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2016-17


We listen and share

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Greetings IVÁN FISCHER AND THE ORCHESTRA CONCERTS CHAMBER MUSIC ON TOUR BFO cares PARTNERSHIPS TICKETS AND SEASON TICKETS CONCERT CALENDAR

4 6 15 63 69 75 85 97 100 3


Greetings

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN! It is with the greatest of pleasure that I present to you the programme we have compiled for the 2016/ 2017 season. We have taken great care when selecting the works and the performers, and I sincerely hope that the con足 certs will bring you many inspirational musical moments. Of all the novelties we have in store for you, I would like to highlight one in particular; over the course of a short series, we will be introducing you to three young conductors. Please be so kind as to receive them with interest and affection. We want to de足 velop the next generation of performers, and naturally that in足 cludes conductors at the beginning of their careers. I vividly remember what it was like when I was similarly thrown in at the deep end a few decades ago. It was so helpful to see so many pairs of friendly, supportive eyes in the concert hall. Please give these new youngsters a smile. In a similar vein, we would like to give a warm welcome to our new audience members. They should be made to feel at home; we would like to provide them, and our loyal returning season ticket holders, with ever so many hours of happiness. Iv叩n Fischer 4


Greetings

DEAR FRIENDS OF THE BUDAPEST FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA! For the 2016 / 2017 season Iván Fischer developed a rich and diversified programme which aims to cater the interests of all music-lovers. It will kick off with the fourth edition of our ”Bridging Europe” Festival which we organise together with our strategic partner Müpa Budapest. It focuses on France and will offer insights in the fashionable heritage of one of the richest European cultures. Strolling through the season programme you will see well-known faces and new discoveries. It strives to provide tantalising and enjoyable moments in the next twelve months. Presenting a new season is a great opportunity to thank you, our faithful and supportive audience, for carrying the orchestra and for being curious and encouraging. It strengthens our passion to perform music at the highest level and to interact with people through music. We would like to invite you to share your experiences and to help us build the BFO community as a place in which we can listen to and learn from each other. We welcome you to share your thoughts and ideas, be they about our concerts or about such other activities as the educational activities or the community projects. They are a source of inspiration for us, and we are strive to inspire you in the same way. Music is not only a universal language which can be understood all over the world, it might be the only human expression with the power to connect people regardless of descent, cultural background or religion, because it provides the key to opening the human soul. There is nothing comparable to music. Music invites you to listen to and understand one-another. It is the medium of sharing differences, but also of bridging and preserving them in mutual experiences. Music can build a community of all those who are open to listening and sharing. Music is life. Music is love. We would like to ask you to support us in building bridges between people, and to join us on the fascinating journey along which music leads us all. It is fundamental to the unparalleled success story of our orchestra in Budapest, and all over the world, that Iván Fischer and the BFO are regarded as highly innovative, playful and unique. Stay tuned! Stefan Englert, Managing Director

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THE ORCHESTRA

The Budapest Festival Orchestra is one of the Hungarian music scene’s major success stories, being rated among the world’s top ten orchestras. The New York Times even went as far as to say they “might be the best orchestra in the world”. One of the secrets of our success lies in the way Iván Fischer and his musicians are constantly on the lookout for new paths; we never stick to one method, era, composer or approach. Beyond the resoundingly energetic and uniquely refined musical expression, reminiscent of chamber music, it is our innovative concerts that appeal to those open to music.

Our INNOVATIVE CONCERTS include Dancing on the Square, one of the orchestra’s priority projects, which is as much about communal creativity, tolerance and equal opportunities as it is about music and dance. The Autism-friendly Cocoa Concerts are another of our major initiatives, providing a safe environment for children living with autism and their families alike. The Festival Orchestra is driven by an openness towards the new and the unknown, by curiosity and attention to detail. It is that same experimental spirit and passion that has taken the BFO to both the world’s most important music venues and to the furthest-flung villages in Hungary. OUR ORCHESTRA HAS WON two Gramophone Awards, the ‘Oscars of classical music’, and has also been nominated for a Grammy. International concerts and successes aside, our driving mission is to serve our home audience. Music aficionados have over seventy chances to meet us every season, be it in concert halls or at our rehearsal hall. What is more, we are making ever more frequent appearances at alternative venues – in nursing homes, abandoned synagogues, hospitals, child care institutions, prisons and schools – where we can create an intimate connection with the audience. Through our community and musical education programmes, we continuously strive to bring the beauty of classical music to every age group and stratum of society. We connect people, helping to build and strengthen communities with the power and beauty of music.

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Ivรก n F I s ch e r


Iván Fischer

IVÁN FISCHER is the founder and Music Director of the Budapest Festival Orchestra, as well as the Music Director of the Konzert­ haus and Konzerthausorchester Berlin. In recent years he has also gained a reputation as a composer, with his works being performed in the United States, the Netherlands, Belgium, Hun­ gary, Germany and Austria. What is more, he has directed a number of successful opera productions. The BFO’s frequent worldwide tours and a series of critically acclaimed and fast selling records, released first by Philips Classics and later by Channel Classics, have contributed to Iván Fischer’s reputation as one of the world’s most high-profile music directors. Fischer has guest-conducted the Berlin Philharmonic more than ten times; every year he spends two weeks with Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra; and as a conductor, he is also a frequent guest of the leading US symphony orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic and the Cleveland Orchestra. As Music Director, he has led the Kent Opera and the Opéra National de Lyon, and was Principal Conductor of the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington DC. Many of his recordings have been awarded prestigious international prizes. He studied piano, violin, and later the cello and composition in Budapest, before continuing his education in Vienna where he studied Conducting under Hans Swarowsky. Iván Fischer is a founder of the Hungarian Mahler Society and Patron of the British Kodály Academy. He has received the Golden Medal Award from the President of the Republic of Hungary, and the Crystal Award from the World Economic Forum for his services in promoting international cultural relations. The government of the French Republic made him Chevalier de L’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. In 2006 he was honoured with the Kossuth Prize, Hungary’s most prestigious arts award. In 2011 he received the Royal Philharmonic Society Music Award, Hungary’s Prima Primissima Prize and the Dutch Ovatie Prize. In 2013 he was accorded Honorary Membership to the Royal Academy of Music in London. In 2015 he was presented with the Abu Dhabi Festival Award.

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THE BFO’S MUSICIANS Violin Bence Asztalos Zsuzsanna Berentés Ágnes Bíró Antónia Bodó Balázs Bujtor Csaba Czenke Györgyi Czirók Violetta Eckhardt, leader Mária Gál-Tamási Tibor Gátay Emese Gulyás Giovanni Guzzo, leader Krisztina Haják Hrib Radu Erika Illési Tímea Iván, principal Pál Jász István Kádár Péter Kostyál Erika Kovács Eszter Lesták Bedő Zsófia Lezsák Tamás Major, leader Noémi Molnár Anikó Mózes Gyöngyvér Oláh János Pilz, principal Gábor Selmeczi Gábor Sipos Levente Szabó Zsolt Szefcsik Zsuzsanna Szlávik Gabriella Takácsné Nagy Zoltán Tuska Viola Miklós Bányai Cecília Bodolai László Bolyki Ágnes Csoma, principal Zoltán Fekete Ferenc Gábor, principal Csaba Gálfi, principal Barna Juhász Péter Lukács, principal István Polónyi István Rajncsák Nikoletta Reinhardt Nao Yamamoto

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Cello László Bánk Lajos Dvorák Éva Eckhardt Antoaneta Emanuilova, principal Péter Háry György Kertész Gabriella Liptai Kousay Mahdi György Markó Orsolya Mód Rita Sovány Péter Szabó, principal Double Bass Zsolt Fejérvári, principal Alajos H. Zováthy Károly Kaszás Géza Lajhó László Lévai Csaba Magyar Attila Martos Csaba Sipos Flute Anna Fazekas Anett Jóföldi Zsuzsanna Kovács-Madai Bernadett Nagy Gabriella Pivon, principal Erika Sebők, principal Oboe Márta Berger Nehil Durak Lucas Navarro, principal Eva Neuszerova Clément Noël Ivan Podyomov, principal Clarinet Ákos Ács, principal Roland Csalló Rudolf Szitka Ákos Pápai

Bassoon Nina Ashton Andrea Bressan, principal Sándor Patkós Dániel Tallián Horn Dávid Bereczky Miklós Nagy, principal Zsombor Nagy András Szabó Zoltán Szőke, principal Trumpet Zsolt Czeglédi, principal Bence Horváth Tamás Póti Balázs Tóth Zoltán Tóth Trombone Justin Clark Róbert Stürzenbaum Balázs Szakszon, principal Mariann Szakszon Norbert Zakó Tuba József Bazsinka Harp Ágnes Polónyi Kinga Katinka Szilágyi Júlia Szilvásy Timpani Roland Dénes Percussion Boglárka Fábry László Herboly István Kurcsák Gábor Pusztai Gáspár Szente Keyboards Dávid Báll Soma Dinyés Zoltán Fejérvári László Adrián Nagy


CONCERTS

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COMMUNITY WEEK CHILD CARE INSTITUTIONS NURSING HOMES CHURCHES SYNAGOGUES

SEPTEMBER 09-16

Three times a year, the Budapest Festival Orchestra embarks upon a journey to take classical music to those who, be it for medical, social, physical or financial reasons, would not nor­ mally be able to enjoy our concerts. Every social class and age group is equally important to the orchestra, which is why, during Community Weeks, we visit child care institutions in the farthest-flung corners of the country, just as we do for the elderly living in nursing homes. On every occasion, we design programmes to give the greatest joy to each specific audience. We prepare our interactive and playful Music Castle programme for the children. While for the elderly we play healing, reminiscing, melodic classics, with the same attention to quality as we do when we perform in Carnegie Hall. During Community Weeks we visit children who usually live under difficult circumstances and have often never even seen an instrument in real life, meaning they await every such event with excitement and curiosity. Our job is to give them a lasting gift. In previous Community Weeks we have performed at places such as the SOS Children’s Villages or the International Pető Institute. The residents of nursing always receive our free concerts with great affection. They treat these occasions as a celebration. They read up on the compositions, dress up in their best clothes, and listen to the performance with unwavering attention. Through these concerts, we aim to introduce audiences to the miraculous world of music, removing the obstacles and allowing young and old alike to enjoy music in a familiar environment. We go wherever we are needed.

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BRIDGING EUROPE FRANCE IN THE SPOTLIGHT

“The European family means that every person is equally import­ ant, everybody is equally precious, that everyone has the same opportunities. There should be no distinctions made between nationality, creed, colour or origin. We are all people, we are all family members.” Iván Fischer A joint production by the Budapest Festival Orchestra and Müpa Budapest, the Bridging Europe festival brings a special flavour to the opening of each season. The inspiration and driving force for the series has always been a specific country with a rich, colourful and significant cultural heritage. In the autumn of 2013 it was the Czechs; in 2014, German melodies took centre stage; in 2015 we could get closer to our Austrian neighbours. This year, we are giving the spotlight to the cultural fineries of France. Besides the usual orchestral symphonies, baroque and contemporary concerts, the audience will get some lighter bites too, with jazz and world music perform­ ances. Iván Fischer’s programme selection includes the impressionist composers Debussy and Ravel; a 20th century successor to their traditions in Dutilleux; and Erik Satie, who’s known mostly for his piano compositions. The organisers are convinced that trust and fellowship among the nations of Europe are in desperate need, and that art is a perfect means to help bring them about. As Csaba Káel, Müpa Budapest’s CEO put it: “The Bridging Europe festival draws our attention to what a rich family we belong to as members of the European community. We must get to know each others’ cultures and gain an insight into one another’s lives, in order to uncover the ground on which to build our common future.”

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H e r vé N i q u e t


André Campra: Le carnaval de Venise – excerpts from the orchestral suite Jean-Féry Rebel: Les éléments – excerpts Jean-Philippe Rameau: Pigmalion, Platée, Les Indes Galantes – excerpts Chantal Santon-Jeffery, soprano Conductor: Hervé Niquet Baroque gesture: Sigrid T’Hooft

SEPTEMBER 22 Müpa Budapest, Festival Theatre 22nd Thursday 7:45pm

Campra Rebel Rameau Niquet SantonJeffery T’Hooft

For the opening concert of the season, our baroque ensemble and the internationally-renowned French early music specialist Hervé Niquet will be providing an insight into French baroque music, a real rarity for Hungarian concert-goers. The long-lived André Campra was a significant French opera composer in the period between Lully and Rameau. One of the reformers of the genre, he began his career as a church musician then went on to become a priest and later a musketeer, before finally turning his hand to opera composition; by the end of his eventful life he had even risen to Inspecteur Général (director) of the Paris Opera. His most significant works were opéra-ballets, including Le carnaval de Venise. Selections from the orchestral suite arranged from that piece will feature in the beginning of the concert, followed by a few movements from the famous Les éléments (The Elements) by Jean-Féry Rebel, who was a pupil of Lully. Rebel was also an accomplished violinist, which is what enabled him to perform the solo part of Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons. That composition was most likely the template for Les éléments, a “staged” or “choreographic symphony” which uses musical devices to describe the creation of the world in eleven movements. Jean-Philippe Rameau was the most significant composer and music theorist of the post-Lully era. He only began composing operas at the ripe age of fifty, but over the following three decades he made up for the time he had missed and wrote operas prolifically. The second part of our concert will feature arias and instrumental excerpts from three Rameau works for the musical stage; the irresistibly witty comic opera Platée; the one-act Pigmalion, based on the work by Ovidius; and the opéra-ballet Les Indes galantes (The Amorous Indies).

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Debussy Dutilleux Satie Ravel Fischer Feng

SEPTEMBER 23-24+26

Claude Debussy: Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall 23rd Friday 7:45 pm Doráti 24th Saturday 3:30 pm Reiner 26th Monday 7:45 pm Solti

Eric Satie – Claude Debussy: Gymnopédies

Henri Dutilleux: L’arbre des songes

Maurice Ravel: Pavane pour une infante défunte Daphnis et Chloé – suite No. 2 Ning Feng, violin Conductor: Iván Fischer

It is not without reason that artists from all over the world used to love going to Paris, to go hungry, languish and gather expe­ riences – no place on Earth could have been more exciting. Our concert takes a light-hearted trip through time, to the French capital of the 20th century. Debussy’s inspiration was Mallarmé’s poem L’après-midi d’un faune (The Afternoon of a Faun), published in 1876. The young composer, who knew the poet, managed to grasp the dreamlike atmosphere of Mallarmé’s poem perfectly. “All in all the piece grows somewhat like a tree,” said Henri Dutilleux of his violin concerto in four movements and three interludes. This symbolic trope, and the cyclical changing of the seasons, inspired the composer. One of the places in which Erik Satie’s eccentricity manifested itself was in the strange titles he gave to his works. He wrote two of his three short Gymnopédies, each with their own special atmosphere, in 1888, while the third followed a few years later. The Gymnopaedia was a traditional, several-day-long Spartan festival that focused on music and gymnastics. Claude Debussy, Satie’s friend, orchestrated two of the Gymnopédies in 1896. The piano piece ‘Pavane for a Dead Princess’ was the first of Ravel’s masterpieces, composing it as he did during his academy years. He orchestrated the piece in 1910. Alongside Ma mère l’Oye (Mother Goose), the composer considered Daphnis et Chloé to be his most important work for the stage. The story, which takes place on the island of Lesbos, concerns the initiation of two innocent youths into the hardships of life and love. The second suite, compiled from the ballet’s music in 1913, is regularly performed in concert halls.

