Page 1

DN MONDAY, SEPT. 9, 2013

THE DAILY NEWS

BSUDAILY.COM

DON’T JUST CENSOR SEE PAGE 3

Dill Street opens over weekend in the Village

Columnist pushes for changing beliefs, not just cleaning up social media posts SEE PAGE 5

PUPPIES

New rules possible for SGA

IN THE

Social media key issue following former president’s resignation EMMA KATE FITTES NEWS EDITOR | news@bsudailynews.com

POOL

The Student Government Association executive board is considering adding regulations for social media into its bylaws following the former president’s resignation. Malachi Randolph’s formal resignation letter was approved at an emergency SGA Senate meeting Thursday after he tweeted racially derogatory comments Tuesday. “I think it is definitely something they should really look at,” said Jennifer Jones-Hall, assistant vice president of Student Affairs. “One of the options in the bylaws talks about being able to censure executive officers and cabinet if they do something wrong. I’m wondering if they should go further. I also am praying and hoping that students will learn from this, but I could be wrong.” She said it could take anywhere from two weeks to a couple months for any changes to the bylaws to become official. The SGA Senate would have to draft the new legislations and work with the parliamentarian to get them approved. “It’s really just a matter of if people have the ability and want to do that,” she said. Chloe Anagnos, the current vice president who SGA will induct as president Wednesday, said this has been brought up to her, but it would be challenging. “It has been brought up a few times [that] maybe we should write [social media regulations] into SGA bylaws,” she said. “There are a few things we want to change. Our bylaws are really big; it will take awhile.” Jones-Hall said adjusting the bylaws could help SGA promote a positive image. “I think it’s something that they could do,” she said. “I think they really need to be getting out there and meeting with people more face to face and really being accessible to people. I am really hoping they will take it upon themselves to meet face to face with many different groups and organizations.” She said she thinks the executive board will handle this situation well. “I have been with the current slate that is sitting here on campus the whole time,” Jones-Hall said. “I couldn’t have asked for a better job. I really do feel like they were fast, furious. I thought they were upfront, I thought that they answered honestly. I am really, really proud of them.”

Tuhey Pool opens up to canines, owners before winter close

DN PHOTO KEELY COLLIER

CONSTANCE HARCOURT CHIEF REPORTER | cmharcourt@bsu.edu

W DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

TOP: Abby plays in the kiddie pool at the first Drool in the Pool event Saturday at Tuhey Pool. Pet owners were able take advantage of Drool in the Pool, an event that allowed dogs to swim in the pool before it closed for the season and raise money for local animal organizations at the same time. Proceeds from the general admission fees went to the Muncie Animal Rescue Fund and the Muncie Animal Shelter. ABOVE: Mike White holds Abby, a one-year-old Shihpoo or a poodle and Shih Tzu mix, during Drool in the Pool on Saturday at Tuhey Pool.

hile wet paw pads pounced and water splashed, drenched fur shook and tongues wagged at Tuhey Pool’s first Drool in the Pool event. Dog owners from Muncie and surrounding cities, like Anderson and New Castle, came with ONLINE their pups to enjoy the last open day of Tuhey Pool. Canines of all breeds, including Great Danes, golden retrievers and boxers, swam, ran and drooled at the event. To watch a Todd Smekens, publisher of the video of the Muncie Voice, said he believed this event, go to bsudaily.com will become an annual event for the Muncie community. “We had such a broad spectrum this year; it’s a good way to close out Tuhey Pool,” Smekens said. “Drool in the Pool will add to the portfolio we offer here.” Informational booths were set up around the pool. Each booth offered different accommodations for dogs, like grooming care, microchips, adoption and, of course, bone-shaped treats. See PUPPIES, page 6

Undefeated start best since 2008 season PEER REVIEW TEAM TO VISIT Wenning has yet to throw an interception CAMPUS SOON in first two games McKINNEY SPORTS EDITOR | MATT @Matt_D_McKinney

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Senior quarterback Keith Wenning prepares to pass the ball down field during the game against Army on Saturday at Scheumann Stadium. Ball State swept Army with a score of 40-14.

LAST THREE SEASONS 2010

First two games Points scored Points allowed Yards passing Yards rushing

2011 50 37 278 388

Points scored Points allowed Yards passing Yards rushing

2012 34 57 321 287

Points scored Points allowed Yards passing Yards rushing

2013 64 78 395 581

Points scored Points allowed Yards passing Yards rushing

91 42 665 195

MUNCIE, INDIANA

ON THIS DAY IN 1791, THE NATION’S CAPITAL CITY TOOK ITS NAME FROM PRESIDENT GEORGE WASHINGTON.

An hour after Saturday’s win over Army, Ball State football head coach Pete Lembo talked to the media about his quarterback, Keith Wenning. “He’s decreasing some of the bad plays,” Lembo said. “Here we are through two games. ... No interceptions yet. That’s-” Just then, Lembo was interrupted by a loud knocking. Two seats over, Wenning had a small smirk on his face as he had rapped his knuckles on the wooden table on front of him. Wenning has a reason to smirk. For the first time since the 2008 season, Ball State is undefeated through its first two games. The offense has rolled on all cylinders since halftime of the Aug. 29 game against Illinois State. In the last six quarters, Ball State has outscored its opponents 75-21. Expanded to the last two games, Ball State has outscored its opponents 91-42. In the entire 2013 season, Wenning has thrown for 665 yards and five touchdowns, without

throwing a single interception. “He’s not full of himself,” Lembo said of Wenning after Saturday’s win over Army. “He doesn’t have a big ego. He takes criticism very well. He’ll be hard on himself — in a good way — about the things he didn’t do well [Saturday]. Obviously, he did a lot of very good things [Saturday].” After the first two games of last season, Ball State was getting outscored 78-64, although most of those points came from a 52-27 beatdown by then No. 12 Clemson. Wenning had passed for 395 yards and no touchdowns, while throwing two interceptions. Wenning and the receiving corps carried some of the offensive load for the offense when starting running back Jahwan Edwards missed Saturday’s game with concussion-like symptoms. Ball State’s rushing attack still managed 109 yards and two touchdowns — despite a lost fumble in the third quarter — but needed 30 carries between sophomore Horactio Banks and freshman Teddy Williamson. “Other than [the fumble], I feel like I stepped up,“ Banks said. The 91 points scored by Ball State in 2013 is the most scored by any Ball State team in its first two games.

