet could carry us. Blocks and blocks and blocks I traveled, and while not everyone purchased a box, I had very few doors shut in my face. Girl Scout cookies made people happy then, and they still do today. There is a pure simplicity to the Girl Scout Cookie, and that’s why it is beloved, here and abroad. Each year, tens of thousands of boxes are donated to our American soldiers overseas. The boxes, sent through Joliet’s Operation Care Package,each are

wrapped in a letter or coloring page from a scout, and delivered to an individual soldier. Many of these men and women return letters and photos from Iraq, Afghanistan and other places in the world, sharing their appreciation and a bit of their experiences with the scouts. But our children can’t go doorto-door at the distance they once did. A suburban environment that leaves many of us strangers to our own neighbors also cuts short their fund-raising opportunity. That’s why these days you see our scouts selling cookies from booths in front of Sam’s Club and Jewel. Also a challenge is the very fact that we live in a world chock full

of fund-raisers. There are band members selling chocolate bars and home-schooled kids selling newspaper subscriptions. We buy wrapping paper and Boy Scout popcorn, flower bulbs and magazines. Schools host bake sales and spare change drives while cheerleaders wash cars. And of course, there’s Market Day. All of these fund-raisers are equally important. They provide the means for class trips and equipment, camping excursions and museum visits, projectors and patches and more. In scouts, they often allow for reduced troop dues so children from families that can’t pay still can participate in a program that teaches leadership, citizenship

and instills confidence in its young members. So when you see our girls at your doorstep or out front of your nearby grocer, consider buying a box. Keep it for yourself or donate it to our servicemen and women overseas. And if you don’t make a purchase, give a smile and some encouragement. Selling to the public is tough for youngsters, and the whole process raises confidence as well as funds. In return, you’ll get the satisfaction of knowing you helped a good cause. Your tastebuds will thank you as well. Sherri Dauskurdas Bugle Staff

Please write You are invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to Grace Tucker, managing editor, at gtucker@buglenewspapers.com; send your letter to The Bugle, P.O. Box 1613, Plainfield, IL 60544; or drop off your letter at our office at 23856 S. Route 59; or fax to 815-436-2592. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Illustrated Opinion Publisher Rich Masterson publisher@buglenewspapers.com Editor-in-chief Andrew Schneider aschneider@buglenewspapers.com Managing Editor M. Grace Tucker gtucker@buglenewspapers.com Sports Editor Rob Valentin rvalentin@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Sherri Dauskurdas Rick Kambic Laura Katauskas Debbie Lively Sports Reporters Mark Gregory Scott Taylor Staff Photographer Robert Bykowski Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication Letters to Editor: 9 a.m. Friday

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Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 3 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. (Except holidays & special sections.) Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at noon Monday.


SCHOOLS 8

THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

Colleges weigh costs of winter commencement By Sherri Dauskurdas Staff reporter

The University of St. Francis in Joliet graduated more than 450 undergraduate and graduate students during commencement exercises earlier this month.They donned caps and gowns and listened intently to the address by commencement speaker The Rev. Donald Senior, president of the Catholic Theological Union in Chicago, and recipient of USF’s honorary doctorate of Humane Letters degree. Senior also is a professor of New Testament at the school. But winter ceremonies like USF’s are becoming less common, as colleges struggle with ways to save money in an overburdened campus environment. Joliet Junior College, heralded as the nation’s first community college, held its final December commencement ceremony in 2009, citing financial and space constraints. “The cost to hold the JJC December 2009 commencement ceremony on the Main Campus was over $20,000,” said Kelly Rohder, JJC communications director. “The college decided to ultimately fold the December event into the May commencement so that we could accommodate more student family members at the ceremony and to save money.” Additionally, Rohder said the community college moved the May ceremony from the campus gym to the nearby Lewis University field house, a

Bugle 2010 file photo

Joliet Junior College only conducts spring commencement exercises. The last winter commencement was in 2009.

much larger space. This enabled the community college to allow graduates to invite as many friends and family members as they chose. The facility is large enough to accommodate approximately 3,000 people. “We didn’t have to put a ticket limit on our graduates,” Rohder said.“Before, some people would have to watch the ceremony on closed-circuit TV in our overflow rooms. By also inviting the December graduates to participate in the May ceremony (starting this spring), they now have the same opportunity.” Benedictine University in Lisle holds one ceremony in May, to

which graduates from May and the previous December, as well as those scheduled to complete their studies in August, are invited to participate. This also is the case at many state universities, which hold multiple ceremonies for schools of education such as engineering, liberal arts, and communications, but all in a single weekend. As for private Lewis University in Romeoville, which offered up its field house to JJC, they remain committed to ceremonies in both December and May. Each commencement weekend includes two ceremonies - one for graduate level students

on Saturday and one for undergraduate students on Sunday. (Sunday also includes the Baccalaureate Liturgy). “We graduate between 500850 students twice a year and most of the students who are eligible to graduate participate in the actual ceremonies,” said Kurt Schackmuth, Associate Vice President for Mission at Lewis. “Anywhere from 175250 graduate students typically participate on Saturday and between 400-500 undergraduate students participate on Sunday.” Contrary to many campuses, Lewis actually added the winter ceremony in recent years.

“Lewis started holding two ceremonies per year in the early 1990s in order to accommodate the number of students graduating and to position a ceremony that was closely held to the actual completion date of the student’s degree,” Shakmuth said.“We found that a student who finishes his or her degree in the fall is not as likely to attend a ceremony in May since several months elapse between the completion of the degree and the Commencement celebration.” There have been no discussions about combining Lewis’s December and May ceremonies. “In fact, we know that at some point we will need to explore how we can accommodate larger numbers of graduates on each of our Commencement Weekends,” he said.“We now have more than 6,000 student enrolled at Lewis, which means we will have more graduates, and more families that want to attend graduation.” Space constraints, as well as financial ones have lead to a host of changes at college campuses, including limiting tickets and even charging admission to the ceremony, as the cost of space has risen for many small schools that must rent a facility for the ceremony. Still, there are many creative solutions in the works. To save cash, many colleges have cut out the paid commencement speaker. Universities are often moving to alumni or esteemed professors and board members to offer the keynote address.

