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Editor’s Acknowledgments Intersight 16 is an annual publication presenting work completed by the students in the School of Architecture and Planning at the University at Buffalo. The publication seeks to represent the current trends of academia portrayed through the pedagogy of the school in the year of 2013. Intersight 16 is made possible through the Fred Wallace Brunkow Fellowship, an endowment created by Kathryn Brunkow Sample and Steven B. Sample, former president of the University at Buffalo, and the continued generosity of Cannon Design. It is with my sincere gratitude that I thank them for their commitment to the professions, the education of architects and planners, and continued support which makes the publication possible. Many thanks to Dean Robert Shibley, Chair Omar Khan, Bill McDonnell, Subbiah Mantharam, Barb Carlson, Doug McCallum, and Rachel Teaman for their continuous support. A special thank you, as well, to the board that inspired the focus of the publication: Joyce Hwang, Greg Delaney, and Robert Silverman. Finally I would like to thank my assistants who worked heroically in helping me finish this book: Joseph Swerdlin, Trenton Van Epps, and Phoebe Sumulong. Without all of your input and hard work none of this would have been possible. Thank you! I am honored to be the editor of Intersight 16. This has been my most challenging and rewarding experience at the University at Buffalo. It has been my pleasure to work with the entire school of Architecture and Planning, and be able to present our work to you.

-John Brennan Fred Wallace Brunkow Fellow, 2013-2014


Architecture 7

Stretching Space

Urban + Regional Planning & Design

8

Twisting Artifact

27

Bridge the Gap

9

Temporal Symmetry

28

New Form to Old Fabric

10

Westside Food Market

29

Invest in Fresh

11

Architecture Office

30

HumBOL[D]T

12

Duet

31

Sound Central

13

Bandwidth

32

Wyoming County

14

Symbiont 54

33

One Region Forward

15

Volumes of Knowledge

Buffalo in the World

16

The New Ad-Hoc

19

Headed West

17

Exposing The Library

20

Real Taxonomies

18

Solar Decathlon

21

Sustainable Futures

19

Google Limerick

22

Ireland

20

Knitting for Healing

23

Estonia

21

Urban Reading Rooms

24

Clarkson Chairs

22

Drawing Against Gravity

25

Fellows + Lecturers

23

The Observer Looks Twice

Theses

24

2XmT

43

Hover

25

The Front Yard

44

Contest Urbanism

45

Spatial Disparities

46

Visual Perception

47

[Inter] Act

48

Printing Extents

49

Drawing a Blank


Letter from the Dean We are pleased to present to you Intersight 2014, the Buffalo School’s annual journal of student work. In this inspiring compilation, we showcase exemplary student enquiries that push the limits of knowledge and practice in our disciplines. From the classroom to the studio to our local and global communities, students of the Buffalo School directly engage with the planning problems and design opportunities of our time. Buffalo School students bring a sense of enterprise and experimentation to their work and embrace the Buffalo School’s characteristic learnby-doing approach to professional education. In the following pages, you’ll learn how our students are testing the limits of building materials, from fabric to steel. Read about “GRoW House,” a solar-powered home that students will now build as finalists in the U.S. Department of Energy’s elite Solar Decathlon competition. Explore our planning students’ innovative solutions to such questions as alternative energy development in rural communities, gaps in urban food access and infill development in Buffalo’s industrial neighborhoods. We take full advantage of our location in Buffalo, an ideal site of investigation for architecture, planning and urban design. Consider the “Front Yard,” a cultural installation at the Burchfield Penney Art Center designed and built by students of the Buffalo School in partnership with the community. Project 2XmT, a sculptural wall crafted from more than 150 pieces of super-thin, folded steel, is the product of a years-long research partnership with local manufacturer Rigidized Metals. Our engagements also span the globe. From Costa Rica to Estonia to Barcelona, Buffalo School students share the results of their international explorations through our study abroad program, the largest at UB. Intersight is a celebration of the talent, creativity and collaborative spirit that defines our Buffalo School community. Enjoy, and be inspired. Robert G. Shibley, FAIA, AICP Dean, School of Architecture and Planning


ARCHITECTURE The Bachelor of Science in Architecture (BS Arch) is a bachelor of science in architecture pre-professional baccalaureate degree. Students in their freshman year develop skills in drawing, modeling and full-scale prototyping. The sophomore year introduces historical precedence and building typology. In the junior year, students investigate the integration of building systems and how that influences program and responsiveness to environmental factors. In the final year, students are tasked with developing a multi-housing scheme from concept to construction details. The BS Arch is designed to instill concepts, skills and complete all prerequisites for entry into a two-year accredited professional master of architecture (MArch) degree program. The 3.5-year Master of Architecture offers students who have an undergraduate degree in a field other than architecture an accredited degree. The initial four semesters of a core studio sequence introduce students to the values, issues, and methods of architectural design. Projects address spatial, technical, social, environmental, and aesthetic problems related to decision making in design. In the final three semesters of the 3.5-year track and all four semesters of the two-year track, students take courses under the guidance of Graduate Research Groups (GRGs) and visiting faculty/ researchers that expose them to multi-disciplinary modes of working on design projects. Our current areas of concentrations are ecological practices, inclusive design, material culture and situated technologies. The upper-level studios develop positions and skills as they relate to design process, collaboration, and research. Each advanced studio is organized around the study of applied research to buildings, environment, and/or design culture. Students are encouraged to do an independent thesis where they can develop their positions on pressing issues in architectural design.


Stretching Space Jessica Baker, Ingrid Calderon, Gary Chung, Mohan Lin, Dan Topolski, Olivia Twist

Georg Rafailidis + Jennifer Oakley + Matthew Hume Will Sedig Generative Spatial Processes ARC 102 | Undergraduate Studio

For the final project, investigation was initiated to find way for a thin-shell structure. With the given material of liquid latex, a structure was developed that incorporated the studio space. This installation would hold the six students in the group. The design of the structure carried all of the students’ weight. With no previous experience with latex material, testing was needed. Around the edges of the sheet of latex, a mesh material was added to strengthen the sheet and give the stretch of the latex a stopping point. By introducing vertical cuts into the latex, it gave each person their own space, without interfering with others. The final structure consists of a 10’x20’ sheet of latex. The sheet was 3 layers thick and was able to be successfully occupied by six people.

7


Twisting Artifact Yifan Zhu

Georg Rafailidis Jennifer Oakley Sophomore Studio ARC 201 | Undergraduate Studio

This artifact relies on the concept of expanding the relationship between inner and outer spaces, which break and restructure the bounded volume. The building in the park is half covered by the cliff. The cone from the artifact, standing in the center of the site through the whole building, expands as a steelframed roof, infilled with panels of glass. The extended branches of the cone attached to the base become different levels of space. These spaces on the upper levels are open and public. The glass cone brings light into the building. The cone growing from the closed building expands out and covers the whole structure, unifying the form.

8


Temporal Symmetry John Costello

Laura Garofalo Nerea Feliz Sophomore Studio ARC 202 | Undergraduate Studio

The temporal perception of symmetry focused this work. Symmetry is evident through orientation, perspective, framing of view, and scale. When siting a research facility in the context of the Palladian villa, an expression of these qualities of symmetry and prominent existing axes was key. I was interested in drawing attention to the techniques inherent in Palladio’s work. Anamorphic projection was explored as a means to create the illusion of mirrored symmetry on east/west axis, preserving the existing view through the villa as intended. True mirrored symmetry was utilized on the other primary axis to again preserve intended sightline through the villa while continuing the dialogue about our perception of symmetry. Siting the residencies along the river provided climatic and atmospheric benefits, simultaneously allowing for the reclamation of Palladio’s originally intended views. The villa itself was a working farm, though a guest had no access to the inner workings of the farm. Following this strategy, the exhibition space at the level of piano nobile fosters public access of the research yet circulation is limited to the residents. 9


West Side Market Jibo Yiao

Nerea Feliz Variable Organic Systems ARC 301 | Undergraduate Studio

This project focuses on a strong integration between structure, form and function. A series of studies were made with different forms of structure. These create various roof forms and results in different market experiences below. A modified grid is applied to the site, coordinating between the human and urban scale. The market is divided into two levels. First is an open ground floor with flexible programs for different seasons. The second floor is divided into bands with fixedmarket stalls and service spaces. The steel-frame structure located between these bands creates the space on the second floor, which functions as a space frame supported by three cores. The result of splitting floors and roofs defines individual spaces on the second floor. This links all floors’ planes together with daylight and visual connections.

10


Architecture Office Phoebe Sumulong

combined with other accent materials

Kenneth MacKay Sergio Lopez-Pinero Variable Organic Systems ARC 302 | Undergraduate Studio

An architect’s office needs space for cooperative team work, creative thinking, and growth. structure for vines to grow on

Inspired by a simplistic form that is stacked and stretched for optimum office environments, the office incorporates sustainable aspects such as natural elements and practical forms. The pitched roof slopes of each wing sheds water as well as provides higher ceiling heights to promote creativity. Plants and greenery provide shade and a closer connection to nature. The walls are structured to keep the cores of the building ventilated and house plants that exist all year round. The floors are interconnected through balconies within the office building to create a unified working environment. Each floor is specific to a different department in the firm – architecture, planning, interior design, and engineering. With a variety of people in one building, it creates a setting that is flowing with opportunities for group work, creativity, and personal growth.

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Duet Micaela Barker, Austin Tylec

STAGE

Annette LeCuyer Brad Wales Comprehensive Studio ARC 403 | Undergraduate Studio

Buffalo is a music city filled with multiple scales of performance spaces. Project Duet, a musician’s housing project, brings the many scales of performance space that the City of Buffalo needs into one building located in Elmwood Village. This project’s concert, cafe, and outdoor public plazas enhance Elmwood Village as a contemporary urban destination. The multi-leveled, indoor- and outdoor- concert spaces have the ability to expand and contract depending on the scale and environmental needs of a performace. The project also provides musical artists with a live/work dwelling that allows them to build meaningful relationships with other musicians. This encourages inspirational exchanges and creates a supportive network that keeps the production of music thriving in the City of Buffalo.

