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DN WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 18, 2013

THE DAILY NEWS

BSUDAILY.COM

Students fear war in Syria

BID DAY NUMBERS INCREASE

FOOTBALL

Rushing attack still not on track

Banks, Williamson have been carrying load without Edwards

Almost 600 women looked to join one of 10 Panhellenic sororities SEE PAGE 4

SEE PAGE 6

OFF THE RAXX Student sisters team up to chase dream of creating fashion business

Students, faculty member talk about potential military action

BRITTANY WATSON STAFF REPORTER | bmwatson4@bsu.edu

K

ellin Carter, a senior public relations major, knew she wanted to start a fashion company from the time she was 10 years old. At the time, her younger sister Kourtney Carter, now a junior public relations and photography major, was 9 —and was more concerned about one day becoming a chef. Eleven years later with some continued persistence, Kellin got Kourtney on board and they teamed up to create the fashion line Kellin Carter dreamed of as a child.

EMMA KATE FITTES NEWS EDITOR | news@bsudailynews.com

A U.S. military strike against Syria is looking less likely, and that’s fine with some future soldiers and veterans on Ball State’s campus. “I’m completely against, and most of those in the ROTC are completely against, any kind of boots on the ground for Syria, just based on the last ten years of war with Iraq and the last 12 or so in Afghanistan,” said Wesley Jones, a cadet battalion commander. Jones, a senior sociology major, said current ROTC cadets who will likely commission in the next four years could be serving in Syria if military action is taken. “With air strikes, and things of that nature, it’s still an act of war,” he said. “Look what the Japanese did to America [in Pearl Harbor], they didn’t put any boots on the ground, it was just an airstrike to our Navy, so if we were to do an airstrike on any of their armed forces, it would be an act of war and retaliation would be expected, absolutely.” Last week President Barack Obama suspended the Senate’s vote on authorizing force against Syria after accepting Russia’s negotiation to eliminate the chemical weapons. According to the Associated Press, Secretary of State John Kerry said the United States will closely monitor the plan while continuing to be a military threat for Bashar al-Assad’s government. Jessica Robinson, the vice president of the student veteran organization, said “boots on the ground” should be avoided at all costs for America. Robinson, a masters clinical mental health counseling major, was a sergeant in the Army National Guard and deployed to Baghdad from 2008 to 2009. “Being a veteran allows me to imagine what invading Syria will be like,” she said. “It’s not going to be a short invasion.”

See RAXX, page 5

See ROTC, page 3

Team shows size in win over IUPUI

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Kellin Carter adjusts her younger sister, Kourtney’s, dress during a studio shoot to illustrate clothes from their company. The duo formed a company called RAXX.

Spikes help to bolster offensive game in second home match DAVID POLASKI ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR | @DavidPolaski The average height of a Ball State women’s volleyball player is 5-foot-11. They played a lot taller than that in their defeat of IUPUI on Tuesday night. The Cardinals knocked off the Jaguars 3-0, winning 25-21, 25-15, and 25-23. Tied at seven in the first set, IUPUI went on a 5-1 run to take a 12-8 lead, forcing a timeout from Ball State head coach Steve Shondell. His team responded with a 6-2 run to tie the game, capped off with a kill from Mackenzie Kitchel. The kill sparked Kitchel, who connected on another spike and then blocked an DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY attack to give Ball Senior setter Jacqui Seidel State an 18-16 lead, sets the ball for senior middle which Ball State hitter Mindy Marx on Tuesday wouldn’t relinquish. against IUPUI. Ball State IUPUI was constantly defeated IUPUI in 3 sets. forced to change spikes into soft taps over the net in order to get around Ball State’s height. Kitchel was involved in many of the plays, and recorded a block in the first set. “Our size helped us and it was a main focus for us tonight,” Kitchel said. “It’s something we worked on a lot in practice yesterday and we were pretty strong today.”

Orange clutch

The orange clutch was a thrifted piece they found while shopping at home. Kellin Carter said the color caused it to stand out, yet fits the style RAXX brings to its customers

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

Vintage earrings

Tribal bracelets

The earrings are vintage finds the sisters found in thrift shops in St. Louis, their hometown.

The sisters handpick beads for each bracelet and go for the “tribal” look. They said they try to never make the same bracelet twice.

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See VOLLEYBALL, page 6

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

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5. SUNNY

Keep those umbrellas handy as a frontal system progresses east bringing a chance of rain the rest of the week. The passing cold front will bring cooler temperatures later in the week. - Erin DeArmond, WCRD weather 9. SCATTERED SHOWERS

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VOL. 93, ISSUE 18

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY

CLARIFICATION

The Discovery Institute, an organization promoting intelligent design, has asked the university to review four teacher’s honors science classes, which may not have been clear in the headline “Honors classes under review” in Monday’s edition of the Daily News.

NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

5 THINGS TO KNOW

1.

RUSSIA OPPOSES USE OF US FORCE IN SYRIA AFTER WEAPONS DEAL

TODAY 3. TRIAL ORDERED IN POST-KATRINA SHOOTING NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge on Tuesday ordered a new trial for five former New Orleans police officers convicted of civil rights violations stemming from deadly shootings on a bridge after Hurricane Katrina, concluding the case had been tainted by “grotesque prosecutorial misconduct.” In a 129-page ruling, U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt said at least three government attorneys posted

DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — Russia insisted Tuesday that a U.N. Security Council resolution governing Syria’s handling of its chemical weapons not allow the use of force, but it suggested that could change if Damascus reneges on the deal to give up its stockpile. The main Syrian opposition coalition, meanwhile, urged the international community to take swift action against the regime of President Bashar al-Assad in response to a U.N. finding that the nerve agent sarin was used in a deadly attack near the capital last month. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said his country “spoke clearly” about rejecting the use of force when the chemical weapons agreement was worked out Saturday in Geneva between Washington and Moscow. The plan calls for an inventory of Syria’s chemical weapons within a week, with all components of the program out of the country or destroyed by mid-2014.

anonymous comments on a New Orleans newspaper’s website, creating a “carnival atmosphere” that “distorted and perverted” justice in the case. “The public must have absolute 21. SCATTEREDin THUNDERSTORMS 20. THUNDERSTORMS trust and confidence this process,” he wrote. “Re-trying this case is a very small price to pay in order to protect the validity of the verdict in this case, the institutional integrity of this 21. SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS 20. THUNDERSTORMS 4. MOSTLY SUNNY court, and the criminal justice system as a whole.”