Big Brothers/Big Sisters call upon area mentors This January, as part of National Mentoring Month, Big Brothers/ Big Sisters of Will and Grundy Counties (serving children in Will, Grundy, Kankakee and Iroquois counties) will join in launching Start Something™, a national initiative inviting all adults – not just volunteers -- to support quality mentoring to help children who face adversity beat the odds. The nation’s leader in quality one-to-one youth mentoring services, Big Brothers/Big Sisters holds itself accountable for and is able to

measure specific youth outcomes -- educational achievement, avoidance of risky behaviors (especially juvenile delinquency), higher self-esteem, confidence and ability to relate to others. Start Something challenges individuals in Will, Grundy, Kankakee and Iroquois counties to visit www.bbbswillgrundy. org to get involved by donating, sharing mentoring success stories or volunteering. Increased funding will allow Big Brothers/ Big Sisters to carefully make more mentoring matches and

provide ongoing assistance for mentors, mentees and families to help sustain long successful relationships unique to its programs. “We know the serious risks – high dropout rates, juvenile crime, teen pregnancy – facing today’s youth and we know all too well what happens when we do nothing.Start Something empowers Americans to become a part of a proven solution,” said Lisa Morel Las, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Will and Grundy Counties CEO. “We are proud of

all who take the initiative to Start Something. What better time than now, National Mentoring Month, to start a child on the road to success? When our kids improve in and out of school, the entire nation succeeds.” Big Brothers Big Sisters estimates the cost of carefully matching a child with the right volunteer mentor and managing the relationship with ongoing monitoring, training and support for the mentor, mentee and family is about $1,300 a year. Start Something is a reminder that

while volunteers are a critical component of its successful mentoring programs, funds are needed to manage its mentoring programs, expand them to more children and to track and measure impact and outcomes across the country. Headquartered in Joliet with satellite offices in Morris and Kankakee, Big Brothers Big Sisters serves approximately 500 children a year. Learn how you can positively impact a child’s life, donate, or volunteer at www. bbbswillgrundy.org


CALENDAR THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

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ONGOING Volunteers wanted. If you are 55 years or older and want to share your talents and help someone in need, the Retired Senior Volunteer Program of Catholic Charities needs you. RSVP is seeking volunteers to provide assistance at a variety of local organizations. You can deliver a nutritious meal to a homebound senior, mentor a child, visit lonely seniors in nursing homes or help coordinate craft projects at a senior center. Catholic Charities will match your interests with available volunteer opportunities. Catholic Charities will provide supplementary insurance, mileage and meal reimbursement during volunteer service. Please contact Barbara at 815-933-7791 ext 125 if the time is right for you to help. Mortgage Counseling. Home Equity Conversion Mortgage counseling offered at no cost by the Will County Center for Community Concerns. Homeowners ages 62 years or older can supplement their incomes, pay off debts or make needed home repairs. Call the center at (815) 722-0722 ext. 209 or ext. 221 to learn more about a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage.Financial literacy class. The Will County Center for Community Concerns offers a financial literacy class on budgeting, money management and credit. At the end of each class the participant will have a bank account opened for them with $100 deposited by Will County Center for Community Concerns. To be eligible, each participant must: be at or below the 20 percent poverty level, have a child in the household 16 years old or younger (bring in proof of children’s age: birth Certificate or medical card), provide proof of 90 days income, proof of Will County residency (mortgage statement, deed to your home, rental lease, or utility bill) and Social Security cards for everyone in the household. For more information call (815) 722-0722 and ask for the CSBG department. Need a Job?/GED Classes?. Education Service Network NFP Inc.’s Career Seekers GED/ Workforce program, a program of the Regional Office of Education, has relocated. Our new office is

located at 179 North Chicago St. Joliet, Illinois 60432. We continue to offer GED classes/resume preparation/job placement for participants between the ages of 16 and 21. Classes meet Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 12 noon; Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 1 to 3 p.m. We also offer GED classes at our satellite site at the Friendship Centre at HighPoint, 175 South HighPoint Dr., Romeoville on Monday and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m.This program is conducted with funds from the Workforce Investment Board of Will County, the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, and the United States Department of Labor. Equal Opportunity Employer/Program Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. For more information concerning these classes, please contact 815-774-8902 or 815774-8922. GED test dates. The GED is a 2-day test; Will County tentative dates for February and March: Feb. 1 and 3, 7 and 9, and 19 and 26, 2011. March 5 and 12, 8 and 10,14 and 16, and 19 and 26, 2011. Please call the office to check on tentative dates and necessary verifications needed before coming in to register. Anyone interested may register for the GED test at the Will County Regional Office of Education, 702 West Maple St., New Lenox. For more information, call 815-7408360 weekdays, 8:30 a.m.-4:30

p.m. You may also visit willroe. org, choose the link for GED, and view the tentative GED dates. Art league contest. Plainfield Art league (PAL) is participating in the Alliance of Fine Art annual high school student scholarship program. The league will be giving a $50 cash award to one League student winner. The League will present the winning student’s artwork to the Alliance. Two winning students will be presented $250 each and their art work will be exhibited during the Alliance’s annual “The Best of the Best” art exhibit. Entries must be dropped off Jan 12 or 15.Visit http://www.plainfieldartleague. org for details.

FEBRUARY 1 How to format a resume. 2-3 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Unsure of what a resume is or how to create one? Need help formatting a cover letter? This class will discuss using Microsoft Word to create resumes (aligning text, font sizes, and bullet points) and saving resumes, files types, and copying and pasting text into webpages. Registrants should have a paper resume on hand. Basic computer and Microsoft Word skills are required. To register, contact the adult services desk at 815-8862030. Pajama jam storytime. 6-6:45 p.m. at the Romeoville library, 201 W. Normantown Rd. Kids can feel free to wear their

favorite pajamas to this weekly storytime, which features stories, songs, and crafts. Registration is required and begins January 17. Call the children’s services desk at 815-886-2030 to register.

FEBRUARY 2 Cell phone scavenger hunt. 7-8 p.m. at the Romeoville library, 201 W. Normantown Rd. Team up and use your phone or digital camera to snap the most pics and win fabulous prizes. Bring a cell phone or digital camera from home if possible, or one will be provided. For more information contact Sarah Stumpf at 815-8862030.

FEBRUARY 7 Creative writing club. 4-5 p.m. at the Romeoville library. This club meets weekly for a series of creative writing workshops. Whether you have never written before or you are working on a novel, this club is for you. Ages 8 and up. This program will meet in the Storytime Room. Registration is required by

visiting the children’s services desk or calling 815-886-2030.

