Page 1

DN TUESDAY, SEPT. 24, 2013

THE DAILY NEWS

BSUDAILY.COM

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Cancer doesn’t care about age

Initial season for head coach James Whitford includes home game against Butler

A student writes about her experience with diagnosis at age 21

SEE PAGE 4

SEE PAGE 6

NON-MAC SCHEDULE RELEASED

SETTLING FOR TIME Without a clear starter, Ball State’s setters work together for the best result

JACQUI SEIDEL

DAVID POLASKI ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR | @DavidPolaski

2013 STATS

acqui Seidel has seen this play out before. Now a senior setter for the Ball State women’s volleyball team, Seidel ran away with the starting setting position last season. She racked up more than 1,000 assists, while no one else eclipsed 100. Yet one year later, Seidel doesn’t have the stranglehold on the starting position she had just months ago. After essentially owning the spot, she now shares it with sophomore Jenna Spadafora, a rising star for Ball State. And she’s completely fine with that. “It’s different — I’m not going to lie — it’s really different,” Seidel said. “But it’s great because in the end, it’s making both of us better.”

SETS PLAYED 50 KILLS 20 ASSISTS 421 ASSISTS PER SET 8.42

JENNA SPADAFORA POSITION setter YEAR sophomore HEIGHT 6-foot-1

2013 STATS SETS PLAYED 45 KILLS 21 ASSISTS 202 ASSISTS PER SET 4.49

J

See VOLLEYBALL, page 4

DN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION EMMA ROGERS AND MICHAEL BOEHNLEIN

POSITION setter YEAR senior HEIGHT 5-foot-10

DN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BREANNA DAUGHERTY AND MICHAEL BOEHNLEIN

Police investigate string of trash fires No eye witnesses, suspects for ‘vandalism’ outside residences southeast of campus

|

CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS AND DEVAN FILCHAK news@bsudailynews.com

University Avenue

See FIRES, page 3

“Privacy Violation— Use of audio, video, or photographic devices to make an image or recording of an individual without that person’s prior knowledge, or without that person‘s effective consent, when such image or recording is likely to cause injury or distress as determined by a reasonable person. This includes but is not limited to, surreptitiously taking pictures of another person in a private area such as a residence hall room, a public or private restroom, or a dressing/locker room.”

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The Twitter account @bsu_ makeouts, is safe from investigation, while a photo it retweeted earlier in September is not. Mike Gillilan, director of the Office of Student Rights and Community Standards, said he will not review anyone who retweeted the photo, which showed two people engaging oral sex outside, but instead is focusing on the person who originally captured and tweeted it. He said he still hopes the investigation sends a message to students. “I would like to think that students in general are more

As funding begins to come in for the second phase of Ball State’s geothermal project, the current cooling system has required some repairs. On Saturday, the cooling system for Burkhardt Building, L.A. Pittenger Student Center and North Quad were shut down as crews worked to fix a leak in the chilled water piping. Jim Lowe, director of engineering and construction operations, said the leak was fixed by 1 p.m He said rust on the pipes caused the leak, since many pipes around campus were installed 40 years ago when the standard piping was a carbon steel pipe. Most pipes will be replaced in the next few years, Lowe said, as the university begins installing the second half of the geothermal project. He said the university is on schedule to finish the new geothermal system by December 2015. The next bid package is expected to arrive Wednesday to begin converting the old chill plant on the south side of campus. The Heat and Chill Plant that caught on fire July 26 also will be shut off until the spring, Lowe said, as cooler weather permits. The fire caused three of the five chillers in that location to be out of service, leaving some buildings around campus to go without cool air during record breaking high temperatures. Lowe said the missing coolers will be replaced by the spring.

STUDENT CODE

EMMA KATE FITTES NEWS EDITOR news@bsudailynews.com

SOURCE: Student Code of Rights and Responsibilities DN PHOTO

The Twitter account @bsu_makouts retweeted a photo of two people having oral sex outdoors. The university is reviewing the photo and the person who originally took the picture for violating privacy and sexual misconduct guidelines, according to the student code.

thoughtful on how they portray themselves, and others and the university on social media,” Gillilan said. “I am not going to try to regulate that. ... I am trying to

influence that.” He said police will not be involved since the university is prohibited by federal law from sharing student’s disciplinary re-

DN GRAPHIC

REPAIRS MADE TO CHILLED WATER PIPES, COOLING PLANT

Twitter picture, not retweets, under review for privacy, sexual misconduct Photo may be against student code, shows people having oral sex

Locust Street

Light Street

Dill Street

Intentional trash toter fires are an ongoing problem for those living in houses on the southeastern edge of campus, as three more trash totes were extinguished over the weekend, firefighters said. Robert Mead, Muncie Fire Department chief fire investigator, said there were no witnesses or suspects for the fires that have been set to green plastic trash totes and furniture left outside

residences on Beechwood and Ashland avenues. “There’s never any witnesses, and it is typically in the alleys,” Mead said. “It also usually involves types of furniture, like mattresses and couches that college kids leave out.” The fires have occurred every weekend since students returned to Ball State for the Fall Semester, Mead said. Gene Burton, University Police Department chief of police, said UPD is investigating that matter,

although there are no leads and LOCAL FIRES IMPACT SOUTHEASTERN EDGE OF CAMPUS little to no evidence at the crime Fires have occured near Ball State’s grounds since the beginning of the school year, said Robert Mead, scenes. UPD has heightened pa- Muncie Fire Department’s chief investigator. This is where most have been set. trols in the area. Burton said students should Riverside Avenue FEET N be mindful of suspicious activMcGalliard Ave. 0 200 ity, although he is not surprised 332 Bet that such acts of vandalism haphel Ave pen near Ball State. . Beechwood Avenue “I don’t want to discount it,” he said. “But vandalism is just someBSU Riverside Ave. thing that we periodically have to Area affected by fires fight in one form or another. Detail He said acts of criminal misAshland Avenue Ashland Avenue chief, which is what these fires are considered, have happened Hazelwood Christian on or near campus. Church campus

cords without a search warrant. He said it is not clear that the people were aware the photo was being taken, which could be a violation of privacy and sexual misconduct.

