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Berthoud Resident Berthoud, CO 80513

440 Mountain Ave. Berthoud, CO 80513

Berthoud, 80513

PAID

STANDARD POSTAGE #7

© Berthoud Weekly Surveyor July 27, 2017


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Berthoud High School

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n behalf of the current staff I would like to extend the warmest of welcomes to the new staff members at Berthoud High School (BHS). BHS celebrates a tradition of excellence in education by setting high expectations for academic, social and emotional growth. Our dedicated staff and our supportive parents jointly promote the development of our students as eager, lifelong learners and as compassionate, responsible human beings. BHS honors the arts, develops student leadership, and encourages selflessness through a culture of caring and a spirit of giving. We are committed to continual improvement through collaboration and innovation as we prepare students for lives of achievement, meaning and fulfillment. The BHS family consists of parents, staff and community members who are committed to ensuring our students learn at the highest levels. Berthoud Bash, Richard Harris School Advisory Committee, and Athletic Boosters help Principal at Berthoud ensure students receive the support they need to surHigh School pass the highest expectations. BHS would like to welcome our great new additions to the BHS staff for the 2017-2018 school year: Brian Barringer - assistant principal/athletic director Patrick Gaines - science Richard Harris - principal Elisabeth Lee - math Kristin Lutz - building secretary Nicholas Peardot - language arts Kayla Sommers - science Jordan Vlieger - language arts Christopher Winter - math Here are some important dates for you as August approaches: Back to School Night is scheduled for Tuesday, Aug. 15, from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 18 - Freshman day only Monday, Aug. 21 - First day of school for all students The athletic department will have the Fall Sports Night parent meeting on Aug. 9 at 6 p.m. in the auditorium. Please remember the online paperwork for athletic participation and payment is on our website, www.thompsonschools. org/berthoudhs. I look forward to a great year ahead of us. Please do not hesitate to reach out to me if you have any questions, concerns, or ideas you would like to discuss. Have a great rest of the summer.

Berthoud High School, 950 Spartan Ave., 970-613-7700, Principal Richard Harris.

Berthoud Weekly Surveyor

BACK TO SCHOOL 2017 Back to School 2017Š is published by the Berthoud Weekly Surveyor. Editorial content is provided by Surveyor staff writers and the Thompson School District. For more information about advertising with the Surveyor, call 970-532-2252. All additional information regarding individual schools, fees, registration and testing dates, alternative education options and other resources can be found at thompsonschools.org or call 970-613-5000.

970-532-2252 440 Mountain Ave., Berthoud, CO 80513

www.BerthoudSurveyor.com


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Berthoud El — a team effort — a supportive and caring learning community

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n behalf of Berthoud Elementary School, it is my pleasure to welcome you to the 2017-2018 school year. We are excited for students to return, and for the opportunity to work in partnership with the Berthoud community. Our school community is enriched by our dedicated students and families. The academic achievement of our students has consistently been recognized by the John Irwin Schools of Excellence award. We serve the largest enrollment of gifted and talented students in the district and diligently support the needs of all students through a skills group instructional model. In spite of our increasing enrollment, our staff strives to know every student personally. This Melanie Patterson year we will continue to collaborate with Principal at Berthoud Ivy Stockwell Elementary to implement the Elementary School InFocus curriculum. In Focus supports our students in thriving socially and emotionally. Facilitating a supportive and caring learning community is truly a team effort, and I am grateful for the efforts of our staff, our parent volunteers, our PTA, and our community stakeholders. The investment in our students that is exhibited by our board of education, district leadership, community agencies and helpers, Kid’s Hope mentors, and the Berthoud Schools Fund is making an important difference. ncreased access to technology, and flexible seating arrangements have supported a more personalized approach to learning, and visits by our stakeholders elicit meaningful, real-world connections. It is a privilege to be part of the unique journey of each learner in our school. Thank you for demonstrating to our students they belong in a community that cares. Check out our Facebook page for updates on school events and recognition of the learning and accomplishments of our students and staff.

Berthoud Elementary, 560 Bunyan Ave., 970-613-7500, Principal Melanie Patterson.

