Page 1

DN THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014

THE DAILY NEWS

SEE PAGE 4

Columnist offers advice on how to create centerpieces

MLB DRAFT

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

2014

Former Cardinals prepare for career after Ball State

Sean Godfrey attempts to hit the ball against Bowling Green on March 21 at Ball Diamond. Godfrey, who was a senior outfielder in the 2014 season, has the potential to be picked in the 2014 First-Year Player Draft.

MLB DRAFT WHEN

Starts today at 7 p.m. and continues through Saturday WHERE

First two rounds (and two “competitive balance rounds”) from MLB Network Studio in Secaucus, N.J. Rounds 3-10 will be hosted via conference call with teams Friday and rounds 11-40 Saturday. ORDER

Determined by reverse order of finish in overall standings from 2013 season

F

or four seasons, three former Cardinals have played their hearts out for the Ball State baseball program. As their college eligibility ended May 23, Sean Godfrey, T.J. Weir and Nestor Bautista will now look to the 2014 First-Year Player Draft as they hope to be chosen by a Major League Baseball organization. “We are keeping our fingers crossed for [Weir and Bautista],” head coach Rich Maloney said. “I’m certain Godfrey will be selected.”

The draft starts today and runs until Saturday, and it will be on MLB Network. The first day will consist of the first two rounds, with the third through the 10th rounds Friday and the final 30 rounds Saturday. The last time a Cardinal has been selected in the First-Year Player Draft was in 2011. The Cleveland Indians selected outfielder Cody Elliott in the 21st round.

See DRAFT, page 5

DN FILE PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

SEAN GODFREY, FORMER OUTFIELDER • .333 batting average • 237 at-bats • 48 runs • 79 hits • 9 home runs • 57 RBI • .403 on-base percentage • 21 stolen bases

Community talks where to draw line FRESHMEN LEARN Privacy, surveillance OF LIFELINE LAW top panel discussion Orientation requires discussion, details on state legislation PAYNE HORNING STAFF REPORTER | prhorning@bsu.edu

on federal agencies ALAN HOVORKA CHIEF REPORTER | afhovorka@bsu.edu

Governmental surveillance, data collection and where the line should be drawn were the center of discussion for professionals and Muncie citizens Wednesday. “One of the challenges in our history is that the tools, [or] the powers, the government uses are used in a way that are consistent with the privacy we hold dear,” said Jane Henegar, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana. One year ago, Edward Snowden leaked thousands of documents on the National Security Agency activities and methods of surveillance and data collection. Twenty-five years ago today, an unknown number of people were murdered at China’s Tiananmen Square. It is estimated 500 to 2,600 were murdered. The Chinese government has since then taken major steps to hide that part of its history, which has gone so far as to delete references to the event on LinkedIn.

MUNCIE, INDIANA

DN PHOTO ALAN HOVORKA

Jane Henegar, executive director of American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana; Rich Hanson, a government and regulatory affairs representative for the Academy of Model Aeronautics; and State Rep. Sue Errington talk during the panel discussion Wednesday at the Innovation Connector. The panel discussion was part of the First Wednesdays Discussions.

An informal survey conducted by NPR’s Louisa Lim found that 15 out of 100 students from Beijing University recognized the iconic photo of the man in front of a tank, a photo that symbolized the events of the Tiananmen Square protests and massacre. These two events have one encompassing topic in common at the core of their controversy: surveillance, privacy, information and how governments control it.

CASHEWS COME FROM THE CASHEW APPLE.

The Muncie community discussed these topics Wednesday at the Innovation Connector. The talk featured a panel moderated by Phil Bremen, associate professor of journalism at Ball State, and featured Henegar, State Rep. Sue Errington and Rich Hanson, government and regulatory affairs representative for the Academy of Model Aeronautics. The ACLU’s job is to hold the government accountable to those promises it makes to

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its people about their rights, Henegar said. “The Fourth Amendment basically says the government can only get in our business when they have a good reason to,” she said. “There are standards, probable cause, et cetera. If you are going to find out personal stuff about us we aren’t already putting out on Facebook, then you have to get a search warrant.”

See SURVEILLANCE, page 3

TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter.