See PHOTO, page 3

– STAFF REPORTS

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

3 GENERATIONS OF WOMEN CLASH IN ‘ELEEMOSYNARY’

Cave Theatre play kicks off production series where leading women dominate the stage in all-female casting season

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

SEE PAGE 5 THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

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HAPPY 117TH BIRTHDAY, F. SCOTT FITZGERALD.

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Sunny conditions are in-store for today. There is a slight chance for a sprinkle Wednesday, but chances are slim. - Michael Behrens, WCRD weather 5. SUNNY

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21. SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS

VOL. 93, ISSUE 21

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

5 THINGS TO KNOW

1.

EXPERTS TO ADVISE ISRAELI OFFICIALS ON KENYA STANDOFF

JERUSALEM (AP) — Scarred by memories of a pair of attacks on Israeli targets in Africa a decade ago, Israel has dispatched a team of experts to its close ally Kenya to advise authorities on the bloody standoff at a Nairobi shopping mall. While officials refuse to discuss the precise nature of the assistance, Israeli leaders have made it clear they believe the defeat of the al-Qaida militants behind the mall attack will have great meaning around the world. Israel has had strong commercial interests across Africa for decades. But only in recent years has it begun to view Africa as being of vital strategic interest in the battle against Islamic extremists. One of those groups, Al-Shabab, has claimed responsibility for the Nairobi attack, which has left dozens dead. Kenya has been a leading player in this Israeli effort. The two countries exchange intelligence, and Israel has provided security training to the eastern African country, according to experts and officials.

TODAY 3. EGYPT COURT BANS MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD CAIRO (AP) — An Egyptian court on Monday ordered the banning of the Muslim Brotherhood and the confiscation of its assets, opening the door for authorities to dramatically accelerate a crackdown on the extensive network of schools, hospitals, charities and other social institutions that was the foundation of the group’s political power. Security forces have already been moving against the Brotherhood’s

social networks, raiding schools and PARTLY CLOUDY hospitals run by the group since 3.the military’s July 3 ouster of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi. The sweep points to the ambitions of Egypt’s new leaders to go beyond4. MOSTLY SUNNY 3. PARTLY CLOUDY the arrests of top Brotherhood figures to strike a long-term, even mortal, blow to the group by hitting the pillars of its grassroots organization. Doing 4. MOSTLY SUNNY CLOUDY political so could cripple the3. PARTLY group’s prospects far into the future.

4. MICROSOFT UNVEILS UPDATED TABLET A woman is rescued Saturday from the Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya. A gun battle inside the shopping center left 68 people dead after gunmen attacked one of the city’s most exclusive malls. MCT PHOTO

NEW YORK (AP) — Microsoft refreshed its Surface tablet computers Monday, giving them longer battery life and better comfort on laps as the software giant continues its transformation into a devices and services company. The company said it tried to address many shortcomings of the first-generation Surface models, sales of which have been slow. Microsoft needs to boost its tablet business to make up for sales declines in traditional desktop and laptop computers. IDC is forecasting a nearly

10 percent decline in PC shipments this year. The research firm also said tablets will outsell traditional PCs in the last three months of the year. The new tablet models come with a better built-in kickstand so they can rest more firmly on users’ laps while they sit on the couch. Microsoft is also making a docking station and a wireless mouse for business customers who need the mobility of tablets but also desire the traditional ways of using computers while in the office.

2. ASSAD SAYS TO DESTROY CHEMICAL WEAPONS

5. NEW IPHONE SALES OFF TO FAST START

DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — President Bashar al-Assad pledged in an interview broadcast Monday to honor an agreement to surrender Syria’s stockpile of chemical weapons, but he said that rebels might try to block international arms inspectors from doing their work. As battles continued across Syria, new Associated Press video of an attack Sunday night showed the regime’s helicopters dropping barrel bombs on opposition-held areas, creating chaotic

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Gadget lovers still can’t resist the iPhone. Even as investors fret that Apple’s smartphone is losing its allure amid a bevy of enticing lower-priced alternatives that offer similar features, the iPhone’s call remains seductive. In a Monday announcement, Apple Inc. said it sold 9 million units of its top-of-the-line iPhone 5S and lessexpensive iPhone 5C during their first three days on sale. That trounced the

scenes of destruction. In a sign of worsening infighting among the rebels, a top al-Qaida commander in Syria was killed in an ambush by rival, Western-backed group — an assassination sure to raise tensions among factions seeking to topple the regime. Assad’s comments came as world leaders gathered in New York for the annual U.N. General Assembly, where the use of chemical weapons in Syria’s civil war was high on the agenda.

performance of last year’s model, the iPhone 5, which sold 5 million units in its opening weekend. The initial sales figures for Apple’s latest iPhone models provided the latest testament to the product’s appeal more than six years after the debut of the first iPhone. The iPhone 5S and 5C’s quick start also surpassed analyst prediction that Apple would sell from 6 million to 8 million models the first weekend.

THE FORECAST POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

WEDNESDAY Partly cloudy High: 75 Low: 52 3. PARTLY CLOUDY

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THURSDAY Mostly sunny High: 77 Low: 48 4. MOSTLY SUNNY

5. SUNNY

FRIDAY Sunny High: 80 Low: 52 5. SUNNY

SATURDAY Sunny High: 83 Low: 55 5. SUNNY

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Steven Williams

NEWS EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes ASST. NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz ASST. FEATURES EDITOR Jeremy Ervin

SPORTS EDITOR Matt McKinney ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

72 HRS EDITOR Ryan Howe FORUM EDITOR Devan Filchak

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Corey Ohlenkamp ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Jonathan Miksanek

DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITORS Daniel Brount Marisa Hendrickson

Updated 24/7 Crossword

Sudoku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Michael Mepham

Level: Mild

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.