MCT PHOTO

al-Shabab connections, Mussa hung up and switched off his mobile phone. Earlier Mussa said police have seized 29 liters of acid from different people, saying they were illegally in possession of it. Last week a Catholic priest was attacked and badly injured in the fifth acid attack in Zanzibar since November. Last month two young British women doing volunteer work were injured when acid was thrown in their faces.

2. MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD LEADER ARRESTED

5. BRAZIL LOOKS TO BREAK TIES TO US INTERNET

CAIRO (AP) — Egyptian police arrested the main English-language spokesman of the Muslim Brotherhood on Tuesday along with other senior members of the group, all charged with inciting violence, state media and a security official said. Gehad el-Haddad had emerged has one of the group’s most well-known faces, appearing regularly in foreign media to defend the Brotherhood’s policies during Mohammed Morsi’s year as president and following Morsi’s July 3 ouster by

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil plans to divorce itself from the U.S.-centric Internet over Washington’s widespread online spying, a move that many experts fear will be a potentially dangerous first step toward fracturing a global network built with minimal interference by governments. President Dilma Rousseff ordered a series of measures aimed at greater Brazilian online independence and security following revelations that

the military. His father, Essam el-Haddad, was a senior foreign policy aide to Morsi and has been in detention with Morsi since the coup. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki criticized the arrest as politically motivated, saying “we are opposed to all politicized arrests, of course including this one, and detention, and remain focused on encouraging the interim government to move forward on an inclusive process that brings representatives from all sides.”

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the U.S. National Security Agency intercepted her communications, hacked into the state-owned Petrobras Oil Company’s network and spied on Brazilians who entrusted their personal data to U.S. tech companies such as Facebook and Google. The leader is so angered by the espionage that on Tuesday she postponed next month’s scheduled trip to Washington, where she was to be honored with a state dinner.

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FRIDAY Thunderstorms High: 83 Low: 61

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4. 15 ARRESTED FOR ZANZIBAR ACID ATTACKS ZANZIBAR, Tanzania (AP) — Police in Zanzibar said Tuesday they have arrested 15 people, among them suspects linked to terror groups, in connection to a spate of acid attacks in recent months. Some of the suspects have links to al-Qaida and Somali Islamic extremist group al-Shabab, said police commissioner Mussa Ali Mussa, but he offered no evidence. When pressed for details by the Associated Press about al-Qaida or

THE FORECAST

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4. MOSTLY SUNNY

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SATURDAY Mostly sunny High: 73 Low: 48 4. MOSTLY SUNNY

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SUNDAY Sunny High: 74 Low: 46 5. SUNNY

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Steven Williams

NEWS EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes ASST. NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz ASST. FEATURES EDITOR Jeremy Ervin

SPORTS EDITOR Matt McKinney ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

72 HRS EDITOR Ryan Howe FORUM EDITOR Devan Filchak

SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR Aric Chokey MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Corey Ohlenkamp

ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Jonathan Miksanek DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein

ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye

SENIOR COPY EDITORS Daniel Brount Marisa Hendrickson

Updated 24/7 Crossword

Sudoku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Michael Mepham

Level: Mild

SOLUTION FOR TUESDAY.

ACROSS 1 NATION BETWEEN TOGO AND NIGERIA 6 “LOOK OVER HERE!” 10 CSNY MEMBER 14 PRIVATE LINE? 15 ELEVATOR MAN 16 “IT’S CLEAR NOW” 17 *EDWARD CULLEN’S RIVAL FOR BELLA’S HAND, IN THE “TWILIGHT” SERIES 19 GENGHIS __ 20 “THE PLAINS OF PASSAGE” AUTHOR 21 FORMER SSR 22 PHARMACEUTICAL REP’S SAMPLES 23 *SHE PLAYED MICHELLE ON “FULL HOUSE” 26 DOGPATCH CREATOR 31 ALLEY CATS, E.G. 33 SOME CROWNS 34 DESERT TABLELAND 35 BLUE BIRD 37 LOOKING FOR A FIGHT 38 SUFFIX WITH INFER 39 COOK, IN A WAY

41 BAR BOWL ITEM 42 “DON’T TELL ME!” 44 2007 “AMERICAN IDOL” WINNER SPARKS 45 *BROTHER OF HELEN OF TROY, SOME SAY 47 FAILS TO PRONOUNCE 48 IMAGE TO IDENTIFY ON A DRIVER’S LICENSE EXAM 51 DRIFTERS 53 DIARIST ANAÏS 54 NEIGHBOR OF A CAMBODIAN 58 SHORT RACE, BRIEFLY 59 *BEACH BOYS TITLE GIRL 62 RUSE 63 DUEL TOOL 64 TARGET FIELD TEAM, AND EACH PAIR OF INTERSECTING NAMES IN THE ANSWERS TO STARRED CLUES 65 FUNNY DAME 66 BOMBS 67 NARROW PIECE, AS OF CLOTH

DOWN 1 __ CALIFORNIA 2 *BIBLICAL BIRTHRIGHT SELLER 3 “GREAT SHOT!” 4 TEEN VOGUE SUBJECT 5 LINCOLN’S ST. 6 BEER GARDEN MUSIC 7 SUPER BOWL I AND II MVP 8 [NOT MY ERROR] 9 “THAT WASN’T NICE” 10 FORMER SOVIET LEADER KHRUSHCHEV 11 *”HIGH CRIMES” ACTRESS 12 CORPORATE EMBLEM 13 EGG SOURCES 18 BRUISES PARTNER 22 SHADE PROVIDER 24 NORTH SEA FEEDER 25 NAUT. SPEED UNITS 26 ENV. ROUTER 27 STAY AWAKE IN BED 28 *SOURCE OF AN AGE-OLD MEDICINAL OIL 29 PART OF MOMA 30 PROMOTIONAL BRIBES 32 COMPOSER ERIK