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Ning Feng


GRISEY DUTILLEUX APERGHIS VOLKOV WIEDERATHERTON RIVALLAND

September 25

Gérard Grisey: Modulations

Müpa Budapest, Festival Theatre 25th Sunday 7:45 pm

Georges Aperghis: Le Reste du temps

Henri Dutilleux: Mystère de l’instant

Gérard Grisey: Partiels Sonia Wieder-Atherton, cello Françoise Rivalland, cimbalom Conductor: Ilan Volkov

In 2016 the Bridging Europe festival is bringing France into the spot­light. After having performed significant compositions from the French baroque and the earlier 20th century, this Festival Orchestra concert will feature pieces that are more contemporary, coming as they do from the last third of the 20th century. Rather than pitch, duration or volume, spectral music is based on the acoustic properties of sound. Gérard Grisey, who passed away in 1998, was one of the pioneers of spectral music. “I see sounds as beams of force oriented in time, infinitely mobile and fluctuating,” he wrote of his piece Modulations, which he composed in 1976-77 for instrumental ensemble and electronics. Henri Dutilleux composed his Mystère de l’instant (The Mystery of the Moment) for cimbalom, strings, and percussion in 1989, on Paul Sacher’s commission. The ninth of the ten short movements is a fantasy that uses the letters of Sacher’s name as musical notes. The thematically unrelated movements are played without a pause. Georges Aperghis was born in Greece, but moved to Paris in 1963 at the age of 18. He composed Le Reste du temps (The Time Left) for cello, cimbalom and orchestra, out of respect for Haydn. Grisey’s composition Partiels (Partials), written in 1975, also carries flavours of spectral music. The work is based on electronic analysis of a trombone note. The composer used the spectrum of this sound to shape the orchestral tone of the piece. According to several composers of the younger generation, Partiels was a milestone in the shaping of their interest in music.

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So n i a W i e d e r - A t h e r t o n


M i do r i S e i l e r


Tomaso Albinoni: Sonata in G major, Op. 2, No. 1 Baldassare Galuppi: Concerto grosso in C minor Giovanni Benedetto Platti: Concerto grosso in D Major, D-WD 538 (after Op. 5 No. 1 of A. Corelli) Antonio Vivaldi: Violin Concerto in E minor, RV 278 Concerto for Two Cellos in G minor, RV 531 Concerto for Strings in A major, RV 158 Alessandro Scarlatti: “Ombre tacite e sole” – cantata for alto voice

October 23 Liszt Academy, Grand Hall 23rd Sunday 3:30 pm Reiner A 23rd Sunday 7:45 pm Ormándy

ALBINONI Galuppi PLATTI VIVALDI SCARLATTI SEILER WEI T’HOOFT

Artistic director and leader: Midori Seiler Terry Wei, alto Baroque gesture: Sigrid T’Hooft

Midori Seiler is a celebrated performer of early music, both as a soloist and as an orchestra leader. The BFO’s audiences will have two chances to meet her this season. The first concert consists of compositions by five late Italian baroque masters. The virtuoso violinist, singer and composer, Tomaso Albinoni of Venice, did not compose professionally; his family’s financial background allowed him to live for many years without having to seek paid work. The only well-known piece of his significant oeuvre is the eternal baroque hit, the Adagio in G minor. The BFO will be performing the first piece from his Op. 2 collection, which he dedicated to the Duke of Mantua. Antonio Vivaldi was also born in Venice, and worked for decades as the music director of a girl’s orphanage while he won Europe-wide renown with his operas, his vocal and his instrumental works. He was largely forgotten after his death, and only rediscovered during the 20th century. He is the most frequently played baroque composer after Bach and Händel. Baldassare Galuppi, who predominantly composed operas, had a professional connection to Vivaldi. His works display a mixture of the late baroque and classical styles. The least known composer of the night is the Padua-born Giovanni Benedetto Platti. We will be performing the first piece from his concerto grosso series, which was adapted from Corelli’s violin sonatas. Alessandro Scarlatti was one of the greats of Italian baroque music, composing 40 oratorios, 115 operas and about 700 cantatas, in addition to many sacred and orchestral works. He composed the cantata performed in this concert in 1716.

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SHOSTAKOVICH RACHMANINOFF TCHAIKOVSKY KITAYENKO ZILBERSTEIN

October 29-30-31 Liszt Academy, Grand Hall 29th Saturday 7:45 pm Doráti A 30th Sunday 7:45 pm Széll 31st Monday 7:45 pm Doráti B

Dmitri Shostakovich: Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10 Sergei Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 Pyotr Tchaikovsky: Francesca da Rimini – Symphonic Fantasy after Dante, Op. 32 Lilya Zilberstein, piano Conductor: Dmitri Kitayenko

Dmitri Kitayenko has been living and working in the West for a quarter of a century and now only returns to his homeland as a visitor, but even so, he is internationally considered to be one of the most knowledgeable interpreters of Russian music. He is returning to the Festival Orchestra in that role, and will conduct a work each by Shostakovich, Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky. Arguably one of the greatest symphony composers of the 20th century, Shostakovich’s first attempt at the genre already aroused great interest. Following its premiere in 1926, the Symphony in F minor soon conquered the world, with many eminent conductors of the age including it on their programmes. Three emigrant Russian musicians will be meeting one another this evening. The world-famous Russian pianist Lilya Zilberstein, like the conductor, lives in Western Europe, reminiscent of how Rachmaninoff spent many years living and composing in Western Europe and the US. The Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini is the last piece he composed for piano and orchestra. The soloist at the world premiere, conducted by Leopold Stokowski in Philhadelphia, was the composer himself. The last of Paganini’s 24 caprices was the inspiration for this half an hour of highly effective and virtuosic variations. Tchaikovsky spent the autumn of 1876 in Bayreuth, where he wrote his symphonic fantasy in under three weeks. He took his theme from Dante’s Divine Comedy. Francesca, a noblewoman who falls in love with her husband’s brother, appears in the fifth canto of Inferno. The cruel husband takes revenge by killing the lovers who, because of their adulterous passions, go to Hell as sinners of love, never to find peace. Tchaikovsky, in writing a piece which bears many of Liszt’s fingerprints, dedicated the work to his friend and former student, Sergei Taneyev.

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D m i t r i j K i t ay e n ko


Rising Stars DUBÓCZKY KÁDÁR

November 19+21 Liszt Academy, Grand Hall 19th Saturday 7:45 pm Ormándy 21st Monday 7:45 pm Solti A

Hector Berlioz: Le Corsaire – overture Paul Hindemith: Violin Concerto Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No. 2 in D major István Kádár, violin Conductor: Gergely Dubóczky

Gergely Dubóczky, the talented young conductor who first worked with the BFO in 2014, will be leading the first concert of the new Rising Stars series. István Kádár, a well-known member of the orchestra and one of the winners of the 2015 Sándor Végh Competition, will be the concert’s soloist. Besides his opera overtures, Hector Berlioz also composed overtures for concerts, a few of which have become integral parts of orchestral concert programmes. Le Corsaire (The Pirate) is one of his oft-performed concert overtures; he wrote it in Nice during the summer of 1844. It premiered as The Tower of Nice, but in the end the composer borrowed the title from Byron’s poem, which was seen as one of the great literary accomplishments of the age. Berlioz’s overture is sweeping, spectacularly orchestrated, unsparing with the volume by providing plenty for the brass section to play, and makes for an excellent opening to the concert. That the national socialist regime was not going to embrace Hindemith was clear to him from the very beginning. His works were banned from being broadcast on the radio as early as 1934 and he was denounced as a ‘cultural Bolshevist’, his music as ‘degenerate’. After his prohibition in Germany, he emigrated first to Switzerland, and then on to the United States in 1940. His violin concerto, composed in 1939, was his last major work before leaving Europe, and the flowing melodies of the first two movements, as well as the witty, brilliant ideas of the third, brought new colours to his palette. Beethoven himself conducted the April 1803 premiere of his Second Symphony at the Theater an der Wien. He already knew about his incurable hearing condition while composing the piece, and had said farewell to happiness in his famous Heiligenstadt testament. This doesn’t come through in the music, though. The novelty of the symphony surprised contemporary listeners, who were especially captivated by the opening movement and the Scherzo.

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G ER G E L Y D U B Ó C Z K Y


L e o n i da s K avako s


Franz Schubert: Die Zauberharfe – overture, D. 644 Béla Bartók: Violin Concerto No. 2 in B minor Hungarian Sketches Franz Schubert: Symphony No. 5 in B flat major, D. 485 Leonidas Kavakos, violin Conductor: Iván Fischer

December 02-03-04-05 Liszt Academy, Grand Hall 02nd Friday 7:45 pm Doráti A 03rd Saturday 7:45 pm Széll + Midnight Music 11:30 pm 04th Sunday 7:45 pm Ormándy 05th Monday 7:45 pm Doráti B

SCHUBERT BARTÓK FISCHER KAVAKOS

20th century music in a 19th century frame. How does the music of Schubert and Bartók reinforce and contrast each other? How do four masterpieces sound that do not, at first sight, appear to be connected? Find out at our concert. The Magic Harp, a chivalric drama in three acts, would serve only as a cultural curiosity even if the lost libretto were found and the work itself could be staged. Melodrama, which was the standalone genre of the era, would in all probability put the 21st century listener to the test; but the choruses of the piece and the romances of the troubadour who possesses the enchanted instrument make this one of Schubert’s finest works. Of this, only the great overture remains as a standard concert hall piece. Bartók composed his violin concerto between August 1937 and December 1938, on the commission of Zoltán Székely. Because of the tone effects and the many special, mixed sounds, the piece is highly challenging for violinists, orchestras and conductors alike. The 1939 recording of the world premiere is still considered the gold standard by performers and audiences. In 1931, Béla Bartók orchestrated five of his earlier piano works and arranged them into a five-movement cycle. Each of them, except for the closing movement entitled Swineherd’s Dance from Ürög, is actually an adaptation of a folk song. Bartók commented that “this is how the last recorder-player of Felső-Iregh performed the melody of [the folk song] ‘The cricket is getting marriedʼ.” Schubert’s Fifth Symphony is the only one that was openly performed during the composer’s life. The composer, not yet twenty, reached back for inspiration to the classical masters of Vienna; musicologists have demonstrated how heavily Mozart influenced the work. The symphony’s sound is not yet that of the ‘Unfinished’ symphony or Winterreise, there is no sign of resignation, but instead one hears youthful momentum and optimism.

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CHRISTMAS CONCERT TAKÁCS-NAGY VÁRDAI

December 26-27-28 Liszt Academy, Grand Hall 26th Monday 7:45 pm Széll 27th Tuesday 7:45 pm Solti A 28th Wednesday 7:45 pm Solti B

Ludwig van Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3 Edvard Grieg: Peer Gynt Suite No. 1 Pyotr Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme, Op. 33 Camille Saint-Saëns: Bacchanale from Samson and Delilah Paul Dukas: The Sorcerer’s Apprentice Maurice Ravel: Ma mère l’Oye Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy: Symphony No. 3 in A minor ‘Scottish’, 4th movement István Várdai, cello Conductor: Gábor Takács-Nagy

The BFO will be putting short but extremely popular works under their audience’s Christmas tree. Gábor Takács-Nagy has chosen works from a century’s worth of music. The early version of Beethoven’s Fidelio was still entitled Leonore. The composer wrote four distinct overtures to the composition during his reworking of the score. The most important elements of the opera’s plot are given in the third Leonore Overture, which will be performed this time. The resounding success of the Norwegian play Peer Gynt can be attributed as much to Ibsen’s genius as to Grieg’s music. The suite, compiled from the flashiest parts of the stage music, quickly found its way into concert halls. Tchaikovsky composed the Variations on a Rococo Theme for cello and orchestra in 1876, for the cellist Wilhelm Fitzenhagen. The piece, which consists of seven variations, has become a fundamental part of the cello repertoire. Saint-Saëns’ biblically themed opera is perhaps the most often played of the romantic operas. Symphony orchestras also love performing the oriental colours of the famous ballet scene, the bacchanale. Paul Dukas’ most famous work is an orchestral Scherzo based on a ballad by Goethe, which employs orchestral means to tell the story of the literary work. Ravel originally composed Ma mère l’Oye for piano four hands, but orchestrated it in 1912 for the ballet stage. The ballet music has been one of the most popular pieces of his oeuvre ever since. Impressions of a journey in four movements. Mendelssohn’s symphony recalls his experiences, moods and flavours of his stay in Scotland. The hymnal end to the symphony’s last movement is a perfect concert finale.

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L IS Z T F EREN C A C A D E M Y O F M U SI C , G R A N D H A L L


TÜÜR SHOSTAKOVICH PROKOFIEV JÄRVI MØRK

January 12-13-14

Erkki-Sven Tüür: Sow The Wind

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall 12th Thursday 7:45 pm Doráti 13th Friday 7:45 pm Solti 14th Saturday 3:30 pm Reiner

Sergei Prokofiev: Symphony No. 6 in E flat minor

Dmitri Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 2 in G minor

Truls Mørk, cello Conductor: Paavo Järvi

Our concert will feature two 20th century Russian classics, pre­ ceded by a brand new Estonian piece. The conductor, Paavo Järvi, is a regular and celebrated guest at the world’s greatest concert halls, and he goes out of his way to showcase Estonian music. His Budapest concert will be no different, as he opens with his compatriot and long-time friend Erkki-Sven Tüür’s composition Sow The Wind. Tüür, born in 1959, is one of the best known of contemporary Estonian composers. He wrote this work for his compatriot Arvo Pärt’s 80th birthday. That will be followed by the world-famous Norwegian cellist, Truls Mørk, as he performs Shostakovich’s Second Cello Concerto in G minor. The work, which counts as a cornerstone of 20th century cello music, was written during the spring of 1966 – Shostakovich dedicated it to Mstislav Rostropovich, just as he had done with his First Cello Concerto. The concerto, bearing the hallmarks of the mature Shostakovich, also premiered the same year at a concert organised to celebrate the composer’s 60th birthday. Prokofiev composed his Sixth Symphony in 1947, which he set as a monument to the tragedy of World War II. The composer described the basic thought behind the work by saying that even in the euphoria of a great victory, one should not forget the incurable injuries that have been incurred. Despite positive reviews, Prokofiev’s symphony fell victim to the 1948 Zhdanov Decree, and the composer was accused of writing a composition out of line with Party directives. The work only found its way into the concert repertoire following the death of Stalin (and Prokofiev).