See FOOTBALL, page 4

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter. 1. CLOUDY

Students walking campus next week might get to talk about their Ball State experience with accreditors, and the university wants them to be honest. One of the methods the peer review team will use to determine whether Ball State remains accredited is talking to random students about how they perceive the university. Associate Provost Marilyn Buck, a co-chair on the steering committee for accreditation, said she wants to stress that students should be honest. “There’s no canned statement they need to make,” she said. “When they’re asked a question, they need to honestly talk about the experience they’ve had here at the university.” She encouraged students to not think of only academics when discussing the university, but also athletics, student organizations and events or any other experience that has impacted their college experience. The Higher Learning Commission’s accreditation is divided into five categories, the first being Mission. Here’s a closer look at the criterion and its four core components, from the HLC’s website. THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

See ACCREDITATION, page 3 THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

CONTACT US

Accreditors to ask students for their opinion about university SAM HOYT CHIEF REPORTER | sthoyt@bsu.edu

2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

5. SUNNY

FORECAST

We will start off the week very hot, but we will see some relief as the week continues. Make it a great day or not, the choice is yours. – Adam Burniston, WCRD Weather

TODAY  Mostly sunny High: 87 Low: 71 3. PARTLY CLOUDY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

5. SUNNY

21. SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS

VOL. 93, ISSUE 12

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY TODAY’S BULLETIN BOARD NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

1. INDIANA STATE UNIVERSITY GIVES OK FOR OIL DRILLING 3. PARTLY CLOUDY

TODAY

CORNERSTONE OPENS ALL-AGES CLASSES

The Cornerstone Center for the Arts begins its 12-week Cornerstone Arts Programs for all ages. They offer a variety of classes, including acting for grown-ups, contemporary and jazz, adult tap, belly dancing, hip-hop, Pilates and painting.

DN FILE PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

FRESHMAN READER AUTHOR TO TALK

STUDENT ALUMNI RELATIONS TEAM CALL-OUT MEETING

Conor Grennan, the author of the 2014 Freshmen Common Reader “Little Princes: One Man’s Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal,” will speak on campus. He will present at 7:30 p.m. at John R. Emens Auditorium. Tickets are free and the event is open to the public. Grennan will be available to sign books after the Q&A portion. Angels for Life will host a blood drive from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in Pruis Hall. Walkins are welcome.

The Student Alumni Relations Team will have its first meeting for interested participants. The meeting will be at 8 a.m. in the library of the Alumni Center. According to a press release, members of the team will get to be involved in planning the annual Graduation Celebration, help with the Finals Survival Kit program as well as other events like Homecoming, football pregame rallies and regional outings. ‘ERNESTINE SHUSWAP GETS HER TROUT’

“Ernestine Shuswap Gets Her Trout” will play at 7:30 p.m. at the Strother Studio Theatre. The show will run through Saturday. It follows a group of women through 100 years of history and how they “confront a changing world,” according to a press release. Tickets are $10 for the public and $8 for students.

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT ON THIS PAGE?

Email us at news@bsudailynews.com.

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP) — Indiana State University is hoping join in on the ongoing oil boom in Vigo County. The university has given permission for Pioneer Oil of Lawrenceville, Ill., to drill on university-owned land, the Tribune-Star reported. Indiana State President Dan Bradley, a former professor of petroleum engineering, said Pioneer believes there is “significant” potential for oil production under the campus in Terre Haute in western Indiana. The drilling won’t cost the university anything, but it would receive royalties if oil is found. Bradley said other property owners downtown

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TUESDAY Sunny High: 92 Low: 75 5. SUNNY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

20. THUNDERSTORMS

WEDNESDAY Thunderstorms High: 91 Low: 69

also are being contacted about possible drilling. THURSDAY Interest in Vigo County Partly cloudy oil really took off afHigh: 83 Low: 55 ter Indianapolis-based CountryMark made a significant oil find on FRIDAY property belonging to the Sunny Hulman family that owns High: 71 Low: 50 the Indianapolis Motor 5. SUNNY 4. MOSTLY SUNNY 3. PARTLY CLOUDY 20. THUNDERSTORMS Speedway. The strike was producing as many SERVICE DIRECTORY as 2,000 barrels per day The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144for a time, CountryMark 360), the Ball State student newspaper, Chief Executive Officer is published Monday through Thursday Charlie Smith said. during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero “There’s nothing that atdays on breaks and holidays. The Daily tracts attention and interest News is supported in part by an allocation like someone who has had from the General Fund of the university success,” said Herschel and is available free to students at various McDivitt, DNR’s director of points on campus. the division of oil and gas. 3. PARTLY CLOUDY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

5. SUNNY

20. THUNDERSTORMS

3. PARTLY CLOUDY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

5. SUNNY

POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind.

2. INDIANA PRISON INMATES PROVIDE END-OF-LIFE CARE INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Inmates at a western Indiana prison are trained to give end-of-life care for their cellmates through a hospice program as a way to help deal with an aging prison population. The program at the Wabash Valley Correctional Institute in Carlisle, 35 miles south of Terre Haute, was the idea of a prisoner who had watched his friend die of lung cancer in 2009 without a single outside visitor. Inmate volunteers have cared for 50 convicts

THE FORECAST

in their final days over the past three years, The Indianapolis Star reported. “They forge some pretty close relationships with their patients,” said Marla Gadberry, health services coordinator at Wabash Valley. “And when the patient passes on, there can be a quite a bit of grief.” Volunteers receive 40 hours when they sign up for the program and an hour a month of on-thejob training. An aging inmate population is a nationwide problem.

TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Steven Williams

NEWS EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes ASST. NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz ASST. FEATURES EDITOR Jeremy Ervin

SPORTS EDITOR Matt McKinney ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

72 HRS EDITOR Ryan Howe FORUM EDITOR Devan Filchak

SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR Aric Chokey MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Corey Ohlenkamp

ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Jonathan Miksanek DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein

ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye

SENIOR COPY EDITORS Daniel Brount Marisa Hendrickson

Updated 24/7 Crossword

Sudoku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Michael Mepham

Level: Easy

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY.