School supply lists can be found at www.teacherlists.com/parents


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Judy Rugg retires from BHS after 28 years

lists. “I was just a jack-of-all-trades, really, (for) anything that needed to be done,” Rugg said. ’d sometimes fill in for office staff. Once you’ve been at the school for a while Judy Rugg makes every effort to answer the phone at Berthoud High School (BHS) and worked as many jobs as had, it was easy to fill in. despite the trend toward automation. Rugg also did various duties as they came up and considered “I always feel that when somebody calls a school they should herself to be “an information source” for the school, getting inforbe able to talk to a person,” said Rugg, a Tucson, Ariz., native who mation for staff and students as they needed it. lived in Berthoud until last year, when she moved to Johnstown. “It’s basically anything that needs to be done,” Rugg said. “It’s “It’s more of a personal touch, and Berthoud being a smaller comkind of additional duties as needed.” munity, it’s nice to have that personal touch.” Jennifer Santos, a science teacher at the school, calls Rugg the Rugg, the staff member with the longest time at the school, school’s pillar. retired on June 15 after 28 years there. “If I had a question, I didn’t ask the principal or assistant prinInitially she worked with Thompson School District as a substicipal, I’d go ask Judy,” said Santos, who will be teaching science at tute teacher during the 1988-1989 school year. She did this after Frederick High School next school year. “She’s been there so long going to college for two years, working in the banking industry for and she knows so much, that’s the person you go to. She pretty 10 years, and staying home for seven years to raise her two chilmuch knows the ins and outs of everything.” dren. Santos describes Rugg as friendly and “super organized.” In 1989 Rugg began working at BHS as a paraprofessional in “She was very friendly, but you didn’t mess around with her,” the special-education department, a position she held for two to she said. “She was very straightforward and honest and knew the three years. She assisted special-education teachers with their policies.” students. Rugg liked the job because she likes helping other people with From there Rugg worked her way up the ranks in the school, what they need and answering their questions. she said. She next became a faculty assistant for two years, typing “The work was fun, talking to other people,” Rugg said. “Being up papers and making copies for the teachers. She then became a around the students reminds me of when my kids were younger, counseling secretary and registrar, a dual job rolled into one, where Photo by Shelley Widhalm but so much has changed since then. My kids graduated in the she worked with counselors in registering students for classes and ’90s. Now all the kids have cell phones and that type of stuff.” Judy Rugg, secretary at Berthoud getting them their transcripts. She did that for six years. The students are not supposed to have their cell phones on In 2001 Rugg became the school secretary, mainly working with High School, poses outside Da Bean during class, so Rugg tells the parents to leave messages and their Coffee House on June 17. Rugg the administration department. retired this year after working at the children will return their calls during the passing periods. “It’s an important role,” Rugg said. “Quite often they’ve been “I guess things always change, but I think kids are basically the there the most, and they’re the ones that know the most about the school for 28 years. same,” Rugg said. school. They do a lot of organizational work for the whole school.” She indicated when she’s tired of not doing much in her retireAs the school secretary Rugg’s duties were many. She scheduled appointments for ment years she will get a part-time job, maybe in retail. She likes to read, garden, and the administrative staff, took notes at staff meetings, typed up letters for the staff, do home-improvement projects and yard work, she said. distributed staff mail, set up parent-teacher conferences, filled out hiring information “This is going to be different, not working,” Rugg said. “I’m going to miss the stufor new teachers, kept track of teachers who were absent, and arranged for substitute dents and the staff mainly, the interaction, being able to talk to other people.” teachers. She also tracked the staff’s number of years of service and updated the phone By Shelley Widhalm The Surveyor


School Calendar 2017-2018

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Ivy Stockwell Elementary School