36


P aavo J 채 r v i


J oha n n e s B r ahm s


A joint event by Müpa Budapest and the BFO. Artistic director: Iván Fischer

January 22 Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Müpa Budapest, Festival Theatre 22nd Sunday 10:30 am–10 pm

BRAHMS MARATHON Fischer

In 2008, the BFO and Müpa Budapest put on a Tchaikovsky Marathon. Since then, the day-long concert series has become a fixture in the orchestra’s schedule. Music enthusiasts save the date each year, waiting for the winter’s day when Hungary’s best musicians, symphony orchestras, chamber formations, and soloists allow them to indulge in the oeuvre of a dearlyheld composer. There are ‘short-distance listeners’ who only drop in for an hour or two of concerts, others qualify for the ‘half marathon’ category, but, at every marathon so far, most of the audience of about ten thousand has been made up of those gourmands who sit through every single one of the day’s concerts. After Tchaikovsky, Bach, Beethoven, Bartók, Mozart, Schubert, Dvořák and Stravinsky, 2016 featured two protagonists, two German romantic giants, Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy and Robert Schumann. The spotlight of the 2017 Marathon will fall on Johannes Brahms, who had many connections to Robert and Clara Schumann. In 1853, Liszt advised the twentyyear-old Brahms to make contact with the Schumanns, and they received him gladly. Robert Schumann spoke rapturously of the young Brahms’ compositions, he gave him a professional leg-up, and Brahms became almost a member of the Schumann family. The friendship lasted beyond Robert Schumann being admitted to a mental asylum and his subsequent death, as Clara Schumann played a defining role in Brahms’ life. The 2017 Marathon will feature works by him, the great summariser of 19th century music. Brahms created great works in various genres, from symphonies through concertos to vocal and chamber music, as well as compositions for solo piano. We’ll be presenting the audience with an abundance of works, and although we can’t give any details yet, rest assured that Brahms enthusiasts can certainly look forward to an eventful day.

39


Beethoven Fischer Goode

January 27-28-29

Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No. 1 in C major Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major Symphony No. 5 in C minor

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall 27th Friday 7:45 pm Doráti 28th Saturday 7:45 pm Solti 29th Sunday 3:30 pm Reiner

Richard Goode, piano Conductor: Iván Fischer

This concert will delve deep into the works of a single com­ poser. The earliest and latest of the compositions were written less than a decade apart, but the path the composer took in that time was long. Beethoven began work on his First Symphony in 1799, the final year of a century which had been exceptionally rich in the genre’s history. With his first symphony, the 29-year-old composer was carrying on the great traditions of Haydn and Mozart. While he wrote only a fraction of the symphonies his predecessors did, each of the nine he composed between 1800 and 1824 were hugely significant, and the last one remains a stand-out pinnacle of the genre. Every one of the nine symphonies was powerfully novel for the contemporary audience, full of surprises and innovations. The Allgemeine Musikalische Zeitung published an enthusiastic review about the concert at the Hofburgtheater on 2 April 1800, which said that the reviewer had not heard such an interesting concert for a long time, and that the concluding symphony “was full of art, novelty and inspiration,” even though he thought the winds and brass were overused. The Fifth Symphony was written between 1804 and 1808, and includes his famous ‘fate’ motif at the beginning of the first movement. The interpretation was Beethoven’s own, as he enjoyed ridiculing people who wanted to know the real meaning behind his music; yet his explanation that “this is how fate knocks on the door” was probably serious. The work premiered in December 1809, alongside his Sixth Symphony and Piano Concerto in G major, the latter of which will also be heard during our concert. The composer, despite rapidly losing his hearing, could still present the 1807 concert to the audience in person. Contemporary listeners were shocked by the meditative opening phrase of the first movement, and by the numerous novel solutions in the piece.

40


R i cha r d G ood e


WAGNER R. STRAUSS BRUCKNER TICCIATI VLATKOVIĆ

February 24-25+27 Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall 24th Friday 7:45 pm Solti 25th Saturday 3:30 pm Reiner + Midnight Music 11:30 pm 27th Monday 7:45 pm Doráti

Richard Wagner: Lohengrin – prelude Richard Strauss: Horn Concerto No. 2 in E flat major Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 6 in A major Radovan Vlatković, horn Conductor: Robin Ticciati

Our concert begins with the prelude to Richard Wagner’s Lohen­ grin, before continuing with one work from each of two compos­ ers whose oeuvres were greatly influenced by Wagner: Strauss and Bruckner. Wagner finished his opera, Lohengrin, in 1848. It was Wagner himself who named the roughly ten-minute-long orchestral piece which precedes the opera a ‘Prelude’; as opposed to the usual overtures of the time, which provided a taste of the opera’s themes, the composition expands out from a single motif in the plot. Richard Strauss was still a child when he wrote his first horn compositions for his father, Franz Strauss – a horn player at the Royal Bavarian Opera House. But by the time his Second Horn Concerto came along, in 1942, many decades had passed. The latter composition recalls Strauss’ late-romantic sound and the world of his first concerto. It premiered at the Salzburg Festival in 1943. There is little more indicative of Bruckner’s devotion to Wagner than that memorable occasion on which he visited the ‘Master of Masters’ – although later he couldn’t remember whether it was his Second or Third Symphony that he dedicated to the great man. Allegedly, it wasn’t just blind reverence that played a role in this, but also the copious amounts of beer consumed. (In sober hindsight, we know that it was his Third Symphony that he dedicated to Wagner.) The Sixth is the least played symphony of Bruckner’s oeuvre; it is also simultaneously his most daring work. After its completion in 1881, the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra were unwilling to perform the entire symphony because of its difficulty, and the 1883 premiere featured only the middle two movements. The first full performance of his Sixth Symphony took place only after Bruckner’s death, in 1899, when Gustav Mahler conducted the Vienna Philharmonic.

42


Rob i n T i cc i a t i


Ivรก n F i s ch e r


Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy: Symphony No. 4 in A major “Italian” Gustav Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde Gerhild Romberger, alto Robert Dean Smith, tenor Conductor: Iván Fischer

March 16-17+19 Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall 16th Thursday 7:45 pm Doráti 17th Friday 7:45 pm Solti 19th Sunday 3:30 pm Reiner

Mendelssohn Mahler Fischer Romberger Smith

Both Mendelssohn’s Italian symphony and Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde are about living in harmony, an overwhelming joie de vivre, exhilarating dance versus resignation, bitterness, sadness and eternal farewell. One could hardly imagine a more contrasting programme. The 21-year-old Mendelssohn condensed the experiences from his second journey to Italy into this youthful work, the Italian symphony. In the autumn of 1830, he wrote an enthusiastic letter from Venice to his loved ones, saying that Italy is the place to find “supreme joy in life.” By the time he reached Rome he had already become preoccupied with thoughts of a symphony to encapsulate his travelling experiences. He composed the work later; in 1832 the Royal Philharmonic Society invited Mendelssohn to write a new symphony. That is when he hastily composed his Symphony in A major, and he conducted the world premiere in London in 1833. Besides enjoying the genial Italian lifestyle, contemplation and the Saltarello, the frenetic south Italian dance which inspired the finale, in the slow movement he commemorated two key figures of his life. One of them was his teacher, Zelter, the other his patron, Goethe, who he had lost in 1832. Mahler’s six-movement symphony for two voices and orchestra, Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth), only premiered after the composer’s death, in 1911. The composer had a superstitious dread of writing a Ninth symphony, which is why he followed his Eighth not with a number but with a name. In 1907, Mahler read Hans Bethge’s book of poetry, Die chinesische Flöte, which had been inspired by Chinese poets and led him to set six of its poems to music. The contemporary critic, Paul Bekker, spoke of Mahler’s “late style”, which was “full of austere fantasy, like the late style of every great artist, and full of presentiments of the future.”

45


Liszt R. Strauss Fischer Ökrös LAZIĆ

March 29-30 april 01

Franz Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 1 Piano Concerto No. 2 in A major

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall 29th Wednesday 7:45 pm Doráti 30th Thursday 7:45 pm Solti + 31st Midnight Music 11:30 pm 01st Thursday 3:30 pm Reiner

Oszkár Ökrös, cimbalom Dejan Lazić, piano Conductor: Iván Fischer

Richard Strauss: Thus Spake Zarathustra

In 1889, the 25-year-old Richard Strauss accepted the position of conductor at the Weimar Theatre, the very institute whose profile Franz Liszt had shaped a few decades earlier. The typical features of gypsy music – its free rhythms, unusual modulations, strange timbre – had a great impact on the young Liszt. The composer published his Magyar dalok (Hungarian Melodies) series between 1840 and 1843, and in 1847 he started bringing out his Hungarian Rhapsodies. He selected six of the piano pieces, which he had orchestrated, and they have since become part of the classical orchestral repertoire. Liszt left his Second Piano Concerto to ripen for some time. When he began working on it in 1839 he was still a globe-trotting virtuoso, but by the time he finished it in 1861 he had retired from the stage and was devoting most of his time to composing. The concerto is a single movement made up of five sections, each of which display various characters around a singular theme. The composer himself conducted the world premiere in Weimar, and his pupil Hans von Bronsart played the piano part. Von Bronsart would go on to become the manager of the Weimar Theatre, where he signed Strauss. Richard Strauss came up with the genre of the tone, or symphonic, poem early on. Following his orchestral fantasy Aus Italien, in the 1880s he composed his Macbeth, Don Juan, and Death and Transfiguration. Thus Spake Zarathustra is a more mature piece. As the composer put it, “I did not intend to write philosophical music or to portray Nietzsche’s great work in music … The whole symphonic poem is intended as a homage to Nietzsche’s genius, which found its greatest expression in his book ‘Also Sprach Zarathustra’.”

46


D e ja n L az i ć


Rising Stars AVIAT SEBŐK NOËL

april 14-15 Liszt Academy, Grand Hall 14th Friday 7:45 pm Solti B 15th Saturday 7:45 pm Ormándy

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Symphony No. 36 in C major “Linz”, K. 425 Arthur Honegger: Chamber Concerto for Flute, English Horn, and Strings Robert Schumann: Symphony No. 1 in B flat major “Spring”, Op. 38 Erika Sebők, flute Clément Noël, English horn Conductor: Victor Aviat

Up to now, Victor Aviat’s collaboration with the Festival Orches­ tra has been as an oboist and assistant conductor. Through the Rising Stars series, he will be making his debut with two sym­ phonies, one Viennese classical and one romantic, as well as a 20th century concerto. The two soloists, Erika Sebők and Clément Noël are the BFO’s Sándor Végh Competition-winning musicians. Mozart himself described the circumstances under which he had composed the ‘Linz’ symphony by telling how, in 1783, he and his wife Constanze travelled to Salzburg to placate his father who disapproved of their marriage. On their way back to Vienna, they stopped in Linz as guests of the music-loving Count Thun and his family. Over the course of the occasion, Mozart gave a concert, but because he had no suitable symphony with him he ‘hastily’ composed one. The work is highly rated in the orchestral repertoire for its cheerfulness, the playful contrasts of light and shadow, its moving serenade, the adorably humorous minuet and the irresistible finale. Arthur Honegger was seriously ill in 1948 when he composed his late chamber concerto for flute and English horn. According to András Szőllősy, the concerto is the composer’s “most lyrical, most balanced work.” Honegger’s Hungarian monographer emphasised the intimate dialogue between the two solo instruments in the first movement; the romantic, daydreaming tone of the second; and the kindly ideas of the finale. The concerto will be performed by the BFO’s Sándor Végh Competition-winning musicians. Schumann’s First Symphony was not his first attempt at the genre. His Symphony in G minor, which he composed in his youth, was a success in his hometown. A line from the now-forgotten Adolf Böttger inspired the First Symphony: “Im Tale geht der Frühling auf” (Spring is coming to life in the valley). This is where the symphony gets its title “spring.”

48


Victor Aviat


V lad i m i r F a n s h i l


Mikhail Glinka: Waltz Fantasy Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Concertone in C major, K. 190/186E Sergei Prokofiev: Symphony No. 7 in C sharp minor

april 26+28 Liszt Academy, Grand Hall 26th Wednesday 7:45 pm Széll 28th Friday 7:45 pm Ormándy

Rising Stars FANSHIL GÁL-TAMÁSI MÓZES

Mária Gál-Tamási, Anikó Mózes, violin Conductor: Vladimir Fanshil

Three eras, three genres. The Australian assistant conductor of our Music Director, Vladimir Fanshil, will be making his debut with a varied programme in the BFO’s new Rising Stars series. The concert begins with a gem, rare to Hungarian concert halls. Mikhail Glinka’s Waltz Fantasy is reminiscent of grand balls; he composed it for piano four hands in 1839, and later orchestrated it in 1856. The inscription “Concertone di Wolfgango Amadeo Mozart” stood on the manuscript of Mozart’s K. 190 composition. Concertone means ‘grand concerto’; it is a transition between the genres of concerto grosso, already going out of fashion at the time, and the sinfonia concertante. The concerto was written for two violins, although Mozart also provided plenty of opportunity for the oboe and cello to shine. The premiere most probably took place in the Archbishop of Salzburg’s palace, and it is not beyond the realms of possibility that Mozart played one of the solo violin parts himself. The Seventh Symphony is Prokofiev’s last complete orchestral work. He composed it in 1951-52 on the commission of Soviet Radio. Its characteristics are rich, flowing melodies, simplicity and transparency. It is a telling addendum to the story of the work’s conception, and to the age, that during the rehearsals of the 1952 premiere the conductor convinced the composer to rewrite the ending of the piece to make it more uplifting, because that way Prokofiev could receive a First Class Stalin Prize. Prokofiev was neglected and miserably poor in those years, so he took the advice. But before his death he restored the original version of the closing movement. His colleague, Shostakovich, lauded Prokofiev’s swan song with warm words.

51


COMMUNITY WEEK CHILD CARE INSTITUTIONS NURSING HOMES CHURCHES SYNAGOGUES

May 02–07

Community building is extremely important to the Budapest Festival Orchestra. In the past thirty-something years, the orches­ tra and its audience have grown into a large and ever-expanding, music-loving family. The aim of our Community Weeks is to help this family grow, to rebuild the ties between existing communities and forge new ones, through the power of music. There are many people in this country who are open to music, but distance and a lack of time prevent them from enjoying the BFO’s performances. We help them by bringing our free concerts to local churches. Our musicians are constantly on the lookout for new challenges, beyond the spectrum of orchestral performances. Four years ago we founded our baroque ensemble, which plays on authentic period instruments. Their performances play a key role in both our regular season and our community work. And what could be more fitting for baroque music than the spirituality, atmosphere and acoustics of a church? We started our church concert series in the summer of 2014, since when we have visited Catholic, Calvinist and Lutheran communities. We performed our first such concert at the Deák tér Lutheran Church of Budapest, but our tours of the country have taken us to so many other places, from Hedrehely to Nyírbátor, and even as far as the small Transylvanian village of Kaplony. The first year and a half of our series was based around Bach’s cantatas, but now we are going to broaden our repertoire with other baroque composers and different genres. The Festival Orchestra is glad to be preserving this musical tradition, and would be delighted to share it with anyone open to it.