ACROSS 1 THE CRIMSON TIDE’S SCHOOL, FOR SHORT 5 DELAYED, AS IN TRAFFIC 10 BOAST 14 FE ON THE PERIODIC TABLE 15 LATIN BEARS 16 BRIDLE STRAP 17 DITTY 18 LAMENT OVER A LOSS 19 LIGHT BROWN 20 GENTLE LEADER’S QUALITY 23 CRY OF SURRENDER 24 PRACTICE FOR THE LSAT, E.G. 25 CRESCENT COMPONENT 28 LOU GRANT PORTRAYER 31 TAR PITS LOCALE 33 COWBOYS AND INDIANS, E.G. 36 LAB GEL MADE FROM SEAWEED 37 DEVOUT PETITIONS KEPT TO ONESELF 43 DOUGHNUT’S MIDDLE 44 GETS REALLY WET 45 VOICES ONE’S VIEW

48 401(K) ALTERNATIVE NAMED FOR A DELAWARE SEN. 53 LIKE COOL CATS 54 1986 PEACE NOBELIST WIESEL 57 “THE __ SANCTION”: EASTWOOD THRILLER SET IN THE ALPS 58 BEHIND-THE-SCENES INVESTOR 62 NYC OR LONDON AREA 64 BYGONE ANESTHETIC 65 BOTTOM OF A SHOE 66 BE ABSOLUTELY SURE 67 APRIL FOOL’S ANTIC 68 “MILA 18” AUTHOR LEON 69 JEDI GURU 70 ‘90S WHITE HOUSE CAT 71 CONFINED, WITH “UP” DOWN 1 SHELLFISH SOUP 2 IN THE AREA 3 TENNIS GREAT SELES 4 BEINGS WITH HALOS 5 KID’S MATH HOMEWORK 6 PACE BETWEEN A WALK AND

A RUN 7 SEIZE, AS POWER 8 CONCERNED PERSON 9 PET MOTEL 10 ONE OF TV’S MAVERICKS 11 PLUG IN, AS A SMARTPHONE 12 WHAT YOU BREATHE 13 AFRICAN ANTELOPE 21 7:50, VIS-À-VIS 8:00 22 DEAN’S LIST NO. 26 BACK 27 VALETS PARK THEM 29 COMIC STRIP SHRIEK 30 EXPLORER JOHN AND COMICAL CHARLOTTE 32 HOWL AT THE MOON 34 LETTERS AFTER L 35 TRADE JABS 37 “WHOOPS” 38 “NAH!” 39 HAPHAZARD, AS WORKMANSHIP 40 PIG HOLDER 41 FORMER MGM RIVAL 42 DAISYLIKE FALL BLOOMER 46 LONG, THIN FISH 47 RAINS ICE PELLETS

49 ASKS BOLDLY, AS FOR A LOAN 50 TURN ONE’S BACK ON 51 LAND WITH A ROD 52 SLAP THE CUFFS ON 55 EMCEE’S SPEECH 56 MORAL PRINCIPLE 59 DES MOINES’S STATE 60 QUICK KISS 61 SLOW-MOVING VESSELS 62 BIG __ COUNTRY 63 SEAN’S MOM YOKO

www.bsudaily.com

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY.

20


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

Messer talks Syria Congressman says he could vote yes on military strike

|

ARIC CHOKEY CHIEF REPORTER | aachokey@bsu.edu

Muncie community schools are slated to face some major changes in the coming year. Due to enrollment numbers, the Muncie Community School Board of Trustees is considering different plans for closing or merging different elementary, middle and high schools. “[Enrollment has] been declining since the factories started to close,” said Ana Pichardo-Delk, communications director for the Muncie Community Schools. Aside from the shift in students to other schools that some of the plans may cause, Ball State students who volunteer would have to go to seek a new school as well. Last school year, there were about 638 Ball State student volunteers placed all around the Muncie Community Schools, according to data from the Office of Teacher Education Services at Ball State. The students placed included student teachers, observational placements and participation placements. “We do have a project in [Northside Middle School, which could close according to the new plan] working with special education students,” said John Jacobson, Dean of Teachers College. “Obviously, students will still have that need, and I’m sure our program

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

line against Syria on chemical weapons, I believe it will be even harder to enforce red lines against Iran, who is undoubtedly racing toward nuclear weapons,” Messer said. Another member of Indiana’s congressional district remains skeptical about the nations interests in the region. The Indianapolis Star reported Sen. Dan Coats, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, has

asked for more input from his constituents back home and from the president’s administration on a longterm strategy before making a decision. Messer, who has stood by the president in seeking congressional approval, said a “swift, strong and targeted strike” should be the goal during the vote. However, he said, after the vote is held, the president should abide by the

will be shifted to that school that the students end up in.” Despite the shift, Jacobson said he doesn’t believe it will have much impact on the program. “I wouldn’t think that it would have any effect on our relationship,” he said. “And we have a school partnership network, and Muncie is part of that network.” If facilities were to be repurposed or abandoned, the board would not be able to sell them, but would have to save them for charter schools. “According to my finance officer, we cannot sell the building. It will go toward a charter school,” Pichardo-Delk said. “[However,] we can’t just say ‘Ball State wants to buy this building, they can buy it.’” Historical data from the school system’s website show that enrollment numbers have declined since at least 2003. The low enrollment has consequently led to less funding from the state for the school system, causing the board of trustees to start plans for cutting costs. “Our superintendent and this board were ready to make a decision,” Pichardo-Delk said. The decision will be based off six different plans that have been proposed. The board has had two different public meetings on the issue. “This is a district level decision, and it’s really unfortunate that enrollment has decreased, but they are doing the right thing holding public meeting and looking at a variety of options before making a decision,” Jacobson said.

PROPOSED PLANS AS OF AUG. 27

congressional decision. “There may be legal arguments that he was not required to seek our consent, but he has now sought it,” he said. “I believe that if he does not abide by Congress’ decision, it will create a constitutional crisis.” Congress will head to a vote on action in Syria within the next two weeks. Unified Student Media contributed to this story.