Berthoud Weekly Surveyor

water and weed our Ivy community garden. Over the next few weeks we will begin construction of our Outdoor Classelcome to another great year at Ivy Stockwell Elementary. For those of room. Thanks to a dedicated committee of parents, our Ivy families and staff, you who are new to Ivy Stockwell, or are exploring our school as a pos- and our fantastic students, we are ready to get this moving forward. This will sibility, you won’t be disappointed. We are in year six as a STEM focus be phase one of a project that will continue to grow over the coming years. Please look for more informaschool and continue to grow our program. tion on an upcoming concert at As you can see from the construction around Berthoud High School that will town, we are continuing to grow in our enrollment. feature Face Vocal Band. They We have also received many will be performing for a one-night applications for families hopevent Oct. 7. All proceeds will go ing to be accepted through to Ivy Stockwell Elementary to open enrollment for the comhelp with the outdoor classroom ing school year. We are so funding. Tickets will be on sale lucky to have dedicated staff soon for $15 each. and supportive families that If you are new to Ivy Stockwell continue to work together to Elementary, please make sure make this an amazing place you have completed your online for student learning and registration as soon as possible. growth. ou can find this information Once again, Ivy has been on our district website at www. very busy this summer with thompsonschools.org. We will opportunities for enrichment Rick Bowles also be available for registraand literacy support. Teachers Principal at Ivy Stockwell tion support on Aug. 2 from 8 and support staff have spent Elementary School a.m.-6 p.m. You can turn in any countless hours this summer planning and providing Ivy Stockwell Elementary, 175 Fifth St., Berthoud, 970-613-6100, Princi- required documentation (immunizations, etc.) during this time. pal Rick Bowles. workshops that have taken advantage of our InnoAlso, Back to School night will vation Station. We also offered a six-week summer be on Aug. 16 from 4:30-6 p.m. Students can bring in their supplies and visit school program with students from Berthoud Elementary, Ivy Stockwell, and their new classrooms. In addition, parents can pay fees and access a variety of other schools. Students had opportunities to take mini-courses that gave them resources (before/after school care, bus routes, nutritional services, etc.). hands-on opportunities to experience STEM, sewing, gardening, and more. Our first day of school for all students is Aug. 8. School starts at 8 38 a.m. In the middle of summer we invited our families in for our summer Read-In and is dismissed at 3:40 p.m. and Book Swap. Students read in the shade under the trees, swapped books, Thank you to all of the Berthoud community for your support of Ivy Stockand enjoyed a popsicle. They were also able to trade in their used books for well, Berthoud schools, and the Thompson School District. You help make our new ones to read over the summer. I also want to extend a huge thank you schools amazing. to all of the parents and students who volunteered their time this summer to

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Turner Middle School

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Berthoud Weekly Surveyor

elcome back for another exciting school year at Turner Middle School. As the new principal I am honored to be asked to lead this building and have the privilege to work with your students. I look forward to meeting with parents/guardians, as we will be working together in the education of your child. My family and I have relocated from Columbus, Ohio, over the summer. For the past four years, I was a principal at Middle School North in Groveport Madison Local Schools, and prior to that had five years of experience as an assistant principal in two different high schools, one in Ohio and the other in Colorado. Middle school is an exciting time when students learn how to become more independent and begin to establish healthy work habits to support their academic goals. The teachers will continue to incor- Turner Middle School, 950 Massachusetts Ave., 970-613-7400, Principal Brandy Grieves. porate project-based learning opportunities and standards based learning in our Mark your calendars for the following dates. classes. A focus will be placed on working closely • Back to School Night: Wednesday, Aug. 16, from 6-7 p.m. with each student to assist him/her on their individ• riday, Aug. 8 - Sixth graders first day of school. Students are to ual learning path as they master the content’s stanreport to the gym to receive their schedules. Backpack and school supplies Brandy Grieves dards. Working with students in collaboration will Principal at are not needed this day. allow them to make necessary connections and engage Turner Middle School more deeply in their learning. We encourage you to come into the building and see what great teachers and students we have here at Turner Middle School. The key for student success lies with our students, our staff, and the support received from parents/guardians and the community we serve. We appreciate your continued support in making our schools a great place for all students to learn and grow. Online registration for new and returning families is available on the district website at http://www.thompsonschools.org/registration.


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TMS Createspace adds equipment thanks to a grant from OtterBox By Bob McDonnell The Surveyor

Monday, Nov. 28, 2016, is a day Turner Middle School (TMS) Createspace teacher Dan Champion will not forget. On that morning representatives from OtterCares, the charitable foundation for the OtterBox company surprised the teacher with a check. This check was for $18,253, the entire amount Champion had requested to help equip TMS Createspace teacher Dan Champion checks the his classroom/workprogress of an item being produced on the 3D printer. space with some new equipment. OtterCares received 50 applications, including the one from TMS, and 19 schools were awarded funding grants. The money has all been spent wisely, and Champion is pleased with the results. He used some of the grant to purchase two iMac computers, used for video editing. Champion pointed out these computers can be used school-wide, not just for his classes. Students in many classes at TMS utilize video as part of their project-based learning. He also bought a large laser engraver. The engraver cuts foamboard and plastic. It can burn paint from metal too. Champion says the TMS art classes

are looking forward to using this device in many creative ways. Two additional 3D printers came to the Createspace area thanks to the OtterBox grant. The use of these printers has steadily increased since the first ones were acquired by the school. n the past the demand for use of the 3D printers has caused a bottleneck and delays for students wanting to use them. The new printers should ease that pressure. More teachers want to be trained on how to use 3D printers, Champion said. Overall, as a result of more equipment for the Createspace classes, more students are signing up for this elective. Champion will continue to search for other sources of funding for his classroom. He may try for a follow-up grant to purchase materials for the Photos by Bob McDonnell 3D printers and Ellie Dodd and Rachel Hoogland stand by the new laser other equipment engraver in the TMS Createspace room. Champion called the process a rewarding experience. Students at TMS for the 2017-2018 school year will see the results of his hard work to better equip the Createspace.