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PRACTICE SPACE

PRACTICE PRA TICE SPACEE SPA

STAGE


GLAZI ZING

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P IVA PR V TE T BA B R COMP M OSITE T

SEM EMI-PUB U LIC BA B R COMP M OSITE T

Ilana Simhon, Robert Yoos

Annette LeCuyer

GLAZI ZING SOCIA I L BA B R COMP M OSITE T

REFLEC

Bandwidth

Comprehensive Studio ARC 403 | Undergraduate Studio

Challenging the typical layout within a residential unit, Bandwidth reorganizes the programmatic elements into a series of layers that filters occupants from private to public and from routine to spontaneous interactions. At the rear of the site, solitary spaces that allow the residents to reflect include sleeping spaces, private bathrooms and personal work spaces. The central band contains services, kitchens, and a central car lift to consolidate the routine activities. By opening up these programs to multiple units, the routine band creates permeable thresholds and begins to break down the barriers of the individual unit. The most public layer, adjacent to Elmwood Avenue, unites all of the residents within a single, transparent social living room to instill a dialogue between the residents and the surrounding urban context. Moving through these layers, thresholds are expanded to highlight the transition from one social condition to the next. The three bands have distinctively different structural and aesthetic qualities inherent to the programmatic needs of privacy versus community.

13


Symbiont 54 Dean Ciofani

Mike Zebrowski 3.5 Graduate Studio ARC 501 | Graduate Studio

The project begins with a simple geometric form; the cube. Students were instructed to consider the different ways in which a cube could be ‘pulled apart’ to generate multiple formal elements. After a series of iterations, the cube design was modeled first in cardboard, then again at a larger scale using plaster (pictured). The resulting plaster casts were then reoriented and situated within a fabricated landscape, serving as foundational elements. The topography design employs smooth changes in elevation. At times these changes manifest as subtle nuances, while at others they are quite abrupt. Such differences in elevation and slope permit a multiplicity of interactions between the landscape and the stereotomic elements embedded within it. The symbiotic nature of the two foundational elements is continued throughout the tectonic structure above. Here, the modular unit is repeated at varying scales and orientations as the superstructure grows seemingly ad-infinitum.

14


Volumes of Knowledge Adam Grenci

Korydon Smith 3.5 Graduate Comprehensive Studio ARC 502 | Graduate Studio

The library and cafe are both based on tectonic models of different additive logics. Each floor of the library acts as its own hollow box. Surfaces are slid, leaving voids in the surfaces from which they came. The shifts in the library run from floor to ceiling and never take place at the corners of the box, while the shifts in the cafe are never floor-to-ceiling height and always originate from a corner. The interior of the cafe is finished in light bamboo to capture and reflect light which enters from the apertures in the walls and ceiling. This light finish, coupled with the very open north side of the cafe, will produce an airy and open feel. The library interior will be finished in a slightly darker wood to provide a relaxing environment. In the voids left behind from the shifting of ground surfaces, vegetation is planted to make them distinct from one another. In the voids left from the shifting of wall and ceiling surfaces, glass is placed to provide views to the surrounding area and allow for sunlight to penetrate into the buildings.

15


The New Ad-Hoc Josh Dillin

Brian Carter 3.5 Graduate Studio ARC 503 | Graduate Studio

What does a parking attendant shelter do? Perhaps it seems selfevident, but what if its ambitions dared to go beyond its function and amuse the realm of art and architecture. Reinventing such a simple and disregarded structure effectively requires insight and understanding. Not just into what it does, but more importantly, into what it can do. It can inspire and re-use. It can provide energy and atmosphere. It’s not just a functional box, but rather a sculpture and a symbol of sustainability. It addresses the elements as well as the public, spreading ideas of renewable energy and giving new value to otherwise forgotten waste. It is constructed of salvaged heavy timber, old windows, and a once generic catalog parking shelter. It brings new life to a utilitarian box. It is a collage of little pieces of architecture and time, softening an otherwise mundane hardscape with nostalgia, creativity, and imagination. Thus... the new ad hoc

16


Exposing the Library Andrew Koudlai

Annette LeCuyer 3.5 Graduate Comprehensive Studio ARC 504 | Graduate Studio

The massing of the building on site addresses the relationship of the library to the streetfront. Typical public buildings in the community are set back in their sites to provide a public plaza or green space. This strategy distinguishes the building as public but sacrifices street frontage and also pedestrian visibility. The central part of the library is pulled back into the site to provide a public plaza that is framed by the two wings of the library. This provides the cafe wing street frontage while also using the cantilevered wing to break the streetfront and establish presence on the street. The result is a building that is pushed down into the site at the south wing and pulled up off of the ground at the north wing. The depressed south wing permits ample daylight into the plaza while the cantilevered north wing established a dramatic presence on the street and frames the plaza without blocking it off from the street. Conceptually, the library is an exposure of the collection to the Elmwood community. The stacks are moved to the glazed facade around the plaza and displayed to pedestrians.

17


Solar Decathlon Colleen Creighton, Peter Foti, Wayne Fung Tim Gargiulo, Nick Karl, Jingyan Li, Sungyong Lim, Chen Lin, Steve Parks Alyssa Phelps, Ned Schelleng, Rick Van Curen

Martha Bohm + Brad Wales

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9#5* 2NCPVKPI /CKPVGPCPEG *CTXGUVKPI %QORQUVKPI 5QKN6GUVKPI

(+.6'4

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5614'

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Ecological Practices ARC 607 | Graduate Studio

The design is a proposal for the Solar Decathlon Competition 2015 to take place in Irvine, California. It proposes a spacious-feeling 1,000 sf max, better-than-netzero house, for an urban farmer/ gardener couple living in Buffalo. The house provides excellent opportunities for indoor-outdoor living, gardening, entertaining (movie nights, dinners), and can be passively heated and cooled. The program and design goals have been established, as follows: 1) optimizing passive solar gain and ventilation; 2) innovative PV deployment; 3) site-specificity to the City of Buffalo; 4) activation of the landscape, particularly for food production; 5) re-use of materials; 6) water catchment and re-use; 7) modularity in construction; and, 8) re-configuring & invigorating domestic spatial hierarchies. The final outcome of the studio was a complete drawing set, including supporting research and analysis, ready to proceed to full design development.

18

1. Passive Design:

Optimize for Buffalo by maximizing possible solar gain, and then filtering with kinetic screening, thermal blanket, and light shelves. Also provide Passive Cooling. a. Include diagrammatic elements of passive design, including cooling b. All schemes will utilize a thermal mass for temperature modulation. c. Provide shading via overhangs, louvers, and vegetation d. Provide daylighting; include schematic daylighting diagrams.

2. Reconfiguring domestic spatial hierarchies 3. Create distinct heating and cooling a. Utilizing bonus/solar space/greenhouse in various different seasons zones with small square footages. b. Moving furniture such as tables and beds and couches; moved during the day away from thermal mass locations, or for any other living purposes c. Creating an indoor/ outdoor continuum through the living room / greenhouse.

4. Activation of landscape, particularly for food production a. Pre-cultivation in California b. Maximize food production strategies: ex) Bonus space as greenhouse

BUFFALO, NY LOCALITY


Google R&D Office Maryam Sadeghi

Keneth MacKay Timothy Ung Inclusive Design ARC 605 | Graduate Studio

The project was designed to house a small branch of Google’s Office for Research and Development. Through vigorous precedent study and cataloging of other Google offices, a comprehensive understanding of the inter-relationships of an IT office were obtained. Google’s main objective for their office design is collaboration and interaction and the building was designed to facilitate that and increase creativity in the workforce. In addition to site analysis and its relationship to the larger context Ireland, the design started by superimposing the historical layers of the ancient city of Limerick. Lines of the changing waterfront extracted from those layers created the conceptual plan of the office building and its adjacent urban space. The design emphasizes the continuous movement along the waterfront with equal access for everybody and creates a flexible abstract landscape with dynamic spatial and visual experiences to accommodate all sorts of public events and activities throughout the site.

19


Knitting for Healing and Support Charlie Schmidt + Louis Rosario

Shayne O’Neil Material Culture ARC 605 | Graduate Studio

As a part of research focused on the potential use of knotting in relation to full-scale construction, the studies focused on two potential uses for knitted fields within construction: pre- and post- construction integration as a structuring element. The design catalogued multiple column studies, focusing on material combinations and processes of application, between concrete, knits, and fused concrete rubber elements. This unlocked the potential of the knitted field to be used as a joining element between the concrete-rubber and concrete within the column construction. The studies revealed the knitted field and rubber-concrete element to be a construction solution for the deflection and fracturing of columns, both as a preventative means and as a temporary response to catastrophic failure.

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Urban Reading Rooms Vincent Krause

Mark Shepard Situated Technology ARC 606 | Graduate Studio

People of the world! Stop wasting your time! Sit down and read something for a change! Urban reading rooms! Spread the word! Using foursquare venues and a reading database for content, a newsticker or ‘status feed’, a thermal-receipt printer spits out constant snippets of text. This seemingly constant autonomous act is triggered by the scans of the QR codes linked to the six creative common novels embedded in my blog - Dracula, Metamorphosis, Frankenstein, The Gambler, Alice in Wonderland, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Importance of Being Earnest. Every time a specific novel is loaded on a mobile device, an application initiates the printer to print a paragraph of that book. This is programmed to happen sequentially, i.e. the 50-foot-paper roll will display a collage of the six novels, resembling an exquisite corpse.