OPTION A: TWO HIGH SCHOOLS

Two high schools: grades 8-12 One middle school: grades 6-7 Nine Elementary schools: grades K-5 PLAN:

- Repurpose one middle school building for lease, innovative and alternative programs as well as administrative offices - Sell or lease the Anthony Administration Building

LOCATION

Mayoral Proclamation

Ball State University Green

TIME

WEDNESDAY

LOCATION

Muncie City Hall Auditorium, 300 N. High St.

TUESDAY

Candlelight Vigil, World Suicide Prevention Day TIME

7:30 p.m.

Buck said one of the biggest ways the university articulates its mission is one recognizable phrase: Education Redefined. “That’s not our mission statement, but is a good representation of what our mission statement says we’re about,” she said. “We indirectly distribute our mission for

others to see through our publicity.” Buck said the mission statement led to the creation of the strategic plan, which follows the mission’s goals. “We’re a university where the strategic plan really leads and guides the focus of what we do,” Buck said.

One of the issues the self-study provided to the accreditors points out is that diversity is not directly addressed in the mission, but Buck said that doesn’t mean it’s not present. “They focus on [the] mission, but they’re also looking at the vision and the value statements,” she said. Buck said diversity is an important, if not necessary part

of a well-rounded education. “[Students] are living in a world that is diverse,” she said. “It’s a global economy. If we don’t help people understand how to live in a diverse world, our students aren’t going to be successful.” Major evidence showing the importance Ball State puts on diversity is the recognition it received Friday for tripling its international population in the last decade.

The mission statement stresses the integration of knowledge and application, and one of the benefactors it mentions are external partners, which Buck said are where the university really works toward the public good. Through programs such as immersive learning and Building Better Communities, the university works with people in communities located far from Muncie. “There’s an awful lot of communities that can talk

about the things Ball State has done to build their community and make them a better place,” she said. Another area Buck said focuses on the public good is the new strategic plan — Education Redefined 2.0: Advancing Indiana. “Goal 4 is all about that effort of engagement and our commitment to the public and making a difference in the state of Indiana,” Buck said.

BALL STATE’S MISSION STATEMENT

“As a public research university, we focus on students and highquality, relevant educational outcomes. Disciplinary knowledge is integrated with application. We do this in a manner that fundamentally changes students, researchers and our external partners, who look to the university for guidance. We transform information into knowledge, knowledge into judgment and judgment into action that addresses complex problems.”

One high school: grades 9-12 Two middle schools: grades 6-8 Nine elementary schools: grades K-5 PLAN:

- Space will be available in one or both of these buildings for innovative and alternative programs as well as administrative offices - Repurpose one middle school building for lease - Sell or lease the Anthony Administration Building SAVINGS:

School closure savings: $1,742,146 Anthony Administration Building: $178,298

OPTION C: TWO HIGH SCHOOLS

Two high schools: grades 9-12 One middle school: grades 7-8 Nine elementary schools: grades K-6 PLAN:

- Repurpose one middle school building for lease, innovative and alternative programs as well as administrative offices SAVINGS:

School closure savings: $1,406,962 Anthony Administration Building: $178,298 SOURCE: Muncie Community Schools

UPCOMING TOWN HALL MEETINGS 6:30 P.M. WEDNESDAY

at Wilson Middle School

CONTACT

TIME

FRIDAY

6:30 P.M. OCT. 8

at Central High School

Community safeTALK Suicide Prevention Training

CONTACT

Tracy Bemis-Smiley at 765-7479107 to register, limited to 30 participants.

SATURDAY

Bullying and Suicide Awareness Event TIME

2-6 p.m.

Kennedy Library, 1700 W. McGalliard Road

TIME

4-7 p.m.

LOCATION

TRAINER

LOCATION

FEES

Jay Zimmerman, Ball State psychologist

“THE INSTITUTION’S MISSION DEMONSTRATED COMMITMENT TO THE PUBLIC GOOD.”

OPTION B: ONE HIGH SCHOOLS

Free community QPR Training

LOCATION

“THE INSTITUTION UNDERSTANDS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ITS MISSION AND THE DIVERSITY OF SOCIETY.”

School closure savings: $1,406,962 Anthony Administration Building: $178,298

Email your name and contact information to ecispc@gmail.com or call Chris Drapeau at 219-730-6765 to register, limited to 25 participants.

6:30-8:30 p.m.

4.

“THE MISSION IS ARTICULATED PUBLICLY.”

SAVINGS:

NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION WEEK //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// TODAY 10 a.m.

practicums,” Buck said. Michael Maggiotto, the dean of College of Sciences and Humanities and the other co-chair, tried to meet with every faculty member to discuss the mission statement and how it applies to them and their duties. The university also keeps track of the mission’s goals, noting which ones are on track and which are having trouble being accomplished, publishing progress yearly.

3.

Congressman Luke Messer, along with Ball State President Jo Ann Gora, discusses the Indiana Leadership Academy at a press conference Friday morning in Ball State’s virtual studio. Messer was interview by student media after the press conference on how he will vote in the coming congressional action vote on Syria.

“THE INSTITUTION’S MISSION IS BROADLY UNDERSTOOD WITHIN THE INSTITUTION AND GUIDES ITS OPERATIONS.”

The first component looks at two basic areas of the mission: how people understand it and use it. Student opinions are gathered every three years with the National Survey of Student Engagement taken by freshmen and seniors in the Spring Semester. “The interesting piece of evidence that we have about that is the seniors in particular have done a lot of experiential educational activities: immersive learning, internships [and]

2.

Area schools face change Plan may include selling building, merging schools

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

1.