52


Bartók Fischer Gergye

May 12-13-14 Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall 12th Friday 7:45 pm Doráti 13th Saturday 7:45 pm Solti 14th Sunday 3:30 pm Reiner

Béla Bartók: The Miraculous Mandarin The Wooden Prince Conductor: Iván Fischer Choreography: Krisztián Gergye

Since the concept premiered at the Budapest Opera House in 1956, the Hungarian audience has often been able to hear the opera Bluebeard’s Castle, the pantomime The Miraculous Man­ darin and the ballet The Wooden Prince, in one concert. Our con­ cert will feature the staged versions of the latter two works. “It may sound strange,” said Bartók on the day of The Wooden Prince’s premiere, “but I must confess that the neglect of my opera Bluebeard’s Castle gave me the momentum to write this ballet. As you may know, that work of mine flopped at an opera contest … I love my first opera so much that when I received the ballet’s script from Béla Balázs, I immediately thought that, with its flamboyance, colourful, rich and varied stories, that ballet would make it possible to stage my two works on a single night.” The resounding success of the piece did indeed open the doors for Bluebeard’s Castle. The Miraculous Mandarin faced a more difficult path, however, as its stage career began with a scandal. After Eugen Szenkar conducted the premiere in Cologne in 1926, the mayor of the city, Konrad Adenauer, banned any further performances of the work. Bartók learnt of Menyhért Lengyel’s story in the magazine Nyugat (West), and began to set it to music in 1918. “The music at the beginning will be diabolical, if I can get it right … horrific noise, clatter, crashing, honking, I will lead the listener from the hustle and bustle of a metropolis into the tramps’ hideout,” wrote the composer to his wife. With Lengyel’s pantomime-script, Bartók explored and set to music the fundamental questions of human existence, man and woman, passion and vulnerability, pleasure and pain.

54


Ivรก n F i s ch e r


C a r oly n Samp s o n


Johann Sebastian Bach: Suite in A minor (reconstructed by Werner Breig) Concerto for Two Violins and Strings in D minor, BWV 1043 Georg Philipp Telemann: Orchestral Suite in G major “La Bizarre”, TWV 55:G2 Concerto for Two Violas in G major, TWV 52:G3 Georg Friedrich Händel: “Agrippina condotta a morire” – cantata, HWV 110

June 02-03 Liszt Academy, Grand Hall 02nd Friday 7:45 pm Ormándy 03rd Saturday 3:30 pm Reiner B + Midnight Music 11:30 pm

Bach Telemann Händel Seiler Sampson T’Hooft

Carolyn Sampson, soprano Artistic director and leader: Midori Seiler Baroque gesture: Sigrid T’Hooft

Midori Seiler, the world-famous baroque violinist of German and Japanese descent, will be collaborating with the Festival Or­ chestra for the second time this season. The programme con­ sists of compositions by German baroque masters. The Suite in B minor, presumed to have been composed in Cologne, is probably the most popular of Bach’s four orchestral suites. The audience will be in for an unusual treat; according to musicologists the work was originally written in A minor for strings. The Bach scholar Werner Breig has reconstructed that version. Music history knows of six Bach violin concertos, of which three have been lost. Bach and the Leipzig Collegium Musicum performed the Concerto for Two Violins in D minor in concerts at Café Zimmermann. Spitta, Bach’s notable 19th century biographer, described its divinely beautiful slow movement as a “vocal pearl”. “… even though I have composed many such as this, they have never really stemmed from my heart; the least you could say is that they are mostly in the French style”, wrote Georg Philipp Telemann in one of his autobiographies. Tonight’s concert will feature his suite, La Bizarre, and his Concerto for Two Violettas in G major. (The violetta was an instrument between the viola and the gamba, but isn’t used any longer today, which is why this work is usually played on two violas.) After his stays in Hamburg, Rome and Florence, Händel visited Naples in April 1708 and spent the next three months there. He composed the concert’s closing soprano cantata during these eventful times. The libretto is a fictive monologue from the widowed Empress Julia Agrippina (15 - 59 AD), shortly before her assassination.

57


COMMUNITY WEEK CHILD CARE INSTITUTIONS NURSING HOMES CHURCHES SYNAGOGUES

June 19–25

Each season, the Budapest Festival Orchestra makes every effort to take our music out of the confines of the concert hall. The orchestra introduces unique variations of concerts, and we are performing at ever more unconventional venues to build new ties with audiences. Since the summer of 2014, our Community Weeks have seen us perform in provincial synagogues which have been abandoned or no longer serve their original purposes. Our goal is to fill synagogues that were laid bare by the Holocaust, with life, music and culture once again. Tunes, stories and flavours can introduce local communities to the one-time diversity and tolerance that used to be so typical of Hungary. Our concerts will be featuring works by composers with Jewish connections, as well as klezmer tunes. As Iván Fischer summarised the essence of the concert series: “Synagogues still stand in many villages and small towns which have not had Jewish inhabitants for a long time. Some places they are in ruins, at others they have been turned into furniture stores or a gym. We visit these places, and give free concerts. People are curious, and the music entices them in. The orchestra plays, and afterwards a rabbi speaks about how things used to be, about how cohabitation with the Jewish community looked. We hope that the beauty of music and the small presentation will bring the memory of the Jewish community closer to those who live around the building today. The Synagogue Concerts are a joint production by the Budapest Festival Orchestra, the Unified Hungarian Jewish Congregation and the Federation of Hungarian Jewish Communities.

58


DANCING ON THE SQUARE FISCHER

JUNE HEROES’ SQUARE

“Every listener is equally important to the Festival Orchestra, and they start from a very young age. Being receptive to music has nothing to do with one’s family background. Everyone de­ serves respect.” Iván Fischer Iván Fischer and the Budapest Festival Orchestra founded the Dancing on the Square project in 2015. It is not only about music and dancing together, but also about mutual responsibility, tolerance and respect. The most important participants of the project are those disadvantaged children who become real heroes for the day when they dance together in Heroes’ Square, to the Festival Orchestra’s music. They work for months towards a common goal, and they enjoy the results of being part of a real creative community. In 2017, we will be organising our third free grand open-air concert, to delight the community that has developed around the project through the children, the audience and the concerts. The participating schools are all our partners in inviting as many Roma and non-Roma children as possible to dance and experience the feeling of acceptance together. Besides the weekly dance rehearsals, we organise regional meetings and build connections with host schools in Budapest. We also give the children the opportunity to meet the musicians of the Festival Orchestra, bringing them closer to classical music. We believe that music can build special relationships among people regardless of gender, social status, ethnic background or linguistic differences. And besides all that, music teaches us to cooperate, that we should be attentive and tolerant to one another.

60


CHAMBER MUSIC

63


SUNDAY CHAMBER MUSIC

2016 OCTOBER 16

NOVEMBER 06

DECEMBER 18

BFO Rehearsal Hall, 5:00 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall, 5:00 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall, 5:00  pm

MENDELSSOHN LISZT

MOZART RAVEL BRAHMS

DEBUSSY CRAS SCHUBERT

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Flute Quartet in D major, K. 285 Maurice Ravel: Songs of Madagascar Johannes Brahms: String Quartet in C minor, Op. 51, No. 1

Claude Debussy: Danse Sacrée et Danse Profane Jean Cras: Quintet for Harp, Flute and String Trio Franz Schubert: Quintet in C major, Op. 163, D. 965

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy: String Quartet in E flat major, Op. 12 Franz Liszt: Tristia – Vallée d’Obermann – Piano Trio Franz Liszt: Liebesträume, No. 3 (transcribed by Skalmer) Franz Liszt: Orpheus – piano trio Franz Liszt: Angelus (transcribed by Widsperger) Franz Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 9 ‘Carnival in Pest’ – piano trio Ágnes Bíró, violin Antónia Bodó, violin Noémi Molnár, violin Csaba Gálfi, viola Orsolya Mód, cello Péter Szabó, cello István Lajkó, piano

64

Balázs Bujtor, violin Violetta Eckhardt, violin Mária Gál-Tamási, violin Csaba Gálfi, viola Gábor Sipos, viola György Kertész, cello Rita Sovány, cello Gabriella Pivon, flute Emese Mali, piano Nora Fischer, vocals

Balázs Bujtor, violin Erika Kovács, violin Zsófia Lezsák, violin Noémi Molnár, violin Csaba Gálfi, viola Lajos Dvorák, cello Éva Eckhardt, cello György Kertész, cello Zsolt Fejérvári, double-bass Anett Jóföldi, flute Ágnes Polónyi, harp


SUNDAY CHAMBER MUSIC

2017 FEBRUARY 19

APRIL 09

MAY 28

BFO Rehearsal Hall, 5:00 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall, 5:00 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall, 5:00 pm

MOZART VAUGHAN WILLIAMS PROKOFIEV GOLDMARK

MARTINŮ HINDEMITH SZABÓ ZEMPLÉNI MOWER

C. SCHUMANN DVOŘÁK BEETHOVEN

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Grande Sestetto Concertante (transcription of the Sinfonia Concertante for string sextet), K. 364 Ralph Vaughan Williams: Phantasy Quintet Sergei Prokofiev: Sonata for Two Violins, Op. 56 Károly Goldmark: String Quintet in A minor, Op. 9 Csaba Czenke, violin Tibor Gátay, violin Eszter Lesták Bedő, violin János Pilz, violin Levente Szabó, violin Zsolt Szefcsik, violin Zoltán Tuska, violin Cecília Bodolai, viola László Bolyki, viola Barna Juhász, viola István Polónyi, viola István Rajncsák, viola Péter Háry, cello Mahdi Kousay, cello Rita Sovány, cello

66

Bohuslav Martinů: Sextet Paul Hindemith: Anecdotes for Radio (Three Pieces for Five Instruments) Csaba Szabó: Suite for Solo Cello with Cow Bells László Zempléni: Quartet for Flute and Percussion Mike Mower: Sonata Latino Bence Asztalos, violin László Lévai, double-bass Attila Martos, double-bass Péter Szabó, cello Anna Fazekas, flute Bernadett Nagy, flute Erika Sebők, flute Ákos Ács, clarinet Roland Csalló, clarinet Andrea Bressan, bassoon Sándor Patkós, bassoon Nehil Durak, oboe Tamás Póti, trumpet Boglárka Fábry, percussion László Herboly, percussion István Kurcsák, percussion Irina Ivanyickaja, piano László Adrián Nagy, piano Katalin Sarkadi, piano

Clara Schumann: Piano Trio in G minor, Op. 17 Antonín Dvořák: Terzetto in C major, Op. 74 Ludwig van Beethoven: String Quartet in E minor, Op. 59, No. 2 Ágnes Bíró, violin Mária Gál-Tamási, violin Pál Jász, violin István Kádár, violin Anikó Mózes, violin Győző Máté, viola István Polónyi, viola Mahdi Kousay, cello Péter Szabó, cello Gábor Gyülvészi, piano


BACK TO NATURE – CHAMBER MUSIC ON PERIOD INSTRUMENTS

JANUARY 19

FEBRUARY 18

BFO Rehearsal Hall, 7:45 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall, 7:45 pm

SCHEIDT TELEMANN BACH J. CH. BACH VIVALDI

MOZART BRAHMS

Samuel Scheidt: Pavana, Galliard Battaglia, Ludi Musici – Canzon super ‘O Nachbar Roland’ Georg Philipp Telemann: Suite for Two Violins ‘Gulliver’s Travels’, TWV 40:108 Georg Philipp Telemann: Concerto for Four Violins in G major, TWV 40:201 Johann Sebastian Bach: Sonata for Violin and Harpsichord in G minor, BWV 1030R Johann Christian Bach: Ah, why shou’d love with tyrant sway, WH 27 Antonio Vivaldi: In furore iustissimae irae, RV 626 Johann Christian Bach: Cease a while ye winds to blow, WH 36

Emese Gulyás, violin Gábor Sipos, violin Gabriella Nagy, violin Ágnes Csoma, viola Mahdi Kousay, cello Rita Sovány, bass viola da gamba Soma Dinyés, bass viola da gamba Attila Martos, double-bass Gábor Tokodi, lute Gergely Hamar, oboe Csaba Nagy, oboe Gergő Farkas, bassoon László Feriencsik, bassoon Zoltán Szőke, horn András Szabó, horn Judit Varga, harpsichord Éva Bodrogi, soprano

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Divertimento in E flat major, K. 563 Johannes Brahms: Trio in E flat major, Op. 40 Eszter Lesták Bedő, violin Ágnes Csoma, viola Mahdi Kousay, cello Zoltán Szőke, horn Balázs Fülei, Graf piano

Györgyi Czirók, soprano viola da gamba János Pilz, soprano viola da gamba, violin Eszter Lesták Bedő, alto viola da gamba, violin Gyöngyvér Oláh, violin

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on tour

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BFO AROUND THE WORLD

“The sound of the Budapest Festival Orchestra is unique. It’s not so much the timbre of individual instruments, more the voluptuous textures they create and the exquisitely blended chords.” London Evening Standard The Budapest Festival Orchestra amazes its audiences not only in Hungary, but around the whole world. We share our passion with music-lovers across the globe, in music’s most important international venues. Whether at the Musikverein in Vienna, the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam or New York’s Carnegie Hall, the orchestra brings the magic of music to listeners, delighting audiences in a unique way. The BFO are regularly invited to play at such major festivals as the Salzburger Festspiele, the Lucerne Festival, the BBC Proms and the Edinburgh Festival. The overwhelming interest from audiences in cities which regularly host the world’s leading orchestras shows the significance, value and the appreciation for BFO. The value of the orchestra is underlined further by the professional accolades they receive. This is emphasised by Gramophone magazine, as they rank the Festival Orchestra among the world’s ten best orchestras; those that have built outstanding reputations over the past few decades. The tireless work of Iván Fischer and the musicians has secured the BFO a place among the most sought-after of international ensembles, reinforcing the relevance and importance of outstanding Hungarian musical culture. The BFO serves as an ambassador to a country whose contribution to the development of classical music in the 20th century has few rivals. Highlights of the touring schedule for the upcoming season include taking up residency at the San Sebastian Festival, a Far East tour with performances in China and Korea, and a major US tour with concerts in New York, Chicago and Boston. Our orchestra entices the entire world, while bestowing the exceptional qualities of Hungarian culture on international audiences.