1. CLOUDY

6. RAIN

2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

7. PERIODS OF RAIN

As incoming freshmen begin their orientation this summer, they will be the first class to learn about a law that could help save their lives. This is the first year that the university requires Summer Orientation leaders to inform the freshmen of the Lifeline Law. This law attempts to save people suffering from a medical emergency by providing immunity to certain crimes for bystanders who call for help and cooperate with law enforcement. The Indiana General Assembly passed the law in 2012. “We decided that, with our partnership with Ball State [Student Government Association], this was something very important and critical for our leaders to pass onto students,” said Lindsey Speer, director of the Office of Orientation. Speer said while training orientation leaders in the past, the law had been discussed, but this

FORECAST TODAY Sunny High: 75 Low: 55

3. PARTLY CLOUDY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

9. SCATTERED SHOWERS

5. SUNNY

10. DRIZZLE

There will be a break from stormy weather today with sunshine and a high of 75 degrees. — WCRD

ORIENTATION, LIFELINE • Ball State now requires Summer Orientation leaders to learn the Lifeline Law and inform incoming students and their parents about it. • The Office of Orientation’s change comes in part due to a Student Government Association legislation requesting leaders receive training. • This year, students and orientation leaders will discuss it in the “College 360” session. In the future, it will have its own session. year will mark the first formal training on the Lifeline Law. This is in part due to SGA, which passed legislation requiring the training session for orientation leaders. Alyssa France, former SGA vice president, and Jack Hesser, former president pro tempore, co-authored the bill. Both parents and students will learn about the Lifeline Law during their separate tours with orientation leaders. Bryan Kubel, a junior orientation leader, was a co-sponsor of the SGA legislation. He said teaching freshmen is a necessary component of their orientation at Ball State. THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

See LIFELINE, page 4

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

VOL. 93, ISSUE 126

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY JUNE’SMUNCIE EVENT LIST NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

TODAY

MONDAY

FIRST THURSDAY ARTS WALK

JUNIOR RECITAL: SIYUAN TIAN, PIANO

Various downtown businesses 5-9 p.m. FREE MOVIE THURSDAY

“Ender’s Game” 5:30-7:30 p.m. Kennedy Library at 1700 W. McGalliard Road MUSICA IN SITU

5:30-7 p.m. Choral Hall on campus

WEDNESDAY

Doors open at 8 p.m. Must be 21 Be Here Now

7:30 p.m. Sursa Hall

8 a.m.-4 p.m. and Saturday Minnetrista

5:30 p.m., free and open to the public Sursa Hall

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Matt McKinney

DN FILE PHOTO KRYSTAL BYERS

A little girl twirls in her picnic dress at the Festival on the Green in 2013. This year’s event will be June 14.

SUNDAY @ THE MOVIES

SECOND SUMMER SESSION LATE REGISTRATION AND COURSE CHANGE ENDS

Doors open at 7 p.m, all ages Be Here Now

6:30 p.m. Minnetrista

THE SHARROWS

Doors open at 7 p.m. Be Here Now FIRST SUMMER SESSION ENDS NEWS EDITOR, COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye

“Monuments Men” 3-5 p.m. Maring-Hunt Library at 2005 S. High St.

JUNE 19 AUTHORS ON SITE

JUNE 16 SECOND SUMMER SESSION CLASSES BEGIN

Don’t forget to check class times

Mike Homoya, author, botanist and plant ecologist 6:30-8 p.m. Kennedy Library

JUNE 17

JUNE 20

FREE LEGAL AID

BACK TO SCHOOL TEACHER’S STORE ANNUAL PURSE SALE

10 a.m.-1 p.m. Carnegie Library at 301 E. Jackson St.

FEATURES EDITOR Evie Lichtenwalter

SPORTS EDITOR Anthony Lombardi

6-8 p.m. Muncie Central High School MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty

June book is “Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore” by Robin Sloan 6:30-8 p.m. Savage’s Ale House

JUNE 27

THE NEARLY DEADS AND RIVER MONROE

DAR WILLIAMS AND LUKE KNIGHT

EDITORIAL BOARD

BOOKS ON TAP

JUNE 18

KALISH VISUAL EDITING WORKSHOP

1-3 p.m. Mounds State Park

All day The Valhalla Room

JUNE 15

JUNE 13

FREE FISHING DAY FOR HOOSIERS

HANK LYKINS

JUNE 12

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

JUNE 24

SUMMER BAND EXTRAVAGANZA

MINNETRISTA GARDEN FAIR

All day until Wednesday Ball State

Doors open at 10 p.m. Must be 21 Be Here Now

Doors open at 8 p.m., all ages Be Here Now

DISCOUNT GUNS

FRIDAY Sunny High: 78 Low: 52 05 - SUNNY

SATURDAY Sunny High: 78 Low: 55 05 - SUNNY

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SONS OF HIPPIES AND ACTION CAMP

COMPUTER CLASS: IPADS 101

OPEN MIC NIGHT

“Frozen” Starts at dusk Canan Commons

5:30 p.m. Ball State Arts Terrace

Artists from around the community display their works and the Muncie Symphony Orchestra performs.