ACROSS 1 BABBLING WATERWAY 6 PILLOW COVERS 11 HEALTHFUL FACILITY 14 NOCTURNAL PRIMATE WITH A RINGED TAIL 15 SQUIGGLE IN “PIÑATA” 16 MAKE A MISTAKE 17 *1972 HIT WITH THE LINE “THE DAY THE MUSIC DIED” 19 FEEL SICK 20 SHARP TURN 21 AUCTION CRY 22 “I’M INNOCENT!” 24 PENNSYLVANIE, PAR EXEMPLE 26 *COUNTY FAIR PRIZE 29 RECEDING TIDE 31 ON EDGE 32 SAMBUCA FLAVORING 35 PLACE FOR A POLAR BEAR 37 STREET SHADERS 40 *HOME-BASED BUSINESS 43 __ II RAZOR 44 TELLS IN A BAD WAY 45 BIBLICAL BEASTS 46 BLUE GEM, FOR SHORT

48 “I __ YOU ONE” 49 *BEEF-BRAISED-WITHTOMATOES DISH 53 JONES WITH A LOCKER 57 CAGNEY’S TV PARTNER 58 SPRING BLOOMER 60 GO HEAD-TO-HEAD 61 PREFIX FOR THE BIRDS 62 GREEN BAY PACKER FANS ... AND A HINT TO THE ANSWERS TO STARRED CLUES 66 PINCE-__ GLASSES 67 PREFIX MEANING “SUN” 68 KRUPP WORKS CITY 69 AFTERNOON ORA 70 BAGEL FLAVORING 71 “STAR WARS” SURNAME? DOWN 1 BURN BRIGHTLY 2 SEND A MONEY ORDER, SAY 3 ALPHA’S OPPOSITE 4 “__ MAN IN HAVANA”: GRAHAM GREENE NOVEL 5 BARBRA’S “A STAR IS BORN” CO-STAR 6 DELAY ON PURPOSE

7 MANY AN INDIAN, RELIGIOUSLY 8 THE EIGER, E.G. 9 START OF THE 16TH CENTURY 10 GREETED AND SEATED 11 VEHICLE SAFETY DEVICES 12 FIRST-CLASS 13 FORMER SENATOR SPECTER 18 __ SALAD 23 EXCESSIVELY PREOCCUPIED 25 PRECEDENT SETTER 27 BOARDING SCHOOL JACKETS 28 BASSOON VIBRATOR 30 “BUT I DON’T WANNA __ PIRATE!”: “SEINFELD” 32 DO SOME FILM WORK 33 PARTNER OF NEITHER 34 HIGHLIGHT IN PRINT, IN A WAY 35 BANQUET 36 PUT A MATCH TO 38 G.I. GRUB 39 PART OF TBS: ABBR.

41 PINOT __ 42 DETROIT LABOR ORG. 47 FILM WITH A CLASSIC SHOWER SCENE 48 SOONER STATE MIGRANT 49 BIAS 50 HAVE SECOND THOUGHTS 51 FIVE-LETTER SONG REFRAIN 52 FELONIOUS FIRE 54 SALT’S “HALT!” 55 AUDIO COUNTERPART 56 LIKE “WILL YOU MARRY ME?” QUESTIONWISE 59 STORAGE BUILDING 63 CLUCKER 64 YALE ALUM 65 SUFFIX WITH BROOKLYN

www.bsudaily.com

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.

5. SUNNY


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

New marketing campaign to represent university Board of Trustees to see new videos, with other projects SAM HOYT CHIEF REPORTER | sthoyt@bsu.edu New faces will represent Ball State as part of a new marketing campaign that will premiere during the Board of Trustees meeting Wednesday. The new 15-second spots will run Saturday and they will be available online, as well. “It is a real challenge to tease a story in 15 seconds,” said Tom Taylor, vice president of enrollment, marketing and communications. “So we also do longer versions that will be on our website called ‘The Chronicles.’” The first Board of Trustees meeting for the academic year will be at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday in the L.A. Pittenger Student Center Founders Room and is open to the public. Taylor will give a short presentation on the new TV spots, which

are updated roughly every two years. Taylor said “The Chronicles” spots should be available by the end of the week. They will focus on five students and some of their immersive learning experiences and post-graduation plans. “We have a new round, and we’re pretty excited about the stories these tell,” Taylor said. John Fallon, associate vice president of economic development and community engagement, also will give a presentation on what goals Building Better Communities will pursue this year and what basis of success they can be measured on. “We like to have our goals and objectives and work plans and the metrics settled going into the new fiscal year,” Fallon said. Fallon said Building Better Communities’ goals were somewhat modified to accommodate for the new strategic plan, Education Redefined 2.0.

“One of the four goals in the strategic plan deals with advancing Indiana, and it is that goal that is the focus of our outreach and engagement initiatives here on campus,” he said. “Building Better Communities is key to that, and I think they just want to know what it is we’re doing and what we intend to be measured on.” Fallon said students should care because they live in Indiana. “We’ve made a big commitment of resources, time, personnel and the like to make this state a better place to live,” he said. Taylor and Fallon said they preferred to withhold the details of their presentations until the meeting Wednesday. The board will also discuss a proposed naming of the Ball State University Planetarium and Phase II of the Geothermal Conversion Project, discuss the health care plan of 2014 and hear a presentation on accreditation.

learn and prepare themselves to make an impact in a global economy.” The money will be available starting Spring Semester for qualified undergraduates who complete a credit-bearing study-abroad program for a semester or school year. Purdue will pay up to $1,000 to those who choose a shorter program. Suresh Garimella, Purdue’s chief global affairs officer, said the cost of traveling abroad discourages many students. “We have a fairly good sense that at least one obstacle for them is the financial one,” Garimella said. “Maybe [this] pays for their ticket.” Along with the financial investment, school officials plan to make it easier for students to go abroad by designating approved programs and courses. Karissa Raderstorf, associ-

ate director of undergraduate studies in the School of Chemical Engineering, said the study abroad offerings for science and engineering students have grown over time. “For the engineering students, [study abroad] helps open the doors to them,” she said. Short-term funding for the grants will come from Purdue’s current budget, Garimella said, though the university has not set a cap on how much it will pay out. The cost could approach $7 million a year if 30 percent of Purdue’s undergraduate students were to participate once during their college years at the full $3,000 level. “We’re obviously starting an ambitious plan,” Garimella said. “... In the long run, if every one of our students wants to [participate], that would be a wonderful problem to have.”