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sued for this project. The money raised was not from tax dollars, he emphasized. When CS originally opened in there were students from kindergarten through ninth grade. Since adding the high school component the number of students jumped to more than 8 in total. Stout estimates the new campus will see 3 students in August. e thinks the number By Bob McDonnell at the high school will move to the followThe Surveyor ing year. This is a typical size for a charter high When school starts up in August, the school, Stout added. Loveland Classical School (LCS) high school n an email Kaufman commented on the school’s will have its own building. And it’s a brandresults from the state testing procedure. e said, new building at that. The charter school in The Colorado State testing that has been used in Loveland will open and greet new students on the last few years is referred to as either CMAS the first day of school for the 8 school or PA CC. n those tests, one of the main areas year at their newly-constructed building. tested was in English Language Arts. In English The school currently operates all its grade anguage Arts for the testing session, the last levels at 383 S.W. th St. When the high one for which results are available, percent of school splits off to occupy its own building, it the ninth graders met or exceeded the goals set by will be situated at 3 W. th St. the state for targets at that grade level, resulting in Anyone driving near the intersection of th a percentile ranking within the state of percenStreet and Wilson Avenue can see the structile. ture. The principal added the Academy has a statePhoto by Bob McDonnell computed dropout rate of . percent. This contribLCS is the term used to describe all grades Over the summer the Loveland Classical School’s new high in both of the school’s buildings. The new uted to the high school earning the highest possible school building sprouted up in northwest Loveland. It sports a high school goes by the name The Academy rating for this category, Kaufman said. or just Academy, according to Principal John “classic” look befitting the organization’s name. Loveland Classical School does not charge a Kaufman. tuition. t is open to any student, with Thompson The new facility will cover ,8 square feet and have a red brick classical School District children receiving priority. To enroll a student, a parent should exterior. Cost for the project is million, with million of that being for the log on to www.lovelandclassical.org. There is a tab labeled earn More followed new construction. by one to nroll. Very recently the new high school went ahead with the basic construction of a CS follows the Thompson School District open enrollment period starting gymnasium. Although in the original plans, the school did not think they could the first day back to school after Thanksgiving break. A lottery process conductbuild the gym right away. The , square feet of additional space for a gym ed by CS will determine which students are accepted. shell costs , . The school has , of that in hand, thanks to lowerAccording to www.uncommonschools.org, a charter school is an independentthan-anticipated city fees. They also used , from construction reserves. ly run public school granted greater flexibility in its operations, in return for a The SC oundation will assist in raising the money needed for the interior greater accountability for performance. The site adds charter schools are public of the gym and items such as flooring, scoreboards, lockers and bleachers. schools of choice, meaning families choose them for their children. Kaufman says the gym will be ready for use starting in mid-October of . Kaufman, his staff and the students at CS are all looking forward to the first an Stout, oveland Classical School’s executive director says bonds were isday of school.

Back to a new school


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Student physical examination tips Special to the Surveyor School time requires having all of the necessary supplies, clothing and gear ready for the year. In addition, preparing for a new school year often involves providing updated physical health information to the school administration. The requirements for health screenings and reporting may vary between school districts. Some physical examinations need to be conducted annually, while others may only need updating at certain intervals, such as when kids transition from elementary school to middle school or middle school to high school. Updated physical forms also may be required at the start of a sports season. Health screenings are intended to detect problems that may interfere with learning. Physical exams may indicate issues that can hamper progress or shed light on undiagnosed problems that may require further assessment and necessitate customized learning plans to help students succeed. Physical exams are also a way to ensure students’ immunizations are up to date. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Health, physical exams typically are completed by students’ primary care providers. Some school districts offer free or low-cost health assessments through school providers as well. Students who will be traveling for school may

be required to meet the health requirements of their destination country. For example, medical students admitted to a Canadian university may be required to get a medical exam, according to

the Government of Canada. Visiting the doctor, nurse practitioner or a school-provided medical professional may not make school-aged children too happy. To make the process go smoothly, consider these suggestions. •Work with physicians who have access to

electronic health records. EHRs are secure technology that provides easy access to vaccination records, health history, appointment reminders, and even prescription information. Some providers even make it possible for patients to directly access their health information through a secure login, helping save time. • Make appointments during school hours. After-school appointments are peak times for pediatric offices and medical clinics. Sign students out of school early to visit the doctor for medical exams. The staff likely will be less harried, and you can spend more time asking questions and completing forms. Schools may not count the absence if a doctor’s note is provided. • Don’t forget the forms. Bring the right paperwork so that the staff can fill out what is necessary for the school, camp or sports league. • Know your insurance guidelines. Physical exams may be part of routine well visits. Insurance companies institute their own policies regarding how frequently physicals can be conducted (usually annually). Be sure to schedule the appointment accordingly. Physical examinations are on many parents’ back-to-school to-do lists. Certain strategies can make physicals easier for adults and children alike.