COREY OHLENKAMP MULTIMEDIA EDITOR photo@bsudailynews.com

The United States’ stance on Syria remains uncertain, however an Indiana politician said he is considering supporting military action. Shortly after Congressman Luke Messer’s address with the community, alongside Ball State President Jo Ann Gora, about the newly slated Congressional Academy, Messer moved from the stateside to the national front during an interview with Unified Student Media on the upcoming vote with Syria. Messer, who has been an opponent of President Barack Obama’s foreign policy, confirmed he is considering voting yes on the proposal. “If the vote were held today, I would vote yes,” Messer said. “Frankly, there is no more somber responsibility as a member of Congress than the responsibility to determine whether we should send men and women into combat.” For Messer, the situation was stressed after a trip to Israel in August with other members of Congress. Messer met with Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who emphasized the need for U.S. commitment in keeping Iran’s nuclear weapons ambitions suppressed. Messer said he saw the connection clearly. “There is no question that Syria is a direct client of Iran,” he said. Those ties are what Messer said he believes is a reason for the U.S. to involve itself with Syria. “If we do not enforce our red

ACCREDITATION: Diversity, mission statement key

YWCA Community Room, 310 E. Charles St.

Canan Commons, 500 S. Walnut St. Event is free to the community; no registration required

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Bar patrons wait to get into Dill Street Bar & Grill during the bar’s soft opening Saturday night. Shortly after opening, Dill Street filled to capacity, causing a long line in front of the bar with overflow spilling over to The Locker Room and The Chug.

DILL STREET OPENS OVER WEEKEND After months of moving, Dill Street Bar & Grill ONLINE opened in its new location, the former CBX bookstore, Saturday afternoon. The doors opened at 5 p.m. “A lot of work went into this, so it’s really nice,” Jake Larimore, kitchen manager of Dill Street, said. Saturday was the soft opening of the bar and no in- To see the house audio or light equipment had been set up yet. video of the “The DJs brought in their own stereo equipment,” he opening night, said. “They actually did the same thing last year. There’s go to no carpet or anything in there, so it’s loud enough.” bsudaily.com The official grand opening of the bar will be Wednesday night. “I think it’s actually going to benefit a lot of the bars because we now have the bars in a lot closer of proximity,” Larimore said. “People are more inclined to walk around to every bar.” – STAFF REPORTS


PAGE 4 | MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

/////////// THE

HAPS

EVENTS THIS WEEK

TUESDAY The Ball State field hockey team will take on Northwestern after a 2-1 win over Colgate.

FRIDAY The men’s tennis team will open fall play in the Milwaukee Classic in Wisconsin.

Fresh off a 1-2 weekend, women’s volleyball will play in the Iowa Tournament, opening against Western Illinois.

WOMEN’S GOLF

SEASON BEGINS AT REDBIRD INVITATIONAL

The women’s golf team traveled to Illinois this weekend to begin their season competing against 13 other teams in the Redbird Invitational. After a long day of 36 holes at Illinois State’s Weibring Golf Club, the team tied at third place with Bradley University. The tournament will conclude today with 18 holes, where the Cardinals will try to by pass Bradley, as well as Bowling Green State and leader Toledo. The team is only five strokes behind Toledo. Junior Jenna Hague and senior Meghan Perry led the way in the first day back on the green. Hague shot a 72 in the first round and a 70 in the second finishing with a 142 for the day, or 2-under, while Perry shot a 71 and 74, finishing with a 145, or 1-up. Freshman Kelsey Sear competed as an individual and finished with a score of 163 after shooting her second round nine strokes better than her first. As a team, Ball State ended with a 299 in the morning and with a 298 in the afternoon. “Our lineup is a lot different from last year, so we had some unknowns on what to expect, but I’m anxious to see what this team can produce,” Ball State head coach Katherine Mowat said. “We have to take today and what we learned from the course and use that knowledge to fix our mistakes and capitalize on opportunities tomorrow.” The final round will tee off today at 8:30 a.m. CT. – STAFF REPORTS

FOOTBALL: Offense boosts team to record opening | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Freshman forward Kelsey Wendlandt attempts to recover the ball from Tennessee Tech player Kelsey McGohan during the match Sunday. During the match, Wendlandt made her third goal of the season.

Shutout win propels team to 4-0 at home Bench production, defense has been key during 4 wins

|

EVAN BARNUM-STEGGERDA CHIEF REPORTER @Slice_of_Evan

Ball State’s 2-0 victory over Tennessee Tech was just another day in the office, fitting the mold of each of Ball State’s games: dominate possession, let the team’s depth be an advantage and hold strong on the backline. “We were very pleased,” head coach Craig Roberts said. “We took our chances when we needed to.” In all of its four wins, Ball State has attacked in waves to wear the opposition down, until finally breaking through. In the first half, Ball State looked as tested as much as it had been all season. The first 20 minutes were a war of attrition, as both teams prodded and probed, but neither were able to generate any real threats. Once again, it took Roberts

going to his bench for the Cardinals to break through. On the carrousel of offensive players being mixed and matched this season, bench players have generated a majority of Ball State’s offense, as substitutes have scored seven of Ball State’s 10 goals. Roberts brought in sophomores Kalynn Flanagan and Elaina Musleh and freshman Kelsey Wendlandt. The trio has been an integral part to Ball State’s success offensively. In the 29th minute, junior defender Cailey Starck teed up a free kick from just inside midfield that found the head of senior midfielder Michelle Blok. Blok’s header trickled to the feet of Wendlandt, who found the back of the net for her team-leading third goal of the season, not long after being substituted in. Despite shooting 22 times, Ball State scored only once more. Going into the game, Roberts said attacking down the wings against Tennessee Tech’s defense would be a focal point of Ball State’s offense. The Golden Eagles play with two defensive midfielders in front of their cen-

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

tral defenders, making the inner part of the field congested. Ball State’s second goal came from sophomore midfielder Madison Oyer’s assist. Her individual spurt of brilliance had her juke a few Tennessee Tech defenders until she reached the touchline. Oyer laced a pass through the six-yard box, and Musleh ran on to tap in her first goal of the season in the 63rd minute. Even with the win and domination of the box score, Roberts said he would have like to see a more complete performance from his team. “I would have liked to have seen us be a little bit more consistent to the end,” he said. “I think we took it for granted a little bit.” One facet that has remained constant for Ball State has been the defense. Anchored by senior Kelsey Shapiro, who has played all minutes this season, Ball State posted its third shutout of the year. “We’re just trying to do our job,” Shapiro said. “If we keep the ball in front of us, then the team will be playing good soccer.”