FEBRUARY 8 Pajama jam storytime. 6-6:45 p.m. at the Romeoville library, 201 W. Normantown Rd. Kids can feel free to wear their favorite pajamas to this weekly storytime, which features stories, songs, and crafts. Registration is required and begins January 17. Call the children’s services desk at 815-886-2030 to register. How to use Twitter. 6-7 p.m. at the Romeoville library. Learn to use the popular social networking site Twitter. This presentation will show all of the features that make Twitter so popular, how to sign up for an account, and how to keep up with all of your friends and contacts. The presentation is open to the public, but a basic knowledge of compting and internet use is recommended. Sign up at the reference desk or call 815-886-2030 for more See CALENDAR, page 9


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Will County Sheriff now offering online police reports Beginning this week the Will County Sheriff’s Office will begin a new method for the public to file a police report utilizing the agencies web site. This on-line reporting system is designed as a convenience for the public and can only be used to report the following minor crimes and incidents: Lost Article(s), Lost Drivers License, Lost License Plate, Theft under

$300, Mail Theft, Theft of an Animal, Identity Theft, Credit Card Fraud, Theft of Gasoline, Harassing Phone Call, Hit and Run Property Damage only, and Non-Criminal Damage to Property. By visiting www.willcosheriff. org citizens can link to the new system by clicking the On-Line Reporting link. They will then be directed to an instruction page

in order to complete the form. Once the report is submitted an email will be sent within three business days with instructions on how to receive a copy of the report. All reports filed will be reviewed by Sheriff’s Deputies, and those incidents requiring follow up will be handled. Sheriff Paul Kaupas stated, “This is not an entirely new way for the public to report a

crime or an incident. Several suburban police departments currently invite their citizens to report minor offenses via their departments’ web sites and they have received positive feedback.” The Sheriff’s Office wants to assure residents that they will still be able to request a Sheriff’s Deputy to respond to their location, even if it qualifies

for an online report. The Will County Sheriff’s Office realizes that not all citizens have access to a computer or may not feel comfortable with the new system. The Sheriff’s Office cautions those parties that may attempt to use this new online system as a way to file a false police report. They will be prosecuted to the fullest extent under Illinois Law.

EVENTS

contact the adult services desk at 815-886-2030.

world wide web. Learn basic Google search skills, all about the browser, as well as basic tools to assist you with online safety. Basic computer experience is required, as are mouse and keyboard skills. Class meets in the computer lab. To register, contact the adult service desk at 815-886-2030.

methods used and actual case histories with us. Register is limited to 26, so sign up early for this registration-only program by calling 815-886-2030.

required and begins January 17. Call the children’s services desk at 815-886-2030 to register.

Continued from page 9 information.

FEBRUARY 9 Book discussion group. 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Romeoville library. Have a lively discussion of the popular bestseller “Eat, Pray, Love” by Elizabeth Gilbert. For more information or to pick up a copy of the book, visit the Romeoville Reference desk. The group will meet in the South Conference Room. Wii for Tweens. 4-5 p.m. at the Romeoville library.You may have games at home but it’s way more fun to challenge your friends. Play games like Mario Kart, Karaoke, Mario Party 8, or Wii Sports on the big screen. This program is for ages 9-12, and takes place in the Storytime Room upstairs. Registration is required, so contact the children’s services desk at 815-886-2030.

FEBRUARY 10 E-mail basics. 3-4 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. This class will teach you the basics of e-mail skills. Basic computer skills are required prior to taking this class. Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. This class meets in the computer lab. To register,

Game time. 3:30-5 p.m. at the Romeoville library. Play board games, create board games, or learn new board games. Whatever you want to do, have fun! This program is for ages 6-12 and will take place in the children’s department. Registration is recommended by visiting the Children’s Services desk or calling 815-886-2030.

FEBRUARY 12 Chocolate!. 3-4 p.m. at the Romeoville library. Celebrate all that is sweet! Make chocolate crafts, play chocolate games, test chocolate treats, and eat chocolate snacks. All ages are welcome, and registration is required. Call the children’s services desk at 815-886-2030 to register.

FEBRUARY 14 Ice candles. 6:30-8 p.m. at the Romeoville library. Sick of boring crafts that involve safety scissors and coloring? Make your own unique candle using crushed ice to make a mold. You’ll leave with a candle that looks like Swiss cheese. This program is for grades 7-12. Sign up at the reference desk or by calling 815886-2030.

FEBRUARY 15 Internet basics. 2-3 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. In this class, you will learn the basics of the

Pajama jam storytime. 6-6:45 p.m. at the Romeoville library, 201 W. Normantown Rd. Kids can feel free to wear their favorite pajamas to this weekly storytime, which features stories, songs, and crafts. Registration is required and begins January 17. Call the children’s services desk at 815-886-2030 to register.

FEBRUARY 21 Mystery Craft Monday. 12-5 p.m. at the Romeoville library. Drop in to take a chance and pick a bag, you never know what craft you will get. All the materials will be provided, just bring your creativity. All ages are welcome and no registration is required. This event will take place in the Children’s Services department.

FEBRUARY 22

FEBRUARY 19

Internet intermediate class. 2-3 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. For patrons who have mastered the basics of web searching but would like to learn how to search Google products more effectively. Keyboard and mouse skills are required, and previous attendance at one of the library’s Internet Basics class is recommended. Registration is required and behind one month prior to the class date. Class meets in the computer lab. To register, contact the adult services desk at 815-886-2030.

Paranormal 101. 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Romeoville library. Think your house may be haunted? Want to know more about things that go bump in the night? Melissa Tanner, a real life ghost hunter from TnT Paranormal will share information on the

Pajama jam storytime. 6-6:45 p.m. at the Romeoville library, 201 W. Normantown Rd. Kids can feel free to wear their favorite pajamas to this weekly storytime, which features stories, songs, and crafts. Registration is

FEBRUARY 17 Brick building club. 4-5 p.m. at the Romeoville library. The library will supply the LEGO bricks, children aged 6 and up supply the creativity. Your finished work will go on display until next month, when the club meets again to start all over. Registration is recommended, so visit the children’s services desk or call 815-886-2030.

FEBRUARY 24 Job search workshop. 2-3 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. The Will County Workforce Services presents a workshop on job searching. Learn the ins and outs of job searching techniques, including using the internet and networking to enhance your search. The group will meet in the storytime room. For more information or to register, contact the adult services desk at 815-886-2030. Game time. 3:30-5 p.m. at the Romeoville library. Play board games, create board games, or learn new board games. Whatever you want to do, have fun! This program is for ages 6-12 and will take place in the children’s department. Registration is recommended by visiting the Children’s Services desk or calling 815-886-2030.

FEBRUARY 28 ACT 10 Question Challenge. 7-8 p.m.at the Romeoville Library. In this one hour workshop, students will try 10 tough SAT or ACT questions and learn 10 winning strategies to help them succeed on test day from Kaplan. For more information on this workshop, contact Sarah Stumpf at 815-838-0755.


THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011 11


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011 1 Declare as true 5 Machu Picchu

47 Sault __ Marie, MI

15 Writer Bellow 16 Dutch flower

55 Part 5 of quote 59 Attribute

resident 9 Persian rulers 14 Japanese soup

48 Turns inside out 51 Book div. 53 Plunders

17 Martial __ 18 Start of Ashleigh Brilliant quote 20 Impassive 22 Play for time

23 Part 2 of quote 25 Alone 30 Holds sway

32 __ Sue Martin 33 Friend in France 36 Former D.C. hostess Perle 38 Actress Moran

39 Part 3 of quote 41 Part 4 of quote 44 Waikiki dance 45 Yellow-fever mosquito

Don’t let a chance for some fun today pass you by. The workweek ahead will be a busy one and a little time spent doing what you enjoy will recharge your batteries. A romantic interest may be a little more romantic than usual tonight.