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On tour

2016

2017

August 20–28 Spain Great Britain Denmark

February 04–12 United States of America

20th San-Sebastian, Kursaal 21st San-Sebastian, Kursaal 22nd Santander, Palacio de Festivales de Cantabria 23rd San-Sebastian, Kursaal 26th London, Royal Albert Hall 28th Copenhagen, Tivoli October 01–11 China South Korea 01st Guangzhou, Opera House 03rd Xi’an, CRR 05th Beijing, NCPA 06th Beijing, NCPA 08th Shanghai, Symphony Hall 10th Seoul, Seoul Arts Center 11th Seoul, Samsung Hall December 06–10 Germany Austria Belgium France Croatia 06th Frankfurt, Alte Oper 07th Vienna, Musikverein 08th Antwerp, De Singel 09th Toulouse, Halles aux Grains 10th Zagreb, Lisinski Hall

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04th Newark, NJPAC 05th New York, Lincoln Center 06th New York, Lincoln Center 08th Chicago, Symphony Hall 10th Ann Arbor, Hill Auditorium 12th Boston, Symphony Hall March 07–14 Switzerland France Germany 07th Bern, Kulturcasino 08th Zurich, Tonhalle 09th Geneva, Victoria Hall 10th Paris, Philharmonie de Paris 12th Cologne, Philharmonie 13th Lucerne, KKL 14th Lugano, LAC April 02–07 Slovenia Italy The Netherlands France 02nd Ljubljana, Cankarjev Dom 03rd Udine, Teatro Nuovo 05th Utrecht, Musikzentrum Vredenburg 07th Grenoble, MC2

May 15–22 Poland Belgium Germany Great Britain 15th Katowice, Sala Koncertowa NOSPR 16th Katowice, Sala Koncertowa NOSPR 18th Bruges, Concertgebouw 19th Bruges, Concertgebouw 20th Bruges, Concertgebouw 21st Dortmund, Konzerthaus 22nd London, Royal Festival Hall


REVIEWS OF THE BFO

“The Budapest Festival Orchestra is rated among the top ten orchestras in the world. Such rankings are questionable, but the concert by the Hungarian orchestra on 2 August in the Großes Festspielhaus in Salzburg, featuring the works of Bartók and Mahler, proved that the BFO is a world-class orchestra.” Drehpunktkultur

“Excitement, awe, fatigue, euphoria, melancholy and polite appreciation are all states of being that have carried me out of the doors of the Konzerthaus over the years, but rarely have I felt such a sense of warmth and energy as exuded from the Budapest Festival Orchestra on Thursday evening, and it is eve­ nings like this which make people come out to classical music concerts.” Bachtrack “All the elements of performance worked as one, each in bal­ ance. All in a night’s work for what might be the best orchestra in the world.” The New York Times “Not every orchestra can end a concert by grouping itself into a choir and singing decently some a cappella Brahms, but not every orchestra is the Budapest Festival Orchestra. In Wednes­ day’s concert it took about three notes of the curtain-raiser, Mozart’s Magic Flute overture, for the magic to hit.” The Times 73


BFO cares

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Young BFO

“What vocation could be more beautiful than planting the first good seed in a new garden?” Zoltán Kodály The Budapest Festival Orchestra’s globally unrivalled programme of musical education endeavours to introduce the treasures of classical music to children, families and young adults. During these action-packed adventures, younger learners become familiar with instruments and shorter tunes, while older ones get acquainted with entire operas and symphonies. Our goal is to collect and pass on professional values, and to complement our renowned concert types with new musical initiatives. The organisation of children’s and youth programmes is a part of my work that I hold close to my heart. In my childhood, my grandparents, parents and teachers encouraged me to appreciate music early on; already in my primary school years I was experiencing the soul-nurturing and community-building power of music. As József Hámori, the famous Hungarian neuroscientist said, “music and musicality are just as fundamental elements in healthy human personality development ... as human speech is.” The mission of the Festival Orchestra is share the joy of playing and listening to music with both smaller and older children, whether they are from the Capital or from the countryside, well-to-do or disadvantaged, talented or less-curious about music. The 2016 / 2017 season will see us continue our renowned and popular youth programmes. We are working to strengthen relations with our growing number of partner schools in order to acquaint their students with the world of instruments and music literature, as well as to the openness and creativity of the orchestra. Among the programmes on offer you’ll find ‘Choose your Instrument’, visits to open rehearsals, and children’s operas. On certain occasions, school children can enjoy our concerts for just 1500 Forints per ticket. We are also looking to name our Partner School of the Year; we first awarded this title in 2015 to the Bárdos Lajos Bilingual Primary and Secondary School in Lágymányos. Be sure to check out the Budapest Festival Orchestra’s colourful and varied programme. Orsolya Erdődy, Deputy Executive Director

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Young BFO

“Aunt Anita! Instead of going to football training, I’d prefer to learn to play the violin!” 4th grade boy after Choose your Instrument 6–8 YEARS OF AGE CHOOSE YOUR INSTRUMENT This is a special programme for kids who are interested in music but have not yet decided which instrument they would like to take up. During ‘Choose your Instrument’ sessions, some of the orchestra’s musicians introduce young schoolchildren to their own instruments with a short concert, after which the kids can have a go on the instruments. The happy cries, the roaring laughter, the trombones blown at full force, the squeaking violins, the mercilessly beaten cymbals, all echo the programme’s success.

8–18 YEARS OF AGE BFO REACHES OUT! Members of the Festival Orchestra visit groups of young people in provincial Hungarian towns to work with them in short sessions and whet their interest in becoming a musician. These visits also allow us to discover new talent. Over the course of the programme, we have performed in some unusual places including public baths, libraries, zoos, hospitals and prisons.

8–18 YEARS OF AGE OPEN REHEARSALS It is not just the BFO ‘reaching out’; children can also reach out to the orchestra. Open rehearsals are a great opportunity for students from our partner schools to gain first-hand experience of how a symphony orchestra works. Children can learn tricks of the trade, find out what a conductor does and how the musicians follow his lead. Experience shows that children simply love these visits. They sit through the rehearsals attentively, in utter silence, and afterwards they keep talking about the experience for days.

8–18 YEARS OF AGE CHILDREN’S OPERA Youth operas have graced the start of our season for the past few years. We perform these operas in ten provincial and Budapest schools, enabling thousands of young people to enjoy them. The productions are not exclusively for children, although in order to allow young people in the audience to identify with the pieces, child actors often perform in the operas. The first of these productions was Hans Krása’s opera, Brundibár, in 2013. In 2016, we will be premiering a work by Gaetano Donizetti for the children.

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Young BFO COCOA CONCERTS MIDNIGHT MUSIC

Cocoa Concerts

Midnight Music

September 25 Sunday 2:30 pm and 4:30 pm BFO Rehearsal Hall Iván Fischer

December 03 Saturday 11:30 pm Millenáris Iván Fischer

November 27 Sunday 2:30 pm and 4:30 pm BFO Rehearsal Hall Erika Illési

February 25 Saturday 11:30 pm Millenáris Robin Ticciati

January 15 Sunday 2:30 pm and 4:30 pm BFO Rehearsal Hall András Hábetler

March 31 Friday 11:30 pm Millenáris Iván Fischer

March 18 Saturday 2:30 pm and 4:30 pm BFO Rehearsal Hall Iván Fischer

June 03 Saturday 11:30 pm Millenáris Midori Seiler

May 07 Sunday 2:30 pm and 4:30 pm BFO Rehearsal Hall Iván Fischer

5–12 YEARS OF AGE COCOA CONCERTS This series can now look back over more than two decades of weekend afternoons of music and storytelling in a family atmosphere, introducing the world of music to a young audience. This season, we once again welcome families to our interactive concerts, and after the music and applause have died down, the young audience will be able to queue up for polka-dot mugs of hot cocoa.

AUTISM-FRIENDLY COCOA CONCERTS With the help of the Nemzetközi Cseperedő Alapítvány (an International Foundation to support children and their families living with autism), we have developed a unique concert format which provides a safe and fun environment for autistic children and their families alike. Before the concerts, we send some helpful materials to the families so that the children can prepare for the visual and audio effects they are going to experience.

18+ YEARS OF AGE MIDNIGHT MUSIC Some prefer listening to music at night. Through our Midnight Music concerts, audiences can enjoy classical music at night-time, while lounging on beanbags beside our musicians in an open and informal environment. The BFO presents this new form of concerts for young audiences, which start as late as half past 11 in the evening. These concerts are for the open-minded, who enjoy getting to know our artists under unusual circumstances and, of course, don’t mind staying up late. Aside from beautiful classical music, the audience gets short, professional and entertaining introductions to the pieces.

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BFO IN THE COMMUNITY

Over the past 30 years, the Budapest Festival Orchestra has be­ come a regular guest at the world’s most significant and pres­ tigious concert halls. Whether in New York, London or Istanbul, they are always welcomed with open arms. However, for Iván Fischer and the musicians of the BFO, the priority is to allow Hungarian audiences – of all ages and social strata, living under any circumstance – to enjoy their music. Because of that, we try to involve those who are not part of our regular audience, and who cannot make it to the concert halls. They include disadvantaged young people, who are neither familiar with nor have access to classical music; disabled children who would have to make great efforts to visit a concert; the elderly, who often find that hearing a violin played live is the best medicine; families who cannot afford to buy tickets; new mothers who don’t have the time and the energy to attend concerts; as well as church communities and inhabitants of small towns and villages. In other words, everyone who might find music important. Because of that, the Festival Orchestra organises three Community Weeks every season. Over the course of these weeks, our musicians play in chamber music setups in old-age nursing homes, child care institutions, schools, churches and synagogues. In 2015 we decided that we shouldn’t just visit disadvantaged regions, but give the chance to those who live there to come to Budapest and create an important and grand event together. That is why we created the Dancing on the Square project; this year once again, hundreds of disadvantaged young people will become heroes for the day as they dance to the orchestra’s music in Heroes’ Square. We believe that music can build special relationships among people, and we work to enable as many as possible to experience the positive effects of music.

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PARTNERSHIPS

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PARTNERSHIPS

The Budapest Festival Orchestra is one of Hungary’s most successful cultural initiatives. Since 1983, the orchestra has been sharing the joy of music of the highest order, with tens of thousands of people every year in Hungary and abroad. Many see the BFO as a true institution, playing a permanent and defining role in the musical world. But uniquely, much of the orchestra’s costs are covered by its own foundation, meaning the fate of the BFO lies in the hands of those who contribute to its operations through their valuable support. Naturally, state funding in recognition of our world-class non-profit activities is an important factor in ensuring the continu­ ity of our work. However, this funding alone, even when taking the considerable income from ticket and performance sales into account, is insufficient to maintain our constantly refreshed and broadening spectrum of activities. The corporate and civic collaborations that stem from the outstanding performance of the musicians are key to allowing the Festival Orchestra to occupy an exceptional position in international music, while providing vital community-building and educational services to augment our world-class artistic performances. We are proud of our Supporters’ Club, which adds a devoted and knowledgeable dimension to the orchestra. As worthy partners of the musicians, club members join in order to support our sometimes grand, sometimes ground-breaking, ini-

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tiatives at the first call to action. Without them, projects such as the Community Weeks, the Autism-friendly Cocoa Concerts or the Dancing on the Square project in Heroes’ Square, could never have come to fruition. But besides these bold gestures, this circle of people is also very loyal, and the Festival Orchestra does everything it can to honour this devotion.We are waiting for you to join our success story; become part of the Club! We also give our corporate partners unique service. We are well aware that the secret of fruitful sponsorship is cooperation based on mutual benefit. The BFO is constantly on the lookout for new partnerships, and is ideally poised to mobilise all its available knowledge and capacity to ensure mutual success. Our programme takes us everywhere, from the world’s busy metropolises to small disadvantaged villages; our music appeals to those in need as much as to social elites. The BFO’s broad spectrum of activities and high brand value enable our corporate supporters to reach specific and appropriate target groups. This brand value was recognised in 2015 by the Hungarian edition of Forbes and the MagyarBrands programme, something for which we also owe a debt of gratitude to our supporters. During the upcoming season, hopefully alongside more partners than ever, we are going to attempt to broaden further the long-term sustainability of the Festival Orchestra.


HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT US?

INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT OPPORTUNITIES Join the Supporters’ Club! Depending upon the amount which people are able to give, individuals sympathetic to our cause are placed into one of several categories of Supporters’ Club membership, while we provide them with exclusive services in return. We are revamping the system for the 2016 /17 season, introducing new kinds of supporters’ benefits and establishing both the Music Director’s Circle and the Young Friends of the BFO group. You can read a summary of the benefits of membership on the next page. Support a project! The Budapest Festival Orchestra is continually launching new projects which stem from the fields of interest of our musicians, and reflect the demands of our audience. Our programmes for educating young people and enabling their social integration are looking for supporters as much as our communitybuilding concert series, which brings music to small villages, or our grand season finale, the Dancing on the Square project in Heroes’ Square. You can find out more about our initiatives through our website.

of intimate events every year, whereby, in exclusive surroundings, they can learn from Iván Fischer about the most pressing and interesting plans he has for his orchestra. Support the BFO by donating 1% of your tax! Hungarian tax payers can donate 1% of their income tax, without incurring additional charges, to a non-profit organisation of their choice. In 2016, we will be spending the funds raised through these 1% donations on the BFO’s Cocoa Concerts and the school tour of our children’s opera performance. Tell your friends abroad about the BFO’s international circles of friends! The Budapest Festival Orchestra’s network of international circles helps the orchestra on a global stage, through fundraising and the organising of local events. Their members meet regularly, and whether it’s following a BFO concert abroad or during other friendly meetings, they are always ready to greet and support the orchestra. You can contact Zsuzsanna Deák any time of the year (TAMOGATOIKLUB@BFZ.HU) if you want more details on individual donations.

Take part in our events! Every year, the BFO opens their concert season with a gala dinner. Traditionally held at an exclusive Budapest venue, the event allows our supporters to celebrate the season’s opening together alongside Iván Fischer and members of the orchestra. Our highergrade supporters get invited to a number

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HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT US?

Purchase season tickets before they go on general sale Invitations to an open rehearsal Exclusively for Supporters’ Club members, discounted tickets are made available twice a year The BFO’s electronic newsletter for supporters Online programme notes for BFO concerts Discount at the Bohém Restaurant Admission to Müpa Budapest’s VIP room during the intervals of certain concerts An invitation to the annual Patrons’ Dinner A signed BFO CD The opportunity to join the orchestra on an international tour (includes discounted travel package offers) An invitation to the annual Benefactors’ Dinner An invitation to a BFO concert with the CEO (# occasions / year)

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Invitation to a post-BFO-concert reception with the Music Director (# occasions / year) Bronze: 20,000 HUF Silver: 40,000 HUF Gold: 80,000 HUF Patron: 120,000 HUF Benefactor – Silver: 250,000 HUF Benefactor – Golden: 500,000 HUF Diamond: 1,000,000 HUF Platinum: 2,000,000 HUF Star Platinum: 5,000,000 HUF The BFO reserves the right to make occasional modifications or withdraw specific club membership benefits as it sees fit. Due to circumstances beyond the BFO’s control, at some performances the full range of club membership benefits may not be available.