KEY CONTRIBUTIONS BENCH PRODUCTION

• 7 of 10 goals this year are from substitutes • 40 of 77 shots in wins, 47 of 96 total • 26 different players with playing time • Elaina Musleh: 1 goal, 2 assists • Kelsey Wendlant: 3 goals DEFENSE

• 10-2 goal differential • 3 shutouts • 96-41 shot differential • Kelsey Shapiro, Victoria Jacobs, Leah Mattingly and Cailey Starck are four of six players to start every game • 17 saves (opposition: 35) Ball State’s defense stifled Tennessee Tech’s offensive juggernaut Ellie Iaciofano. Iaciofano came into the game with three goals in five games, and had eight goals last season. Iaciofano only recorded two shots and Tennessee Tech only had eight as a team. “Every team presents different challenges, and we need to keep moving forward in order to meet them,” Roberts said.

Sunday’s win salvages weekend Fuelling, Marx lead team statistically in three matches DAVID POLASKI ASST. SPORTS EDITOR | @DavidPolaski After losing every set against Minnesota and Duke, Ball State needed a big showing against Western Illinois to save the weekend. Sophomore Alex Fuelling and senior Mindy Marx made sure they got it. The duo combined for 20 kills against Western Illinois to propel Ball State to a three set sweep, improving the Cardinals record to 4-3. “I thought we probably played our best match of the season against Western Illinois,” head coach Steve Shondell said. “We needed a win to help make up for our earlier losses, and the team delivered big time.” Ball State jumped out to a 12-3 lead against Western Illinois and extended it to 19-9 off a Fuelling kill. The set ended 25-17 after an attack error from

the Leathernecks’ Ann Miller. Western Illinois shot itself in the foot on numerous occasions, committing a combined 28 attack and service errors over the match. The first set saw Ball State kill just 11 points, while Western Illinois committed 11 errors. The Cardinals took a 5-1 lead to begin the second set, off of two kills from freshman Mackenzie Kitchel, one from sophomore Jenna Spadafora, and errors from Western Illinois. Shondell’s squad extended the lead to 21-13 off another kill by Kitchel and won the set 2516 after a spike from sophomore Kelly Hopkins. Kitchel finished the set with five kills on eight attempts, and finished the match with seven kills, third best on the team. Ball State was in control from the start of the third and final set, taking a 10-5 lead off a Spadafora kill and forcing Western Illinois to take a timeout. The Leathernecks regrouped and mounted a comeback, cutting the lead to 12-11 off a spike from Miller that forced Ball State to use a timeout of its own.

OVERALL STATISTICS LEADERS PLAYER

Alex Fuelling Mindy Marx Kylee Baker Jacqui Seidel

YEAR

KILLS

ERRORS ATTACK %

Junior Senior Senior Senior

94 61 45 9

37 23 26 5

The Cardinals responded and went onto win the set 2518, with Marx finishing the game with a kill. “We were so much more aggressive against Western Illinois,” Shondell said. “Even though we had already played two matches, we had more energy and spark than what we had played with earlier.” It won’t be the last time Shondell sees Western Illinois. The two teams are slated to face off again Friday, this time in the Iowa Tournament. Shondell said he was pleased with how his team responded, especially after seeing them go down in straight sets earlier in weekend. “Minnesota came out firing, and we were a little caught off guard with the intensity,” Shon-

“I’ll throw the ball to whoever’s open,” Wenning said. “If that’s a running back, if that’s any of the receivers, it just depends on my reads.” Apparently, the player who has been the most open for Wenning is junior wide receiver Willie Snead. Snead leads the team with 14 catches for 228 yards and a pair of touchdowns in his first two games this season.

After two games last season, Snead had 10 catches for 101 yards and no touchdowns. In the 2008 season, Ball State continued its undefeated tear through the schedule all the way to December before losing in the Mid-American Conference Championship game to Buffalo. At 2-0 for the first time since that season, Ball State’s spirits are as high as its hopes for the rest of the year. Knock on wood.

.258 .281 .133 .105

dell said. “Then Duke rolled around and we were still so shell-shocked from Minnesota that we let it affect our play.” Shondell said although his team played better against Duke, inability to hold a lead cost them in each set. Fuelling led the team with 11 kills against the Blue Devils, but no other player could tally more than five, making it difficult for the Cardinals to sustain offense. With Iowa coming up on the schedule, Shondell said he hopes the weekend can be a learning experience for his team. “We have to learn how to play in these difficult environments — it doesn’t get much harder than playing at Minnesota,” Shondell said. “Next time, we should handle it better.”

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Ball State junior Tarel Teach attempts to push back Colgate senior Kelsey Jensen to receive a pass. Teach scored both goals in Ball State’s 2-1 win against Colgate.

TEACH’S BIG GAME LEADS TO VICTORY Junior scores two goals in comeback win over Colgate DAKOTA CRAWFORD STAFF REPORTER | @DakotaCrawford_

A group of individuals muddled through the scoreless first half. A team worked to win in the second. Junior midfielder Tarel Teach led the Ball State field hockey team to its second victory of the year Sunday. Despite scoring both goals in the Cardinals’ come-from-behind win, Teach said unity and cohesion made it possible. “In the first half, [Ball State] was just kind of frantic,” she said. “We played individually. Once we settled down and realized what we needed to do and what we were capable of doing, we definitely started connecting.” Teach scored the team’s first goal in the 48th minute. She was able to drive a shot past the Colgate goalkeeper, following a dribble move to the left of the net. After losing to Robert Morris in a 0-1 contest Friday, the team felt it was important to improve against Colgate. “Tarel created opportunities on attack,” head coach Beth Maddox said. “She took shots and that’s what we needed. The team attacked a bit more today and that was a step up.” Early on though, it looked as if improvement would be of less

concern than just keeping up. Colgate’s Kelsey Jensen scored in the eighth minute to give the Raiders an early advantage. Despite registering 13 shots, it would be their last goal of the match. Ball State sophomore goalkeeper Shelby Henley made five saves on the day, while junior Jenna Rosenberry made a defensive save as well. Teach said Ball State is slowly improving, taking “baby steps” in its development. “I think that we are heading in the right direction,” she said. “It’s just taking us time to realize all of the good things that are happening.” Good things continued to happen for Teach as she scored a second time in the 57th minute on an assist from freshman Mikayla Mooney. The late goal sealed a 2-1 victory for Ball State. Maddox said her team needs to continue working on fundamentals as the season progresses. Ball State will return to its home field at Briner Sports Complex at 3 p.m. Tuesday for a match against Northwestern. The Wildcats are 3-1 this season, already defeating a pair of Top 20 teams. “Getting a win is always a good thing,” Maddox said. “We have some major issues that need to be fixed before conference games start, and Northwestern is a great opportunity to improve.”