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J.O.S.H. program offers a place for local youth to belong By Amber McIver-Traywick The Surveyor

to make a change in the lives of middle- and highschool students after tragedy struck Berthoud last year. The leaders and several kids at the “Wednesday Night Workout” are wearing t-shirts with the J.O.S.H. logo which features a Phoenix, a mythical winged creature that gained new life through rising from the ashes of its former life. The symbolism is appropriate, as JOSH began as a direct result of founding member JJ Francis’ son Joshua taking his own life on Nov. 3, 2016. He was 15 years old. “This has been developed out of a need, I really believe this is meant to be. This program means we are being proactive with the youth in our community rather than being reactive when it’s too late — we’re doing something for our youth that gives them confidence and a place to

There is a circle of 25 young people, ranging in age from 11 to , seated in an open fitness room at the Berthoud Athletic Club (BAC) on a Wednesday night. They’re getting ready to work out. It’s an eclectic group of kids reflected back in the mirrors along the wall. There are preteen girls with brightly colored bows in their hair and neon tank tops, sitting across from teenaged boys wearing all black. One of the group’s founders, Scott Crossen, an athleticallybuilt man with a stern demeanor, who now teaches boxing at BAC after making a career competing professionally in martial arts and boxing, asks the group a question. “How many of you feel like you’re a warrior?” Many raise their hands with confidence immediately after being asked; a few do not. The leadership of the group, some just teens themselves, as Photo by Amber McIver-Traywick well as the adult leaders, want to Students involved in the J.O.S.H program receive boxing instruction during their free, weekly see every hand and head held high “Wedensday Night Workout” at the Berthoud Athletic Club on July 19, 2017. as a result of a journey they are on with each of the participants. The organization is called J.O.S.H., an acronym for Journey of Strength and ope, a nonprofit formed by concerned community members who wanted JOSH continued on page 17


Berthoud Weekly Surveyor

JOSH continued from page 16 belong,” Francis said of the group that began less than a week after his son’s memorial service. Crossen, who has been mentoring troubled teens for more than a decade, was asked to speak at Joshua’s memorial service last November. “Every time a kid took his life it really bothered me, it just ripped my guts out, and I had to do something about it,” he said. After being contacted by several other parents who also wanted to take action, Crossen, along with the Francis family and Berthoud residents Kate Hudson, her son Gunnar, 14, Rhea Denney, Trent Maddex and daughter Taylyn, 16, with the funds that were left over from Joshua’s memorial fund, began to put into motion the plans for J.O.S.H. With the BAC donating their space for the group to meet, they were ready to begin their journey to reach the young people of Berthoud. The group, which has now grown to more than 25 attendees, meets at 7 p.m. for Wednesday Workouts and for a variety of activities at different locations beginning at 3:30 p.m. at their Sunday Gatherings. Once a month, events that are “just for fun” are also planned and have included a trip to the Colorado Speedway and Fly High Trampoline Park. All of the events are free, and have so far been paid for through donations. The workouts consist of both group-led instruction and free time for individuals to exercise how they prefer. Crossen leads the boxing and self-defense instruction, “He calls it boxing, but it’s so much more than that; they’re learning about themselves physically and mentally,” leader Trent Maddox said. Strength training, cardio, core-work, flexibility as well as breathing techniques and mindfulness exercises are also done. “Exercising like this, boxing, is such a good way to get your emotions out, it’s an outlet,” said Taylyn Maddex, a student leader who manages the group’s social media and also produced a documentary about the group for a school project. Ethan Decoteau, 14, reiterated that sentiment. “Ever since my first time here was just hooked it just feels like everything gets lifted off your chest.” “It’s not just about gaining physical strength, but also mental strength and confidence rancis said of the variety of activities that are provided for the kids to experience. Sunday Gatherings have involved guest speakers on various topics, includ-