ADVANCE AMERICA

Senate President Pro Tempore David Long, R-Fort Wayne, said the GOP senators will discuss the amendment and other topics, but that the meeting “has nothing to do with Eric Miller” or his lobbying organization. Miller is among the highest-profile lobbyists in

the Statehouse and also unsuccessfully sought the 2004 Republican nomination for governor. Advance America, which claims 45,000 families, 3,700 churches and 1,500 businesses as supporters, has been among the leading backers of the gay marriage ban proposal. Miller did not respond to the Star’s calls seeking comment, nor did he immediately return a phone message Monday from The Associated Press. State law currently prohibits gay marriage, and the General Assembly overwhelmingly supported the proposed constitutional amendment in 2011. If legislators approve it again next year, it would go before voters in November 2014. An organization named Freedom Indiana has formed to campaign against the amendment and is receiving money and public support from Indianapolis-based Eli

Lilly and Co. and Columbusbased Cummins Inc. Surveys like Miller’s are a way for interest groups to apply pressure to lawmakers, said Andrew Downs, director of the Mike Downs Center for Indiana Politics at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne. “The implied threat is if you’re in a district where your position is wrong, watch out, because your position may come back to haunt you,” Downs said. Some lawmakers are keeping an eye on changing public attitudes toward same-sex couples. “I think the times have changed, as have people’s attitudes toward it,” said Sen. Thomas Wyss, R-Fort Wayne, who voted for the amendment in 2011. While believing marriage should be between a man and a woman, Wyss said he is “uncomfortable” with a provision that also would ban civil unions.

The account creator said she doesn’t feel as though the people in her photos are easily identifiable. “I am going to be a little more careful about some of the pictures [and] make sure they are just make outs, not anything more,” she said. She said she also will tweet letting people know that if they would like their picture taken down from her feed, they can direct message her an ask. Since the investigation, she also has been careful to erase captions that accompany the original photos if they are too inappropriate. “I don’t think it’s a big deal,”

she said. “They should be ready to have a picture of them taken if it’s out in public.” Even though she is not under investigation, the creator of the @bsu_makeouts does not want to release her identity. “I think its more ... mysterious that way, so people aren’t coming up to me and asking me to tweet something about me or something like that,” she said. Gillilan said students should consider their futures before taking pictures of their classmates or having their photo taken. “It’s important that people looking forward that all of this stuff could have significant

negative impacts on their career,” he said. “It could be devastating if somebody did come across something like that. The person who took the picture and subjects of the pictures and all of those folks could be affected down the road.”

MEETING

WHO

Ball State Board of Trustees, public event WHAT

First meeting of the academic year WHERE

L.A. Pittenger Student Center Founders Room WHEN

1:30 p.m. Wednesday

THE PRESENTATIONS There will be four presentations at the Board of Trustees meeting over the following topics: •H  igher Learning Commission update and visit preparation by Provost Terry King •A  ssessment of student learning outcomes by King •B  uilding Better Communities metrics by John Fallon, associate vice president of economic development and community engagement • New marketing campaign by Tom Taylor, vice president of enrollment, marketing and communications

Purdue set to pay students $3,000 to study abroad for semester, year University could spend $7 million per year for program | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Purdue University officials hope paying students up to $3,000 will lead to more of them to study abroad. Fewer than 20 percent of Purdue students participate in international study programs before graduating, and one of university President Mitch Daniels’ new initiatives is to increase that to one-third of some 30,000 undergrads, the Journal & Courier reported. “Learning in another country is an educational necessity,” Daniels said. “And making study abroad a core component of a Purdue education will help students grow,

BY THE NUMBERS

$3,000

maximum award for Purdue undergraduates who complete a semester or full year study abroad

$1,000

award for Purdue undergraduates who complete a shorter study abroad program

$7 million

a year cost for the university if 30 percent of undergraduates participate once before graduation

BLOOD DRIVES HELPS END SHORTAGE The Angels for Life Blood Drive on campus in September helped end the state-wide blood shortage. The blood drive, Sept. 10 and Sept. 11, was hosted one day after the Indiana Blood center declared a critical need for blood. A critical status for Indiana Blood Center means that they need more blood for the more than 60 hospitals that they supply. Lucy Wehking, communications specialist for the center, said the backlog DONATE BLOOD caused them to not be able to perform WHAT medical procedures. The morning of Homecoming Blood Drive Sept. 9, they couldn’t fill orders for 24 WHEN units of O negative blood, eight units 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 11 of A negative blood and six units of B WHERE negative blood. L.A. Pittenger Student Part of the problem, Wehking said, is Center Multipurpose Room that the Labor Day weekend saw less people coming in to donate blood. Every day, the center needs to have 550 donors to keep up with the demand. “People have other priorities,” she said. “People take holidays, but people in hospitals do not.” The blood drive at Ball State helped lift the critical situation, with 123 units being collected on Sept. 10 and 125 units on Sept. 11., Wehking said. In total, 3,712 Hoosiers donated from the time the Indiana Blood Center went into the shortage, she said. Out of all the blood the center receives in a year, she said 21 percent comes from educational blood drives. Indiana Blood Center runs four blood drives a year at Ball State. The next scheduled blood drive on campus is from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 11 at the L.A. Pittenger Student Center Multipurpose Room during Homecoming Week. –

STAFF REPORTS

IND. GYM FACES POSSIBLE CLOSURE MUNCIE, Ind. — Another of Indiana’s landmark high school gymnasiums faces talk about possibly being closed as school district officials look to cut spending. The Muncie school board has been holding public meetings on options such as closing schools in the face of declining enrollment. The future of the 6,000-seat Muncie Fieldhouse should be “on the table,” board President Beverly Kelley told The Star Press. “To be honest, until it got mentioned, I never thought about including the fieldhouse,” Kelley said. “But that’s one of the reasons why we have these meetings — to get ideas about things we haven’t considered.” The Anderson School Board shuttered its iconic 9,000-seat Wigwam gymnasium in a 2011 cost-cutting move. Mark Burkhart, the chief financial officer for the Muncie Community Schools, estimated closing the fieldhouse would save perhaps $100,000 a year in utility and custodian expenses, but said he didn’t believe the nearby Muncie Central High School had enough gym space without it. “Because the fieldhouse was there when Central opened in the early ‘70s, I am sure the architects took into consideration the availability of that fieldhouse,” Burkhart said. Closing the fieldhouse wouldn’t meet the annual spending reduction needed to meet the district’s average yearly $500,000 funding decline from a 100-student enrollment drop, he said. The fieldhouse in downtown Muncie marks its 85th anniversary in December. Kelley acknowledged that the building has a “great history,” including as home court of the record eight-time state basketball champions Muncie Central Bearcats. “We have to do what’s best for our kids and our community,” Kelley said. “I truly feel that we need to leave all options open because of that.” – THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

20 percent

of Purdue undergraduates participate in international studies before graduating Source: The Associated Press

GROUP PUSHES FOR EXPECTED VOTES Senate President Pro Tempore says will not take survey | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS INDIANAPOLIS — A prominent conservative lobbying group is pushing for Indiana lawmakers to disclose what side they’ll take in next year’s expected vote on whether to put a ban on gay marriage into the state constitution. Eric Miller, founder and executive director of Indianapolis-based Advance America, said in a letter to legislators that he will compile the responses and “make them available to citizens around the state.” The Advance America survey’s deadline is Thursday — a day after the state Senate’s majority Republicans have scheduled a private caucus, The Indianapolis Star reported.