34 CATTLE CALL 36 HANKERINGS 38 “NEED YOU TONIGHT” BAND 40 FIRST NAME IN SHIPPING 43 1963 NEWMAN/NEAL FILM 44 *”TODAY” CORRESPONDENT __ BUSH HAGER 46 START OF A SHOW-OFF KID’S CRY 49 HOW TRADITIONAL CHINESE BRIDES DRESS 50 TAUNTS 51 GARDEN WATERER 52 BURNED, IN A HIGH-TECH WAY 54 “I __ I TAW ...” 55 IT MAY HAVE HIGHLIGHTS 56 YEARS, TO CAESAR 57 CLOUSEAU’S RANK: ABBR. 59 PLACE TO SLEEP 60 BART’S SQUISHEE PROVIDER 61 ACLU CONCERNS

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

ROTC: ‘I did not sign up to defend another country’ veteran says about Syria | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “It will unfold, probably, like Iraq did,” she said. “We will go in and hunt the terrorist, control the area, and then spend years trying to rebuild what we destroyed during the invasion.” “What happened in Syria is heartbreaking and my heart goes out to all the victims and the family but I just don’t see the need to send Americans into a country who will replace the terrorist they lose in war with more terrorists.“ Although he said he is completely against sending any troops to Syria, Jones said he understands his role is a policy enforcer, not a policy maker. “Once you are there, there is nothing you can do about it politically, so what you do, is you do your best for the man standing next to you,” Jones said. Robinson said starting this war is not worth the lives that would be on the line. “Terrorism has been around for a long time and will be around forever when you have more than one country struggling for power. I understand that joining the military means defending your country and defending freedom but I did not sign up to defend another country. I know this may sound harsh, but I lost friends in Iraq and Afghanistan and I don’t want to see any more American lives lost because we don’t agree with how another

« I know this may sound harsh, but I lost friends in Iraq and Afghanistan, and I don’t want to see any more American lives lost because we don’t agree with how another country is governing. » JESSICA ROBINSON, vice president of the student veteran organization

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

ROTC members Carolyn Bell, Wesley Jones and Michael McAllister sit around their conference table in the ROTC meeting area. During training, conversations about current events such as Syria are held here so that soldiers can think about how to lead fellow soldiers in certain situations.

country is governing.” Daniel Reagan, a political science professor, said if America were to isolate itself from events in the Middle East, America could lose

some of its reputation as a world leader. “I think it’s an area of the world where there is a lot of American interest on our play, so oil comes to mind of course,”

he said. “And actually, while the U.S. gets some Middle Eastern oil, a lot of our other allies in Western Europe and elsewhere get a large percentage of their oil from the Middle East.

Award winning author to take part in Q&A session ‘Sideways’ writer to speak following screening of film

|

TYLER JURANOVICH STAFF REPORTER tjjuranovich@bsu.edu

The creative writing program is hosting a video conference Q-and-A with Rex Pickett, author of the best-selling book “Sideways,” at 8 p.m. in room 125 of the Letterman Building. The Q-and-A will be preceded by a 5 p.m. showing of the 2004 Academy Awardwinning film adaptation of “Sideways,” directed by Alexander Payne and starring Paul Giamatti and Thomas Haden Church. “Sideways” tells the story of two friends who travel to California’s wine country to enjoy the last week of their freedom before one gets married. The book has sold over 150,000 copies in the U.S., and the film grossed over $71 million in the U.S. and has won 107 awards from various award shows across the world. The event is part of the creative writing program’s focus

REX PICKETT’S POPULAR WORKS Sideways (2004) Vertical (2010)

LAUREN CHAPMAN STAFF REPORTER | lechapman@bsu.edu

SCREENPLAYS

California Without End (1984) From Hollywood to Deadwood (1989) My Mother Dreams the Satan’s Disciples in New York (1998) Repairman (2010) DIRECTOR

California Without End (1984) From Hollywood to Deadwood (1989) EDITOR

PHOTO COURTESY OF REX PICKETT

Actors perform in the stage version of “Sideways,” based on the novel by Rex Pickett. The author will participate in a Q-and-A video conference for students.

on hosting events that cater to the interest of all creative writing majors. “With this event, I wanted it be different,” said Sean Lovelace, director of creative writing. “We’ve never done a video event before, so it’s cool we have a well-known author for our first one.” Pickett has written two novels and has both written and directed two independent feature-length films. Lovelace cited Pickett’s ca-

reer in both novels and screenplays as the major reason he organized the event. “Pickett has written screenplays, novels and now even a play, so I thought bringing him in to talk to creative writing students would be great,” Lovelace said. The film and video conference Q-and-A is open to Ball State students and the public. The Q-and-A will be informal and more audience-driven, so any audience member can ask

Pickett questions. “I want this to be more of a community and universitywide event than a lecture,” Lovelace said. There will be refreshments, as well as a contest where attendees can guess what the secret drink “Cardinal Punch” tastes like. The attendee who has the most creative answer will win a prize. “If you’re into creativewriting or screenwriting, I recommend coming,” Lovelace said.

shotguns and rifles. Virginia gun laws require only that an out-of-state buyer show valid identification, pass a background check and otherwise abide by state laws in order to buy a shotgun in the state. Alexis was never prosecuted for the two misdemeanors involving guns. Alexis bought the shotgun at Sharpshooters Small Arms Range in Lorton, Va. on Saturday, according to a statement from the attorney for the gun range. Michael Slocum said in an email that Alexis rented a rifle, bought bullets and used the range before buying the shotgun and 24 shells. Slocum said Alexis passed a federal background check. Law enforcement officials visited the range Monday, reviewing the store’s video and other records. “What the 1986 Firearms Owners’ Protection Act did was it made it more convenient for gun buyers,” said Kristen Rand, the legislative director at the Violence Policy Center. “That’s the road we’ve been on for a while: The convenience of gun owner always seems to trump the right of

victims not to be shot.” Federal gun laws bar the mentally ill from legally buying guns from licensed dealers. But the law requires that someone be involuntarily committed to a mental health facility or declared mentally ill by a judge, and that information must be reported to the FBI in order to appear on a background checks. In the wake of the 2007 shooting at Virginia Tech, state authorities changed state laws to make it tougher for the mentally ill to buy guns there. But like other recently accused mass shooters, Alexis was never declared mentally ill by a judge or committed to a hospital. He was being treated by the Veterans Administration as recently as August, according to two law enforcement officials, but the Navy had not declared him mentally unfit. The Virginia Tech shooter, Seung Hi Cho, was declared mentally ill by a judge, but nobody ever reported it to federal authorities to get him included in the database of banned purchasers. After the December massacre at a Connecticut elementary school, U.S. lawmakers pushed to overhaul gun laws.