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Drawing Against Gravity John Brennan, David Heaton, Ryan Meyers, Ana Misenas,

Dennis Maher Drawing Agrainst Gravity ARC 591 | Architecture Elective

What is constant in architecture? As social, cultural, economic, and environmental conditions change, one thing remains the same gravity. All decisions in the design of habitable structures address this condition in some way. Some of the finest examples of built form have responded to the gravitational situation at Earth’s surface in profound ways. Now what if we disrupt this ever present force? By inhabiting new sites with new gravity scenarios, we liberate these buildings from their constant acceleration of 9.8 m/s². Extreme relocation comes with a submission to new forces which deconstruct and reorganize the original built forms. In these new sites, dialogues have been initiated between building and environment. Extreme locations have extreme consequences on forms which were so well suited for Earth’s surface, and at times the building takes on a reorganization in response to new environmental constants. We start at the core…

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The Observer Looks Twice Joseph Swerdlin

Thomas Kelly Common Error ARC 404 | Banham Fellow Seminar

Mistake is accidental but intentional deviation from ‘the correct’ is error. To create something new, a subtle variation is introduced into a rigid system. Modern office buildings were designed with a strong grid in plan that translated to static facades defined by parallel, vertical lines. When the geometry of the elevation is translated through the introduction of a subtle sine curve, a perceptual glitch is created causing the observer to double take what was seen. Furthermore, this elevational shifting affects the plan; pinching and pulling the interior organization and redistributing the democratized space.

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2XmT Research Assistants: Philip Gusmano, Daniel Vrana, Daniel Fiore, Stephen Olson, John Brennan, Kyle Mastalinski, Sandra Berdick, Marek Patrosz, Richard Stora

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Nicholas Bruscia + Christopher Romano Sheet Metal Self-Structuring Prototype Faculty Research

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The research represented by project 2XmT has an underlying goal of producing self-structuring and lightweight architectural screens built entirely from thin-gauge sheet metal. Using only textured stainless steel, the research attempts to investigate the relationship between structure and appearance through performative analyses at full scale. The project incorporates a computational workflow that is informed by the material’s fabrication parameters and attempts to provide evidence for thin-gauge textured metals as a high performance material by identifying structural rigidity and specular quality as inherent characteristics borne from the rigidizing (texturing) process.

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The Front Yard Brian Belluscio, Isabella Britto, Andrew Durkee Ryan Dussault, You-chiang Feng, David Heaton, Hanna Ihrke, Ian Liu, Alex Marchuk, Mike Mieszczanski, Maya Shermer, Ryan Sidor, Trenton Van Epps

Brad Wales with Isabella Brito Small Built Works Program ARC 404/448/548| Architecture Elective

This project is the culmination of 12 years of Small Built Works Program projects. 1) the structures must be as slim and visually transparent as possible; 2) the structures must be elegant and consider the design of the existing art center; 3) the projector and computer enclosures will be water-tight; 4) the projector enclosure will be heated, and the computer enclosure will be vented; 5) for maintenance, the projector and computer will be accessible by a ladder that cannot be climbed by the general public; 6) the structures themselves should not be climbable; 7) landscaping should be included, based on the concept of the cycles of the seasons; and, 8) development of a viewing area/ piazza is considered desirable, contingent on design and budget considerations.

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URBAN + REGIONAL PLANNING & DESIGN The master of urban planning (MUP) program at the University at Buffalo intends to prepare students to become versatile and ethical professionals. We provide such capabilities through instruction in theories and methods of planning, planning practicums, and exposure to specialized fields within urban planning, including urban design, community development, international and economic development, environmental planning, and geographic information systems. We are committed to growing excellence in conveying such capabilities, doing so in ways that engage students in issues of diversity, and extending our teaching to students of diverse backgrounds. Along with the dual MArch/MUP with the Department of Architecture, the Department of Urban and Regional Planning inaugurated a JD/MUP program in conjunction with the Law School during academic 2006-2007. The environmental design BA provides students with the skills to understand, analyze, and solve problems associated with urban development and the design of sustainable environments. Environmental design applies knowledge of social science and design to plan and develop community environments that affect and are affected by human behavior. While concerned about humanity’s use, misuse, and abuse of the natural environment, environmental design also is concerned with the planned environment which humans build – the “artificial” or designed physical environment – and its ability to meet community needs.


EE T ST R

HumBOL(D)T

M AI N

190

John Brennan, Kristen Gabriele, Tino Goo, Katie Heritage, Alex Nowak, Steve Parks, Shauna Pritchard, Edward Schelleng, Sarah Weishaupt, Alan Chan, Vicki Kessinger, Maryam Khojasteh, Travis Norton, Brian Ravinsky, Laurene Schrenk, Brian Smith, Joshua Whitener, Douglas Yormick, Chris Ortloff, Daryl Ryan

1. SPORTS & RECREATION STADIUM RECREATION CENTER NATATORIUM BASKETBALL ARENA

33/ PROPOSED METRO SPUR BNIA

198

Hiro Hata + Harry Warren

2. EDUCATION

METRO RIGHT OF WAY

LOCATION B

PEACE BRIDGE

LOCATION A

Decking the Kensington Expressway ARC 608|ARC 404|PD 581|PD 499 Undergraduate + Graduate Studio

BELTLINE

3. RETAIL / COMMERCIAL

DOWNTOWN BUFFALO

LOCATION B

190

LOCATION A

90

HumBOL[D]T is a multi-phased project that sets out to reestablish and fuse the separated connections of community that the neighborhoods divided by the Kensington Expressway have endured since the thoroughfare’s construction in the 1960s.

4. WATER / HOCKEY - WINTER ICE / OUTDOOR HOCKEY

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SEE

ST

An NFTA Metro Rail will run on the existing grade of the Kensington Expressway. The new transit route will start at the airport and terminate at the Best Street Metro Station to establish a link to the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus. The complete construction of a deck will cover the below grade Kensington Expressway from Ferry to Best Streets. Three lanes of traffic and one Metro rail, running in each direction, will lie underneath this deck construction. Four metro station nodes consisting of mixed-use programs will encourage user traffic and will serve as activators that will encourage the eventual spread of reinvestment to the surrounding neighborhood. The final phase of the intervention is the gradual growth of improvement along the inner residential streets, with programs implemented in vacant parcels, and the improvement of the commercial strips along Fillmore and Jefferson Avenues.


Bringing New Form To Old Fabric

Not Recommended

Housing Proposals

Delia Ferguson, Madeleine Fincham, Amanda Fowler, David Jacobi, Kimberly Schueler, Li Shen, Timothy Vertino, Mei Yang, Ahmad Zaki, ShanShan Zhao

Kerry Traynor

Massing Side-Facing Gable without Carport

Urban Design Studio URP 528 | Historic Preservation

Our South Buffalo study area is within the boundaries of Dorrance Avenue, South Park Avenue, and Abbott Road. Due to the increase of residents coming back to the area they once called home, there is a need for housing that facilitates aging in place. The students examined vacant lots throughout the study area and produced proposals or housing typologies of residential infill development for these spaces that are designed to fit within the already well-established character and style of the neighborhood and street blocks. These proposals also follow universal design guidelines for accessibility of all residents, as well as reference the soon-tobe implemented Buffalo Green Code. Lastly, infill guidelines were produced as a general guide for all new proposals in the area. These guidelines and proposals can be used as a tool kit to effectively continue the character and growth of the heart of South Buffalo.

Fenestration

Bungalow with No Porch

Orientation

2.5 stories, gable roofs, open porches 1.5 stories, gable roofs, covered front porches 1.5 stories, bungalow style, side-facing gables 1.5-2.5 stories, mixed styles 1-1.5 stories, mixed styles 1.5-2 stories, gable roofs, open/closed porches

Porches

Front-Facing Gable with Half Porch

Recommended

Massing Side-Facing Gable with Carport

Fenestration

Bungalow with Porch

Orientation

Porches

28

Front-Facing Gable with Gable Porch


Invest in Fresh Nathan Attard, Travis Gordon, Dongrui Jiang, Danielle Leisten, Samantha Neal, Drew Rogers, Sarah SanGiovanni, Shakira Wiltshire, Siyao Zhou

Dr. Samina Raja City of Jamestown, NY URP 581| Graduate Seminar

Invest in Fresh sought to link food access to improve economic development in Jamestown. Students worked on behalf of the Chautauqua County Health Network in creating a plan that would address three goals:

Legend

!

Supermarkets and Other Grocery Average Biking Distance Average Walking Distance

!

Gas Stations and Convenience Average Biking Distance

1) Assess the food retail environment in the City of Jamestown; 2) Analyze the potential of the city to support additional healthy food retail; 3) Outline feasible strategies that can create or improve healthy food access and economic development in Jamestown.

Average Walking Distance

!

Pharmacy and Supplement Average Biking Distance Average Walking Distance

!

Other General Merchandise Average Biking Distance Average Walking Distance

City of Jamestown Streets City of Jamestown Census Tracts

29

Conservative estimations hold that while the city spends $85 million annually on food, foodrelated sales in Jamestown amount to only $73 million per year. Increased healthy food retail in Jamestown—such as the conversion of an existing convenience store into a healthy corner store, or the creation of a farmers’ market or food hub— could increase food access in the city while strengthening economic development by capturing a portion of the $10 million Jamestown loses annually to food retail establishments outside its borders.