A PROMINENT, INDIANAPOLISBASED CONSERVATIVE LOBBYING GROUP •P  ushing Indiana lawmakers to

disclose what side they’ll talk in next year’s vote to add a ban on gay marriage to the state constitution •P  lan on compiling answers and distributing them to the public • Claims 45,000 families, 3,700 churches and 1,500 businesses as supporters, has been among the leading backers of the gay marriage ban proposal Source: The Associated Press

PHOTO: Account creator says she will be ‘more careful’ | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

If the photo is determined to be against the Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities, Gillilan said the consequences for the person who originally tweeted it could range from an official warning to expulsion from the university, but it is too soon to tell. Since the university announced the investigation, the @bsu_makeouts account has gained 84 more followers, even though the retweet was deleted. The Twitter account was created a couple weeks into the school year, mimicking one from last year that was taken down.

DN PHOTO ASHLEY DYE

The Muncie Fire Department responds to one of the several trash toter fires along Beechwood and Ashland avenues. The fires have been set since the start of the semester and is being investigated by the University Police Department.

FIRES: Vehicle, 2 detached garages result in damages | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Mead also has contacted the Muncie Sanitary District to ask them to more efficiently collect garbage and get trash out of alleyways as soon as possible. His advice for students is to be careful what they leave outside. “Don’t set furniture out,” Mead said. “As simple as that may sound, it seems whoever

is [lighting the fires] has an affinity for lighting furniture.” The fires in total have damaged two detached garages and caused heat damage to one vehicle. However, Mead said none of the damage has been major. Mead asks anyone who knows about the fires near campus or that spots any suspicious activity to contact MFD at 765-747-4807.


PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

SPORTS

TODAY Jenna Hague and the women’s golf team continue its tournament in Colorado for the second day of play.

SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

THE ANATOMY

WEDNESDAY With Sunday’s loss fresh on its mind, the field hockey team takes on UC Davis at home at 3 p.m.

FRIDAY With conference play starting, the women’s volleyball team heads on the road to take on Eastern Michigan at 7 p.m.

BREAKDOWN OF THE PLAY

OF A PLAY H

| MATT McKINNEY SPORTS EDITOR @Matt_D_McKinney

eading into Saturday’s game at Eastern Michigan University, Jamill Smith had scored a touchdown passing and receiving. Late in the first half, the senior wide receiver scored his first career touchdown rushing. On a 1st and 10 from Eastern Michigan’s 27yard line, offensive coordinator Rich Skrosky called a trick play. “We felt good about it during the week of practice,” head coach Pete Lembo said. “We

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wanted to get it called. I think Rich called it at really good time.“ On the play, the football traveled from the center’s hands to senior quarterback Keith Wenning then to sophomore running back Horactio Banks and finally to Smith. The play was set up by a pair of blocks by Wenning and junior wide receiver Willie Snead. “I saw Willie make the block, and I saw Keith make a block,“ sophomore wide receiver Jordan Williams said of his view from the sideline. “I got excited.“

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Wenning is in the shotgun As they pass each other to Smith uses his speed to with Banks to his left. Snead the right of the hashturn the corner with a lead is lined up wide to the left marks, Banks tosses the blocker in front of him with Smith wide right. ball up in the air. Smith grabs it — Wenning. At the 5-yard line, and keeps running toward the Wenning throws his shoulder At the snap, the ofleft. The Eastern Michigan deforward to get a defender to back fensive line blocks their fense, now realizing that Banks off Smith. Snead turns his block to defenders to the right. doesn’t have the ball, tries to shield Smith from the cornerback. Wenning hands off to Banks, change momentum back to the who runs to the right side of left side of the field. Snead stops Smith slides between the formation. The Eastern running his route and begins Snead and a defender to Michigan defense is oblivious blocking the cornerback who get into the end zone, givto Smith running behind the was covering him. ing Ball State a 33-13 lead. line of scrimmage to the left. Snead runs a route to the 15yard line. MORE PLAYS To see more highlighted plays, visit bsudaily.com

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#3 (WR) Willie Snead

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Coach prepares for initial season

Chief reporter Mat Mikesell sat down with the new Ball State men’s basketball head coach James Whitford to discuss his first few months on the job and expectations for the upcoming season. Whitford enters his first season at Ball State after spending eight seasons as part of Sean Miller’s staff at Xavier and Arizona.

Q: Was Ball State’s biggest selling point was a place you could win at?

A: That was the biggest thing I looked at by far. I’ve been here when this place was really successful. I came here knowing that we had the resources to win. I’ve had the job for four and a half months, and I feel just as strongly — if not more strongly — about that now than when we took over. We can win here. We have what it takes to win here. A lot of people can’t say that, there’s certain jobs that are really challenging no matter who the head coach is.

Q: What will it mean for the school to get the basketball program back to competing for Mid-American Conference titles?

A: It’s a big deal. It’s something the student body can take great pride in. We have an incredible campus here and great student life. I think our program is one way to get that word out. For the basketball fans, it’s been a long time coming. It’s been since 2000 — 13 years ... since

we won the conference and 13 years since we’ve been to the [NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament]. And people here care so much about basketball that I think that hurts everybody. To get back there would be a moment of pride for everybody.

Q: Do you clock the team to see how fast it is?

A: Yeah, we try to run really fast [but] we don’t necessarily try to shoot fast. There’s a difference. I want to shoot fast if we have the right shot. We’re trying what we call “attack on the run.” We want to be the team that gets the ball over the half court in three seconds. A lot of our transition game is similar to North Carolina. Our offense is a similar style.

Q: What’s your goal for your first season?