JUNE 23

SUMMER CHORUS

MOONLIGHT MOVIES

FESTIVAL ON THE GREEN

TUESDAY

7:30 p.m. Friends Memorial Church at 418 W. Adams St. 9 p.m.-12 a.m. The Heorot

JUNE 21

JUNE 14

THE FORECAST

DCI CENTRAL INDIANA

Drum Corps groups Blue Stars, Carolina Crown, Colts, Phantom Regiment, Pioneer, the Cavaliers and Troopers 7 p.m. Scheumann Stadium

JUNE 28 SUMMER PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP

9 a.m.-noon, $11 Cornerstone Center for the Arts DELAWARE COUNTY QUEEN PAGEANT

7 p.m. at the fairgrounds

DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein

20 - THUNDERSTORMS

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by AJ 278 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

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Get connected with campus 24/7 Crossword ACROSS 1 Email for the spam folder, probably 5 Comparable 9 Indy participant 14 __ socks 15 Fiddling emperor 16 Drop names, maybe? 17 Flightless flock 18 Swarm member 19 Nodding off at a meeting, say 20 Ballplayer’s home renovation advice about the bare hallway floor? 23 Caution to drivers 24 Flamenco cheer 25 “... but I could be wrong” 27 Tech’s home renovation advice about a dark basement? 32 Bygone TV control 33 Reef denizen 34 Small drink 35 Autumn bloom 38 Nursery rhyme fiddler 39 Pleasing to the palate 41 Luau bowlful 42 Wheels 43 Limit 44 Housekeeper’s home renovation

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advice about a cheap fourposter offer? 50 Joyous hymn 51 Lee follower 52 Cold War jet 54 Bartender’s home renovation advice about the tiny kitchen sink? 58 Capital on the 30th parallel 60 Mill site 61 Sticky stuff 62 Day one 63 Aquatic predator 64 Catches 65 Mild cheese 66 Bucks, perhaps 67 Hook’s right hand DOWN 1 Mother May I? movements 2 Fluffy clouds 3 Lie alongside 4 Monument Valley sight 5 Sharp-cornered 6 Boxer’s hotel 7 Caspian Sea land 8 Sticky writing? 9 Energized anew 10 In the vicinity 11 They may be political 12 Chicago-to-D.C. dir.

Sudoku CROSSWORD SOLUTION FOR MONDAY

13 Former Riverfront Stadium player 21 Chopper topper 22 Provoke 26 Flibbertigibbet 28 Ewe or doe 29 Pay attention in class 30 Drizzly 31 Many a character in TV’s “The Americans” 35 Quick on the uptake 36 Opposite of nuts? 37 Italian dessert 38 Raucous call 39 Popular exercise regimen 40 LAPD alert 42 Cold Stone Creamery purchase 43 It may be extra sharp 45 Came closer to 46 Territory divided in 1889 47 Spell 48 Infiniti’s infinity symbol, e.g. 49 Weaken 53 Formation fliers 55 Apple product 56 Zoomed 57 Fleece-lined boot brand 58 Gear tooth 59 Mayo to mayo

LEVEL: EASY | BY MICHAEL MEPHAM

SUDOKU SOLUTION FOR MONDAY


THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

I&M, city move forward with substation plans Proposed building to hide its presence with fencing, walls ALAN HOVORKA CHIEF REPORTER | afhovorka@bsu.edu

Negotiations between Muncie and Indiana Michigan Power have yielded new plans for a new substation. This comes two years after Ball State, the city, IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital and a neighborhood association opposed I&M’s plans to build a new substation located at University and