I n f o r m a l settings are where you will be most at home. You may look great in a tie or a dress, but you’ll be far more comfortable in jeans this week. Designate time for your own pursuits and bypass the needs of others.

Don’t get in over your head this week. In trying to be helpful, you may offer to solve a problem that you are neither qualified nor capable of handling. There’s no shame in asking for help when you can’t figure out your next move.

You’ll find no enjoyment indoors. Get out and discover ways to have fun in the great outdoors. Some fresh air will be just the thing to raise your energy level for the coming week. When shopping, looking is much cheaper than buying.

For once, you can put pleasure before business. There will be plenty of time for work in the week ahead. Do spend time in pursuit of something or someone that really grabs your interest. Let your hair down.

Get out your calculator. Your prowess with numbers comes into play this week, as you lend help to someone with their books or make precise measurements for mundane tasks. Find little ways to show loved ones you really care.

Get your kicks while you can as a busy week lies ahead. Take some time to enjoy the simpler pleasures in life. You can earn both gratitude and karmic benefits by lending a helping hand to someone who needs it.

Dust off the address book and invite friends and family over for a wingding this week. Surrounding yourself with loved ones will be just what the doctor ordered to bring a much-needed smile to your face.

Dreams don’t always come true this week. An intricate pipe dream may temporarily seem like the answer to all your problems but when you eventually look at it practically, it’s just so much smoke.

A little pride in your appearance can go a long way toward drawing notice from those in power who can start you down the road to success. Conduct yourself as a professional and no one will question that you are this week.

You can’t tell what’s in the center of a chocolate without taking a bite. While outward appearances may seem unattractive, what lies beneath the surface may be far more appealing. Accept nothing at face value in the week ahead.

You’ll need to think on your feet this week. No matter how much training or whatever your qualifications, sometimes the only way to get through a situation is just to follow your instinct and do what you think is right.

61 Talk and talk 62 End of quote

67 Lhasa __ 68 Blazing 69 Unit of loudness

70 Singing Diamond 71 Skin cream 72 Writer Bagnold 73 Writer Quindlen

1 Gather together 2 Taste for objets d’art 3 Bar legally 4 More promising 5 Ending for a belief 6 Those opposed 7 Follower of a charismatic leader 8 Otherwise called 9 Stanley Kowalski’s cry 10 What say? 11 King or carte leadin 12 Towel word 13 Health resort 19 Failure 21 Bread fragment 24 Cordon __ (master chef) 26 Prayer closer 27 Gull-like birds 28 George who was Mary 29 “Divine Comedy” poet 31 Como __ Usted?

33 Was sore 34 Purple hue 35 Wight and Anglesey 37 Verdi heroine 40 Canvas cover, briefly 42 Bennett of Random House 43 Up and about 46 Greek letter 49 Not this, informally 50 Noble address 52 Tennessee’s lizard? 54 Expire 56 Loose cattle 57 Pine sap product 58 “__ Gay” 60 Singer Tennille 62 Trigger treat 63 ET’s vehicle 64 Malleable metal 65 Three in Italy 66 Sen. Kennedy

©2011 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Last Week’s Answers Jumbles: SWOOP WALTZ REFUGE LAVISH Answer: Why the price of the firewood was reduced TO “HEAT UP” SALES

SUDOKU


www.romeovillebugle.com

SPARTAN SHOCKER

THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

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Kyle Zaremba took home a sectional title with a 1,331. Scott Taylor/Bugle staff


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

First place on the line Friday By Scott Taylor Sports reporter

There have been a lot of big games this year for Romeoville, but none are bigger than the Minooka game Friday night in Romeoville. The Indians have been at among the top in the Southwest Prairie Conference, while the Spartans are trying to get to that spot.

Scott Taylor/Bugle staff

Romeoville’s Abby Smith scored 15 points in a 63-39 win over Plainfield South last Tuesday.

The game will give the Spartans (16-4 overall, 8-1 in SPC) a chance to tie for first in the conference. “It’s a huge game,” Romeoville sophomore point guard Abby Smith said. “Every day we talk about how bad we want to be first place,” Smith stated. “We all say the same thing. That’s what See FIRST, page 18


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Spartans complete historic comeback By Scott Taylor Sports reporter

Trailing Oswego by 292 pins with two games remaining for second place at the Joliet West Sectional, it appeared that Romeoville’s best hopes were to get an individual qualifier to state. But an incredible 1,152 in game five gave the Spartans some hope as they trailed by 126. With the heavily-favored Panthers four lanes over and watching every Romeoville shot, they wilted in the final game as the Romeoville barrage of strikes continued. The Spartans shot a 1,137 in the final game to Oswego’s 943 as they flew by the Panthers with a 6,024 total to take second place Saturday. “Coach Tony (Talley) looked at us and said we were going to the other side of the house,”

BOYS BOWLING HIGHLIGHT: Romeoville rallied from a 292-pin deficit to take second at the Joliet West Sectional and advance to state. COMING UP: The Spartans will be competing at the state tournament, which begins Friday.

Romeoville senior Jesus Reyes said. “He said there were higher scores over there. We had our crowd with us and we caught fire fast. Oswego heard our footsteps. With me being in the leadoff spot, I bowled as soon as it was my turn to keep the momentum going. We were two frames ahead of Oswego and they heard us coming.” “(Oswego’s) A.J. (Johnson) and Mikey (Preston) are phenomenal bowlers,” Romeoville freshman Kyle Zaremba said. “We might have distracted them, but we weren’t worried about that. We were having so much fun. Now we’re going to state. Coach

texted us at the beginning of the season that the road to state starts now. And now it happens.” Plainfield Central won the sectional with a 6,221. The top two teams qualified for the state meet, which takes place this weekend in O’Fallon. “It’s incredible,” Zaremba said. “We achieved our goals. We always thought we had a chance. We were down like 300 in the second half and we cut that in half. Then we just went on from there.” It marks the first time Romeoville will be represented at state. “It’s amazing,” Reyes said. “This is like a mini-state and to get out of here is amazing. We want to do that from the beginning, but nobody started off hot and nobody pulled away. We knew we were still within Scott Taylor/Bugle staff

See COMEBACK, page 16

Cal Kramer shot a 1,296 to place fourth at the Joliet West Sectional.