A: I can’t give objective measurements. Our goal is always about our process — how to practice the right way, how to compete for championships the right way. We’ll learn to play hard together and execute like a high-level basketball team. Those are the measurements that matter to me the most. If we do or don’t win the league this year, some of those things are out of our control. We have to control what we can and reach our potential. That’s how I’ll measure this year.

DRAW REVEALS ROOM TO IMPROVE |

EVAN BARNUM-STEGGERDA CHIEF REPORTER @Slice_of_Evan

DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

James Whitford answers questions during the press conference where he was introduced to the university in the spring. Whitford is the men’s basketball head coach after coaching at Xavier and Arizona under Sean Miller.

COMPLETE 2013-14 SCHEDULE Nov. 4

Nov. 9 Nov. 12 Nov. 18 Nov. 23 Nov. 27 Nov. 30 Dec. 4 Dec. 17 Dec. 21 Dec. 30 Jan. 3 Jan. 8 Jan. 11 Jan. 15 Jan. 18 Jan. 23 Jan. 26 Jan. 29 Feb. 1 Feb. 5 Feb. 8 Feb. 12 Feb. 15 Feb. 19 Feb. 23 Feb. 26 March 1 March 4 March 7 or March 8

SOURCE: espn.com

SOCCER

Lots of shots hasn’t translated to goals for team’s offense

Q: What’s something different the fans will see about this team right away?

A: We try to push the ball. A lot of teams fast break on missed shots, not a lot of teams fast break on made shots. We try to do both. It’s a real way to try and create tempo. What you’ll see from us incredible effort from the beginning to the end.

#4 (RB) Horactio Banks #10 (QB) Keith Wenning

DN GRAPHIC ERIC QUAINTANCE

MEN’S BASKETBALL

James Whitford changes offensive identity and focus MAT MIKESELL CHIEF REPORTER | @MatMikesell

#2 (WR) Jamill Smith

vs. Marian (Exhibition) vs. Indiana State vs. Taylor vs. Southeast Missouri vs. Butler vs. Utah vs. Cleveland State vs. Valparaiso vs. Marquette vs. Southern illinois vs. James Madison vs. Oakland City vs. Akron vs. Kent State vs. Ohio vs. Miami University vs. Buffalo vs. Western Michigan vs. Akron vs. Northern Illinois vs. Buffalo vs. Toledo vs. Eastern Michigan vs. Bowling Green vs. Central Michigan vs. Toledo vs. Western Michigan vs. Central Michigan vs. Eastern Michigan

Home Away Home Home Home Away Away Home Away Away Away Home Home Away Away Home Home Away Away Home Away Home Home Home Away Away Home Home Away

vs. Northern Illinois

Away

7 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 2 p.m. 7 p.m. MT TBA 7 p.m. 7 p.m. CT 7 p.m. CT 8 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. TBA 7 p.m. 2 p.m. 7 p.m. 2 p.m. 7 p.m. 2 p.m. 7 p.m. 2 p.m. 7 p.m. 4 p.m. 7 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 2 p.m. 7 p.m. TBA SOURCE: BallStateSports.com

A tie wasn’t what Ball State soccer head coach Craig Roberts was looking for. After drawing 1-1 in double overtime with Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis on Friday in the last non-conference game of the season, Ball State’s soccer team is feeling remorse. “I don’t think we played to our normal standards,” Roberts said. “We possessed better and created chances, but I’m disappointed we couldn’t finish.” Ball State has struggled capitalizing on opportunities at times. In its two losses and draw this year, the Cardinals made 47 shots with 21 on target, but only goal against IUPUI to show for it. “We started [the season] well, scoring two and three goals, I know we can do it,” junior forward Nicole Pembleton said. “We just need to really focus on what we’re doing and as always, be confident.” Ball State is still integrating about a dozen new players into its roster, and Roberts said he thinks the group is still climbing towards an apex near the top of the MidAmerican Conference. “We think we are in the

top teams in the MAC, and we aren’t afraid to play anybody,” Roberts said. “This team is young, they are fresh and their futures are bright.” One that remains unwavering for the Cardinals is their defense. The team has an entirely new back row featuring senior Kelsey Shapiro — who has played in every 760 minutes, including two double overtime games — and a dual goalkeeper system that Roberts said is the best goal keeping he’s seen in his four years with the program. The defense leads Ball State in the MAC in goals against average and shutouts. Ball State has rotated starting two keepers this season. Senior Layne Schramm and freshman Brooke Dennis have started and finished four games each. In a tight intrasquad position battle, the two have brought out the best in each other. Schramm is No. 1 and Dennis is No. 2 in save percentage in the conference. Dennis also has won a MAC Defensive Player of the Week and Schramm touts the conference’s best goals against average. If chances start finding the net with regularity, a 5-21 non-conference record might just be the beginning. “I think the whole team is ready and, ‘Okay, let’s go, it’s MAC time. Let’s show everyone what we’ve got,’” Pembleton said. “We have really strong team this year, and I honestly think we can be No. 1.”

VOLLEYBALL: Senior and sophomore share the setting position for team’s well-being | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Seidel is no stranger to the situation because she went through a slightly similar process when she was a sophomore. Sitting behind Brittany McGinnis, one of the top setters in Ball State history, Seidel competed in most of the matches during the season before tearing her ACL. Until the injury, Seidel was slowly earning more and more playing time, comparable to what Spadafora is doing now. It would be natural for a rivalry to form. With two starting quality setters on the same team, basic instinct would be for incumbent to protect her position at all costs, while Spadafora waits her turn. But that’s not how it’ll work for Ball State head coach Steve Shondell. Building a team and

winning a Mid-American Conference Championship means contributions from all players, not just his senior setter. “They’ve both been extremely unselfish this year,” he said. “They realize they’re both going to get opportunities to set and whatever I’ve asked them to do, they do it with a smile on their faces.” Seidel said she understands that in order for the team to be at its best, it’ll require both setters contributing at different times. She knows firsthand because Shondell hasn’t been afraid to flip the switch and pull one of them at a moment’s notice if he deems it necessary. Against IPFW, Ball State won the first set before dropping the next two. With the match on the line, Shondell pulled