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SUPPORTERS OF PRIORITY EVENTS

The Apprenticeship Scheme Scholarships to allow three talented young conductors the opportunity to spend a year with the Budapest Festival Orchestra. Flüh, John and Caroline von Falkenhausen, Jutta von Wulffen, Hubertus

SEASON OPENING GALA Kiscelli Church September 12, 2015 Supporters of the Season Opening Gala contributed to the BFO’s Autism-friendly Cocoa Concerts. VIP Supporters Bancsó, Katalin Benczédi, Balázs Brasher, Richard Budai, Judit Erdei, László Ferjentsik, Dr. Miklós Hajdu, Judit Hemingway, Sylvia Horváth, Vera Hulla, Bernhard Jaksity György / Concorde Securities Zrt. Kádár, Dr. Gabriella Kádár, Judit Kiefer, Lorenz Kocsi, Gábor Kőrösi, Zoltán Lehoczki, Tímea Rosta, Dr. Ildikó Razumovsky, Gregor Schimert, Andreas Schimert, Konstantin Schwartz, Daniel Seres, Béla Simor, András

Süttő, Péter Szabó, Vilmos Vámos, György Varga, Júlia Varga, Zoltán Velencei, Renáta von Wulffen, Hubertus Supporters Anonymous Bálint, Csilla Benko, Radka Bródy, Dr. Péter Büki, Dr. Ágnes Csetényi, Csaba Csetényi, Szilvia Csontos, Beáta Illés, Gábor Kohut, Noémi Krug, Zsuzsanna and Armin László, Csaba Leányvári, Enikő Leighton, Robert Markovich, Dr. György, and guests Marschall, Miklós Matyi, Dezső Miklósvári, Andrea Ortiz, Mo Rényi, Andrea Salgó, István Sauer, Judit Seibel, Nancy Simon, Annamária Somfai, Dr. Éva Somfai, György István Stern, Ellen Benko, Steve Strohmayer, János Széver, Szonja Szigeti, Ágnes Taipei Representative Office in Hungary Temple, Réka Thomas, Geoffrey

Verykios, Sophia Winkler, Nóra Zwack, Izabella Zwack, Sándor

DANCING ON THE SQUARE PROJECT Heroes’ Square June 18, 2015 Individual supporters of the Dancing on the Square project who contributed to feeding the young participants from disadvantaged towns. Barna, Dr. Judit Borgos, Anna Brasher, Richard Bródy, Dr. Péter Galla, Zsuzsanna Gallasz, Péter Galambos, Dr. Éva Gidáli, Dr. Julianna Gyulai, András Homonnay, Géza Jáki, János and wife Kertész, Gabriella Kittel, Dr. Ágnes Kökény, Dr. Mihály Meinczinger-Krug, Zsuzsanna Németvölgyi, Ágnes Radinkó, Dr. Erzsébet Simon, Erzsébet Sitkei, Dr. Éva Szteklács, Gabriella Tanos, Zsuzsa Tímár, Mrs. László (Dr.) Valis, Éva Márta Zeidler, Mrs. Gerd Erich

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MEMBERS OF THE SUPPORTERS’ CLUB

Star Platinum CLASS Soros, Tamiko

PLATINUM CLASS Benko, Stephen and Radka Flüh, John and Caroline Simor, András Toth, Sylvia von Falkenhausen, Jutta von Wulffen, Hubertus

DIAMOND CLASS Balássy, M., László and Petra Bojár, Gábor and Zanker, Dr. Zsuzsanna Hulla, Bernhard Markovich, Dr. György and Sátai, Dr. Anikó

GOLDEN BENEFACTOR CLASS Bencsik, László and Kis, Dr. Bernadett Bottka, Dr. Erzsébet and Feldmájer, Dr. Péter ‫אליעזר יצחק בן אברהמ‬ Juhász, Zoltán, instrument maker Kabcenell, Nicholas and Gudor, Orsolya Meinczinger-Krug, Zsuzsanna and Krug, Armin Mosonyi, György and Mosonyi, Ágnes Szecskay Attorneys at Law Varga, Júlia Zsámboki, Dr. Gabriella

SILVER BENEFACTOR CLASS Bíró, Ágnes Bognár, Péter, Vaya Travel Kft. Farago, John and Martin, Jeanne Gala Tours Kft. Jalsovszky Law Office Kálmán, Szilasi, Sárközy and Partners, Attorneys at Law Kirkby, David and Ruth Marschall, Dr. Miklós

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Mécs, Endre and Andrea Nyitrai, István Rosta, Dr. Ildikó and Ferjentsik, Dr. Miklós Roszkopf, Nyina SBGK Attorneys at Law and Patent Attorneys /Szamosi, Dr. Katalin Steiner, László and Zsuzsa Rényi, Andrea and Straub, Elek Thompson, David and Petra Vámos, Dr. György

PATRON CLASS Arriba Taqueria Bakró-Nagy, Marianne Balázs, Árpád and Dénes, Andrea Berger, Mrs. György Bernabei-Reynolds, Loreta Boros, István Bőcs, Ferenc and Sárdy, Ágnes Brasher, Richard Bródy, Dr. Péter and Ildikó Csépe, Dr. Valéria and Molnár, Imre Csík, Dr. Gabriella and Hudecz, Dr. Ferenc Dornbach, Alajos dr. and Zachár, Zsófia Dulin, Bence Faber Dutch-Hungarian Trade Kft. / Felkai, Tamás Fráter, Dr. Loránd Fuzesi, Nancy and Stephen Göncz, Kinga and Benedek, László Gyarmati, Dr. György and Kuti, Katalin György, Dr. Pál and Simon, Ágnes Győri, Dr. Zsuzsanna and Garai, Ferenc Hanák, Gábor and Tatai, Ágnes Havass, Miklós Horváth, Dr. Ágnes Huebner, Charles and Suzanne Kalmár, György Visky, Dr. Katalin (Mrs. Kelemen) Kertész, Dr. Gabriella

Király, Júlia Királyfalvi, Dr. György Komáromy, Péter and Pollák, Dr. Katalin Kökény, Dr. Mihály and Stiller, Mária Marker Kft. Mártonfi, Attila Mester, Éva and Hancz, László Molnár, Dr. Gábor Németvölgyi, Ágnes Szabady, Dr. Judit (Mrs. Nyárádi) Péter, József Pre-Tax Kft. Professional Medical Kft. Sárváry, Mariann Sólyom, Dr. Éva Somfai, Dr. Éva, Somfai and Partners Industrial Property Kft. Surányi, Sándor and wife Szántó, Csaba and Szántó-Kapornay, Emőke Szauer, Péter Székely, Zoltán and Leposa, Csilla Tóth, Gábor and wife Török, Zoltán Varga, Dr. Ildikó and Nagy, Dr. Péter Varsányi, Pál and Katalin Zoltán, István and Ágnes

GOLD CLASS B. Nagy, András Bálint, Mrs. András (Dr.) Bánáti, Mária Beghetto Oreste, Mrs. Paolo Bitter, Brunó and Iványi-Bitter, Brigitta Bittner, Péter Burger Balogh, Ingeborg and Balogh, Tibor Csernay, Dr. László Csillag, Dr. György and Keszthelyi, Dr. Alexandra Drexler, Miklós and


MEMBERS OF THE SUPPORTERS’ CLUB

Lengyel, Gabriella Eisler, Dr. Péter Gál, György and Győrfi, Gabriella Anna (Mrs. Gál) Hall, Karl Philip Szakonyi, Mirella (Mrs. Horváth) Kertész, Viktor and Terézia Kis, Balázs Kocsány, János Lock, Richard and Julia Matskási, Dr. István Mika, Dr. János Nagy, Dr. Károly Pálfia, Dr. Judit Pallag, Tibor and Karner, Anikó Palotai, János and Soltész, Dr. Anikó Salgó, Judi Sápi, Mrs. Lajos Sápi, Hedvig Seres, Béla Sessler, István and Judit Soltész + Soltész Kft. Szabó, Dr. Gábor Szomor, Dr. Erika (Mrs. Szabó) Szelényi, Iván Szever, Dr. Zsuzsanna and Dalos, Mihály Szigeti, Ágnes Szilágyi, Mrs. Béla, Szilágyi, Éva and Horváth, Péter Szivós, Péter Szűcs, András Tanos, Zsuzsa Varga, Péter Wetzker, Konrad

SILVER CLASS Abonyi, Dr. Iván and wife Alföldi, István Ambrus, Dr. Ágnes Bacher, Gusztáv Barczikay, László Barkóczi, Jolán Barta, Mrs. István Batta, Mária and Madar, Gyula

Bende, Zoltán Benedek, Andor Berényi, Gábor and Pető, Dr. Katalin Bertalan, Dr. Éva Böszörményi, Dr. Katalin Csanádi, Judit and Gyabronka, József Doleschall, György and Szabó, Katalin Dögei, Anna Feldmájer, Lea and Kocsis, Tamás Félegyházi, Pál Feuer, István and Feuer, Mária Földényi, Éva and Korda, Péter Füredi, Gábor Gabriel, Dr. Szilvia and Kalmár, Dr. Lajos Galambos, Dr. Éva Gálosi, György and Júlianna Garai, Mrs. Péter Géta Center Kft. Gordon, Pál Görgényi, Judit and Dénes, Miklós Plank, Mária (Mrs. Goszták) and Madaras, Olga Greiner, Ákos Gyulai, András Halmos, Judit and Magyar, Mihály Hámori, Ferenc and Ács, Éva Hardy, Thomas G. Hargitai, Tibor and Ilona Harkányi, Mária Hegyes, Dr. Erzsébet and Szolnoki, Gábor Holéci, József Hollay, György Hornung, Hajnalka and János Horváth, Anna Horváth, László Ihász, Márta and Spollár, József Jáger, Gyula Jáger, Zsuzsanna Kabódi, Ferenc

Kabódi, Mátyás Kádi, Anna and Sziráczky, Zoltán Kenesei, Mrs. Gábor Kertész, Zsuzsanna Keviczky, László Kis, Ádám Kiss, Andrea Klauber, Dr. András and Szigeti, Dr. Éva Komlósi, Júlia and Zsolt Kőszegi, László Kreiss, Gábor and Hartai, Gabriella Lantos, Dr. István Lastofka, Péter and Patkós, Katalin László, Dr. János and Péley, Bernadette Lövenberg, Gábor and Radó, Dr. Júlianna Márton, János Mezei, Katalin Mitsányi, Zoltán and Juvancz, Beáta Müller, György and Bárd, Anna Nagy, László Nagy, Mária Éva Nagy, Dr. Péter and Varga, Dr. Ildikó Németh, Erzsébet Németh, György Paksy, Dr. László Radics, Dr Edit (Mrs. Papp) Páris, György and wife Patyánik, Dr. Mihály Pék, Mrs. István Pelle, Mrs. Gábor Pernesz, Mrs. Péter Petrucz, György Prágai, Éva Radinkó, Dr. Erzsébet Révai, Péter and Maya Rimanóczy, Zoltán and Csala, Éva Rónai, Mrs. Tibor Simó, Judit and Bokor, László Sitkei, Dr. Éva

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MEMBERS OF THE SUPPORTERS’ CLUB

Sívó, Róbert Somogyi, Éva and Horváth, László Spohn, Ferenc Stenczer, Noémi and Vámos, Dr. Tibor Szabó, Klára Szentesi, Dr. Péter Tárnok, Gyöngyi Hardy, Thomas G. Thomas, Geoffrey Thurzó, Dr. Sándor and Turcsányi, Rozália Torma, Kálmán and Halász, Anna Tóth, Katalin Tóth, Mihály and wife Tóth, Mrs. Tamás (wid.) Törő, Mrs. András (Dr.) Váradi, János Váradi, Dr. Mónika and Varjú, Gabriella Várkonyi, Vera Varsányi, Gyula Végh, Mrs. József Vígh, János Vörös, Imre

BRONZE CLASS Abonyi, Dr. Iván and wife Ábrahám, Zoltán Feldmájer, Lívia (Mrs. Alba) Alföldy, Zoltán and Szász, Erika Almási, Dr. József Almási, Mrs. József Apáthy, István Arany, Andrea Ármay, Dr. Zsuzsanna Árvay, Mrs. János Balázs, Gabriella Szücs, Judit (Mrs. Balázs) Bánki, Mrs. Ervin Bánki, Iván Baranyi, Dr. Éva Barna, Dr. István, Szabó, Zsuzsanna

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and Barna, Rebeka Eszter Barsi, Dr. Gusztáv Benkő, Dr. Judit Bérczi, Gábor Béres, Mrs. Károly Biksz, Péter Birman, Erzsébet and Tóti, Magda Bodor, Aranka and Liliom, Károly Bodor, József Bogdán, Mrs. István Bogdány, Éva Bognár, Béla Bonta, János and Nemes, Katalin Borissza, József and wife Bölöni, Eszter and Felsmann, Balázs Brunner, Boglárka Budaházy, Mrs. Miklós Bumberák, Dr. József Búzás, Mrs. József Buzás, Viktória Chabada, Kinga Csepregi, Terézia Cseszkó, Magda Csillag, Beáta Csurgó, Mrs. Ottó (Dr.) Dalmy, Dénes Danziger, Dr. Éva Deák, János Doubravszky, Mrs. Sándor Duba, Dr. Jenő and wife Dvorák, Lajos Egri, István Elsner, Dr. Miklós Ható, Katalin (Mrs. Faragó) Farkas, Gábor Fazekas, László Fábián, András Fehéregyházi, Zsuzsa Feldmájer, Györgyi and Benedek, Zsolt Feldmájer, Benjámin ‫ןימינב רימדלפ‬

Feldmájer, Ágnes and Sándor Félix, László Fendler, Judit Fenyő, Dr. Péter Czinege, Dr. Erzsébet (Mrs. Francsics) Fülöp, Annamária Gadzsokova, Kraszimira Gál, Mrs. Mátyás Gál, Dr. Nóra Galambos, Mrs. Imre Gallasz, József and Edit Gecse, Jolán Gecsey, Mrs. Dezső Gerő, Judit and Reich, Tamás Gidáli, Dr. Júlia Görög, Mrs. Tamás Grósz, Dr. György Gurubi, Imre and Jónás, Katalin Guti, Péter Gyarmati, Béla and wife Hajdu, Dr. András Halász, Mrs. Péter Halbrohr, Pál Hámori, Dr. Rudolf Havas, Ágnes Havas, Dr. István Hazai, Judit and László Hetényi, Ágnes and Bender, Mrs. György (Dr.) Hlavács, Dr. Éva Hollós, János Horváth, Dr. István Horváth, Mrs. János (Dr.) Horváth, Lajos Horváth, László Horváth, Sándor Horváth, Vilmos and Kőszegi, Anna Hőnig, Gábor Jáki, János and Jáki, Marika Jakob, Károly Jankó, Katalin and Béla Jeney, Sarolta Jórend, Dr. Judit and Herczeg, Ferenc


MEMBERS OF THE SUPPORTERS’ CLUB

Kardos, István Kádár, Mrs. László Kádár, Dr. Zsuzsanna Káldor, Mária Kalivoda, Imre Kálmán, Mrs. István (Dr.) Kárpáti, András Kelemen, Antal Kerékgyártó, Kálmán Kerényi, Gyula Keve, Károly and Urbán, István Kirsch, Mrs. Bertalan Kiss, Andrea Kiss, Dr. Mariann and Szamarasz, Theodorakisz Kitainik, Leonid Klinga, Ágnes Kocsis, György Hlatky, Katalin (Mrs. Komlós) Kónya, Albert and Sárközi, Alice Kónya, Dr. Katalin Koós, Ágnes Korda, János Korodi, Dr. Mihály and Magyar, Zsuzsanna Kósa, Mrs. János (Dr.) Kovács, Katalin Kovács, Dr. Péter Krausz, András Kriston, Dr. József Kutas, Magdolna Láner, Judit Láng, Béla Lantos, Dr. Bálint Lantos, Dr. Zsolt László, Júlia Lehel, E. Katalin Lellei, Dr. György Lovas, Mrs. János (Dr.) Maár, Dr. Judit and Krokovay, Dr. Zsolt Magyar, Dr. Iván and Fadgyas, Dr. Ildikó Magyar, Sylvia Major, György Marosffy, Dr. László