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

COMEBACK Continued from page 15 striking distance. We’re the talk of the town now.” “I think we were just bowling,” Romeoville senior Cal Kramer said. “We didn’t worry about what we were doing. We just had to do whatever we could do to make it to state. We had a ton of energy. I don’t know what we ate at lunch, but the energy in the second half was amazing.” While the team performance was impressive, there were a

pair of individual performances that matched. Zaremba won the individual title with a 1,331 total, including a 268 in game five. “It’s good, but these guys over here are going to state,” Zaremba said.“That’s all that really matters right now. When we started to come back down here (lanes 1-4), they were hooking more. I found my shot pretty early. In the last game I was just picking up my spares.” Meanwhile, Kramer took fourth overall with a 1,296. “It’s way better to go as a team than as an individual,”

Kramer stated. “As an individual, you might know people down there, but as a team you’re with people you’ve been bowling with all year. It’s so much nicer.” It was quite the comeback for the senior, who was in 31st after the morning session with a 559. His afternoon games were 226, 234 and 277. “My mindset in the second half was to shoot big,” Kramer said.“I knew I didn’t shoot good in the first half and our team didn’t shoot good, so we needed to shoot big if we wanted any chance to go. I found the right line. The ball rolled right into

the pocket.” Dakota Vostry added a 1,153, Reyes had a 248 and 227 over his final two games and Will Thompson closed with games of 202 and 239. Romeoville proved it could beat some of the top teams the state has in Oswego and Lockport. Now it has the chance to do it at the state tournament. “The sky is the limit,” Kramer said. “We’re going to go and try to win state. Anything can happen, like I said last week. We have to avoid the bad game, but if we do, we have to make it a good game. We can’t shoot in

the 800s. We have to avoid the opens.” “We’re gonna do our normal stuff and come out and shoot big,” Zaremba said. “In our entire history of Romeoville, no one has ever won a state title. It’s incredible to go down and represent Romeoville, knowing what a great town it is. But, I don’t think there’s any pressure.” One of the top competitors at state will be Lake Park. The Lancers were second last year in state and were first the year before. staylor@buglenewspapers.com


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Spartans stuffed by Oswego By Mark Gregory Sports reporter

Romeoville coach Jeff Bambule said the effort of the Spartans last Friday night was not what he was hoping for, especially against a team like Oswego. The Panthers tallied 23 points in each of the first two quarters and jumped out to a 25-point lead en route to a 77-59 win. “They came out hot and beat us up and down the floor,” said Romeoville coach Jeff Bambule. “I don’t think we had great effort and against a team like that, you are going to be in trouble.” Oswego made 20 of 32 first half shots, putting the Spartans in a hole. Romeoville came back in the second half and cut the lead to 64-53, but an 11-2 run by Oswego put the game away. “We had to expend a lot of energy to come back and Oswego is one of the most talented and offensively potent teams in our conference,” Bambule said.“They get up and down the floor and they can put it in the basket. Even though we came back and cut it to 11, defensively we gave up a lot of good looks.They went on an 11-2 run. We have to do a better job on the defensive end of the floor. “At halftime we challenged them. We challenged their effort, we challenged the seniors to come out and do a better job.

Scott Taylor/Bugle staff

Nick Samuelson and Romeoville fell to Oswego 77-59 Friday.

BOYS BASKETBALL HIGHLIGHT: Romeoville fell behind early and lost to Oswego 77-59 Friday. Nate Washington led the way with 23 points. COMING UP: The Spartans play host to Minooka Friday night as they look to sweep the series.

We cut it to 11 and missed a free throw to cut it to 10. As bad as the first half was, you have to be pleased with the effort in the second half.” The Spartans could not keep up the high energy after the comeback. “It takes a lot of energy to come back, it is a lot of fight,” said junior Nate Washington.“We don’t quit. Coach always tells us don’t put our heads down because we can come back.” Washington scored a gamehigh 23 points, including 18 in the second half. Devin Purnell added 13 points. “I try and keep working hard and try and listen to what coach says in practice,” Washington said.“The 23 points was a varsity career high for him. Washington has been coming on as of late. “In the past two or three weeks, he has really stepped up,” Bambule said.“With him, it is flat out effort. He is 5-10. Sure, he knocked down a couple shots, but most of the points he is See SPARTANS, page 18


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

FIRST Continued from page 14

BOYS BASKETBALL 1. Downers South (16-3) 2. Notre Dame (16-3) 3. Lockport (14-5) 4. Plainfield Central (14-4) 5. Plainfield South (12-5) 6. Maine South (15-6) 7. Plainfield North (13-6)

GIRLS BASKETBALL 1. Bolingbrook (16-2) 2. Minooka (16-3) 3. Maine South (17-6) 4. Niles West (16-7) 5. Romeoville (16-4) 6. Downers South (13-7) 7. Downers North (9-8)

we want.” Minooka (16-3, 9-0) won the earlier meeting 55-41 in Minooka as Stephanie Furr totaled 26 points and shut down Romeoville’s sophomore point guard Abby Smith. “The key is to stop (Stephanie) Furr,” Romeoville coach Julio Carrasco said.“She has a nice left hand and she gives a little pump fake. They are very disciplined and we’re not. We’re striving for that. They have been the best in the conference the past four or five years and we’re striving to get there.”

GIRLS BASKETBALL HIGHLIGHT: Romeoville extended its winning streak to 12 in a row with a 52-32 win over Oswego Friday. COMING UP: The Spartans look for a piece of first place Friday against Minooka.

GIRLS BOWLING 1. Plainfield Central 2. Minooka 3. Plainfield South 4. Lockport 5. Joliet West 6. Plainfield North 7. Downers South

BOYS BOWLING 1. Plainfield Central 2. Romeoville 3. Lockport 4. Notre Dame 5. Bolingbrook 6. Minooka 7. Plainfield South

WRESTLING 1. Minooka 2. Plainfield Central 3. Notre Dame 4. Lockport 5. Downers North 6. Joliet West 7. Bolingbrook Voyager Media is the parent company of the The Enterprise, Bugle and Sentinel newspapers. The three papers cover 18 high schools in 12 communities. The rankings are compiled by Rob Valentin, Mark Gregory and Scott Taylor.

“She shut me down till the fourth quarter,” Smith said of Furr. “We can take some confidence out of that game. Losing to them motivates us because we don’t want to lose to them again.” There are a lot of differences from then until now, especially for Romeoville. It had four sophomores playing significant minutes in one of their first SPC games. The Spartans are a much more experienced team now and have an 11-game winning streak to show for it. “The first time we played them, we were still fresh and trying to figure out our team,” Carrasco said.“We didn’t press them till the second half. In the first half we let them dictate the game. I think the score was 22-9 at the half.” “We know what they do, so we have to work around it,”Romeoville sophomore guard Angelica Osusky said.“It’s a really big game. We lost to them last time, so we really want to win the game.”

SPARTANS Continued from page 17 getting are pure effort, going to the basket or going to the glass and putting it in.” The Spartans face Minooka Friday night. Romeoville defeated the

Scott Taylor/Bugle staff

Raquel Sessoms and Romeoville battle Minooka Friday with first place at stake in the SPC.

Last time the Spartans let their emotions get the best of them, which was one of the biggest reasons for the loss. The players know they have to keep those emotions in check this time. “The keys are going to be to be disciplined, follow our shots, rebound, win the glass and go for every loose ball,” Romeoville sophomore Brianna Harris said. “We learned that we have to keep our control and not let the pressure get to us.” “I think we just need to settle down,” Osusky said. “I think we were getting too flustered (last time).We need to relax and make our shots.”