Seidel from the game and inserted Spadafora as the setter. The change sparked Ball State’s offense, and the team rallied to win the last two sets and take the match. “We weren’t getting enough offense with Jacqui [Seidel], so I pulled her,” Shondell said. “It’s great having two setters who can give me offense or defense depending on what I need.” Seidel is more defense oriented, while Spadafora brings a stronger offensive attack. Spadafora was temporarily switched to outside hitter last season after numerous players suffered injuries. The combination allows for a balanced attack and can wreak havoc on opposing teams. If Ball State is struggling offensively, Spadafora may be inserted. If the team is giving

up numerous points, Seidel may be the answer. The constant switching keeps defenses unprepared. Because both players bring different strengths to the court, the two setters mesh together instead of being hostile or jealous. Instead, the two have set aside any differences they have, both pushing each other to improve during practices and in games. While this position can typically be undesirable, Shondell has turned it around to benefit the team. There’s a clear reason Shondell has decided to split playing time between the two women, as the strategy has helped lead the team to victory. “We’re always competing and it helps both of us as players,” Spadafora said. “It’s good to know that whoever is

out there will be able to get the job done.” To this point, they have. The duo has combined for more than 600 assists — Seidel with 421 and Spadafora with 202. It’s led the team to a 12-3 record. It can be hectic for Seidel and Spadafora, however, because it’s difficult to determine who will be the starting setter. Shondell doesn’t plan in advance which player will play when; it’s dictated by the tone of the match. “It’s hard because usually, setters aren’t in this position that we are,” Seidel said. “But we both know that we both have a role on this team, and it’s our job to accept that role.” And there’s no way to tell who will be on the floor until the next set starts.

2011 LEADERS LEADING SETTER

Brittany McGinnis • 122 sets played • 79 kills • 1,172 assists • 9.61 assists per set SECOND HIGHEST SETTER

Jacqui Seidel • 92 sets played • 16 kills • 229 assists • 2.49 assists per set.

2012 LEADERS LEADING SETTER

Jacqui Seidel • 110 sets played • 68 kills • 1,211 assists • 11.01 assists per set SECOND HIGHEST SETTER

Jenna Spadafora • 71 sets played • 148 kills • 93 assists • 1.31 assists per set

SOURCE: BallStateSports.com


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FEATURES

WEDNESDAY Get to know Kent Bullis, Health Center director, once he says farewell after years of service.

FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

Students take a trip back in time to another culture in an architecture contest centered around ancient Jewish traditions.

Meet the woman who rules the top fashion brands. Elizabeth A. Hodges is the brand manager for Chico’s and educates on HIV.

Cave Theatre begins all-female series ‘Eleemosynary’ tells the story of difficult family relationships

|

KATHRYN HAMPSHIRE STAFF REPORTER kmhampshire@bsu.edu

As the first show for this Cave Theatre series, “Eleemosynary� will begin the all-female season tonight by delving into the complex relationships connecting three generations of women. “I was looking for a script with all female characters where the central conflict wasn’t around a man,� director Linda Sherfick, a junior theatre director major, said. “I didn’t want to see women emote about their baggage. This script tells a beautiful story that is relatable to everyone. It is non-linear and metaphysical, using the lens of memory to show how stories change over time.� This play revolves around the importance of family relationships, but reveals the hidden struggles involved with choosing to love a family member. “The show is about love, understanding and listening,� Sherfick said. “Everyone is worthy of being listened to, and everyone has to have that understanding to make love work.� “Eleemosynary� tells the story of three women: a grandmother, Dorothea Wesbrook, played by senior acting major Molly Wagner; a Dorothea’s daughter, Artie Wesbrook, played by junior acting major Sam Sheeks; and Dorothea’s granddaughter, Echo Wesbrook, played by sophomore acting major Shay Stewart. Wagner described Dorothea is an eccentric, strong-willed elderly woman who has ambitious dreams for herself and her family. Sheeks said her Artie, by

CAVE PERFORMANCE WHAT

“Eleemosynary� WHERE

Cave Theatre, located in the basement of the Arts and Communications Building Room 007 WHEN

7:30 p.m. tonight-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday COST

$6

contrast, has an analytic mind and struggles between desires to love her family and to escape the past. Stewart said this stark contrast between Dorothea and Artie — along with events in the past — leads to a strained relationship which has a trickle-down effect on Echo. “The relationship with her own mother causes Artie to struggle with learning how to love her daughter,� Sheeks said. When Artie finally flees from her mother, she leaves Dorothea to raise Echo. Growing up this way has left Echo “a very old soul, but at the same time, she is whimsical, playful and full of hope,� Stewart said. However, this innocent nature has left her as “a person who loves to the point of hurting herself.� All three of the actresses revealed feeling a connection to their characters. Stewart indicated that she and Echo both share a “deep-seated love of words� and that she is also “very much an old soul in a young body.� Sheeks, on the other hand, can relate to Artie since “[the character] is very much like my own mother, and I think that her struggle between wanting something more while still wanting her family is a common thing

that many can relate to.� Like Sheeks, Wagner can relate to Dorothea through the female role models in her own life. “I see a lot of my mother and grandmother in her,� she said. Sherfick conveyed that one of the challenges of producing this play was to make the characters “lovable� since she said it can be easy to dislike them. “These are three beautifully flawed characters who become lovable in spite of it,� Sherfick said. The word “eleemosynary� is an adjective meaning “supported by charity,� something that Sherfick said she thinks is evident in the story. “All of the characters are charitable in their own way,� she said. “And they are also all deserving in their own way — they are both willing to give and to receive.� In keeping with the all-female theme for Cave Theatre productions this series, six women work on the play: three actresses, one stage manager, one director and one assistant director. “[It’s been a] very compelling opportunity as a young actress to work with a cast and crew comprised of extraordinarily dynamic women,� Stewart said. From a director’s standpoint, Sherfick looks back on the process as a journey. “We have been building the story together, and along the way, we have learned lot about each other and our own relationships with our families,� Sherfick said. Sherfick said her goal throughout this process has been to produce a show that is relatable and touching to everyone in the audience. “If I can inspire the audience members to walk away from this play and call their mothers, I will be happy,� she said.

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DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

ABOVE Dorothea, played by student Molly Wagner, plays with Echo, played by Shay Stewart, as she speaks with her daughter, Artie played by Sam Sheeks, during a rehearsal of “Eleemosynary� on Monday evening in Cave Theatre. Linda Sherfick, a junior theatre director major, directs the all-female show. BELOW Dorothea talks about family photos with her granddaughter, Echo, played by Shay Stewart, during a rehearsal of “Eleemosynary� on Monday evening in Cave Theatre. The show will open tonight and runs until Sunday.