Among the proposals was a ban on military-style rifles, including the popular AR15, and high-capacity ammunition magazines. There was also a plan to expand background checks to make sure anyone who wanted a gun got the approval of the federal government. No legislation has moved forward in Congress, despite urgent pleas from the president, some lawmakers and victims’ families. President Barack Obama has made a few narrow administrative changes, but those are not likely to impact the kinds of guns most often found at crime scenes. Obama said Tuesday he was concerned that an American ritual could emerge where every few months, the nation suffers a horrific mass shooting, then fails to take action to stop the next one from occurring. He said he would continue speaking out about the need for new gun laws, but that ultimately, it’s up to lawmakers. “I’ve taken steps that are within my control,” Obama said in an interview with Telemundo. “The next phase now is for Congress to go ahead and move.”

D.C. SHOOTER BOUGHT GUNS LEGALLY

Firearms purchased using out-of-state license in Virginia | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — The gunman in the mass shootings at the Washington Navy Yard, Aaron Alexis, had a history of violent outbursts, was at least twice accused of firing guns in anger and was in the early stages of treatment for serious mental problems, according to court records and U.S. law enforcement officials. But Alexis apparently managed to exploit seams in the nation’s patchwork of complicated gun laws designed to keep weapons out of the hands of dangerous people. He was able to buy a shotgun in Virginia with out-of-state identification, even though that would have prevented him from buying a handgun. It is illegal for gun dealers to sell handguns to such outof-state buyers, but the Firearms Owners’ Protection Act, passed by Congress in 1986, opened up interstate sales for

Group requests look at university investment plan Spokesperson says cutting fossil fuels out of investment portfolio may be impossible

NOVELS

California Without End (1984)

If the United States -- wants to be a world leader, with leadership comes responsibility.” Reagan said this is one of the issues policy makers are considering while deciding

what to do. “Most of these decisions, the right thing to do isn’t real clear, so what the president decides is … ‘Which do I think is the least bad option,’” he said. Congress has not yet voted on authorizing force against Syria, and is facing opposition from within,w as well as from the public, according to the Associated Press. Reagan said the president’s decision to consult with Congress before declaring war is unusual, since recently presidents have been more willing to engage in military action without Congress, but not unprecedented. He said some critics have been worried that the bipartisan gridlock will slow down the process too much. “A lot of things in politics are time sensitive, especially in international affairs and especially when it comes to the decision to deploy military force or not,” Reagan said. “What we hear from the experts in chemical weapons is that it can’t go real fast in terms of locating, identifying and removing chemical weapons, that there is just a time lag there. “On the political side … I think, certainly from the American point of view, faster is better. So we will have to see if the political time table can be made compatible with the technical time table, for locating and removing chemical weapons.”

an official petition through the school for more transparency A student organization is in the foundation’s investasking Ball State to keep its ments. However, Thomas Heck, Ball promise to promote clean energy by ceasing investing in State chief investmentofficer, said there really isn’t much fossil fuels. Go Fossil Free Ball State is to show. “The main body of our porta project within Students for folio is in Perella Weinberg Responsible Consumerism created to get the university Partners,” Heck said. “They are to disclose the details on its the external CIO for the body of investments through the Ball the investment portfolio. Under them we are invested in many State Foundation. different types of inKourtney Dillavou, vestment vehicles, a senior landscape It isn’t fair energy, on the global architecture major, market.” and Michael Russell to students The investments have taken the lead to make that Ball State makes on the initiative. “We want Ball State money off of with the foundation funds are broto make parameters ken down into so they don’t invest something in the fossil fuel in- that could be investment allocation targets, which are dustry,” Dillavou said. killing us. percentages of invest“We are a sustainments in a particular able campus and we industry or good. should be working in KOURTNEY DILLAVOU, a This allows Perthat direction.” senior landscape ella Weinberg PartThe one-semester architecture major ners to invest in any initiative is being company or product carried out through SRC with members involved within the parameters Ball State sets. in the group. Heck said the investments Diane Berg, president of SRC, said the group wants to Ball State makes can change raise awareness through its constantly in order to protect the university’s ability to members’ interests. “We’re still kind of small,” make money. With the complications in Berg said. “It’s hard without money to grow and advertise. defining which particular We have some [members] in- companies are receiving involved in humanitarian [proj- vestment, Dillavou said there ects], some that are more en- is a bigger impact than just the vironmental people — more fossil-free goal. “Even if we don’t get the ulfocused on sustainability.” Go Fossil Free Ball State has timate goal, getting people a Facebook page and a peti- exposed to it would be good tion created to gain the atten- overall for the campus,” Diltion of the Ball State Founda- lavou said. “It isn’t fair to students to make money off of tion’s Board of Trustees. Dillavou said she hopes to something that could be killspark attention before creating ing us.”

«

»

BREAKDOWN OF BALL STATE’S STOCK INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO 45 PERCENT IN GLOBAL PUBLIC EQUITIES

shares/stocks in publicly traded companies 25 PERCENT IN GLOBAL PRIVATE EQUITIES

buying ownership in companies that aren’t publicly traded 5 PERCENT GLOBAL FIXED INCOME

a type of mutual fund, they are buying securities with a fixed return, similar to a bond 20 PERCENT ABSOLUTE RETURN STRATEGIES

short term investments

5 PERCENT INFLATION PROTECTION ASSETS

investing in commodities, inflation protected investments, investing in real estate SOURCE: Thomas Heck, chief investment officer, and investopedia.com


PAGE 4 | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

NEWS

Self-study gives focus on ethics Board of Trustees plan future of school, many are alumni SAM HOYT CHIEF REPORTER | sthoyt@bsu.edu

DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

Sisterly Love

Members of Alpha Gamma Delta run back to their sorority after greeting a sister at Bid Day Monday on the Quad.