The Farming Dell

Will Becker (M.Arch/MUP), Madeleine Fincham (MUP), Tuan Hoang (MBA), Kim Schueler (MUP), Ghazal Taikandi (M.Arch/MBA)

Hiro Hata

30

Second + Floors Residential

Second + Floors Residential

Second + Floors Residential

Second + Floors Residential

First Floor Retail

First Floor Retail

First Floor Retail

First Floor Retail

Jefferson Street Bridge

Cumberland River

Harbor

Farming Dell Urban Fa

Music City Greenway

Farming Dell Greenho

1st Avenue

Courtyard

Link to Food Blvd

2nd Avenue

Link to Food Blvd

Courtyard

“The Farming Dell” is comprised of mostly mixed-use with strong catalysts serving as “bookends” to the mixed use structures. The mixed-use development is composed of retail on the first floor and the remaining as residential. Structures closest to the river front are four stories and priced higher than the structures behind due to the more significant views. To the south along the rail line are the proposed light industrial and educational facilities, Healthy Food Hub, Farming Dell Culinary School, and Harrison Street Brew. All three structures complement each other, the culinary school using the storage and facilities of the food hub. In addition, the culinary school and food hub each have a restaurant and community kitchen, respectively. The microbrewery, located on the same lot as the food hub, brings further social activity and a means of income. Furthermore, both uses carry an industrial appearance and feel through skylights, materials, light machinery, and location along the rail and riverfront. The height of the culinary school, rising to seven stories, fits with the view of downtown Nashville’s taller structures.

Roof Top Garden

Urban Land Institute Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition ARC/URP 583 | Urban Design Practicum


Sound Central Drew Rogers, Chris Salmin, Adam Schiffmacher, Chris Snyder, Vivek Thanumalayan

Hiro Hata Urban Land Institute Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition ARC/URP 583 | Urban Design Practicum

Sound Central Tower is a celebration of Sulphur Dell’s industrial heritage. This preserved smoke stack, turned viewing deck and climbing structure, is visible throughout the entire district. With views overlooking the Music City Sound-way, Capitol Hill, and the Nashville city skyline, this attraction offers a dynamic plaza space for outdoor art exhibitions and the future terminus of the Tour De Nash bicycle race. The Music City Sound-way provides another unique public space that offers mixed-use retail, office, and residential living directly adjacent to the corridor. This pedestrian street is the main public space providing open areas for pop-up parks, entertainment series, and community activity space. The flexibility of the space allows for the maximum frequency of uses year-round. The Sound-way also acts as a flood basin in times of heavy rain or flood, while an intensive network of bio-swales, green-roofs, walls, permeable pavement, and catchment system provide suitable infiltration routes for runoff water. Many of these green roof and catchment areas are to also be allocated for urban farming and healthy-living spaces, complete with outdoor gyms and playgrounds for children.

31


Energy Plan For Wyoming County, NY

Types of Energy:

Emission Prediction:

Leyla Akhunzada, Linnea Brett, Parinitha Marnekar, Huan Qi, Mingxin Qi, Melanie Reimondo, Kejia Tian, Mattew Wattles, Laiyun Wu

Dr. Himanshu Grover

Geothermal

CO2 per capita:

Graduate Planning Studio URP 581 | Graduate Planning Studio

Wyoming County holds many opportunities to be an energy producer, rather than solely a consumer. This means there are many different types of potential and currently utilized energy available within the boundaries of the county from wind and solar to biofuel-related and natural gas types. The energy generated from these sources can be sold back to the grid, thus making the region more sustainable and providing a profit for local energy producers. The region already has a comprehensive network of wind farms which generate electricity that is bought by the local electric grid. The area’s rolling hills and windy weather are an ideal topography to site productive wind farms.

Wind Energy

Bio-Digesters

Perceptions of Alternative Energy by Town

Bennington

Attica

Middlebury

County Wide Options

Covington

Hydro-Electric

Perry Over a fifteen-week period, this team of students read through, analyzed, and computed existing comprehensive and zoning plans; county, state, and federal legislation; and countless environmental footprint models in order to concluded the following points that ultimately resulted in a comprehensive energy plan that is designed to be implemented at the town and county level.

Sheldon

Orangeville Warsaw

Castile Java

Weathersfiel Gainesville

Solar Energy

Arcade

Eagle

Yes to Wind Energy Wind Energy Already Natural Gas

32

No to Wind Energy

Pike


One Region Forward Dean Robert Shibley Principal Investigator Dr. Himanshu Grover + Dr. Samina Raja Co-Principal Investigators Bart Roberts Program Manager

One Region Forward is a collaborative effort to promote more sustainable development in Erie and Niagara counties for land use, transportation, housing, energy and climate, access to food and more. It combines research and public engagement with planning and action to help meet the economic, environmental, and social challenges of the 21st century. Because no effort to create a sustainable and prosperous region can succeed without the support of the citizens of the Buffalo Niagara Region, the planning process evolves thorough and persistent engagement of citizens across the two counties. Over the past year, UBRI staff and students engaged thousands of citizens in creative “community learning� activities designed to empower citizens and inform the planning of One Region Forward. One Region Forward is funded by a 3-year, $2 million grant from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development through its interagency Partnership for Sustainable Communities. Professionals and students from the Regional Institute are leading the planning, research, public engagement, and community learning for the initiative. 33


BUFFALO IN THE WORLD Traveling can enhance architecture students’ awareness of the world and bring them closer to understanding global diversity and appreciating what is universal and unique to a culture. The School of Architecture and Planning offers exchange programs, study abroad programs, trips within the United States, and global summer studios each year at local and international locations. Exchange programs, US travel programs, and summer study abroad programs are offered on a regular basis. Global studios are offered each summer at differing locations from year to year, in order to provide the most diverse studio opportunities for students.


Headed West

Donghanyu An, Jessica Baker, Dillon Ballinger, John Brennan, Adam Bundegaard, Matthew Dellehunt, Bryan Espinoza, Bradley Everdyke, Brijhette Farmer, Bari Felix, Wayne Fung, Germania Garzon, Hanna Ihrke, Patrick Jacobitti, Nicholas Karl, Lorrin Kline, James Kubiniec, Lisa Kuhn, Tyler Kuss, Jingyan Li, Chen Lin, Alexandra Lima, Thomas Mason, John Mellas, Matthew Meyers, Alexandra Nicosias-Kopp, Alyssa Phelps, Peter Schmidt, Ilana Simhon, Kiernan Smith, Dylan Stefanko, Michael Tuzzo, Peter Urban, LuchangWang, Emily Warren, Duane Warren

Greg Delaney + Michael Williams Jon Rieke, Aaron Salva Exploring American Architecture ARC 490 | Architecture Elective

The program’s home base: a bus, where time between sites is used to revisit them in the form of student presentations and critical discussions. When the bus de-boards, the classroom follows, as students deepen their understanding of space and design through the acts of sketching, analytical note taking, diagramming, and spatial experience. While both exhilarating and exhausting, Headed West presents students with an incredible opportunity to further knowledge of history, expand architectural vocabulary, build an immense catalog of references and enhance abilities to make arguments in a public forum, all amongst a diverse mix of undergraduate and graduate students.

35


Real Taxonomies Micaela Barker, David Heaton, Jon King, Gabrielle Printz, Peter Foti, Shaun Hyla, Robert Yoos, Illana Simhon, Greg Dubin, Helene Lee, Braedy Chapman, Jesse Pringle

Nerea Feliz + Dennis Maher Architecture Study Abroad Barcelona, Spain

A comprehensive architectural drawing set comprises a veritable taxonomy of the building that it describes. Architectural drawing types are dominated by the plan and the section, a hegemony that is now closely followed by the rendering. Less mighty, more supplemental modes of drawing include the axonometric, the perspective, and the detail. With further abstraction we find the diagram and sketch. Each of these types further filters our knowledge of the object(s). Like material assemblies and drawing methods, the sites of architectural production are also mentally construed through systems of classification. In the conventional site analysis, taxonomies of architectural drawing are closely linked to the way we measure, record and portend to “know” a place. We are encouraged, for example, to understand context according to particular categories of inquiry, including nature, movement, and geometry. However, if we regard these categories critically, they can intensify our awareness of the questions we are not asking about a site and reveal the inability of conventional drawing types to address these “other” concerns.

36


Sustainable Futures Alexander Poklinkowski, Alyssa Phelps Trenton VanEpps, Phoebe Sumulong Heather Stewart, Tyler DeMarle Matthew Kreidler, Christopher Bressler Michael Mieszczanski

Martha Bohm + Dr. Korydon Smith Architecture + Planning Study Abroad Monteverde, Costa Rica

The Sustainable Futures summer course of study gives students a chance to live and work on design projects in the rural and rapidly developing area of Monteverde, Costa Rica. Students work directly with community members and local experts, bringing their own design skills to bear on the unique sustainability challenges in this ecologically sensitive environment. In the summer of 2013 students embarked on three projects springing from needs in the community. They designed and constructed a pair of rain gardens to capture, infiltrate, and celebrate rainwater from the Fox Maple studio building on the grounds of the Monteverde Institute. They completed projects for two community groups: the Guides and Scouts (similar to Boy or Girl Scouts) and APAPNEM, an organization serving the elderly and disabled. The projects carefully address the needs of the ages and physical abilities of occupants while engaging them with their natural surroundings.

37


Ireland Olivia Arcara, Nicholas Batson, Brian Belluscio, Brett Doster, Rebecca Elder, Brian Fiscus, Katherine Meleo, Shauna Pritchard, Kurt Stavdal, Michael Tuzzo, Richard VanCuren, John Wightman

Kenneth MacKay + Matt Hume Architecture Study Abroad Dublin, Ireland

It is the intent of this study abroad program to investigate the myriad forces at work in contemporary architectural practice by studying both urban and coastal environments. Dublin, Ireland, is an urban environment in which to undertake this study since it underwent tremendous cultural and economic change in the decade from 1995 to 2005. This change is best represented by the buildings constructed during this economic bubble. Daily visits to these buildings will be an integral part of the studio and seminar experience. In addition to the buildings of Dublin, there have been numerous significant structures built in the smaller cities along the Irish Coast. The Ireland study abroad program includes a 30-day trip circumventing the Irish Coast, studying the unique environmental conditions in each region. The intent of this studio is to explore the cultural and climatic variation between sites and the resultant affect on architectural design.