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FORUM

DON’T JUST CENSOR YOURSELF

| THE DAILY NEWS COMICS

We’ve heard it too many times to count: watch what you put on social media. But that’s not the important lesson to be learned — it’s not just your tweets you should monitor in terms of offensive material. The problem here isn’t that a person said something offensive on the Internet for everyone to see. The problem is that they said something offensive with such ease. Whenever this happens, as a society, we should work to sort out what caused this situation. We should start a conversation to lessen the tensions, to break through the stereotypes that created the illconceived statements. After all, ignorance plays a factor in racist, sexist and homophobic thoughts. This can be achieved in part by simply habitually talking to and getting to know people who are different from you; it opens your mind. Instead, the bigger push is for people to police themselves even more on social media, even if their accounts are private. This leads to an outcry for freedom of speech. The problem shouldn’t be about people who feel like they can’t pub-

Austin Russell is a senior psychology major and draws “Existentia Academica� for the Daily News. His views do not necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Austin at abrussell@bsu.edu.

FORUM POLICY The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor, guest columns and feedback

on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed. The editor reserves the right to edit and

condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides this on an individual basis and must consult the writer

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before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842

U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

AJ 276 Muncie, IN 47306 Phone: 765.285.8247 Fax: 765.285.8248

Hiring website designers & telemarketers. Full & Part Time Avail. call 765-216-7869

Yorktown HS wants BSU students to coach with the YHS wrestling program 2013-14 season.Will work around studentsĘź schedules. Contact Coach McCormick tmccormick@yorktown.k12.in.us

Today’s birthday (9-9-13) ___ (c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Josh Shaffer is a sophomore visual communications major and draws “Strange Gods� for the Daily News. His views do not necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Josh at jashaffer@ bsu.edu.

U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814 U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

  

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Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 5 -- A solution to an old problem is becoming obvious. Creative work profits for the next month.Your team takes the prize. Keep your tone respectful. Mistakes may occur.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 5 -- Traveling isn’t as easy. Look at a breakdown as a challenge, and stick to your budget. For the next month, let the group decide. They’re laughing with you, not at you. Relax.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 6 -- Venture farther. For the next month, develop logical plans for sharing resources. Consider traditions. Imagine perfection, and forgive mistakes. Be methodical in the face of frustration. A partner opts in.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 7 -- Get practical work done.Your intelligence is attractive.You’re gaining valuable experience. Reducing power works better. Move carefully to avoid injury. Keep track of the money you’re considering spending.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 7 -Figure out finances. This coming month, you’re extra-intellectual. Excite your partner with a challenge. Check the rules. Do the research. Cut entertainment spending, even as you win a new assignment.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 5 -- Pass along what you’ve learned. For the next month, talk about what works (with Mercury in Libra). Do your part as well. It takes patience with breakdowns, especially today. Take it easy.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 5 -- Mercury enters Libra, and for almost a month, expert assistance provides ease. Build your partnerships. Set longterm goals, scheduling with discipline. Explore a long-distance opportunity. Payment is not always in cash.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 6 -- Romance grows. It’s getting easier to communicate at home. Don’t ask for favors. Slow down to avoid accidents. If controversy arises, get the family to help.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 5 -- Assume more responsibility. For the next month, keep legal issues in mind. Distant goals are attainable. Fine-tune and edit your work. Provide facts. A new technique doesn’t work. Take care.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 6 -Prepare to compromise and streamline your routine. Show that you know what you’re doing.You’re in line for a bonus, despite an awkward moment. Fall back on tradition.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 6 -- For about three weeks, you learn with ease. Review the basics. Choose what’s best for all. It’s not a good time to travel or make a big purchase. Plan a luxurious evening at home.

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ASHLEY DYE IS A SENIOR JOURNALISM AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS MAJOR AND WRITES ‘THE DYESSERTATION’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO ASHLEY AT ACDYE@BSU.EDU.

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lish their opinions anymore. The goal should be about how we should all respect one another and not let misguided knowledge dictate our views of particular groups. It’s true that everyone makes mistakes. Education is a growing process. We all have actions for which we have to apologize and hold ourselves accountable. But too often, when people make their errors, the apology is not that their statements were offensive, but that they were sorry people found them offensive. They make nonsensical excuses. It reads like, “I’m sorry you thought it was offensive ... but that’s not my fault.� This puts the blame on the people they hurt. It seems as if they aren’t sorry that they did it, they’re sorry they got caught. It’s insincere, and it’s far from an apology. And while it’s too late to take back previous statements, it’s not too late to prevent future issues. Instead of feeling pressured to censor yourself, realize that this isn’t a matter of political correctness. This is about being a decent, respectful human being.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7 -- You’re immensely confident, with the Moon in your sign. Organization gets easier, and projects move forward. Keep your word. Stand for yourself and others.

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PAGE 6 | MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FEATURES

TUESDAY Author Conor Grennan traveled the world. The result was “Little Princes,” a tale of child slavery in Nepal.

THURSDAY Read about a group of students who take to engage in medieval combat north of Bracken Library.

Muncie MusicFest is moving closer to campus. Get the heads up on the new commute from Canan Commons.

FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

BALL BEARINGS

PRACTICAL

POSES

C

STORY BY KALEIGH SHEAHAN // PHOTOS BY AMIRAH KING

DN PHOTOS JONATHAN MIKSANEK

BACK TO SCHOOL

ABOVE: A band member of No Coast plays a cowbell during Village Green Records’ Back to School Show. BELOW: The horn player for No Coast plays during a song as part of Village Green Records’ concert.

1. Lying-Down V: It’s as sim-

ple as it sounds. Create two “Vs” with your body by lying on your back with your arms overhead to create a “V” with your upper half and then your legs hipwidth apart to create a “V” with your lower half.