Record number of recruits looked to be chosen during sorority bid ceremony

|

DANIELLE GRADY STAFF REPORTER dagrady@bsu.edu

This year’s record-breaking number of sorority recruits means increased competition for bids, the Panhellenic Council President said. “I think every year our recruitment process is attracting some of the brightest students academically because of our successful academic years in the past,” said Kasie Sturm, Panhellenic Council President. The number of women looking to join a sorority has increased this year to almost 600 recruits, which Sturm said is an “insanely high number.” She estimates 450 of those recruits received bids to become chapter members. Chapters are expanding to make room for the increased number of recruits. “Last year the average number of a chapter was around 39 or 40, and now this year it’s 49,” Sturm said. ”We’re really excited to see our community grow so fast in such a short amount of time.” Freshman actuarial science major Alyssa Potts said she thought the process was competitive. “The first round was very laid back, but if you don’t click with who you’re talking to then you don’t have a chance of being called back the next day,” Potts said. “It depends on the person you get.” Girls must complete an “I Value” survey to determine which sororities align best with their values. Sturm said academics is one of the greek community’s core values. She said there is a cumulative GPA requirement for new members of 2.5. Those accepted must also maintain an average that is set by the sorority they join. If potential members do not meet the academic requirements, they will not be allowed to join a sorority. “We always encourage those women to take the year to really focus on their schoolwork and maybe go through the recruitment process as a sophomore,” Sturm said.

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS INDIANAPOLIS — The battle over amending the Indiana Constitution to ban gay marriage is splitting pretty clearly along ideological lines but making for some odd pairings of otherwise partisan foes. When opponents of the amendment launched their campaign last month, they tapped a veteran Republican operative, Megan Robertson, to lead the charge. They then announced this week they had hired the director of the Democratic Party’s field operations, Peter Hanscom. Supporters, meanwhile, are counting on a base of conservative and rural Democrats to bolster their already strong position among

legislative Republicans. “This isn’t an issue that’s divided on party lines so much,” said Robertson, campaign manager of Freedom Indiana, the group leading the fight against the amendment. “It’s a different kind of issue than what you see typically being discussed at the Statehouse. It’s something where people can really come together regardless of what party they’re from,” she said. Indiana already limits marriage to being between one man and one woman. But supporters are fearful a judge could overturn the state law, in part relying on this past summer’s Supreme Court decision. The first part of what could be a lengthy battle will take place during next year’s legislative session. Leaders for Advance America, an Indiana group, and American Family Association of Indiana have been urging

1. “The institution operates with integrity in its financial, academic, personnel, and auxiliary functions; it establishes and follows fair and ethical policies and processes for its governing board, administration, faculty, and staff.”

This first component cuts directly to the most basic idea of integrity. The accreditation steering committee provides four items to the peer review team to help them answer this question: the Faculty and Professional Personnel Handbook, Employee Code of Ethics, the Strategic Plan and the Beneficence Pledge.

2. “The institution presents itself clearly and completely to its students and to the public with regard to its programs, requirements, faculty and staff, costs to students, control, and accreditation relationships.” DN PHOTOS TAYLOR IRBY

ABOVE New sorority members sit on the Quad during Bid Day on Monday evening. LEFT Janelle Morr poses with Dory at Bid Day on Monday evening.

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PARTIES DIVIDED ON GAY MARRIAGE BAN

Politicians take on unexpected roles in debate over law

The second criterion of accreditation is integrity, which deals directly with the Ball State Board of Trustees. President Jo Ann Gora and other administrators manage Ball State on a day-to-day basis, but the Board of Trustees holds the most responsibility at the university. The nine trustees control most of what happens at Ball State with the help and advice of Gora and the Ball State community. Many of the trustees are alumni trying to give back to the university. This is a closer look at the five subcategories the Accreditation Committee will use to determine whether Ball State retains its accreditation.

their members to lobby state lawmakers. The directors of both groups were not immediately available for comment Tuesday, but Advance America posted an item on its website Tuesday with lobbying instructions. “The 2014 General Assembly must pass the Marriage Protection Amendment HJR 6 — as is — so the citizens can vote on Nov. 4, 2014 to stop homosexual marriages,” the group wrote in the post. Placing the law in the constitution is a four-year process in Indiana; lawmakers must approve the measure in two consecutive biennial sessions and then send the issue to the ballot, for a decision from voters. The General Assembly overwhelmingly supported the amendment on a first vote in 2011, but public polling on the issue has shifted somewhat in Indiana in the past few years, leaving both

sides to play a high stakes vote-counting game. Republicans hold strong command in both chambers — 69 of 100 House seats and 37 out 50 Senate seats — but Robertson said she thinks her group can find the votes needed to block the amendment. But there is little guarantee of unity from the chambers’ Democrats. Rep. Terry Goodin, D-Crothersville, said his constituents are clearly in favor of the amendment, which is why he will be voting for it. He can see the state’s remaining rural Democrats peeling away from the larger bloc of urban lawmakers to support the amendment. “It gets to become a non-issue because I think it’s become publicized so much. I think everybody has their stand on where they’re at on it,” Goodin said. “I don’t think there’s any swaying one side or the other, and I think people are at where they’re at.”

Two of the ways Marilyn Buck, associate provost and co-chair of the accreditation steering committee, said the university presents itself and tries to add transparency to its work are press releases and the President’s Perspective. The President’s Perspective is a letter from Gora, released several times a semester. It updates the university community on Ball State from her point of view, sometimes addressing specific events or controversies. Another group that helps make Ball State decisions clear is the Board of Trustees, who have at least five meetings per year. Anything from budget and faculty issues to new programs or policies are discussed at the meetings, which are open to the public.