They know they can’t give up easy baskets and getting to an early lead would be a big key for Romeoville. “They’re a really good team,” Harris said. “We have to play our hardest to beat them. We have to try to get the lead in the beginning.” “It wasn’t our best defensive game,” Smith said. “We gave up a lot of lay-ups and we fouled a lot. I’m pretty sure me and Kiera fouled out, so we’re going to work on committing less fouls and staying in the game. We need to run our transition game and run our plays. I think we’ve come a long way from then.”

Overall the Spartans feel they have a shot at getting the win. “Do we think we can win? On any given day anything can happen,” Carrasco stated. We want that game. We’ve never beaten Minooka and we want to come out and play well.” Romeoville defeated Oswego 52-32 last Friday for its 12th straight win. Earlier in the week it beat Plainfield South 63-39 last Tuesday. Currie tallied 17 points, Smith added 15 points and Precious Williams had 12 points for the Spartans.

Indians 39-30 the first time around in the conference to open SPC play. “We have to have the same intensity and mind set as if it is a team that (beat us earlier in the season),” Washington said. “They beat Oswego and Oswego just beat us, so we have to be ready.” Bambule, however, says the team needs to be prepared by

tipoff. “We better be ready to play, Minooka is playing really well,” Bambule said. “They beat Oswego, they played Maine South and York to a two-point loss to each. They are playing how we thought they would. They have big guys that are good and can shoot from the outside. We better come to play

defensively or we will be in for a long night. “We talked with the kids (over the weekend) and told them we have five weeks left and we have the opportunity to try and get better by playoff time. We are in a tough sectional and there are a lot of teams we feel we can compete with.”

staylor@buglenewspapers.com

mark@buglenewspapers.com


FOOD

THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

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Get back to the basics with hearty winter soup How wonderful it is when you come across a magicalseeming, easy recipe that helps you produce not just one delicious result but instead an endless variety of meals, each of which seems even better than the last. Cooks treasure recipes like that, passing them down from generation to generation. That is certainly how I feel about the pureed soup of winter vegetables that my grandmother taught my mother how to make, and my mother then taught me. No matter what fresh ingredients my mother had on

hand when the weather was cold, she always got wonderful results with this recipe.And, thinking back to my youth, those soups she made were even more surprising because, in the early days, we didn’t even have a refrigerator. What we did have was a wonderful vegetable cellar, where the temperature was constantly around 40 degrees F. In the autumn, when my mother

harvested the root vegetables from our garden, she would nestle them in a bed of sand in the cellar.There they hibernated, waiting to be awakened to play a part in hearty meals all through the winter. No matter what vegetables she brought up from the cellar, in whatever combination, my mother turned them into wonderful soup. That’s the beauty of her recipe. Start with the kind and number of vegetables I give you in the recipe. Add more carrots and less of the parsnips, turnip, and rutabaga, and you get a carrot soup. Leave out the carrots and

CREAM OF ROOT VEGETABLE SOUP WITH SOUR CREAM Serves 6

6 cups water or organic store-bought chicken broth 3 medium organic carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped 2 medium organic parsnips, peeled and coarsely chopped 2 organic celery stalks, coarsely chopped 1 large russet potato, peeled and coarsely chopped 1 large turnip, peeled and coarsely chopped 1 large organic leek, white part only, trimmed and split lengthwise, thoroughly rinsed, and cut crosswise into slices 1/2 large rutabaga, peeled and coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons chopped Italian (flat-leafed) parsley 2 teaspoons salt, plus more to taste 1/2 teaspoon white pepper 1 pinch ground coriander 2 tablespoons whipping cream 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1/2 cup sour cream Minced fresh dill or thinly sliced green onion, for garnish If using a pressure cooker, put the water or broth in the pressure cooker and, with the lid off, preheat it on medium-high heat until the liquid begins to simmer. Add the carrots, parsnips, celery, potato, turnip, leek, rutabaga, parsley, salt, pepper, and coriander. Secure the pressure cooker lid.When high pressure has been reached, reduce the heat to low and set a timer for 12 minutes. When 12 minutes are up, turn off the cooker or remove it from the heat and release the pressure, following the manufacturer’s instructions. If using a soup pot on the stovetop, in the pot combine the water or broth, all of the vegetables, parsley, salt, pepper, and coriander. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat, cover the pot, and simmer until the vegetables are tender and the soup is fragrant, about 45 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat. Carefully remove the lid from the pressure cooker or uncover the pot.With an immersion blender, puree the soup to the desired consistency, as coarse or smooth as you like. (You can also puree the soup in small batches in a blender or food processor, or through a food mill.) Stir in the cream and butter and adjust the seasonings to taste. To serve the soup hot, ladle it into heated serving bowls.Add a dollop of sour cream and a sprinkling of dill or green onion to each serving. To serve the soup cold, transfer the entire batch to a large heatproof bowl. Let it cool at room temperature for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for several hour or overnight until thoroughly chilled. Ladle into chilled bowls and garnish with sour cream and dill or green onions. (c) 2011 WOLFGANG PUCK WORLDWIDE, INC. DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

you get a beautiful ivory-colored winter root puree. Use just potatoes and leeks and you’ll have the classic leek-and-potato soup. Always include some potato, though, to help make the puree smooth and thick. You can also change the soup to your tastes in other ways. Use water or any kind of broth you like. Add a smoked ham hock, some chopped bacon or ham, or smoked turkey to simmer with the vegetables. Puree the soup as coarsely or finely as you like. (My mother used a hand-cranked food mill, but a food processor or blender will work fine, too.) Leave it dairy-

free or enrich it with cream, half-and-half, creme fraiche, or sour cream. One thing my mother always liked to do was bake some white bread cubes in the oven along with a little bacon until golden, then scatter the tasty mixture over each serving. You could just as easily top the soup with grated cheese, or chopped fresh herbs, swirl some pesto into it, or leave it plain. You see? There are so many ways to get delicious, satisfying results from just one recipe. I’ve already begun to share it with my four sons, yet another generation.