Máté, András Matos, Mrs. László (Dr.) Matus, László Meitner, Tamás Meleghegyi, Mrs. József Merényi, Gábor Mituszova, Dr. Mila Molnár, Dr. Gábor Molnár, Mrs. Gábor Monoki, Klára Nagy, Ákos and Papp, Izabella Nagy, Anna Nagy, Boldizsár Nagy, Mrs. Ervin (Dr) Nagy, Gábor Nagy, Mrs. Gyula Nagy, István Nagy, Judit and Kis, Róbert Gábor Nagy, Margit and Lantos, György Nagy, Pál Németh, Zsófia Németujvári, Mrs. László Kutasi, Éva (Mrs. Pál) and Banász, Mrs. András Palotai, Valéria Pankotai, Csaba Lux, Margit (Mrs. Pankotai) Papp, Szabolcs Pártos, Dr. Oszkár Pável, Dr. Iván and Pável, Mrs Iván Piller, Tibor Pongó, Judit Prepeliczay, Mrs. István Rácz, Zsuzsanna Radnóti, Dr. István Radó, Mrs. András Radó, Dr. János Réti, Mrs. József Rimanóczy, Kálmán and Szomor, Márta Rózsa, Dr. Beáta Rózsa, Gyula Rudas, Mrs. János Sáfár, Judit and Kocsis, Sándor

Sáfár, László Sárdi, Gyula Sáska, Géza Segesváry, Gábor and wife Horváth, Dr. Ágnes (Mrs. Sikó) Soltész, András Szabó, Márta Szabó, Dr. Piroska and Oláh, Dr. Ruben Szántó, Gabriella Szegvári, Dr. Mária Székely, Dr. József Szemenyei, Dr. Klára Szent-Martoni, Mária Szepesi, András Sziráki, Edit Szőke, András and Helga Szőke, Mariann Szőnyi, Mrs. Péter (Dr.) Theatrum Mundi Theatre and Literature Agency Thuróczy, Mrs. György (Dr.) Török, Ilona Turi, Dr. Mária Ujvári, Tibor and Erika Vágó, Dr. Júlia Vajda, Dr. Julianna Valis, Éva Márta Varga, Márta Várnai, Magdolna and Kajtár, Dr. István Vas, Ferenc Vass, Gabriella Végh, Anna Vida, Edit Volenszky, Paula Wéber, László and Arányi, Dr. Zsuzsanna Zahorán, Pál and Komáromi, Éva Déri, Erzsébet (Mrs. Zelczer)

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CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP

Every company’s interests, philosophy and approach is different. The Festival Orchestra works individually with each of our partners to ensure optimal methods of cooperation. Our development team is always happy to help you, and can be contacted through partner@bfz.hu.

CENTRAL MEDIA GROUP: CHOOSE LASTING VALUES “We are happy to be able to be a longterm and devoted supporter of such an internationally renowned orchestra as the Budapest Festival Orchestra. The ensem­ ble’s qualities are outstanding, making them ready for any musical challenge. Under Iván Fischer’s leadership, the or­ chestra considers every detail to produce a passionate sound for an ideal impact. In the spirit of the Central Media Group, we encourage everyone to embrace these mutual successes and to share in the joy of the results.” Zoltán Varga, Central Media Group CEO

94

TELEKOM: NEW SOLUTIONS, MUTUAL DEVELOPMENT “For Telekom, it has always been especially important to provide services that bring members of society closer together. It was in this spirit that we developed the first conductible digital billboard, in conjunction with the Budapest Festival Orchestra. We try to bring the unique and world-class musical experience of playing, discovery, and the BFO’s Midnight Music concerts to as wide an audience as possible, breaking down technical or geographical boundaries. This is why we will be supporting the con­ cert series and its live broadcasts during the coming season.” Zsófia Bánhegyi, Hungarian Telekom Group, Director of Com­ munications

K&H: BEING SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE TOGETHER “The ‘K&H for the disadvantaged’ pro­ gramme makes various cultural events accessible to children who would not oth­ erwise have such opportunities. In this way, K&H is contributing to providing fuller lives for the societies of today and tomor­ row. We decided to support the Budapest Festival Orchestra because its programmes, such as the Cocoa Concerts, give the kind of cultural upbringing and experience that the children’s disadvantaged schools and families struggle to provide. It is im­ portant for us to contribute to the intellec­ tual and spiritual development of children, to the broadening of their knowledge, the stimulation of their imaginations, and to make it possible for them to get to know Budapest and values of the Hungarian cul­ ture like the Festival Orchestra.” Nóra Horváth-Magyary, K&H Communications CEO


CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT! Golden class partner

Silver class partner

Bronze class partner

Supporting partners

State partners

Emberi Erőforrások Minisztériuma

Strategic partners

Media partners

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SINGLE AND SEASON TICKETS

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SINGLE AND SEASON TICKETS

SEASON TICKETS

PURCHASING SINGLE AND SEASON TICKETS

For the 2016 /17 season, the Budapest Festival Orchestra is offering six types of season ticket, two of which are available as family season tickets. Detailed information about season tickets can be found in the fanfold on the last page of this brochure, and naturally everything you need to know is also available online.

Season tickets (and tickets for individual performances not included in the season tickets) are available from 18 March 2016. Tickets for concerts which are included in season tickets go on sale on Monday, 23 May 2016.

www.bfz.hu

Our individual and season tickets are available online at www.bfz.hu and www.jegymester.hu.

TICKET PRICES (HUF) Prémium I. II. III. IV. Müpa Budapest, Concert Hall Liszt Academy 14,300 8,800 6,200 4,800 2,700 Rising Stars Baroque nights 11,000 6,600 4,600 3,700 2,700 Brahms Marathon:  990 Cocoa Concerts:  2,700 Contemporary night – Müpa Budapest, Festival Theatre:  3,000 Baroque night – Müpa Budapest, Festival Theatre:  4,400 Midnight Music:  1,800 Chamber Music: 3,000

ONLINE

BY POST, FAX, EMAIL address H-1033 Budapest, Polgár utca 8–10 FAX +36 1 355 4049 Email: rendeles@bfz.hu Requests will be processed upon receipt of order. Please include your contact details (phone number, email address) in your request and indicate alternative preferences for individual tickets or season tickets.

IN PERSON AT THE ORCHESTRA’S SECRETARIAT

. Tickets are available at the BFO’s office in Budapest (Polgár utca 8 –10, Building B, District III), between 10:30 am and 5:00 pm on work days between 18 and 25 March, and between 10:00 am and 4:00 pm from 28 March onwards. We accept all major credit /debit cards, SZÉP cards, Sodexho culture vouchers, Erzsébet gift or leisure vouchers, and Ticket Culture & Sport vouchers.

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SINGLE AND SEASON TICKETS

BFO CARD AT TICKET OFFICES Individual and season tickets can also be purchased nationwide through Jegymester.hu ticket offices, and from our orchestra’s specialist vendors at: Müpa Budapest, ticket office Komor Marcell u. 1, District IX, Tel: +36 1 555 3300 and Andrássy út 28, District VI, Tel: +36 1 555 3310 Liszt Academy, ticket office Liszt Ferenc tér 8, District VI, Tel: +36 1 321 0690 Ticket Express Ticket Office Dalszínház u. 10, District VI, Tel: +36 1 886 2681 Rózsavölgyi Zeneműbolt Szervita tér 5, District V, Tel: +36 1 266 8337 Rózsavölgyi is an exclusive ticket vendor to the BFO.

. . .

Last season, we expanded the scope of the BFO Card to allow holders access to more benefits and experiences. You can still get your card for free, and you can use it to collect loyalty points and receive offers for discounted concert tickets. Regular music-goers will also be able to use their points to attend an exclusive dinner, accompany the orchestra on tour or take part in a BFO event. BFO Cards are available for free online (bfz.hu/en/bfocard/), or from the orchestra’s offices.

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Müpa Budapest Béla Bartók National Concert Hall

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Handicapped seats

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KÖZÉPERKÉLY 101


DORÁTI A+b 9 concerts

+ bonus (10th) concert: one of the Sunday Chamber Music series

2016 SEPTEMBER 23. Friday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Debussy: Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune Dutilleux: L’arbre des songes Satie–Debussy: Gymnopédies Ravel: Pavane pour une infante défunte Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé – suite No. 2 Fischer, Feng OCTOBER 29. Saturday 7:45pm (A) OCTOBER 31. Monday 7:45pm (B)

Liszt Academy Shostakovich: Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10 Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 Tchaikovsky: Francesca da Rimini – Symphonic Fantasy after Dante, Op. 32 Kitayenko, Zilberstein

DECEMBER 02. Friday 7:45pm (A) DECEMBER 05. Monday 7:45pm (B)

Liszt Academy Schubert: Die Zauberharfe – overture, D. 644 Bartók: Violin Concerto No. 2 in B minor Bartók: Hungarian Sketches Schubert: Symphony No. 5 in B flat major, D. 485 Fischer, Kavakos

2017 JANUARY 12. Thursday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Tüür: Sow The Wind Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 2 in G minor Prokofiev: Symphony No. 6 in E flat minor Järvi, Mørk JANUARY 27. Friday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Beethoven: Symphony No. 1 in C major Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in C minor Fischer, Goode FEBRUARY 27. Monday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Wagner: Lohengrin – prelude R. Strauss: Horn Concerto No. 2 in E flat major Bruckner: Symphony No. 6 in A major Ticciati, Vlatković MARCH 16. Thursday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4 in A major “Italian” Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde Fischer, Romberger, Smith MARCH 29. Wednesday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 1 Liszt: Piano Concerto No. 2 in A major R. Strauss: Thus Spake Zarathustra Fischer, Ökrös, Lazić MAY 12. Friday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Bartók: The Miraculous Mandarin Bartók: The Wooden Prince Fischer, Gergye

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Prices: 30% discount compared to the single tickets’ prices Premium Category: 92,200 HUF I. Category: 57,550 HUF II. Category: 41,200 HUF III. Category: 32,400 HUF IV. Category: 19,100 HUF


SOLTI A+b 9 concerts

+ bonus (10th) concert: one of the Sunday Chamber Music series

2016 SEPTEMBER 26. Monday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Debussy: Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune Dutilleux: L’arbre des songes Satie–Debussy: Gymnopédies Ravel: Pavane pour une infante défunte Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé – suite No. 2 Fischer, Feng NOVEMBER 21. Monday 7:45pm (A) Liszt Academy Berlioz: Le Corsaire – overture Hindemith: Violin Concerto Beethoven: Symphony No. 2 in D major Dubóczky, Kádár DECEMBER 27. Tuesday 7:45pm (A) DECEMBER 28. Wednesday 7:45pm (B)

Liszt Academy Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3 Grieg: Peer Gynt Suite No. 1 Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme, Op. 33 Saint-Saëns: Bacchanale from Samson and Delilah Dukas: The Sorcerer’s Apprentice Ravel: Ma mère l’Oye Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3 in A minor ‘Scottish’, 4th movement Takács-Nagy, Várdai

2017 JANUARY 13. Friday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Tüür: Sow The Wind Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 2 in G minor Prokofiev: Symphony No. 6 in E flat minor Järvi, Mørk

JANUARY 28. Saturday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Beethoven: Symphony No. 1 in C major Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in C minor Fischer, Goode FEBRUARY 24. Friday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Wagner: Lohengrin – prelude R. Strauss: Horn Concerto No. 2 in E flat major Bruckner: Symphony No. 6 in A major Ticciati, Vlatković MARCH 17. Friday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4 in A major “Italian” Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde Fischer, Romberger, Smith MARCH 30. Thursday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 1 Liszt: Piano Concerto No. 2 in A major R. Strauss: Thus Spake Zarathustra Fischer, Ökrös, Lazić APRIL 14. Friday 7:45pm (B) Liszt Academy Mozart: Symphony No. 36 in C major “Linz”, K. 425 Honegger: Chamber Concerto for Flute, English Horn, and Strings Schumann: Symphony No. 1 in B flat major “Spring”, Op. 38 Aviat, Sebők, Noël MAY 13. Saturday 7:45pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Bartók: The Miraculous Mandarin Bartók: The Wooden Prince Fischer, Gergye Prices: 30% discount compared to the single tickets’ prices Premium Category: 89,900 HUF I. Category: 56,000 HUF II. Category: 40,100 HUF III. Category: 31,550 HUF IV. Category: 19,100 HUF

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REINER A+b 7 concerts

+ bonus (8th) concert on May 14

2016 SEPTEMBER 24. Saturday 3:30pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Debussy: Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune Dutilleux: L’arbre des songes Satie–Debussy: Gymnopédies Ravel: Pavane pour une infante défunte Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé – suite No. 2 Fischer, Feng

OCTOBER 23. Sunday 3:30pm (A) Liszt Academy Albinoni: Sonata in G major, Op. 2, No. 1 Galuppi: Concerto grosso in C minor Platti: Concerto grosso in D Major, D-WD 538 (after Op. 5, No. 1 of A. Corelli) Vivaldi: Violin Concerto in E minor, RV 278 Vivaldi: Concerto for Two Cellos in G minor, RV 531 Vivaldi: Concerto for Strings in A major, RV 158 Scarlatti: “Ombre tacite e sole” – cantata for alto voice Seiler, Wey, T’Hooft

2017 JANUARY 14. Saturday 3:30pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Tüür: Sow The Wind Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 2 in G minor Prokofiev: Symphony No. 6 in E flat minor Järvi, Mørk JANUARY 29. Sunday 3:30pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Beethoven: Symphony No. 1 in C major Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in C minor Fischer, Goode FEBRUARY 25. Saturday 3:30pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Wagner: Lohengrin – prelude R. Strauss: Horn Concerto No. 2 in E flat major Bruckner: Symphony No. 6 in A major Ticciati, Vlatković

MARCH 19. Sunday 3:30pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4 in A major “Italian” Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde Fischer, Romberger, Smith APRIL 01. Saturday 3:30pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 1 Liszt: Piano Concerto No. 2 in A major R. Strauss: Thus Spake Zarathustra Fischer, Ökrös, Lazić MAY 14. Sunday 3:30pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Bartók: The Miraculous Mandarin Bartók: The Wooden Prince Fischer, Gergye JUNE 03. Saturday 3:30pm (B) Liszt Academy Bach: Suite in A minor (reconstructed by Werner Breig) Bach: Concerto for Two Violins and Strings in D minor, BWV 1043 Telemann: Orchestral Suite in G major “La Bizarre”, TWV 55:G2 Telemann: Concerto for Two Violas in G major, TWV 52:G3 Händel: “Agrippina condotta a morire” – cantata, HWV 110 Seiler, Sampson, T’Hooft Prices: 28% discount compared to the single tickets’ prices Premium Category: 80,000 HUF I. Category: 49,100 HUF II. Category: 34,550 HUF III. Category: 26,900 HUF IV. Category: 15,550 HUF If you would like to introduce your children to the world of orchestral concerts, the Family Reiner Season Ticket allows them to enjoy concerts with a 50% discount. (The offer is available with two adults’ and at least one child’s season ticket purchase; for details please contact the BFO office.)