38


Estonia Dane Bostwick, Mingxin Cui, Davit Deisadze Bryan Espinoza, Dongrui Jiang, Danielle Leisten, Kimberly Schueler Matthew Shufelt, Timothy Vertino Matthew Wattles, Siyao Zhou

Dr. Daniel B. Hess Planning Study Abroad Tartu, Estonia

The course is centered in Estonia, recognized for its high standard of living, wholesome way of life, up-and-coming economy, and export of technology. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Republic of Estonia has experienced sweeping social changes and fundamental shifts in its government and economy. Government policy and local infrastructure—formerly developed and controlled under centralized policy constraints—have undergone significant geo-political changes in recent years, which are reflected in metropolitan spatial structure and the design, construction, and use of the built environment. This summer abroad helps prepare students to live in, and lead, our globally interdependent society.

39


CLARKSON CHAIRS Anne Lacaton Architecture

Inhabiting is about the pleasure, generosity, and freedom of occupying a space. It challenges us to think about the possibilities and the space around us. Designing architecture on the basis of inhabiting means constructing space from the inside and not from the outside as an exterior and distanced act. This inverted perspective avoids or resists the idea of only [engaging] the form or image. [Our work] talks about the importance of the context of the existing situation where the project [is sited]. The existing can be a landscape, a building, or an urban neighborhood. [This] provides the preliminary structure for all our projects. We consider it a resource which offers a substance for the [work].

Lew Hopkins Planning

It’s important to think in terms of centuries. The basic take home here on the idea of word change is, “think centennially, act daily.” The main point is that if we don’t think long term, if we don’t even think in more than one century, then we really don’t understand change.


McHale Fellow

Banham Fellow

Dorita Hannah

Thomas Kelly

Moshe Dayan’s green pencil line on the armistice map was not a line of defense, but when considered to scale, forms a thick smudgy zone, reminding us that a border is a space between people and how we creatively open, activate, and inhabit that space can be achieved through a poetics of weakening constructed borders and conventional architecture.

Error is not an, “Oops” condition. But rather a focused style that exists, not so much because it is wrong, but rather that it isn’t right. It is counter to the normative, to the regular, and the over-determined...It is contextual. Error requires the pre-established value judgment to exist, or right.

The Jammal Lecture

Louise Bethune Lecture

Qing Shen

Billie Tsien

The construction and development of public transportation is tied with commercial and residential development. Rail transit is playing a key role in leading and supporting suburban development. This intense integration is aided by government financing, planning, and implementation.

It’s been said that architecture is the mother of all arts—and so I take that literally, being a mother—meaning that it is the generative route to creative ends. But in our studio, we think of architecture like a mother; caring for a toddler who must keep hold of a larger vision of the adult whom the child will become while stopping to clean up all of the finger prints and wipe all the noses.

Architecture

Planning

Architecture

Architecture


THESES Graduate students in the B/a+p architecture and planning programs have the opportunity to complete a thesis in their final semester. Undertaking a thesis gives students the opportunity to articulate and explore critical issues in the disciplines of architecture and planning. Thesis students engage in detailed exploration of an issue they have defined, researched extensively, and tested through rigorous intellectual investigation. Thesis students will establish a Thesis Committee in the academic year preceding their thesis work, and with permission from the department chair, engage in independent research under the mentorship and guidance of their committee. Alternatively, students who do not wish to engage in independent research and exploration may fulfill the requirements for the graduate degree by completing either a special project in architecture or a final project in planning.


Hover: The Next Infrastructure

Mike Lempert Omar Khan Thesis Chair Beth Tauke Thesis Committee

The question of the Hover-car is less about the vehicle itself than what the widespread use of such a vehicle might do to our built environment and way of life. Several recent technological developments and industrial experiments suggest that the vehicle we have imagined for over 100 years may finally have a place in our world. The question of what we can make hover, and how soon, continues to haunt us. While the future of this vehicle is still ‘up in the air’ serves as the perfect time to begin asking questions about what it means for the future of how we move and the way we build. We still dream of severing our life-long tether to the Earth. This project attempts to explore the space within the city which hover-cars might begin to occupy given the current trajectory of advancing technologies and evolving transportation systems. By looking at historical developments concerning vehicle technology, prominent future projections from the past, and both film and written science fiction creations, HOVER ultimately aims to detail the many opportunities that arise from these vehicles being introduced into our cities, and by which our cities may begin to adapt in return 43


Contest Urbanism:

Meaning And Manifestation In Communuty Garden Design

Cristina Delgado Samina Raja Thesis Chair Kenny Cupers + Joyce Hwang + Robert Silverman Thesis Committee

The contest for space and meaning is manifested and continually revised in the built environment. This thesis explores how community-garden design reflects the process of neighborhood contestation in urban areas. I propose that contestation affects the morphology and meaning of place and that the process of “contest urbanism” shapes the city. Contestation is not inherently “good” or “bad;” it is a process of negotiation with results that may be incongruous when multiple value systems compete for expression. At times disparate agendas may find points of concordance, and other times these agendas may be in conflict with one another. The result of contestation can be collaboration or conflict. This thesis demonstrates that a theoretically grounded, close reading of design in concert with a deep contextual understanding of neighborhood can eludicate meaning. Meaning that occurs at the level of habiting (Lefebvre, 2003) is highly specific to the context out of which it emerges and can be cultivated in place.

New Garden from Concept to Land Access Legend:

GGB application materials

Land owner access

Growing Season - May15 to Sept 1 pre-application

Growing season - May15 to Sept 1

Grassroots Gardens application and approval

Non-growing season pre-application

Non-growing season

Pre-garden activities Active garden activities

Grassroots Gardens New Garden Open Enrollment Starts

Gardens Approved and Parcels added to insurance policy

Grassroots Gardens Harvest Festival Most Gardens Close-up for Winter

Parcels added to master lease

Garden sponsor activities Neigh. Support Sheet

Garden Plan

Neigh. Support Letters

Landowner Letter of Support

Before Image

Application Form

Letter of Intent

Install garden

Growing

Growing; cold season crops

Dashed line represents 30 day take back clause City Owned Lots

Jan

Feb

March

April

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

March

April

June

May

July

Aug

Sept

Nov

Dec

Garden sponsor activities

Community Group Organization & Neighborhood Buy-in

Garden Planning: Site Selection Type Selection

Develop a garden committee Letter of intent to GGB If private land; secure letter of support

Submit application to GGB

Install garden

Growing

Growing; cold season crops

Actual Roof Line Threshold out of the garden into adjacent unofficial lot - “yard”

Implied Roof Line

Foundation blocks support constructed walll

Implied Thresholds Foundation blocks support visual wall created by plants

44

Oct

Privately owned lots

Boarded Up Thresholds


Spatial Disparities In Cardiovascular Disease

Jessica Hall Dr. Samina Raja Thesis Chair Dr. Daniel Hess Thesis Committee

This thesis investigates the roles of the built environment, food environment, and regional and demographic factors in the incidence of cardiovascular disease in Western New York. The study uses a cross-sectional research design to answer the following questions: how do the built and food environments influence cardiovascular disease hospitalizations, and how do demographic and regional factors mediate those associations? The study shows that the density of convenience stores and fastfood restaurants is negatively associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations, while intersection density is positively associated with hospitalizations. Additionally, regional factors and intersection density mediate the associations between cardiovascular disease hospitalizations, race, and household income. This study recommends that planners and policy makers, working alongside public health professionals, act to improve cardiovascular health in Western New York communities by playing the multiple roles as: designers, educators, food-system thinkers, strategists for community and economic development, and actors in the challenge to narrow educational, economic, and racial disparities. 45


Visual Perception Through the Diffusion of Light

Light

Object

Lens

Eye

Timothy Ung Kenneth MacKay Thesis Chair Beth Tauke + Dr. Jean Lamarche Thesis Committee

Human perception of the visual world is limited through the homogeneity of design and the standardization of materials. However, visual perception of light reflecting and refracting off of surfaces changes according to an observer’s location in relation to the surface. Using properties of one’s eyes in relation to sensitivity, location, and light, the goal of this thesis is to engage one’s perception of the visual world using properties of transparent materials to maximize the diffusion of light within a space. If spaces remain flat and predictable, inhabitants will continue to be outside observers within the built environment, which will limit the visual perception and experience of humans. The predictability of spaces results in the use of visual perception as an observatory sense within a space that only allows for way finding and movement from one location to another. By engaging peripheral perception of inhabitants through the manipulation of light, materials, surfaces, and forms, spaces will encourage inhabitants to participate and explore their physical relationship with the space.

46

Observer

Solar Rays

Acrylic Cube 2 Degree Focal Vision

Figure 124 - Process of analyzing the interaction of sunlight with the acrylic cube

Optic Nerve

Visual Area


[ inter ]ACT:

Embodied Interaction in Post-Architectural Space

Kathy Yuen Mark Shephard Thesis Chair Nick Bruscia + Dave Pape Thesis Committee

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Today, we have grown increasingly virtually connected to each other through the expansion of internet accessibility and proliferation of social media. As a result, we—and by extension—our spaces have become increasingly digitally augmented as we constantly maintain our virtual presence, in parallel to our relationships in physical space. The interactions that take place by means of the conventional interface of the screen, keyboard, and mouse can often limit and isolate the user from the physical environment occupied as they enter cyberspace. At the same time, each interaction generates new data about our physical and virtual presence. Can embodied interaction with objects, where chairs act as interfaces, help us negotiate between physical and virtual space? Here the production of space is tied to the embodied interaction with modular and reconfigurable objects rather than the walls that typically program space. So data that is revealed through the object then influences the configuration of both virtual and physical space.