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ing a police K-9 Unit, drum circles, games, poetry, mock job interviews, guitar lessons, painting, writing and yoga to name a few. The group is in many ways shaped by its members, as the leadership asks what interests individuals have and what they would like to experience. Gunnar Hudson, one of the student leaders, described the affect the meetings have, “At our Sunday Gatherings people walk in with their heads down and don’t come off as very confident. Two hours later they’re smiling and shaking hands and ... that has really helped people come out of their shell.” Opportunities called “Give-Backs” are also part of the J.O.S.H program, where members volunteer their time for various projects in the community. “It gives them a sense of that they are a part of this community, that they have purpose.” Francis said. All of the leaders reiterate they want everyone to feel welcome at the meetings regardless of their background. “These kids are coming because they feel like they belong to something, which is what our intent was.” Crossen said. Much of the growth the group has seen since November has come from the efforts of the student leaders and participants encouraging others to come. “It’s nice to feel that we might help somebody. I would hate for Berthoud to go through something tragic again. It’s gone through a lot of hard times,” Kenny Butterfield, , a regular attendee commented. The kids all convene back in the open fitness room to work on core strength toward the end of their time at the gym. As the group all support their body weight in a plank position, the leaders give words of encouragement, “keep pushing yourself, believe in yourself, don’t give up,” can be heard throughout the room. Through a holistic approach to wellbeing, the leadership of J.O.S.H., who themselves chose to be warriors on behalf of the kids of Berthoud, have made it their mission to develop the warrior in each of the young people whose lives they touch, to help them believe that, no matter what life brings them, that they too can be, “invincible, unbeaten, conquerors and defenders.” If you are interested in getting involved by donating supplies, presenting or volunteering at a J.O.S.H. meeting, please contact Scott Crossen at 303775-1290 or JJ Francis at 970-818-1290. Monetary donations can be given at www.youcaring.com/joshjourneyofstrengthandhope-721352 For more information about J.O.S.H. visit www.facebook.com/groups/JourneyOfStrengthandHope/.


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Journalism advisor retires from Berthoud High School, recreated the school newspaper

By Shelley Widhalm The Surveyor

Kim Skoric of Berthoud wanted to bookend her teaching career at Berthoud High School (BHS) with her sons. Skoric, language arts department chairwoman and journalism advisor at the school, began her career there when her oldest of three sons, Tucker, was born 22 years ago. She retired this school year when she handed a diploma to her youngest son Cooper, 19. Her middle son is Kirby, 21. “In my heart of hearts I believe I’m supposed to do something else. I just don’t know what that is,” said Skoric, whose last day was June 22 after she helped teach a three-day professional-development class. “I wanted to leave when I loved it, because there’s lots of teachers that are teaching because they have to. They’re tired, because teaching is hard.” Skoric, who was raised in Green River, Wyo., earned a Bachelor of Arts in Secondary English Education in 1992 from Photo by Shelley Widhalm University of Wyoming, and a Master of Arts in Reading in Kim Skoric, language arts depart2005 from University of Northment chairwoman and journalism adern Colorado. visor at Berthoud High School, poses Upon receiving her bachelor outside Da Bean Coffee House on of arts degree, Skoric moved June 12. Skoric retired from teaching with her husband Todd, an air this year. traffic controller, to ongmont, where they lived for a short time before moving to Berthoud. Skoric had to wait six months to get certified in the state and did a few odd jobs in the meantime. She taught summer school in ongmont and then substitute taught for a year, followed by teaching another session of summer school. She then taught at an alternative middle school, also in ongmont, in all content areas to all grade levels until she realized she wanted to leave her “rather intense job.” In September 1995, she got connected to a position teaching in the English department at BHS. Over the years she taught every class in the department, except for advanced placement language and composition, she said. “I love being a part of the future kids are building for themselves. I love it when kids find a passion for something in my class, and they just take off and go,” Skoric said. “I love helping kids believe in themselves.” Skoric developed a creative writing class and a senior English class and brought back the journalism class, started about 30 years by Jeanne Wade but discontinued after a few years. eonard Sherman, principal of the school at the time, asked Skoric to start a school newspaper, and she said she didn’t have a background in journalism. “He said, ‘I know you can do it,’” Skoric said. Skoric agreed and called the oveland eporter- erald about participating in a summer internship during the summer of 2000. She worked alongside staff in all roles at the newspaper, including in the editorial, management, and advertising departments, helping with everything from reporting to layout and copy-editing. “It was awesome,” Skoric said. “I wrote an article, and it was on the front page, and it was so exciting.” Skoric used the traditional journalism model of an editor-in-chief, news, features and sports editors, and an advertising manager to create her journal-