Tillotson avenues. Original plans had the new substation fully visible to the public. “We now recognize that it is a gateway to the campus and city,” Tracy Warner, I&M spokesman, said. The new plans include hiding the substation’s presence from the community by placing it in an enclosure of decorative fencing and walls. Estimated costs for this new substation haven’t been announced yet. However, the original estimate of $13 million is lower than the new proposal. The project is vital to I&M’s

ability to provide safe, efficient and reliable electric service to the area, Warner said. The current substation is about a half century old and currently running on temporary transformers. The new station would operate on newer gas-insulated switchgear, which will allow the equipment to be housed indoors and at closer spaces. Older substations rely on air as its insulation and require being spaced far apart. “The importance of that to our community is a main thoroughfare into our Ball State community and toward our downtown,” Mayor Den-

nis Tyler said. “That area has become so dense that we felt it needed to be addressed. And it’ll give us a much smaller footprint.” Tyler said vehicles going down Tillotson Avenue won’t realize it is a substation. The next step for the project’s time scale is approval from the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission. However, that could take up to a year, Warner said. Following approval from the IURC, construction could be completed as early as the summer of 2016. Randy Howard, vice president for business affairs, said he was

pleased with negotiations. “I&M has done a good job of working with the community to find a solution that provides reliable energy while also preserving the vibrancy of the area,” he said. “So we are particularly appreciative of their extra effort and pleased with the current plans.” Tyler said he hopes the new station will provide a better service. “There won’t be an issue with the service now and the construction, unless there is a power outage,” he said. “I&M has been showing that they are being a good neighbor.”

SURVEILLANCE: Professor says problem stems from lack of information | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 In general, society has bought in to the notion that a democracy thrives when people have access to information, Henegar said. “We have put in all of our chips that more information is better, that we trust ourselves and each other in figuring out what information is [important to us],” she said. The line for what information should be accessible to the government and other entities is vague, she said. “These issues are subject by subject,” Henegar said. “[It’s] really hard to draw a definitive line in dealing with privacy and surveillance.” She emphasized the severity of this issue by asking, “What would it have been like to live in different time periods where this level of information was available?” “Imagine if this large amount of information was available to Sen. [Joseph] McCarthy in the McCarthy Era,” Henegar said. The problem with discussing this topic stems from the lack of information, especially in the classroom, said Brandon Waite, assistant professor of political science

« We have put in

all of our chips that more information is better, that we trust ourselves and each other in figuring out what information is [important to us]. » JANE HENEGAR, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana at Ball State. “Conversation falls apart and becomes theoretical because of a lack of information on what’s being done in the local community,” he said. Henegar agreed with Waite’s thoughts. “I think the lack of information on [surveillance] is being used in our communities,” Waite said. “We let national discussion influence with what’s going on in our backyard.” Waite said this leads to the perception people have on how local and state governments operate. “[People think] if this is

MUNCIE CHAPTER BLACK EXPO BEGINS 23RD ANNUAL EVENT Focusing on youth and youth issues, Muncie’s Black Expo will begin its annual summer celebration 5 p.m. Friday in Heekin Park. “We want to teach them safety, conflict resolution and peace,” said WaTasha Griffin, chapter president for Muncie’s Black Expo. “[Also] celebrate culture [and] history and give back.” The three-day weekend event will begin with a speech from Mayor Dennis Tyler and a state of our youth address by Demetrius Daniels, followed by a youth basketball tournament for children in fourth and fifth grade. Free food will be provided for all youth. The goal of the event is to help teach lessons to children, Griffin said. “We want to continue to offer programs for our community, and this is one of them,” said WaTasha Griffin, chapter president for Muncie’s Black Expo. “The initiative we are running on is the state of our youth. Their future is in our hands. Family matters.” The Muncie chapter of the Black Expo is part of the larger Indiana Black Expo organization. Saturday will begin with a parade followed throughout the day with various sports, activities, presentations and discussions. Sunday’s schedule shares the same variety and will end the celebration with a jam session. – ALAN HOVORKA

DN PHOTO ALAN HOVORKA

Associate professor Phil Bremen moderates the panel discussion between Jane Henegar, executive director of American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana; Rich Hanson, a government and regulatory affairs representative for the Academy of Model Aeronautics; and State Rep. Sue Errington on Wednesday at the Innovation Connector. The discussion was based on government surveillance.

what is going on at the national level, [local] must be doing the same — local police must be taking pictures

on Sue Errington’s Facebook,” he said. In order to fix this perception, Waite and Henegar said

things need to be figured out on the federal level. “The unknown inspires fear,” Waite said.

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PAGE 4 | THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

FEATURES/NEWS

Create personal displays out of assorted china, glasswear pieces Whether you’re looking to add a touch of charm and class to a party or just want to feel like you’re having dinner with the Mad Hatter and Alice, here’s a guide that shows how to make a set of personal serving trays. This is an Anthropologie-inspired design, but it will carry a more reasonable price compared to the $70 the store charges. This project requires a bit of patience, a keen eye and sense of style.