Printing | Extents

10-1/2"

11-5/16"

16" 13/ 14-

L9

M9

9-9/16"

11-9/16"

16" 11/ 13-

M8

16" 15/ 16-

" 5/8 18-

X20

W20 10-1/2"

10-7/16"

X19

T20 14-1/2"

W19 11-7/16"

W18

V20 10-9/16"

V19 11-1/4"

V18 V17

11-15/16"

U20

S20

T19

10-5/8"

10-3/4"

10-11/16"

S19

U19 11-1/8"

11-1/16"

10-15/16"

T18

S18

U18 11-5/8"

11-3/8"

11-3/16"

T17

S17

" 7/8 20-

U17

6" 9/1 2016-7/8"

12-1/8"

16" 11/ 18-

" 1/4 21-

18-3/16"

6" 3/1 2016-7/8"

16" 13/ 19-

11-11/16"

11-3/8"

" 1/8

" 1/2 19-

16" 11/ 1915-5/8"

T16

S16 11-9/16"

S15 9-3/4"

S14

11-3/16" 10"

R14

" 7/8 15-

11-5/8"

16" 11/ 1713-9/16"

6" 1/1 16-

19-

15-5/8"

15-5/8"

" 5/8 18-

14-1/2"

U16

13-1/2"

6" 1/1 17-

16" 13/ 1512-13/16"

" 1/4

" 1/2 18-

" 3/4 17-

12-15/16"

18-

14-1/2"

14-1/2"

16" 13/ 1713-1/2"

R15

12-7/8"

16" 11/ 1713-1/2"

12-1/16"

6" 3/1 17-

6" 9/1 1713-1/2"

T15

10-13/16"

R19 10-15/16" 11"

12-7/8"

R16

" 1/4 17-

R17

12-7/8"

11-1/8"

6" 3/1 17-

R18

6" 1/1 1712-7/8"

R13

P20

R20

Q20

O20 11"

10-7/8"

10-15/16"

P19

O19

Q19 10-7/8"

10-15/16"

10-15/16"

O18

Q18

P18 10-7/8"

10-15/16"

10-15/16"

P17

O17

Q17

10-7/8"

10-7/8"

10-15/16"

P16

Q16

O16 10-13/16"

10-13/16"

10-15/16"

P15

Q15

O15 10-1/4"

10-1/4"

10-3/16"

13-3/8"

12-1/2"

"

14-5/16"

P14

Q14

" 1/8 18-

11-7/8"

11-7/8"

12-3/16"

6" 1/1 1911-3/4"

P13

Q13

" 7/8 16-

12-11/16"

14"

O14

12-11/16"

16" 15/ 16-

16" 13/ 18-

O12

17"

" 1/8 16-

18"

12-1/8"

5/8

6" 1/1 1712-11/16"

12-5/8"

16" 13/ 1612-15/16"

11-1/16"

19-

6" 3/1 1713-1/16"

6" 1/1 1712-11/16"

13-11/16"

11-5/8"

13-1/16"

17"

12-11/16"

P12

O13

" 1/4 17-

P11

13-1/16"

6" 5/1 1713-1/16"

Q12

13-1/16"

6" 5/1 1713-1/16"

O11

12-5/16"

" 3/8 15-

" 3/4 14-

" 7/8 18-

6" 5/1 1713-1/16"

12-11/16"

N10

10-5/16"

15-

" 5/8 17-

13-5/8"

O10

L20

N20

M20

11-1/4"

11-3/16"

11-1/16" 12-5/16"

N11 11-9/16"

10-5/8"

N9

11-5/16"

M11

12-5/16"

L19

N19 11-1/16" 11"

N17 10-15/16" 10-7/8" 10-3/16"

19-

13-5/8"

N12

N13

N14 11-5/16"

N15

N16

N18

M19

K19 11-3/8"

11-1/4"

11-1/8"

L18

M18 11-1/16"

M17 11-1/16"

M16 11"

M15 10-1/16"

6"

5/1

" 3/8 16-

10-15/16"

J18

11-3/8"

11-1/4" 10-1/2"

L11

11-9/16"

L17 11-3/16"

L16 11-3/16"

L15 10"

L14 10-9/16"

L13 10-15/16"

L12

16" 13/ 1713-3/4"

6" 5/1 1814-1/4"

" 1/2 18-

" 7/8 13-

16" 11/ 13-

13-3/4"

" 1/2 18-

14-7/16"

16" 11/ 19-

" 1/8 13-

10"

14-7/16"

11-3/8"

9-5/16"

" 1/8 14-

" 7/8 17-

12-9/16"

L8

9-11/16"

15-

11-3/16"

" 1/2 18-

6" 7/1 19-

"

" 7/8 17-

13-3/4"

" 7/8 17-

13-1/16"

7/8

" 7/8 17-

13-3/4"

13-3/4"

6" 7/1 1914-1/8"

6" 7/1

" 1/2 18-

" 3/4 18-

10-9/16"

L10

"

5/8

18-

14-7/16"

14-7/16"

14-13/16"

10-1/8"

16" 13/ 1410-7/16"

L7

I17

J17

K17 11-3/8"

11-11/16"

11-9/16"

K11

I16

J16

K16 11-3/8"

K15 9-7/8"

K14 10-5/16"

K13 10-5/8"

K12

6" 1/1 1914-15/16"

18"

9-5/16"

10-1/16"

14-15/16"

11-13/16"

K10 10-1/16"

K9

19"

6" 9/1 17-

10-5/8"

J5

" 3/8 15-

11-1/8"

19"

14-15/16"

12-5/16"

K8

J6 11-9/16"

" 3/8 16-

19"

13-7/16"

10-5/16"

9-3/4"

" 3/8 15-

12-1/16"

14-7/16"

12"

3/8

17-

K7

" 1/8 17-

" 1/8 18-

6" 3/1 18-

6" 5/1 19-

"

16"

14-3/16"

" 7/8 18-

15-1/16"

" 7/8 15-

12-1/16"

14-3/16"

6"

9/1

18-

6" 7/1 1915-3/16"

9-7/8"

16" 13/ 16-

16" 11/ 1612-5/16"

14-9/16"

13-13/16"

15-3/16"

12-7/8"

K6

H16 11-7/8"

11-11/16"

11-9/16"

13-1/8"

10-1/8"

" 3/4 16-

J9

10-1/8"

14"

10-9/16"

I15

J15 9-3/4"

J14 10-9/16"

J13

10-3/16"

15"

" 1/4 18-

6" 9/1 17-

J11

J12

14-3/8"

13-9/16"

12-11/16"

16" 15/ 17-

" 3/4 18-

" 7/8 18-

" 3/8 18-

6" 7/1 18-

6" 9/1 1814-1/8"

14-3/16"

" 1/2 19-

15-1/8"

6" 5/1 1814-5/8"

J8

H15

15-1/8"

6" 5/1 1914-11/16"

10-3/16"

9-5/8"

G15 9-9/16"

9-11/16"

I14

H14

G14 10-3/16"

10-3/16"

10-3/16"

I13

G13

H13

10-3/4"

11-1/4"

11-1/16"

I12

G12

H12 11"

11-3/8"

10-1/2"

I11

H11

G11

9-13/16"

10-5/16"

10-11/16"

I10

G10

H10 11"

11-3/8"

10-1/2"

I9

G9

H9

10-3/4"

I8

11-1/4"

11-1/16"

H8

G8 10-3/16" 12"

11-7/8"

H5

G5 12"

11-7/8"

H4

12"

11-7/8"

" 1/4 19-

G4

15-3/16"

" 1/4 19-

6" 5/1 19-

14-11/16"

14-1/8"

10-3/16"

10-3/16"

18"

15-1/4"

15-1/16"

15-1/16"

19"

6" 1/1 19-

14-1/8"

I7

" 7/8 18-

15-3/16"

" 1/8 19-

14-1/2"

" 7/8 17-

6" 9/1 19-

H7

G7

" 3/8 19-

14-7/8"

" 1/8 18-

14-1/8"

15-1/16"

H3

9-9/16"

14-5/8"

G3

G6

" 5/8 18-

6" 1/1 19-

" 1/8 19-

G2

" 7/8 18-

14-1/2"

" 1/4 18-

14-1/8"

" 5/8 18-

15-3/16"

6" 1/1 1915-1/16"

14-3/16"

6" 7/1 18-

14-3/8"

12"

12-3/16"

F5

14-1/2"

12-3/16"

" 3/4 18-

F3

12-3/16"

16" 13/ 1715-1/16"

16" 11/ 1814-1/2"

F4

6" 3/1 1714-1/2"

18"

14-3/16"

9-5/8"

" 3/8 19-

6" 9/1 1815-1/16"

" 7/8 17-

9-11/16"

6" 5/1 1914-3/4"

14-15/16"

14-1/16"

H6

F14 10-1/16"

F13 11-1/4"

F12 11-7/16"

F11 10-13/16"

F10 11-7/16" 11-1/4" 10-1/16"

14-9/16"

9-7/16"

14-1/2"

" 5/8 18-

F6

16" 11/ 17-

F7

6" 7/1 18-

F8

F9

6" 9/1 1814-3/8"

14-7/16"

" 3/4 18-

14-3/8"

12-3/16"

16" 15/ 18-

14"

" 1/2 18-

14-3/16"

F2

" 7/8 18-

14-3/16"

14-1/4"

"

12-3/16"

" 3/4 18-

14-3/16"

" 1/8 18-

6" 1/1 1914-1/4"

14-3/16"

6" 5/1 19-

6" 7/1 1814-7/16"

16" 15/ 1814-15/16"

21-

" 3/4

"

3/4

18-

F1

E13 11-1/16" 11-1/4"

E11 10-5/8" 11-1/16" 9-15/16" 9-3/8" 12-3/8"

E5 12-3/8" 12-3/8"

14-3/16"

E3

" 5/8 18-

E4

E6

E7

E8

E9

11-1/4"

E10

E12

6" 1/1 19-

" 1/2 18-

14-3/16"

12-3/8"

16" 15/ 1814-1/8"

" 3/4 16-

14-3/16"