ism class. “I tried to make it as real-world as I could for kids,” Skoric said. Skoric combined the editorial and production classes into one to create a monthly publication called the “Maroon Tribune,” the name for the school newspaper selected by the students. At the suggestion of her students she added in a website four to five years ago, B Smaroontribune.com, and a news cast, BHS MTV, or Maroon Tribune Video, two years ago. ow we do all three things all in one class, Skoric said. f they find something they are so excited about, I try to make it happen. Kids took a lot of ownership, and they made things happen.” Nick Yuska, who worked on the newspaper for three years and served as co-editor in chief, said Skoric did a great job introducing journalism to the students, including how to set up a newspaper, write good articles and get good quotes. “She made us love to write articles,” said Yuska, who graduated this year. She helped find a fit for every student in the class, and it made it really enjoyable. She helps you get the ball rolling, and once you get the ball rolling, she lets you do your own thing.” Skoric made the journalism class relevant to the individual students, said Allison anter, an nglish teacher who will serve as the department chairwoman next school year. “She wouldn’t send them on something they didn’t already care about,” anter said. She gave them a lot of choice in what they were covering. ... Any time you give kids options they are going to excel.” Skoric worried about the class’s future in the early 2000s and again in 2011, when she had six and then four students sign up for what she had to turn into an independent study class that met during lunch and after school. SKORIC continued on page 19


Berthoud Weekly Surveyor

July 27, 2017

SKORIC continued from page 18 The second time, the class was so small the students didn’t have the time to also sell enough ads, so Skoric worked with the Berthoud Weekly Surveyor to print the paper for free for one school year. “The Surveyor kept the paper alive the second time,” Skoric said. The class the past year had 15 students. “I think enthusiasm is contagious, and I think the kids see how much I love this and how much I enjoy it,” Skoric said. Skoric let her creative writing students, when she taught the class, take that same type of ownership, tailoring her instruction to their needs. She’s seen three of her students self-publish their novels, she said. “Every time I taught it, it was a little bit different,” Skoric said. “I use the kids as a barometer of where my teaching goes. I’m recreating things all the time. It makes it real.” Skoric plans to remain involved in BHS after her retirement, including continuing working with the Berthoud Book Bunch, an after-school book club which she started 10 years ago. Students also are interested in starting a writing club, and she said she might help with that, too. “There’s lots of things out there,” Skoric said. “I think things happen on purpose. I’m waiting for the compass to turn and point me in the direction I’m supposed to go.” Skoric dabbles in writing and plans to write a novel, she said. She also likes reading, playing the piano, taking walks, camping and kayaking and is learning how to quilt. “So far, I’m throwing things at lots of targets,” Skoric said. “I think I was supposed to be done this year so I can do something else.” Courtesy photo

Kim Skoric escorts her son Cooper, 19, during the graduation ceremony Saturday, May 27.

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July 27, 2017

Berthoud Weekly Surveyor

Camaraderie and a love of horses Local youth riding team values teamwork above all

Berthoud’s Interscholastic Equestrian members and instructors.

Courtesy photo

By Katie Harris The Surveyor

The only thing better than riding horses is riding horses among friends. At least that’s what Berthoud High School juniors Taylor Dower and Cailey Archer credit for their dedication to Berthoud’s Interscholastic Equestrian Association (IEA) English team, an entity with which the pair have been associated since its inception three years ago. The group of more than 20 middle- and high-school-aged girls practices at Gargot Farms Riding Academy in Berthoud under instructor Molly Brame. Brame instructs her IEA riders in hunt seat, a style of riding often used in jumper events, although riders have the option of showing in non-jumping, or flat classes as well. Dower, who’s been riding horses for as long as she can remember, said having the opportunity to train with a group of riders has helped hone her skills in a way that private lessons never could. “Getting to lesson with other people is amazing,” she said. “You can hear [Brame] ask you to do something and not quite get it, but when you see the other girls doing it something just clicks.” When joining the team, riders commit to practicing a minimum of four times per month in groups of five riders per lesson. During show season, from October through February, the riders can compete in as many as five of the seven shows offered across the Front Range. The local program is part of the national IEA, which feeds into the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA), an organization providing opportunities for college-aged equestrians to ride and compete. IEA shows are run differently from typical horse shows, in that riders don’t know which horse they’ll be competing on until the day of the show. Each participating team is expected to bring a selection of horses from their practice barn and riders draw names from the pool of availIEA continued on page 21