BUSINESS 20

THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

Taking the wind out of defensive co-worker’s sails Q. No matter what I do with one of my co-workers, he tells me the job I did is not good enough. He also finds some flaw in everything I do. I’m ready to either give up or scream at him. I love your advice and thought you might have a better idea. Help! A. Some folks believe in the old adage that the best defense is a good offense. The logic behind this thinking is that if they can just keep pointing fingers at you, then no one will look very closely at their imperfections. Now that you’ve discovered your co-worker is deeply insecure, here’s how you handle him. Ask to do some brainstorming privately with him regarding your work projects. When you have him alone, say, “I need to do a better job of making sure I

understand what exactly you want from me on this project. I know you know that if I don’t have all the details in advance, you will always find something that could have been done better.” You are now going to appeal to your co-worker’s need to look perfect by adding: “I can guarantee that if you don’t provide me with enough detail up front, you will not get everything you wanted. I’ve realized that you do not want to look like you’re not being clear or setting up co-workers to fail.” He will, of course, insist that it is true he is being perfectly

clear and completely supports his co-workers. The beauty of this approach is that he now must either get more specific or knock off his constant criticism. Realize that many people suffer from some version of your co-worker’s bad habit. In the workplace, many of us don’t stop to consider the YouTube video we are aiming to get from a co-worker. We seem to put a lot of stock in other people’s telepathic ability. We then get really upset that people don’t deliver what we want. Some of my clients tell me it almost feels like to cheating to define what we want others to do and to say, and then (gasp), yes, tell them. The truth is, most people around us prefer that we be happy with them, rather than

Finding a good car in a bad situation Dear Dave, My wife is divorcing me, and we just had our first baby boy. I feel it’s my responsibility to take care of her until the divorce is final, and to keep her in a safe vehicle. She’s driving a 1982 Honda Civic, and it’s so small any kind of wreck could be a disaster. I’m thinking about buying her a new car. What do you think? Mike Dear Mike, I’m really sorry you guys are going through all this, especially with a brand new baby in the mix. I appreciate your nobility and attitude about the situation, but you need to realize that once you’re divorced, it’s no longer your responsibility to take care of her. Divorce carries a lot of emotional stress and worry for everyone involved, but I don’t think buying her a new car will solve anything. It may actually lead her to expect even more from you later on. I’m going to take a wild guess that the truth of the matter is you’re worried about your child, and this whole thing is breaking your heart. That’s natural, Mike.

It means you love your baby. But a “safe” car doesn’t have to mean a brand new car. You could put her in an old Suburban and she’d be safe, because those things are tanks! If it were me, and the relationship couldn’t be salvaged, I’d find a large used car – one that either one of you can pay for with cash – and let her drive off into the sunset. But spend every second you can hugging and loving on your little boy, and make sure you’re a fixture in his life. He’s going to need someone like you. —Dave Dear Dave, You’re always talking about accumulating piles of cash. I’ve gone to church for several years, and the Bible says not to lay up treasures on earth. Doesn’t that mean that we shouldn’t accumulate wealth or be

greedy? George Dear George, The Bible also says in Proverbs that in the house of the wise there are stores of choice food and oil. If you look back through scripture, you’ll find that many of the major Biblical characters were very wealthy people who understood they were not the owners of the money and wealth. They understood that their job was to manage these things properly for God’s glory. I can appreciate your concern, George, but when I talk about piles of cash my frame of reference is that we’re to handle our money and other possessions for good and for God. It’s not about greed, or to use in buying bigger and better stuff for ourselves. But you can’t do good things if you don’t have the strengths to do good things! —Dave * For more financial help, please visit daveramsey.com.

to make us feel disrespected, unsupported or undermined. If we are willing to take the risk to speak up more often, we set up the conditions for a happier, more productive workplace for everyone. Just make sure that when you speak up, you don’t close your co-worker’s ears by saying things like, “I’d really like it if you’d stop being such an idiot!” Keep in mind that criticizing or labeling people is a way of having a tantrum and has nothing to do with effective communication. Statements like, “I’d really like it if I could have your report first thing on Monday morning so I can make you and our team look good when I meet with our boss,” will go much further than backhanded blame.

The last word(s) Q. My job has gone through about five crises in the last two years. Is there any way to get over being scared of what is coming next? A. Yes. Use your anxiety to be prepared for the scenarios that keep you awake. Then you can be prepared instead of scared.

Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies. (c) 2011 INTERPERSONAL EDGE


THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1958 W. Ashbrooke Road Romeoville, IL 60446. On the 9th day of February, 2011, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Deutsche Bank Trust Plaintiff V. Amy K. Marino a/k/a Amy Marino; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 07 CH 2334 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5200 630-794-5203 fax 14-07-D946

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 322 RICHMOND DR., ROMEOVILLE, ILLINOIS 60446. On the 9th day of February, 2011, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III, Plaintiff V. MICHELLE R. YOUNG; PAUL D. NORDINI; LAKEWOOD FALL PHASE NUMBER 5 HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 2226 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Johnson, Blumberg and Associates, LLC 230 West Monroe Street Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 312-541-9710 312-541-9711 (fax)

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published 1/13, 1/20, 1/27

Published 1/13, 1/20, 1/27

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 525 Maggie Lane Romeoville, Illinois 60446. On the 9th day of February, 2011, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: U.S. BANK, N.A, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF MASTR ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGES TRUST 2006-OA1, ASSIGNEE OF MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HLB MORTGAGE Plaintiff V. ANETA K. PIWOWARCZYK, RANDELL VANDECREEK, AMCORE BANK, N.A., UNDER MORTGAGE RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2006-043274, MARQUETTE ESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, UNDER LIEN RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2009-067452 Defendant.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 2060 Wedgewood Circle, Romeoville, IL 60446. On the 9th day of February, 2011, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Beneficial Financial 1 as successor in interest for Beneficial Illinois Inc. D/B/A Beneficial Mortgage Company Of Illinois Plaintiff V. John P. Towey; Paula M. Towey; Lakewood Falls Phase 5 Homeowners Association; Defendant.

Case No. 09 CH 5484 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Case No. 10 CH 3378 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: For Information Please Contact: LAW OFFICES OF IRA T. NEVEL, LLC 175 N. FRANKLIN STREET SUITE 201 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60606 (312) 357-1125 (312) 357-1140 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 1/13, 1/20, 1/27

Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg & Rappe, LLC 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 630-983-0770 630-428-4620 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 1/13, 1/20, 1/27

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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1818 Fieldstone Court Romeoville, IL 60446. On the 23rd day of February, 2011, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. Plaintiff V. Hasan A. Jawad; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 3202 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g) (1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-17456 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 1/27, 2/3, 2/10


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1581 Arborwood Circle Romeoville, IL 60446. On the 16th day of February, 2011, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Bank of America National Association as Successor by Merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-9AR Plaintiff V. Joshua R. Hurst; Christine M. Hurst; Wesglen Master Association Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 432 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg & Rappe, LLC 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 630-983-0770 630-428-4620 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 1/20, 1/27, 2/3

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1491 COREOPSIS COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446. On the 16th day of February, 2011, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: EMC MORTGAGE CORPORATION Plaintiff V. VERNON H FONDREN SR AND PATRICIA J FONDREN Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 3325 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is $166,270.29 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 177 Mountain Laurel Court Romeoville, IL 60446. On the 16th day of February, 2011, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC Plaintiff V. Irene Delgado; Wespark Master Association Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 3889 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 1/13, 1/20, 2/3 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 2091 LONGWOOD COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446. On the 23rd day of February, 2011, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-FF15 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIE S 2006-FF15 Plaintiff V. MARITES NUNEZ Defendant. Case No. 09 CH 6562 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is $197,538.21 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 1/20, 1/27, 2/3