3. “The governing board of the institution is sufficiently autonomous to make decisions in the best interest of the institution and to assure its integrity.”

The governing body referenced here is the Board of Trustees. Most of the nine trustees live away from Muncie, but they gather at Ball State once a month to manage the university. Hollis Hughes Jr., president of the Board of Trustees, said one reason many of the trustees are committed to the university is because they are alumni. “We had great experiences here, received good educations and want to make sure that young people that follow are also receiving an outstanding education,” he said. In addition to finances and policies, the trustees are kept updated on student life and other matters by administrators.

4: “The institution is committed to freedom of expression and the pursuit of truth in teaching and learning.”

Buck said freedom of expression is a nationwide idea, but it applies to campus as well.

BENEFICENCE PLEDGE Members of the Ball State community... PLEDGE TO MAINTAIN HIGH STANDARDS OF SCHOLARSHIP AND EXCELLENCE

To work with students, faculty and staff to strengthen teaching and learning on campus. PLEDGE TO PRACTICE ACADEMIC HONESTY

To model and uphold academic integrity, to honor their peers and earn the trust and respect from all members of the community. PLEDGE TO ACT IN A SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE WAY

To treat each person in the Ball State community with civility, courtesy, compassion and dignity; to respect the property and environment of the campus. PLEDGE TO VALUE THE INTRINSIC WORTH OF EVERY MEMBER OF THE COMMUNITY

To respect and learn from differences in people, ideas and opinions. Some controversies in the last decade at Ball State have brought the idea to the university’s attention, and an important issue accreditors will look at is not just what happened, but how Ball State responded. In 2004, George Wolfe, a music professor, made national news when he was accused of bringing his liberal bias into class. Ball State defended Wolfe and upheld the idea of academic freedom, that personal ideas and beliefs can still have their place in the classroom. Nearly a decade later in May 2013, the Freedom From Religion Foundation filed complaints against Eric Hedin, an astronomy professor, for allegedly teaching his intelligent design beliefs in a science honors class. Provost Terry King and a panel of four professors reviewed Hedin’s courses to ensure they were aligned with the university’s standards. On Sept. 10, the Discovery Institute, an intelligent design organization, filed complaints against Paul Ranieri and three other professors for anti-theist biases and teaching courses they weren’t qualified to teach. Buck said courses are made in a way to allow instructors freedom to decide how to apply the information. “For each course, there is a master syllabus,” she said. “A faculty member creates a course outline.” The master syllabus is where the concepts are laid out and must be taught. The course outline is where the instructor decides what method to teach (discussion, lecture, etc.), attendance rules, grading and other policies.

5. “The institution ensures that faculty, students, and staff acquire, discover, and apply knowledge responsibly.”

The university provides several means to keep the Ball State community informed of their academic expectations, including the four items above. Of those four, Buck stressed the Beneficence Pledge as the main way to keep students accountable. The pledge was created by Student Government, and Buck said it shows the students dedication to integrity. “Many times the students are more critical than others,” she said. A way Buck said students can ensure that academics are handled responsibly at Ball State is to report a situation when they think it has crossed a line.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

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CUTTING OUT THE MIDDLEMAN RAXX: Sisters juggle school, part-time JEREMY IRVIN NO SLEEP TILL MUNCIE JEREMY IRVIN IS A SOPHOMORE JOURNALISM MAJOR AND WRITES ‘NO SLEEP TILL MUNCIE’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO JEREMY AT JRERVIN@BSU.EDU.

In December of 2011, standup comedian Louis C.K. released his special “Live at Beacon Theatre� for direct sale on his website for $5. The format and distribution method made the files extremely easy to pirate, but people paid anyway. Within 12 days of the release, C.K. had made more than $1 million. Fellow comic Joe Rogan followed suit in the wake of his success. In late July, C.G.P. Grey introduced a “voluntary subscription� to help support his free educational videos on YouTube. Using the crowd source funding website subbable.com, he raised his monthly contribution goal in only five hours. Current contributions stand at 191 percent of his requested funds. Through the use of the Internet artists, writers, musicians and more are able to distribute their content directly to their audience using some pretty atypical business models. While record labels and movie studios struggle to staunch their losses to piracy by suing individuals, shutting down file sharing sites and placing limitations on the use of their content, smaller, more open operations flourish online. Internet technology allows creators to promote and distribute their own content without the help of an agent or publishing company. The stream-lined nature of this new form of distribution is changing the way people create their content as well. When you cut out the middleman, the only authority is the voice of the audience. For example, small bands with a following will no longer be forced to make their music more “commercially viable� in order to have it distributed. While a large record company may offer more opportunity and exposure than sites like YouTube, individuals now have the tools they need to promote their own product their own way, nearly for free. But this new type of distribution is not without its challenges. The reality is that you can’t maintain a professional creative project without money. One way to make money is to introduce a paywall. This follows the traditional business model of “pay me or no content.� While places online do this, such as newspapers, this makes content less accessible to the public. One of the biggest advantages of the Internet is that almost anyone can access it almost anywhere pretty much for free and this business model cancels out part of this advantage. Secondly, there’s advertising. While annoying, advertisements let creators give their stuff away for free. The downside is that the advertisements pay very little, so only popular, well established projects receive much real support from them. Advertisements also have a nasty habit of changing the style of content without issuing any direct demands. The advertising-based business model wants content in smaller chunks more regularly. The quality of the content doesn’t matter as much as total number of views. This creates incentive for creators to pay more attention to their hit counts and less attention to their audience. Lastly, there’s direct distribution. The goal of this method is to make the stuff people want as easy to get and use as possible. For some projects that may mean giving it away; for others, selling at a low price with almost no usage restriction. When you first look at this option, it seems silly. Give away your stuff and hope people don’t steal it? Absurd. However, I think it’s the best option of the three. It lets the audience see if they like your content before they spend money on it. Yes, they absolutely can enjoy it and not give you a single dime. In some cases, others may be able to pirate the content to the same effect. However, this way of doing things works. The projects at the beginning of this article are only a few of many examples that if you make something good and let people see it, they will reward you. It may be kind of sappy, but this gives me a lot of hope for the future and says something very beautiful about human nature. People are building relationships with the people who make the things they enjoy and rewarding them. It would be cheaper and easier to steal and take, and give nothing back. But people give back anyway. They want to see others grow, develop and keep doing what they do. The audience is happy. The artist is happy. Everyone grows. If that isn’t progress, I don’t know what is.