E2

16" 13/ 1814-3/16"

" 1/2 17-

" 7/8 16-

14-3/16"

12-3/8"

14-3/16"

16" 11/ 1714-1/8"

14-3/16"

E1

D12 10-13/16"

D11

C11 9-9/16"

10-3/16"

D10

C10

B10 9-7/16"

10-3/16"

10-13/16"

D9

C9

B9 9-5/8"

10-11/16"

10-1/4"

B8

D8

C8 9-3/8"

9-1/16"

9-11/16"

B7

C7

D7 9-1/4"

9-3/16"

9-1/16"

B6

C6

D6 12-1/2"

12-11/16"

12-13/16"

B5

D5

C5

12-1/2"

12-11/16"

12-13/16"

B4

D4

C4 12-11/16"

6" 5/1 19-

" 3/4 18-

12-1/2"

12-13/16"

B3

C3 12-11/16"

12-13/16"

B2

6" 3/1 19-

C2

" 1/8 19-

14-3/8"

14-3/8"

12-11/16"

12-13/16"

B1

16" 11/ 19-

C1

6" 9/1 1914-11/16"

" 5/8 18-

14-3/16"

D3

14-3/8"

" 1/2 19-

14-11/16"

6" 9/1 1614-3/16"

12-1/2"

19"

D2

" 7/8 18-

14-3/8"

12-1/2"

14-3/4"

" 5/8 16-

14-3/8"

6" 5/1 16-

D1

" 3/8 19-

" 5/8 16-

14-1/8"

1/2 18-

"

14"

I6

625 19.0

" 1/4 19-

14-3/4"

16" 13/ 1614-1/8"

14-3/16"

14-1/8"

14"

6" 7/1 1814-1/8"

14-3/16"

5/8 17-

" 7/8 17-

11-11/16"

875 19.1

14.6875

16" 13/ 1614-3/4"

16" 15/ 1514-3/8"

" 1/2 17-

" 7/8 17-

I5

125 19.3

14.6875 14.6875

16" 15/ 1514-5/16"

14-1/16"

6" 1/1 1814-1/16"

19"

13-15/16"

6" 9/1 1713-15/16"

9-3/8"

14-3/16"

6" 1/1 1913-15/16"

11-11/16"

14.6875

16"

14-3/16"

" 3/4 16-

16" 13/ 17-

I4

5 18.312

6" 5/1 15-

6" 7/1 15-

6" 3/1 1814-1/16"

" 1/2 17-

14-1/16"

14"

" 3/8 19-

J10

13-15/16"

19.0

14-1/8"

14-1/16"

16" 13/ 1714-1/16"

6" 9/1 17-

6" 3/1 19-

16" 15/ 1814-15/16"

M14

J6 J5

19"

" 1/4 19-

15-3/16"

elev_unroll

axon_wireframe

sect_c

sect_b

sect_a 4'-4"

3'-2 1/2"

21'-9 1/2"

sect_a

4'-4"

5'-9 1/2"

4'-7"

4'-7"

2'-6"

4'-7" 21'-9 1/2"

5'-9 1/2"

8'

10'-11"

17'-10 1/2"

sect_plan 4'-7" 2'-6"

48

6" 1/1 16-

14-9/16"

16" 13/ 15-

6" 3/1 1915-3/16"

8 1/2"

Printing|’extents’ asserts that, in order for the 3D-printing process to be integrated into the production of the built environment, the conditions that define traditional modules within architecture must be rethought. Additionally, that the physical extents of any 3D printer suggest a paradigm in which the dimensional and geometric constraints typically applied to modules, act not as fixed conditions, but rather as bounding parameters from which many variations of a given module may be derived. Finally, that the use of the 3D printer, must give consideration to criterias of performance, rather than issues of representation.

" 7/8 16-

14-1/16"

14-7/16"

14-11/16"

6" 3/1 1915-3/16"

10-15/16"

J7

9.75 11.5625 11.5625 11.5625

" 7/8 18-

6" 5/1 1915-1/8"

J7

14.625

J18

Christopher Romano Thesis Committee

14-1/4"

" 1/4 19-

15-1/8"

6" 1/1 1914-11/16"

M13

10.187 5

18.375

J17

Sergio López-Piñeiro Thesis Chair

" 3/8 15-

19"

14-11/16"

11-9/16"

J13

11.5625

J16

16" 11/ 17-

" 7/8 18-

14-3/16"

M12

18.25

9.75

J15

75 16.3

sect_J

Stephen Olson

6" 3/1 1915-1/8"

12.0625

10-1/2"

J12

5 10.187

12.0625

M10

5 12.312

K18

16.75

13.5625

13.125

14.0

875 12.6

16.6875

J8

625

16.0

10.5

15.3 75

17.56 25

J11

75 14.3

10.125

J9

625 10.5

J14

7'-7 13/16"

9.375

J10

10.125

16.8125

4'-11 3/8"

Criterias of Performance

5'-5" 23'-7"

9'-5"

sect_plan


(blank) Drawing a ______

F

A Thesis by Scott J. Archambault

c_1.3 Tolerance

h_1.2 Tolerance

c_3.1 C_2.1

RULE SET:

C_4.1

h_1.1 Tolerance

C__1.4

h_1.5 Tolerance

h_1.7 Tolerance

h_1.1

1) Sequences must be completed in alphabetical order

Drawing a Blank

h_1.8 Tolerance

h_1.6

h_1.7

h_1.5 h_1.6 Tolerance

2) Distinct line types reference a distinct tectonic identity

h_1.2 h_1.4 h_1.4 Tolerance

3) Resulting structure must contain a minimum of 2 enclosures

c_1.3 C_5.1

4) Each enclosure must have a way of entering

F_5.1

h_1.8

h_1.3

f_3.1 Tolerance

h_2.5 Tolerance

f_3.1

f_4.1 Tolerance

h_2.3 Tolerance h_2.3

f_4.1 F_2.3

h_2.1

h_2.2 Tolerance

g_1.1

SEQUENCE A

Scott Archambalt

h_1.3 Tolerance

h_2.5

F_2.4

h_2.6 h_2.7

D_2.33

h_2.4 Tolerance

Opening f_1.1-f_2.5 Tolerance

h_2.2

d_2.2 Tolerance

h_2.4

h_2.7 Tolerance

h_2.6 Tolerance

f_2.5

h_2.1 Tolerance ce e

a_1.1 to a_1.2 a_1.3 to A_1.4 to a_1.5 to A_1.6 to A_1.7 to A_1.8 to a_1.9 to A_2.1

Mark Shepard Thesis Chair

h_2.8

d_2.2 f_1.1

h_2.8 Tolerance

A_2.1 to a_2.2 to a_2.3 to a_2.4 to a_2.5

c_1.1

A_2.1 to a_3.1 to A_3.2 to a_3.3

g_1.1 Tolerance

c_1.1 Tolerance

SEQUENCE B

c_1.2

a_1.3 to b_1.1 to B_1.2 to a_1.5 to B_1.3 a_1.1 to b_2.1 to b_2.2 to A_1.4

SEQUENCE C h_3.7 Tolerance

a_1.1 to c_1.1 h_3.4 Tolerance

a_1.2 to c_1.2 to c_1.3 to C_1.4

g_1.2 Tolerance

c_1.1 to C_2.1 to c_3.1 to C_4.1 to C_5.1 to C_1.4

E_2.1

h_3.4

g_1.3 Tolerance g_1.2

h_3.1 Tolerance

h_3.8 Tolerance

C_2.1 to C_5.1

h_3.3

h_3.8 h_3.6

h_3.5

h_3.2

SEQUENCE D h_3.7 h_3.1

D_1.1 to d_1.2 to D_1.3 to D_1.4

h_3.3 Tolerance

D_1.1 to D_1.3

g_1.3

D_1.4 to d_2.2 to D_2.3

F_2.2

a_1.1

D_1.4

E_1.1

D_3.4

a_1.1 Tolerance

D_1.1 to D_2.1

F_2.1

h_3.2 Tolerance

d_1.2 to D_3.1 to D_3.2 to d_3.3 to D_3.4

h_3.6 Tolerance

h_4.7 Tolerance

h_4.3 Tolerance

h_4.7

SEQUENCE E

e_2.3

h_3.5 Tolerance

D_3.1 to E_1.1

a_3.1

h_4.1

E_2.1 to e_2.2 to e_2.3

h_4.5 Tolerance

e_2.33 Tolerance ra a

h_4.6 Tolerance ce ce

h_4.8 Tolerance

h_4.2

h_4.6 h_4.3

D_3.4 to f_1.1

D_1.3

h_4.8

h_4.5

SEQUENCE F

h_4.4

h_4.2 Tolerance

D_3.4 to F_2.1 to F_2.2 to F_2.3 to F_2.4 to f_2.5

Nick Bruscia + Dave Pape Thesis Committee

Site

h_4.1 Tolerance

h_4.4 Tolerance

c_1.1 to F_2.3 to f_3.1 to C_5.1

How can architectural representation be re-imagined to allow for ambiguity and multiple possible outcomes from a single drawing?