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 1/27, 2/3, 2/10


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THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011


THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

25

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

U.S. BANK, N.A, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF MASTR ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGES TRUST 2006-OA1, ASSIGNEE OF MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HLB MORTGAGE Plaintiff,

Deutsche Bank Trust Plaintiff,

EMC MORTGAGE CORPORATION Plaintiff,

HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III, Plaintiff, vs. MICHELLE R. YOUNG; PAUL D. NORDINI; LAKEWOOD FALL PHASE NUMBER 5 HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; Defendant. No. 10 CH 2226 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 14th day of September, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 9th day of February, 2011, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 20 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 5 POD 22, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 12, 1999 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R99-124554 EXCEPT THAT PART DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE MOST EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 20; THENCE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 15.3 SECONDS WEST, 105.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST, 29.34 FEET; THENCE NORTH 65 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST, 106.49 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG A NON-TANGENT CURVE BEING CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 398.00 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING OF SOUTH 21 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 40.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 322 RICHMOND DR., ROMEOVILLE, ILLINOIS 60446 P.I.N.: 03-12-407-055 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Johnson, Blumberg and Associates, LLC 230 West Monroe Street Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 312-541-9710 312-541-9711 (fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 1/13, 1/20, 1/27

vs. ANETA K. PIWOWARCZYK, RANDELL VANDECREEK, AMCORE BANK, N.A., UNDER MORTGAGE RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2006-043274, MARQUETTE ESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, UNDER LIEN RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2009-067452 Defendant. No. 09 CH 5484 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 28th day of January, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 9th day of February, 2011, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 236, EXCEPT THE SOUTH 31.60 FEET THEREOF, IN MARQUETTE’S ESTATES, PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 11, 2003 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2003084680, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 525 Maggie Lane Romeoville, Illinois 60446 P.I.N.: 02-32-307-046 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: LAW OFFICES OF IRA T. NEVEL, LLC 175 N. FRANKLIN STREET SUITE 201 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60606 (312) 357-1125 (312) 357-1140 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 1/13, 1/20, 1/27

vs. Amy K. Marino a/k/a Amy Marino; et. al. Defendant. No. 07 CH 2334 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 16th day of July, 2008, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 9th day of February, 2011, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: LOT 029 IN PASQUINELLI’S PRESERVE AT FIELDSTONE, UNIT ONE, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, AND PART OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13 LYING NORTHWESTERLY OF THE COMMONWEALTH EDISON COMPANY RIGHT OF WAY AS ESTABLISHED IN A WARRANTY DEED RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 848691, ALL IN TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT OF SUBDIVISION RECORDED OCTOBER 21, 2003 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2003265432, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1958 W. Ashbrooke Road Romeoville, IL 60446 P.I.N.: (06) 03-13-106-011 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5200 630-794-5203 fax 14-07-D946 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 1/13, 1/20, 1/27

vs. VERNON H FONDREN PATRICIA J FONDREN Defendant. No. 10 CH 3325

SR

AND

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 2nd day of November, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 16th day of February, 2011, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: PARCEL 1: LOT 16, IN WESPARK SUBDIVISION UNIT 2, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE WEST OF THE NORTHEAST AND THE WEST OF THE SOUTHEAST OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 16, 1998, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R98-123087, ALL IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PARCEL 2: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FOR THE BENEFIT OF PARCEL 1 OVER THE COMMON AREAS AS DEFINED IN PLAT OF WESPARK SUBDIVISION UNIT 2 AFORESAID AS DOCUMENT R98123087, AND RECORDED WESPARK DECLARATIONS. Commonly known as: 1491 COREOPSIS COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 P.I.N.: 11-04-07-206-132 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is $166,270.29 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 1/20, 1/27, 2/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Bank of America National Association as Successor by Merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-9AR Plaintiff, vs. Joshua R. Hurst; Christine M. Hurst; Wesglen Master Association Defendant. No. 10 CH 432 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 12th day of May, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 16th day of February, 2011, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: LOT 775 IN WESGLEN SUBDIVISION NEIGHBORHOOD 1, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 6, 2001, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2001-23922, IN WILL COUNTY ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1581 Arborwood Circle Romeoville, IL 60446 P.I.N.: 11-04-07-109-009-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg & Rappe, LLC 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 630-983-0770 630-428-4620 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 1/20, 1/27, 2/3


26

THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC Plaintiff,

SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. Plaintiff,

vs. Irene Delgado; Wespark Association Defendant. No. 10 CH 3889

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Master

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 21st day of October, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 16th day of February, 2011, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: PARCEL 1: LOT 180 IN WESPARK SUBDIVISION UNIT 2, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PAST OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 AND THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 16, 1998 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R98-123087, ALL IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PARCEL 2: A NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FOR THE BENEFIT OF PARCEL 1 OVER THE COMMON AREAS AS DEFINED IN PLAT OF WESPARK SUBDIVISION UNIT 2, AFORESAID RECORDED AS AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R98-132087 AND RECORDED WESPARK DECLARATIONS. Commonly known as: 177 Mountain Laurel Court Romeoville, IL 60446 P.I.N.: 11-04-07-204-117 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

vs. Hasan A. Jawad; et. al. Defendant. No. 10 CH 3202

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006FF15 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIE S 2006-FF15 Plaintiff, vs.

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 3rd day of November, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 23rd day of February, 2011, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: LOT 9, IN WESLAKE SUBDIVISION, NEIGHBORHOOD 1, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JANUARY 3, 1996, AS DOCUMENT NO. R96-634, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1818 Fieldstone Court Romeoville, IL 60446 P.I.N.: 03-12-203-035

MARITES NUNEZ Defendant. No. 09 CH 6562

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is $197,538.21 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-17456 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Published 1/20, 1/27, 2/3

Published 1/27, 2/3, 2/10

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 16th day of November, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 23rd day of February, 2011, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 724 IN WESLAKE SUBDIVISION NEIGHBORHOOD 8 UNIT 1, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 25, 1998 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R98-98992, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 2 0 9 1 LONGWOOD COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 P.I.N.: 06-03-12-101-051-0000

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Beneficial Financial 1 as successor in interest for Beneficial Illinois Inc. D/B/A Beneficial Mortgage Company Of Illinois Plaintiff, vs. John P. Towey; Paula M. Towey; Lakewood Falls Phase 5 Homeowners Association; Defendant. No. 10 CH 3378 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 29th day of September, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 9th day of February, 2011, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: LOT 443 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 6 POD 26 BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 12 TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JULY 12, 2000 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2000-074484 IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 2060 Wedgewood Circle, Romeoville, IL 60446 P.I.N.: 03-12-309-019-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg & Rappe, LLC 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 630-983-0770 630-428-4620 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Published 1/27, 2/3, 2/10

Published 1/13, 1/20, 1/27


THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

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THE BUGLE JANUARY 27, 2011

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