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jobs and putting together fashion line | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

put toward school and make both successful, all while trying to have fun with our friends,� Kourtney said. Kellin and Kourtney are planning to not only make people look good, but do good — a dollar from each purchase will go to a scholarship fund or a multiple sclerosis charity. Education is important to both sisters, as is the subject of MS. Their mother was diagnosed with MS eight years ago. As RAXX becomes more profitable, the amount the sisters donate will increase. For now, the sisters plan to further develop their online presence and stock up on their merchandise before the website goes live. Their Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr blog are starting to gain a following and their website will be up and running by the end of November. Kellin plans to graduate this spring and continue to enhance the website and get the online store fully established. Once Kourtney’s time at Ball State is complete, the two hope to see a great deal of success that could potentially lead to a physical store. Coming from parents that are business owners, ranging from interior design to business consulting, Kellin and Kourtney said they have learned a lot and have gotten all the advice and the push they need to be successful. “Our parents are very supportive. They want us to start being millionaires,� Kourtney said. With a little more than two months and all the work left to do before the website goes live, sacrifices are being made to get the business where it needs to be. “Having the courage to go after what you want ...,� Kourtney said. “It takes a lot.�

The siblings left their hometown, St. Louis, and came to Muncie — where they pushed their business into full gear. Their fashion creativity developed into RAXX — a clothing and accessory line aimed at women. “I was trying to think of something easier to do while I was in college and then branch out more once I graduated,� Kellin said. “But now we’re making a lot more of our own things.� Originally, Kellin and Kourtney teamed up with two friends to create a fashion line, but eventually the sisters decided to split off and work as a duo. At first, the plan was to make something simple, like scarves. Then the sisters started to create on-trend vintage pieces, such as highwasted distressed shorts. “If I wasn’t working with Kellin I think a lot more problems would arise,� Kourtney said. “I know her weaknesses and she knows mine. We balance each other.� Finding time doesn’t come easy with classes and part-time jobs. Kellin works on campus and Kourtney works at Jimmy Johns — both balancing full academic schedules. It’s not unusual for Kellin to be found sewing pairs of pants late into the night. Along with clothing, they are developing accessories. Kellin and Kourtney are busy making earrings in several styles and colors and are crafting bracelets of wooden beads and charms. Kellin and Kourtney make their clothing by hand and revamp vintage finds for their fashion line. “This is something we are passionate about and we want to put our energy into, but we have to find enough time to

Bleached shorts “We found vintage denim and decided we could just bleach it ourselves for less [money]. They first started bleaching denim when it became a trend,� Kellin said.

Necklace

Another vintage find, and they we’re lucky enough to locate five of them. “We found them with green, blue and brown pendants,� Kourtney said.

Bleached shirt

There was no plan to where the bleach landed when they made this shirt. “We just placed some rubber bands, twisted it a couple times and added the bleach,� Kourtney said.

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PAGE 6 | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

THURSDAY Check in the Daily News for a story on a Ball State football player’s reunion with his high school teammates.

FRIDAY Look for an online exclusive about an unlikely freshman’s immediate impact on the Ball State football team.

Running backs seek more consistent play Team hopeful for Edwards’ return to action on Saturday MAT MIKESELL CHIEF REPORTER | @MatMikesell Horactio Banks admits running the ball has been tougher the past two games without Jahwan Edwards, who has missed time due to a concussion. Ball State is averaging just 119.3 yards on the ground through the first three games, down from the 203.2 yards the team averaged all of last season. “I feel like we can get a lot better in a lot of different areas,” Banks said. “Mistakes have been made all around, but we’re getting better every day at minimizing those mistakes.” The tandem features a change-of-pace style of rushing attack. Edwards, the brute of a running back that wears down defenders, and Banks the quicker, more elusive of the two. Without Edwards, Banks has been put as the feature back in the offense and Teddy Williamson as the No. 2 backup. Banks accepts the challenge of being the No. 1 back with Edwards out, but said it has been difficult. The inconsistencies with the Cardinals’ running game hasn’t solely been because of Edwards’ absence against Army and North Texas, the team is also adjusting to new pieces on the offensive line. “We just need to work on getting everyone playing well at once,” center Jacob Richard said. “All it takes is one guy on one play.” Ball State got that one play in the loss against North Texas last Saturday.

Despite the low block total, Kitchel had a number of deflections that allowed Ball State to set up easy sets for points. As Ball State started interfering with the IUPUI attacks, the visitors became more passive and their spiking saw a dramatic decrease. “As the match wore on, our blocking really stood out and started getting into the Jaguars heads,” Shondell said. “I think it really intimidated them [IUPUI] tonight.” Leading 12-9 in the second set, Ball State took advantage of a service error to gain possession and momentum. After a spike was deflected by Ball State’s blockers Alex Fuelling, Mindy Marx and Kitchel contributed kills to help extend the lead to 16-11. Every bounce went the Cardinals’ way, including a serve from Catie Fredrich that kissed the top of the net, and landed harmlessly on the Jaguars’ side. Just seconds later, Marx dove and tapped a weak desperation return over the net, where there were no IUPUI players around to return. The final kill of the match was predictably set up after Ball State’s blockers deflected a IUPUI attack, allowing Marx to set up for the last point. “We were for sure getting into their heads,” Kitchel said. “They started tipping a lot and that helped us a lot because it lets our offense take over.” Ball State had three solo blocks and six block assists throughout the match, constantly in its opponents face and never letting up with defensive pressure. Tied at eight in the third set, Shondell called a timeout that rallied Ball State. Kills from Hayley Benson and Fuelling gave Ball State a two point lead and was extended off a block by Kelly Hopkins. IUPUI wasn’t finished, going

4 DOWNS

4 things to know before Ball State’s game 1 p.m. on Saturday at Eastern Michigan

1

MATT McKINNEY SPORTS EDITOR | @Matt_D_McKinney

BALL STATE HAS STARTED FAST THIS SEASON

In Ball State’s first three games, the offense has marched down the field and scored a touchdown on each opening drive. In the season opener against Illinois State, Ball State scored on a 10-play, 79-yard drive. Against Army, it was a 9-play, 60-yard drive that did the trick. Finally, last Saturday at North Texas, Ball State went 75 yards in nine plays for the score. LEMBO’S TAKE: “It’s set the tone in those three games. I think it shows that our guys have been ready to go, coming out of the gate — very focused.” DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Freshman running back Teddy Williamson contends with an Army defender during their game on Sept. 7. Williamson is part of a rushing attack that is behind last year’s pace.