ORMÁNDY 5 concerts

+ bonus (6th) concert on June 2

2016 OCTOBER 23. Sunday 7:45pm Liszt Academy Albinoni: Sonata in G major, Op. 2, No. 1 Galuppi: Concerto grosso in C minor Platti: Concerto grosso in D Major, D-WD 538 (after Op. 5, No. 1 of A. Corelli) Vivaldi: Violin Concerto in E minor, RV 278 Vivaldi: Concerto for Two Cellos in G minor, RV 531 Vivaldi: Concerto for Strings in A major, RV 158 Scarlatti: “Ombre tacite e sole” – cantata for alto voice Seiler, Wey, T’Hooft NOVEMBER 19. Saturday 7:45pm Liszt Academy Berlioz: Le Corsaire – overture Hindemith: Violin Concerto Beethoven: Symphony No. 2 in D major Dubóczky, Kádár DECEMBER 04. Sunday 7:45pm Liszt Academy Schubert: Die Zauberharfe – overture, D. 644 Bartók: Violin Concerto No. 2 in B minor Bartók: Hungarian Sketches Schubert: Symphony No. 5 in B flat major, D. 485 Fischer, Kavakos

2017 APRIL 15. Saturday 7:45pm Liszt Academy Mozart: Symphony No. 36 in C major “Linz”, K. 425 Honegger: Chamber Concerto for Flute, English Horn, and Strings Schumann: Symphony No. 1 in B flat major “Spring”, Op. 38 Aviat, Sebők, Noël APRIL 28. Friday 7:45pm Liszt Academy Glinka: Waltz Fantasy Mozart: Concertone in C major, K. 190/186E Prokofiev: Symphony No. 7 in C sharp minor Fanshil, Gál-Tamási, Mózes JUNE 02. Friday 7:45pm Liszt Academy Bach: Suite in A minor (reconstructed by Werner Breig) Bach: Concerto for Two Violins and Strings in D minor, BWV 1043 Telemann: Orchestral Suite in G major “La Bizarre”, TWV 55:G2 Telemann: Concerto for Two Violas in G major, TWV 52:G3 Händel: “Agrippina condotta a morire” – cantata, HWV 110 Seiler, Sampson, T’Hooft Prices: 25% discount compared to the single tickets’ prices Premium Category: 52,000 HUF I. Category: 31,350 HUF II. Category: 21,900 HUF III. Category: 17,500 HUF IV. Category: 12,150 HUF

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Széll 4 concerts

+ bonus (5th) concert: one of the Back to Nature – Chamber Music on Period Instruments series

2016 OCTOBER 30. Sunday 7:45pm Liszt Academy Shostakovich: Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10 Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 Tchaikovsky: Francesca da Rimini – Symphonic Fantasy after Dante, Op. 32 Kitayenko, Zilberstein

2017 APRIL 26. Wednesday 7:45pm Liszt Academy Glinka: Waltz Fantasy Mozart: Concertone in C major, K. 190/186E Prokofiev: Symphony No. 7 in C sharp minor Fanshil, Gál-Tamási, Mózes Prices: 20% discount compared to the single tickets’ prices Premium Category: 45,500 HUF I. Category: 28,800 HUF II. Category: 21,000 HUF III. Category: 16,900 HUF IV. Category: 11,100 HUF

DECEMBER 03. Saturday 7:45pm Liszt Academy Schubert: Die Zauberharfe – overture, D. 644 Bartók: Violin Concerto No. 2 in B minor Bartók: Hungarian Sketches Schubert: Symphony No. 5 in B flat major, D. 485 Fischer, Kavakos DECEMBER 26. Monday 7:45pm Liszt Academy Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3 Grieg: Peer Gynt Suite No. 1 Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme, Op. 33 Saint-Saëns: Bacchanale from Samson and Delilah Dukas: The Sorcerer’s Apprentice Ravel: Ma mère l’Oye Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3 in A minor ‘Scottish’, 4th movement Takács-Nagy, Várdai

FAMILY COCOA SEASON TICKET Our highly successful Cocoa Concert series continues. Since the tickets are usually picked up quickly, it is a good idea to secure your place with a season ticket. Worth 13,500 HUF, your season ticket comes with a beautiful gift mug. In the 2016/17 season we once again offer fam­ ily season tickets for the Cocoa Concerts, in addition to the normal Cocoa Concert season tickets: buy three season tickets with a 20% discount, for 32,400 HUF, instead of 40,500 HUF.

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Concert Calendar

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CONCERT CALENDAR

2016

concerts

The colour-coded dots indicate which season ticket(s) are valid for which concerts. Doráti A and B Solti A and B Reiner A and B Ormándy Széll

SEPTEMBER 22nd Thursday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Festival Theatre Bridging Europe, Baroque Concert Campra, Rebel, Rameau Niquet, Santon-Jeffery, T’Hooft

23rd Friday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Bridging Europe Debussy, Dutilleux, Satie, Ravel Fischer, Feng Doráti

24th Saturday 3:30 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Bridging Europe Debussy, Dutilleux, Satie, Ravel Fischer, Feng Reiner

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25th Sunday 2:30 and 4:30 pm BFO Rehearsal Hall Cocoa Concert

25th Sunday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Festival Theatre Bridging Europe, Contemporary Concert Grisey, Dutilleux, Aperghis Volkov, Wieder-Atherton, Rivalland

26th Monday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Bridging Europe Debussy, Dutilleux, Satie, Ravel Feng, Fischer Solti

OcToBER 16th Sunday 5:00 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall Sunday Chamber Music

23rd Sunday 3:30 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Baroque Concert Albinoni, Galuppi, Platti, Vivaldi, Scarlatti Seiler, Wey, T’Hooft Reiner A

23rd Sunday 7:45 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Baroque Concert Albinoni, Galuppi, Platti, Vivaldi, Scarlatti Seiler, Wey, T’Hooft Ormándy


CONCERT CALENDAR

29th Saturday 7:45 pm Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Shostakovich, Rachmaninoff, Tchaikovsky Kitayenko, Zilberstein Doráti A

21st Monday 7:45 pm

05th Monday 7:45 pm

30th Sunday 7:45 pm

27th Sunday 2:30 and 4:30 pm BFO Rehearsal Hall Cocoa Concert

18th Sunday 5:00 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Shostakovich, Rachmaninoff, Tchaikovsky Kitayenko, Zilberstein Széll

31st Monday 7:45 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Shostakovich, Rachmaninoff, Tchaikovsky Kitayenko, Zilberstein Doráti B

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Berlioz, Hindemith, Beethoven Dubóczky, Kádár Solti A

06th Sunday 5:00 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall Sunday Chamber Music

19th Saturday 7:45 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Berlioz, Hindemith, Beethoven Dubóczky, Kádár Ormándy

BFO Rehearsal Hall Sunday Chamber Music

26th Monday 7:45 pm

DECEMBER 02nd Friday 7:45 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Schubert, Bartók Fischer, Kavakos Doráti A

03rd Saturday 7:45 pm

NOVEMBER

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Schubert, Bartók Fischer, Kavakos Doráti B

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Schubert, Bartók Fischer, Kavakos Széll

03rd Saturday 11:30 pm Millenáris Midnight Music Fischer

04th Sunday 7:45 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Schubert, Bartók Fischer, Kavakos Ormándy

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Beethoven, Grieg, Tchaikovsky, Saint-Saëns, Dukas, Ravel, Mendelssohn Takács-Nagy, Várdai Széll

27th Tuesday 7:45 pm Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Beethoven, Grieg, Tchaikovsky, Saint-Saëns, Dukas, Ravel, Mendelssohn Takács-Nagy, Várdai Solti A 28th Wednesday 7:45 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Beethoven, Grieg, Tchaikovsky, Saint-Saëns, Dukas, Ravel, Mendelssohn Takács-Nagy, Várdai Solti B

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CONCERT CALENDAR

2017

concerts JANUaRy

12th Thursday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Tüür, Shostakovich, Prokofiev Järvi, Mørk Doráti

13th Friday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Tüür, Shostakovich, Prokofiev Järvi, Mørk Solti

22nd Sunday, whole day

25th Saturday 3:30 pm

27th Friday 7:45 pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Beethoven Fischer, Goode Doráti

25th Saturday 11:30 pm

Müpa Budapest Brahms Marathon Fischer

28th Saturday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Beethoven Fischer, Goode Solti

15th Sunday 2:30 and 4:30 pm BFO Rehearsal Hall Cocoa Concert

19th Thursday 7:45 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall Back to Nature – Chamber Music on Period Instruments

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Beethoven Fischer, Goode Reiner

FEBRUaRy 18th Saturday 7:45 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall Back to Nature – Chamber Music on Period Instruments

19th Sunday 5:00 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall Sunday Chamber Music

24th Friday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Wagner, R. Strauss, Bruckner Ticciati, Vlatković Solti

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Millenáris Midnight Music Ticciati

27th Monday 7:45 pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Wagner, R. Strauss, Bruckner Ticciati, Vlatković Doráti

29th Sunday 3:30 pm

14th Saturday 3:30 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Tüür, Shostakovich, Prokofiev Järvi, Mørk Reiner

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Wagner, R. Strauss, Bruckner Ticciati, Vlatković Reiner

MaRCh 16th Thursday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Mendelssohn, Mahler Fischer, Romberger, Smith Doráti

17th Friday 7:45 pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Mendelssohn, Mahler Fischer, Romberger, Smith Solti 18th Saturday 2:30 and 4:30 pm BFO Rehearsal Hall Cocoa Concert


CONCERT CALENDAR

19th Sunday 3:30 pm Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Mendelssohn, Mahler Fischer, Romberger, Smith Reiner

14th Friday 7:45 pm

29th Wednesday 7:45 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Mozart, Honegger, Schumann Aviat, Sebők, Noël Ormándy

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Liszt, R. Strauss Fischer, Ökrös, Lazić Doráti

30th Thursday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Liszt, R. Strauss Fischer, Ökrös, Lazić Solti

31st Friday 11:30 pm Millenáris Midnight Music Fischer

aPRIL 01st Saturday 3:30 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Liszt, R. Strauss Fischer, Ökrös, Lazić Reiner

09th Sunday 5:00 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall Sunday Chamber Music

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Mozart, Honegger, Schumann Aviat, Sebők, Noël Solti B

15th Saturday 7:45 pm

26th Wednesday 7:45 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Glinka, Mozart, Prokofiev Fanshil, Gál-Tamási, Mózes Széll

13th Saturday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Bartók Fischer, Gergye Solti

14th Sunday 3:30 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Bartók Fischer, Gergye Reiner

28th Sunday 5:00 pm

BFO Rehearsal Hall Sunday Chamber Music

28th Friday 7:45 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Glinka, Mozart, Prokofiev Fanshil, Gál-Tamási, Mózes Ormándy

May 07th Sunday 2:30 and 4:30 pm BFO Rehearsal Hall Cocoa Concert

12th Friday 7:45 pm

Müpa Budapest, Béla Bartók National Concert Hall Bartók Fischer, Gergye Doráti

JuNe 02nd Friday 7:45 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Baroque Concert Bach, Telemann, Händel Seiler, Sampson, T’Hooft Ormándy

03rd Saturday 3:30 pm

Liszt Academy, Grand Hall Baroque Concert Bach, Telemann, Händel Seiler, Sampson, T’Hooft Reiner B

03rd Saturday 11:30 pm Millenáris Midnight Music Seiler

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Imprint

Budapest Festival Orchestra

Budapest Festival Orchestra Foundation

Foreign Friends of the BFO

Music Director: Iván Fischer Executive Director: Stefan Englert Deputy Executive Director: Orsolya Erdődy Development Director: Máté Gáspár Financial Director: Györgyné Maglódi Accountant: Lászlóné Szalai Operational Manager: Dóra Magyarszéky Operational Assistant: Szolongo Szani Touring Manager: Bence Pócs Assistant of Touring Manager: Ivett Wolf PR Manager: Adél Tossenberger Marketing Associate: Gabriella Tooth Senior Development Associate: Beáta Bukvai Manager of Audience Relations: Orsolya Bagi Executive Secretary and Youth Programme Coordinator: Adrienn Balogh Office Assistant: Angyalka Aranyosné Boros Personnel Manager: Éva Kelemen Stage Manager: Zentai Róbert Stage Technicians: Sándor Kathi, István Siba Advisors: Zsuzsanna Deák (Supporters’ Club), Inga Petersen (Personal Assistant to Music Director), Júlia Váradi (PR)

Chariman of the Board: András Simor Curators: István Boros, György Granasztói, Edina Heal, Miklós Marschall, Konstantin Schimert, Tamiko Soros, János Strohmayer, András Szecskay, Sylvia Tóth, Hubertus von Wulffen, Izabella Zwack, Zoltán Varga

Die Freunde des Budapest Festival Orchestra Board of Directors: Lorenz Kiefer Konstantin Schimert Roland Schmidt Hubertus von Wulffen

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Members of the Supervisory Board: Csaba László (chairman), Pál Jalsovszky, Beáta Juvancz, Ádám Terták Chairman of the Budapest Festival Orchestra Association: Eszter Bánffy Advisors: András Batta, Gábor Bojár, Károly Dán, János Dávid, László Donáth, Zsófia Dornbachné Zachár, Botond Elekes, Mária Feuer, Kinga Göncz, Gábor Győző, Charles Huebner, Péterné Jüttner, Mihály K. Varga, David Kirkby, Mihály Kökény, Aladár Madarász, Bálint Nagy, Károly Nagy, József Péter, Gergely Prőhle, János Schiffer, Imre Sívó, Éva Sólyom, János Sziklai, László Tihanyi, Mark Wodlinger Contacts Office: 1033 Budapest, Polgár utca 8–10. Telephone: +36 1 489 4330 Fax: +36 1 355 4049 Email: bfofound@mail.datanet.hu Bank account number: 10300002-10612608-49020027 (MKB Bank) – for IBAN and international bank transfer details please see our website Website: www.bfz.hu Online ticket purchasing: www.jegymester.hu

US Friends of the Budapest Festival Orchestra Board of Directors: Stephen E. Benko (Chairman) Sylvia Hemingway (Officer) László Balássy (Treasurer) Daisy Soros (Director Emeritus) Aniko Gaal Schott Emese Tardy Green Blaise Pasztory David Tobey Tim Warner Published by the Budapest Festival Orchestra Foundation Publisher-in-chief: BFO Director Stefan Englert Editor: László Győri Graphic design: büro für mitteilungen Photos Xavier Arias (25); Julia Bayer (37); Marco Borggreve (32, 43, 56); Felix Broede (23); Máté Fülöp (79); Maike Helbig (26); Harald Hoffmann (49); Yoann Jezeque (18); Bea Kallos (17); Daniel Kause (50); Susie Knoll (47); Eric Manas (20); Dániel Németh (53, 74, 81); Zsófia Raffay (31); Steve Riskind (41); Klaus Rudolph (29); Ákos Stiller (2, 7, 8, 11, 1213, 14, 35, 44, 55, 61, 62, 65, 68, 71, 8283, 84, 96); Dániel Tallián (59)


Budapest Festival Orchestra season 2016-17 WWW.BFZ.HU Facebook.com / BFO.EN

BFO 2016/17  

The Budapest Festival Orchestra's 2016/17 season booklet

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