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Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 5 -Do financial planning today and tomorrow. Discuss shared finances. Discover you’re worth more than you thought. Re-consider a change at home, and reward yourself after with romance and compassion. Treat yourself nicely. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 6 -- Negotiations resume. It’s all in the game. Compromise is required for the next two days. A misconception gets uncovered. Recall a friend’s wise advice. Watch what you say. Refine the plan. Keep the faith.

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Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 6 -- Don’t stick your neck out for the moment... it’s not necessary. It’ll be easier to learn for the next two days, and you’re extra brilliant. Associates become entranced. Don’t overextend. Keep a low profile.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 6 -Finish your work in private today and tomorrow, and postpone a financial discussion, expense or trip. Finish up old projects instead. Make plans, a budget, and copy the itinerary. Keep it quiet for now.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 7 -- It’s getting easier to make household changes. Add candles, new textiles, or a pretty detail. Make more money than you spend today and tomorrow. Extra income is possible. Practicality vies with idealism, and wins.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 5 -- Fantasies may need to be delayed. Don’t fall for a sob story. Talk it out with friends today and tomorrow and handle a misunderstanding. Discuss your next move with your partner. Resting at home may be best.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 7 -You’re hot today and tomorrow. Don’t take anything for granted. Conditions are changing in your favor, though. Don’t start anything new yet. Handle your priorities and adjust as needed. A distant relative appears on the scene.

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It’s easier to work as a team this year. Home, romance and career remain the focus, and travel especially tempts. Study and explore a new passion. Take a class or two. Go there, maybe. Manage your wealth with persistence and discipline, to grow. Keep love as the overarching context.

 

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PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FORUM

Upset with something? Want your opinion heard? Email us at opinion@bsudailynews.com to get your voice out there.

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Trust your instincts when it’s your health EVIE LICHTENWALTER PROGNOSIS UNKNOWN EVIE LICHTENWALTER IS BALL STATE STUDENT TAKING AN ACADEMIC BREAK DUE TO HER CANCER DIAGNOSIS. SHE WRITES “PROGNOSIS UNKNOWN” FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO EVIE AT EMLICHTENWAL@BSU.EDU.

I knew something was wrong when all of my clothes stopped fitting. Jeans that were comfortable less than a month prior would no longer fasten. Their buttons and zippers would silently mock me as I attempted to stretch them across my suddenly enlarged abdomen. Granted, I’m not thin. I’ve always been heavier, but I’ve never had major fluctuations in my weight, and I’ve never had a problem fitting into my jeans. For weeks, I waited, and I hoped whatever was happening would go away. I thought, “Surely, I’m just bloated or just put on a few extra pounds without realizing it.” I became hyperaware of what I was eating, how much and when. I started exercising more and counting calories. Despite my efforts, I continued to gain weight, and my already swollen abdomen continued to expand. Finally, I set up an appointment June 3 at the Amelia T. Wood Health Center. I didn’t see the point in going to the emergency room or bothering my family doctor — I wasn’t in pain. I was just suddenly much larger than I had ever been and I didn’t know why. I met with a registered nurse who asked me an endless amount of questions, drew blood for testing and eventually, prescribed me Prilosec. I was told to come back in a couple weeks if I was still having any issues. Two weeks later, I was back. I met with the same RN who asked me the same questions. After definitively ruling out pregnancy and anything gastrointestinal, I was told I had a urinary tract infection and was given an antibiotic.

DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

Evie Lichtenwalter, a Ball State student taking an academic break due to cancer, stands in front of the Amelia T. Wood Health Center. In June, a Health Center registered nurse told Lichtenwalter that her pains were from a urinary tract infection. She was later diagnosed with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma, a cancer that develops in the lining of the abdomen.

DRAINED Nearly 39 liters of excess fluid came from Lichtenwalter. That equals almost 20 2-liter bottles.

SOURCE: Staff reports

DN GRAPHIC

I left that day feeling dismissed, as if the nurse I met with didn’t take my worries into account. It was hard to explain a pain that wasn’t a pain. I simply insisted that my body

didn’t feel right. Eventually, after being urged by a family member, I gave in and made an appointment with my family doctor July 9.

FORUM POLICY The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor,

guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed.

The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides

this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com

After explaining my symptoms — weight gain, increased abdominal girth, loss of appetite — I suddenly found myself having blood drawn, tests ran and a 12:30 p.m. appointment for a CT scan. The next few hours were a blur, but I eventually found myself in a tiny room at the IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital with my doctor. She was holding the results of my CT scan and saying something about masses. They were on my ovaries. My liver. My bladder. The scan found six masses that were significant enough to suggest metastatic ovarian cancer. I wanted to laugh. “No,” I thought. “That can’t possibly be me she’s talking about. I’m just bloated. I just have a tapeworm. I’m just crazy. Nothing is actually wrong.” I never experienced excruciating pain or obvious symptoms, yet in less than a month I had gone from a healthy, 21-year-old college student to a cancer patient. It’s easy to pretend you’re invincible when you’re in your 20s and to shrug off necessities like going to the doctor. But if something doesn’t feel right, pay attention. You know your body better than a slew of doctors ever will. When I eventually listened to my body, I discovered I was gaining weight because 39 liters of fluid, created by my tumors and called ascites, had built up in my abdomen. On July 30, I underwent surgery to remove the tumors, along with my uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes and appendix. Even though it was necessary to remove everything, after my surgery I found out it wasn’t ovarian cancer. Instead, it was a rare form of cancer — malignant peritoneal mesothelioma, which develops in the lining of the abdomen. Paying attention to my body didn’t prepare me for such a scary diagnosis, but it did help me eventually get the care I needed. If you know something feels off, don’t stop advocating for yourself. It could save your life.

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842

U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814 U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

©2012. Paid for by the United States Army. All rights reserved.

A UNIVERSITY COURSE LIKE THIS TAKES COURAGE.

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Contact Ms. Stephanie Sandoval at stephanie.m.sandoval.ctr@mail.mil or visit: goarmy.com/rotc/ballstateltc

DN 9-24-13  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News for Sept. 24, 2013.

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