Banks broke a 77-yard touchdown run in the first quarter against the Mean Green, putting the Cardinals ahead 13-3 at the time. The 77-yard run was the third longest touchdown run in program history. But over half his yardage in the game came on the run. He finished with 141 total yards. “It shows what we’re capable of and what we expect of ourselves,” Richard said. “We just need to building the chemistry. We’re very capable of putting plays together like that consistently.” The Cardinals’ offense calls for short passing routes and screens that gain four yards consistently. If the running game isn’t working, offensive coordinator Rich Skrosky said the short passing game picks up the slack.

“To me, a screen that goes for six yards is the same as a running play,” Skrosky said. “People see a screen pass that goes for two yards and think it’s not that good. It’s the same as a two-yard run.” The coaching staff knew the offensive line situation entering the season so the inconsistency in the running attack hasn’t been reason to panic. Ball State’s first two opponents — Illinois State and Army — both run defensive schemes that discourage offenses from running the ball. But if the running game is still inconsistent later in the season, it will be a bigger concern. “Every week we’ve gotten a little better,” Skrosky said. “Last week against North Texas was proof of that. We say it every day that it has to be a

VOLLEYBALL: Blockers affected Jaguars’ gameplan late, leading to 3-set victory | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

The women’s tennis team will play in the Ball State Fall Invitational beginning Friday and ending on Sunday.

on a 3-0 run to tie the game at 13. Ball State took the lead back in a way that didn’t surprise anyone. A deflected spike from Ball State led to a kill from Marx, and Ball State never looked back. Leading 24-23 and the game on the line, Fuelling sized up a set and slammed it down, ending IUPUI’s hopes for a comeback. “I was really pleased with Kitchel’s blocking,” Shondell said. The freshman’s size, blocking and offensive prowess allowed Ball State to dictate each set and prevented IUPUI from ever gaining momentum for more than a couple of minutes. “Once you’re in an attackers head, you notice they’ll start taking shots differently,” Shondell said. “Sometimes errors will come when they change

their shot.” The presence Ball State’s blockers had throughout the match clearly affected IUPUI’s gameplan. The Jaguars came out trying to force the ball straight into the heart of the defense, but was unsuccessful after several attacks were rejected or deflected, leading to Cardinal points. IUPUI began tapping balls over the reach of the blockers, but Fredrich and Fuelling were usually waiting to recover the tips and set up chances for the offensive opportunity. Kitchel finished with a teamhigh 17 kills in just three sets, a tall order for a freshman appearing in just her second home match. Tuesday night, everything about Ball State was tall.

little better.” Head coach Pete Lembo is hopeful that Edwards will return in Ball State’s Mid-American Conference opener against Eastern Michigan on Saturday. If he does, Ball State will push to return to the normalcy of its running game with the tandem of Edwards and Banks. Edwards is looking forward to returning to action especially after Banks’ 77-yard touchdown run beat Edwards’ 75-yard touchdown run against Eastern Michigan last season. “[Edwards] was like, ‘Don’t think you’ve got the speed because your longest run was two yards longer,’” Banks said with a laugh. “We’ve been talking to see who’s going to have the most explosive run this week.”

2

INJURIES TAKING A TOLL ON THE CARDINALS

After playing yet another game without starting running back Jahwan Edwards, Ball State has listed him as probable for Saturday. However, Ball State will not have sophomore wide receiver KeVonn Mabon for this game or the remainder of the season with a broken collarbone. Fellow wide receiver Connor Ryan is questionable with a thumb injury, and guard Jalen Schlachter is also questionable with an ankle injury.

LEMBO’S TAKE: “You just have to deal with it. We don’t make excuses. We never do. Last year we were basically injury-free until we got to midNovember and then we got to our last two games of the season. When it rains, it pours. That’s just football. This year we seem to be dealing with more [injuries] early in the season. You deal with it, and you keep moving forward.”

3

TIGHT END LEADS EASTERN MICHIGAN IN RECEIVING

While most teams’ leading receivers are wide receivers, Eastern Michigan’s leading pass catcher plays tight end. Tyreese Russell came into the 2013 season with 18 career receptions for Eastern Michigan, but has 19 this season. He is one of three tight ends the Eagles use in their offense. He has also had success against Ball State. In 2011, Russell scored two touchdowns against the Cardinals.

LEMBO’S TAKE: “They’ll play three tight ends. Each of those tight ends has some different strengths and weaknesses. They’re used in a lot of different ways. Sometimes they’ll get into traditional two-tight end looks — both of them on the ball. Sometimes one will be off the ball. Similar to what we’ve seen from North Texas and Illinois State. They’ll move them around and use them a little more as an h-back.”

4

EASTERN MICHIGAN IS CAREFUL WITH THE FOOTBALL

While Ball State committed five turnovers in Saturday’s loss to North Texas, Eastern Michigan has committed less than half that so far this season. Quarterback Tyler Benz threw one interception against Howard in the season opener, then another on Saturday against Rutgers. Just three players have fumbled, but they were all recovered by the Eagles. In 2012, Eastern Michigan committed 21 total turnovers. In 2011, they committed 17. LEMBO’S TAKE: “They are controlling the ball. They’ve had good balance.” DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

Sophomore Alex Fuelling celebrates a point by Ball State during the game against IUPUI. Fuelling had 16 kills against IUPUI.

DN 9-18-13  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News on Sept. 18, 2013.