F_2.4 to f_4.1 to D_2.3

A_2.1

A_3.2

e_2.2 e_2.2 Tolerance

F_5.1 to F_2.3 SEQUENCE G

d_3.3

g_1.1 to g_1.2 to g_1.3

D_3.2

SEQUENCE H h_1.1 to h_2.1 to h_3.1 to h_4.1 to h_5.1 h_1.2 to h_2.2 to h_3.2 to h_4.2 to A_1.8

D_3.1

Opening a_3.3 - a_2.5 Tolerancee

h_1.3 to h_2.3 to h_3.3 to h_4.3 to h_5.3

D_2.1

a_3.3

h_1.4 to h_2.4 to h_3.4 to h_4.4 to h_5.4 h_1.5 to h_2.5 to h_3.5 to h_4.5 to h_5.5

Site

h_1.6 to h_2.6 to h_3.6 to h_4.6 to h_5.6

h_1.8 to h_2.8 to h_3.8 to h_4.8 to h_5.8 C_2.1 to h_1.1 to h_1.2 to h_1.3 to h_1.4 to h_1.5 to h_1.6 to h_1.7 to h_1.8

d_1.2

a_2.5

b_2.1

h_1.7 to h_2.7 to h_3.7 to h_4.7 to h_5.7

B_1.3

a_1.9

A_1.4

a_1.5 Tolerance

a_2.2 Tolerance

D_1.1

h_5.6 Tolerance

Opening a_1.2 - a_1.3 Tolerance

h_5.6

a_1.5

h_5.1

a_1.2

h_5.7 Tolerance h_5.7

c_1.1 to h_2.1 to h_2.2 to h_2.3 to h_2.4 to h_2.5 to h_2.6 to h_2.7 to h_2.8 to c_1.2

a_2.2

a_1.2 Tolerance

h_5.5 Tolerance

b_2.2

h_5.8 Tolerance h_5.5

h_5.4 Tolerance h_5.4

a_1.1 to h_3.1 to h_3.2 to h_3.3 to h_3.4 to h_3.5 to h_3.6 to h_3.7 to h_3.8 to D_1.3 h_5.3 Tolerance

A_2.1 to h_4.1 to h_4.2 to h_4.3 to h_4.4 to h_4.5 to h_4.6 to h_4.7 to h_4.8 to d_1.2

A_1.6

h_5.1 to A_1.8 to h_5.3 to h_5.4 to h_5.5 to h_5.6 to h_5.7 to h_5.8

A_1.8

B_1.2

h_5.3

a_2.2/ a_1.9 Tolerance

h_5.1 Tolerance

a_1.3

h_5.8

Minimum Acceptable Distance from Site Extents

A_1.7 b_1.1

Site

a_2.3

a_2.4

e_1.2 Tolerance

e_1.3 Tolerance

b_1.1 Tolerance

Drawing a ______ A Thesis by Scott J. Archambault

c_1.3 Tolerance

h_1.2 Tolerance

c_3.1 C_2.1

RULE L SET: T

C_4.1

h_1.1 Tolerance To

C__1.4

h_1.5 Tolerance

h_1.8 Tolerance

h_1.7 Tolerance

h_1.1

1) Sequences must be completed in alphabetical order er

h_1.6

h_1.7

h_1.5 h_1.6 Tolerance

2) Distinct line types reference a distinct tectonic identity t

h_1.2 h_1.4 h_1.4 Tolerance

3) Resulting structure must conttain a minimum of 2 enclosures o

c_1.3 C_5.1

4) Each enclosure must have a way w of entering

F_55.1

h_1.8

h_1.3

f_3.1 Tolerance

h_2.5 Tolerance

f_3.1

h_1.3 Tolerance

f_4.1 Tolerance

h_2.3 Tolerance h_2.3

f_4.1 F_2.3

h_2.1

h_2.2 Tolerance

g_1.1 11

SEQUENCE A

h_2.5

F_2.4

h_2.6 h_2.7

D_2.33

h_2.4 T

Opening f_1.1-f_2.5 Tolerance O

h_2.2

lerance

d_22.2 TTolerance

h_2.4

h_2.

f_2.5

h_2.1 Tolerance ce

a_1.1 to a_1.2

h_2.7 Tolerance

Tolerance

h_2.8

d_2.2

a_1.3 3 to A_1.4 . to a_1.5 to A_1.6 1 to A__1.7 to A A_1.8 to a_1.9 to A_2.1

f_1.1

h_2.8 Tolerance

A_2.1 to a_2.2 . to a_2.3 2 to a_2.4 2 to a_2. _ 5

c_1.1 1

A_2.1 to a_3.1 . to A_3.2 to a_3.3

g_1.1 Toleranc n e

c_1.1 TTolerance

SEQUENCE B

c_1.2

a_1.3 3 to b_1.1 to B_1.2 1 to a_1.5 1 to B_1.3 a_1.1 to b_2.1 to b_2.2 to A_1.4

SEQUENCE C h_3.7 Toler erance an

a_1.1 1 to c_1.1 h_3.4 Tolerance

a_1.2 to c_1.2 to c_1.3 to C_1.4 1

g_1.2 Tolerance

c_1.1 to C_2.1 to c_3.1 to C_4.1 to C_5.1 to C_1.4

E_2.1

h_3.4

g_1.3 Tolerance g_1.2

h_3.1 Tolerance

h_3.8 Tolerance

C_2.1 to C_5.1 5

h_3.3 .3

h_3.8 h_3.6

h_3.5

h_3.2

SEQUENCE Q C D h_3.7 h_3.1

D_1.1 to d_1.2 to D_1.3 to D_1.4

h_3.3 Tolerance

D_1.1 to D_1.3

g_1.3 F_2.2 22 2.2

a_111.1

D_1.4

E_1.1

D_3.4

a_1.1 _ Toler olerance err

D_1.1 .1 to D_2.1 D 2. 2.1 D_1.4 4 to d_2.2 to D_2.3

F_2.1

h_3.2 Tolerance

d_1.2 2 to D_3.1 to D_3.2 to d_3.3 to D_3.4

h_3.6 Tolerance

h_4.7 Tolerance

h_4.3 Tolerance

h_4.7

SEQUENCE Q C E

e_2.3

h_3.5 Tolerance

D_3.1 to E_1.1

a_3.1 31

h_4.1

E_2.1 1 to e_2.2 to e_2.3

h_4.5 Tolerance

h_4.6 Tolerance ce

e_2.33 Tolera rance

h_4.8 To erance

D_1.3

h_4.8

h_4.5

SEQUENCE Q C F

h_4.2

h_4.6 h_4.3

D_3.4 4 to f_1.1

h_4.4

h_4.2 Tolerance n

D_3.4 to F_2.1 to F_2.2 to F_2.3 to F_2.4 to f_2.5 2.5 .5 5

Site

h_4.1 Tolerance

h_4.4 Tolerance

c_1.1 to F_2.3 to f_3.1 to C__5.1 F_2.4 to f_4.1 4 to D_2.3 D

A_2.1

A_3.2

e_2.2 _ 2 e_2.2 Tolerance

F_5.1 . to F_2.3 SEQUENCE G

d_3.3

g_1.1 to g_1.2 to g_1.3

D_3.2

SEQUENCE Q C H h_1.1 1 to h_2.1 .1 to h_3.1 3. to h_4.1 4 to h_5.1 _5 1 h_1.2 to h_2.2 to h_3.2 to h_4.2 to A_1.8

D_3.1

Opening O g a_3.3 - a_2.5 Tolerance e

h_1.3 to h_2.3 to h_3.3 to h_4.3 to h_5.3

D_2.1

a_3.3

h_1.4 4 to h_2.4 .4 to h_3.4 3. to h_4.4 4 to h_5.4 _5 h_1.5 to h_2.5 to h_3.5 to h_4.5 to h_5.5

Site

h_1.6 to h_2.6 to h__3.6 to h_4.6 to h_5.6

d_1.2

a_2.5

b_2.1 2

h_1.7 7 to h_2.7 .7 to h__3.7 3. to h_4.7 4 to h_5.7 _5 h_1.8 to h_2.8 to h__3.8 to h_4.8 to h_5.8 C_2.1 to h_1.1 to h__1.2 to h_1.3 to h_1.4 to h_1.5 to h_1.6 to h_1.7 to h__1.8

B_1.3

a_1.9

a_1.5 Tolerance

A_1.4

D_1.11

h_5.6 Tolerance

a_2.2

a_1.2

h_5.7 _ Tolerance

h_5.5 Tolerance

b_2.2

a_2.2 Tolerance Opening a_1.2 - a_1.3 Tolerance e

h_5.6

a_1.5

h_5.1

h_5.7

c_1.1 to h_2.1 to h__2.2 to h_2.3 to h_2.4 to h_2.5 to h_2.6 to h_2.7 to h__2.8 to c_1.2

h_5.8 Tolerance

a_1. 12T Tolerance o olerance

h_5.5

h_5.4 Tolerance h_5.4

a_1.1 to h_3.1 to h__3.2 to h_3.3 to h_3.4 to h_3.5 to h_3.6 to h_3.7 to h__3.8 to D_1.3 h_5.3 To erance a

A_2.1 to h_4.1 . to h__ _4.2 to h_4.3 to h_4.4 to h_4.5 to h_4.6 to h_4.7 to h__4.8 to d_1.2

A_1.66

h 5 1 to A h_5.1 A_1.8 1.8 to h h_ _5.3 _ 5 3 to h_5.4 h 5 4 to h_5.5 h 5 5 to h_5.6 h 5 6 to h_5.7 to h_5.8

A_1.8

49

B_1.2

h_5.8

a_2.3 2

a_2.4 2

e_1.2 Tolerance

e_1.3 Tolerance

a_1.3 13 Minimum i im Acceptable A t bl Diiistance a from Site Extents

b_1.1

Site a_2.2/ a_1.9 Tolerance

h_5.1 Tolerance

h_5.3

A_1.7

b_1.1 Tolerance

Architectural representation is often concerned with eliminating difference, and producing a single built outcome. This eliminates the possibility of an unintended result, and makes the built product specific only to the drawing. If the performative nature of drawing is instead concerned with providing ambiguity to allow for productive difference, the drawing then becomes a generator of multiple possible outcomes. Each outcome, then, is more situationally specific to the interpretation of a builder, thereby creating a new understanding of authorship within the architectural discourse.


Intersight v16  

Intersight 16 is an annual publication presenting work completed by the students in the School of Architecture and Planning at the Universit...

Intersight v16  

Intersight 16 is an annual publication presenting work completed by the students in the School of Architecture and Planning at the Universit...

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