1

Village Green Records showcases variety of genres to welcome students |

2. V Twist:

amkincaid@bsu.edu

The crowd was filled with laughter and loud conversation as the speakers echoed down the streets from Village Green Records for the record store’s Back to School Show. Saturday night, DMA was the first to take the stage as the crowd outside of VGR began to form. Senior marketing major Hannah Zimmerman and junior architecture major Olivia Williamson gathered around the small stage to applaud DMA at the end of the set. The said they are fans of DMA and have been to VGR events multiple times. This was the first time for DMA, previously of Jookabox, to perform under his new name. The night’s eclectic lineup showcased many genres and styles of music. “The whole goal was to mix it up,” VGR owner Travis Harvey said. “I wanted it to be a welcoming party and have them experience what they like and also something different.”

As the crowd expanded, students, locals and out-of-town bands moved in toward the stage on the corner outside of the store. “A lot of people were really excited,” Harvey said. Sweet Poison Victim, an afro-pop band out of Indianapolis, played for their first time at VGR and also their first time in Muncie. Band member Bryant Cheesely said he was excited to perform for the crowd and that he likes Muncie. Freshman digital audio production major Zach Bulgarelli and freshman telecommunications major Josh Barton said they came for the band Rodeo Ruby Love. “They’re a really fun band,” said Barton, who has seen Rodeo Ruby Love prior to this event. Barton and Bulgarelli said they enjoy all genres of music, but recently have listened to more electronic music than others. “I’m really into electronic now,” Bulgarelli said. “They’re all doing some-

thing different, finally.” Although some people came to watch a specific band, some of the crowd came out to listen to new music from unfamiliar bands and mingle with friends. Freshman architecture major Tom Trail said he’s never been to VGR before and came out to see every band perform without a specific one in mind. Harvey said he believed the show was a success with around 400 people in attendance throughout the night. At its highest point, he said around 160 to 180 people were there. Throughout the night, VGR collected donations, which will go toward supporting local independent music and helping them with travel expenses. As rain sprinkled, the crowd stayed to dance and soak up the music. VGR is partnering with Be Here Now and hosting a show later this month. On Sept. 19 at Be Here Now, they will highlight three different bands, including Everything, Now!, a 10-year-old Indianapolis band.

PUPPIES: Special guests make splash in Muncie pool | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The Muncie Animal Rescue Fund had a booth that offered pet adoption, toys and pet shampoo. Dana Salkoski, ARF co-executive director, was at the event to share information about adoption as well as look for volunteers. Salkoski also distributed goodies for attendees and their four-legged friends. “I think Drool in the Pool is great,” she said. “A lot of people are here with a lot of cute dogs.” Adam Berteram, of New Castle, Ind., brought his black German shepherd, Dexter. He said he hopes to mark this event on his calendar every year. “Our pool [in New Castle] doesn’t do this,” Berteram said. “It’s nice to bring our dog here and enjoy the day.” Suzanne Baga brought her Boston terrier, Mardi, for a swim. Although she said Mardi wasn’t thrilled about swimming, Baga made the most out

« I hope even more

people come out next year to support ARF and the Muncie Animal Shelter. » SUZANNE BAGA, a dog owner of their experience. Baga adopted Mardi from ARF and said she hopes more people will follow her footsteps. “I hope even more people come out next year to support ARF and the Muncie Animal Shelter,” Baga said. Other than swimming, games and entertainment also were offered. For the wet T-shirt contest, each participant ran their dog to a bucket full of water with a Tshirt submerged at the bottom. To win, the participant had to put the T-shirt on the dog the fastest. Muncie’s Happy, Clean and Smart, which offers dog

“FRESHMAN 15” These stances aren’t just for the freshmen. For those looking to kick their metabolism into high gear and start their morning with a nice stretch, the following sequence is a great option for putting the “good” in good morning. Try holding each pose for five deep inhales and exhales — except the “knee-to-chest circle,” do as many as you’d like, and keep it even for both left and right rotations and for both legs.

BASH ALEX KINCAID STAFF REPORTER

affeinated beverages and catnaps are a big part of a college student’s universe. Between 8 a.m. classes, part-time jobs and social engagements, student activities and a healthy lifestyle can be a struggle. Whether you’re looking to fight off the “Freshman 15” or searching for some inner peace between classes, yoga is an easy and fun way to relax your body and mind. In her book, “Slim, Calm, Sexy Yoga,” YouTube sensation Tara Stiles offers a variety of poses and sequences to cure whatever ails you. From headaches to hangovers and anxiety to insomnia, the practice of yoga is here to help you battle almost anything college life throws your way.

DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

A dog and its owner swim Saturday afternoon in Tuhey Pool with other dogs and owners. Different events, including Dock Diving, a wet T-shirt contest for the dogs and a “leave it” contest (where the owner leaves an object and the dog must not pick it up) for the owners and their pets.

day care, boarding, grooming and washing, sponsored Drool in the Pool. Owner Kathie Onieal said she didn’t see one person with a negative attitude. “No people argued and no dogs argued,” Onieal said. “I’m just seeing great joy in the dogs.”

Onieal said she thinks Drool in the Pool will grow once word of mouth spreads. “People will realize that the dogs were safe and had a blast,” she said. The Muncie Animal Shelter and ARF received all of the general admission proceeds.

From the same position, cross your right leg over your left and lift your hips off the floor. Tilt your head and reach your arms to the right side of your body to feel the stretch. Switch sides.

2

3 3. Knee-to-Chest Circle: Lying on your back, bend your right

knee and tuck it into your chest. After holding it there for a few breaths, gently circle it a few times to the left, then to the right. Extend your leg and repeat the same process on the other side.

Download the full Ball Bearings Back to School Issue in the Apple Store or Android Marketplace to find out more poses that battle the “Freshman 15,” hangovers and exams, including step-by-step photo instructions. The issue also has other stories, such as how to reinvent restaurant leftovers into a tasty new meal, an inside look at the Village and downtown bars (drink specials included) and off-campus house hunting tips. Visit ballbearingsmag.com to learn more about the student-life magazine.

ONLINE

Download a copy of Ball Bearings from the app store.


DN 9-9-13  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News on Monday, Sept. 9, 2013.

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