Berthoud Weekly Surveyor

July 27, 2017

IEA continued from page 20

drawing intimidating horses. “My first year, the first show I went to I got to ride Zephyr, this massive draft horse,” said Archer. “I didn’t even place but it was so much fun. I remember my mom telling me afterward that the smile never left my face.” Dower said making it through a show on an obstinate mare without falling off helped her realize how much she had improved as a rider. With another IEA season right around the corner Archer said one of her biggest hopes this year is to ride some of the horses with whom she has not yet had the opportunity to team up. “We see the same horses again and again at shows each season, and we all have our dream list of the horses we want to ride,” she said. “There’s something about that feeling you get when you’re on a horse and the knowledge that you have to work together to accomplish something — that neither of you can do it on your own.” After falling just one point short of qualifying for regionals last season in both her jumping and flat classes, Archer said improving her riding enough to qualify this year is another big goal for her. Dower said she plans to compete in the maximum five shows in which the riders are allowed to participate and, whenever her family is not traveling, she hopes to be in the saddle. Both girls said they’ll compete in both flat classes and jumper classes this season. Brame said IEA is a good fit for anyone interested in riding at the college level and who enjoys the team aspect of riding and competing. “Before I joined IEA I’d ridden at barns where there was a lot of drama,” said Archer. “For me it had always been about going to a show, hanging out with the horses, and going home. When I was able to come here and meet other girls who are super talented and have that spirit of camaraderie that you don’t always get other places, I knew this was where I wanted to be.” The Berthoud IEA team is accepting new riders through the beginning of the upcoming school year. The only requirement to join the team is participants must be in middle school or high school. However, proficiency at the canter is required to compete in shows. Anyone interested in learning more can visit www.RideIEA.org.

able horses. The idea behind the unique horse/rider pairing process is riders gain experience in handling horses with varying strengths and weaknesses; thereby making them all-around better equestrians. The process is both challenging and exciting. “When I first joined IEA I was most scared about having to ride horses that were not my own,” said Dower. “That was the scariest thing in the world to me, but with the help of [Brame] and the barn team I learned riding different horses is a lot of fun, sometimes even more fun.” In fact, both Dower and Archer said their fondest IEA memories since the team was formed three years ago involve facing their fears after

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July 27, 2017

Berthoud Weekly Surveyor

Reduce kids’ risk of getting colds at school Special to the Surveyor

School-aged kids who catch colds or the flu from their classmates can quickly spread those colds to their family members, who then might spread the colds further when they go to work. Preventing the spread of colds and flu at school is a team effort that requires the assistance of not just parents, but also teachers and students. Still, parents might be the first line of defense when it comes to preventing the spread of cold and flu at school. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 38 million school days are lost to the flu each year. Those lost days can affect students who miss lesson plans, but also affect parents, who often must take days off from work to tend to their sick children. While there’s no way for parents to guarantee their children won’t catch a cold or the flu this school year, they can take various preventive measures to increase kids’ chances of staying healthy and achieving perfect attendance. • Make sure kids are immunized and that their immunizations are current. Vaccinations bolster kids immune systems. That’s important, as kids’ immune systems are naturally less mature than adults’, making them more vulnerable to germs and viruses. The CDC recommends that adults and children receive their flu vaccinations in October while noting that such vaccinations can be administered as late as January and still prove effective. The CDC also recommends that adults and children

receive flu vaccinations each year. Additional vaccinations may not need to be administered as often, but parents should still ensure kids’ are up-to-date with their shots. • Make sure kids regularly wash their hands. Kids often catch colds by rubbing their hands that have been exposed to cold virus germs on their noses or eyes. To prevent that, parents can teach kids to wash to their hands thoroughly, including scrubbing the backs of their hands, between their fingers and around their fingernails. Kids should know to wash their hands regularly, but especially after they use the bathroom and before they eat, drink or touch their mouths, noses or eyes. • Keep kids home when they are sick. Parents don’t want their children to miss school, but kids who are suffering from colds or flu should be kept home. This prevents the spread of colds and flu to classmates and teachers, and time to rest at home may help youngsters recover more quickly. • Teach kids to avoid common germ spots. Germs can be lurking anywhere, but some spots seem to make more welcome homes for germs than others. Studies have shown that kids were most likely to encounter germs in schools on water fountain spigots and on plastic cafeteria trays. Teach kids to never put their mouths on fountains and to avoid eating any food that might fall onto their trays in the cafeteria. School-aged children are susceptible to colds and flu when spending time in the classroom. But parents can reduce their youngsters’ cold and flu risk in various ways.


Back to school 2017  
Back to school 2017  
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