JORDAN HUFFER I SHOOT PEOPLE FOR FUN

The hardest part of the entire process is the most important and time consuming: gathering the china. I make a habit of collecting small pieces of china that I like, but I also visit thrift stores. Muncie is home to a few places that are great for selling secondhand goods. Check out Goodwill, the Attic Window and Frankie D’s Fleamarket and always keep an eye out Clean the dishes thoroughly and stack them up how you would like for them to look. This will give you an exact idea on how the pieces should be put together. Use glue that is fit for glass and ceramic and that will dry clear.

WHAT YOU NEED:

• Several pieces of assorted china and glassware • Clear, heavy duty glue

JORDAN HUFFER IS A JUNIOR PHOTOJOURNALISM MAJOR AND WRITES ‘I SHOOT PEOPLE FOR FUN’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO JORDAN AT JAHUFFER@BSU.EDU.

for plates that fit your style. You will want to get plates in a variety of sizes but that will look good together. In addition to the plates, you need to look for separators. You can use regular coffee mugs, tea cups or even cut glass pieces. Make sure to get them in a variety of sizes because this will add a greater dimension to the piece. My tip is to buy anything and everything that you like. It’s better to have too many than not enough.

Apply glue to the bottom of your first separator. Place it in the center of the plate so that there is equal space all around the glass. This may take a few attempts, but the glue won’t dry right away, so you have time.

Continue to stack the plates and glasses until the tray is built. I would suggest building them in the place you want them to dry. I placed mine in the kitchen so that I could step back and look at the plates from a distance to make sure they were level. I let mine dry overnight before touching them again.

DN PHOTOS JORDAN HUFFER

Fill them with homemade or store-bought goodies for you and your guests to enjoy.

MDTEKK OPENS IN ANDERSON, IND.

A student-created cellphone repair and personalization company is expanding. Justin Dunmyer and Zachary Marvel, owners of MDtekk, opened a second location May 28 in CONTACT Anderson. “We wanted to open some more stores WEBSITE: mdtekk.com because we saw that things were going FACEBOOK: on.fb. me/1p7FLMI well in Muncie,” Dunmyer said. @mdtekk The Anderson store is located at INSTAGRAM: TWITTER: @mdtekk 1918 Applewood Center Drive. Dunmeyer said they chose the location because of the amount of foot traffic and the convenience of being right off Interstate 69. “Anderson didn’t have a full service repair shop for phones and tablets, so we decided to open up,” he said. Although they have no definite date on moving into the Village in Muncie, Dunmeyer anticipates it will be later this summer. “We plan on continuing to open stores and grow even outside of the central Indiana area,” he said. “It’s just a matter of time.” – STAFF REPORTS

DN PHOTOS JORDAN HUFFER

LEFT Tyler Little, a junior information system major, works on a phone at MDtekk in Muncie. The business repairs and customizes phones. RIGHT Justin Dunmyer, an alumnus, works on a phone at MDtekk in Muncie. Dunmyer and Ball State student Zachary Marvel created the business. MDtekk currently has a store in Muncie and in Anderson.

LIFELINE: Law can provide immunity for certain crimes of bystanders calling for help | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “We are trying to prevent and make sure people are safe and know this law exists,” Kubel said. He said this way, the students know if something happens, they should call for help. “We don’t want you to be scared,” Kubel said. “Even though you were underage drinking, you can call and save a friend because in the end, saving a life is the most important thing.” France said the SGA legislation originally aimed for the Office of Orientation to include the information as its own session in the freshman program. However, she said because the legislation was passed in March, only a few months prior to Summer Orientation, there wasn’t enough room in the schedule. So, orientation will discuss it during “College 360,” where students sit with orientation leaders and discuss life as a college student. Parents also will be briefed on the law during their tour. Kubel said the Lifeline Law session will receive its own place on the orientation

schedule next year. The university and SGA will likely have students revisit the issue later in the year during Welcome Week and Alcohol Awareness Week, said Jennifer Jones-Hall, director of the Office of Student Life. The motivation for passing the state legislation came from stories like Indiana University freshman Jarrod Polston, who died on Ball State’s campus in 2010. Polston partied with friends one night and returned to Studebaker West Complex early the next morning. When his friends attempted to wake him several hours later, he didn’t move. When they called the police, it was too late. The coroner said Polston’s airway was blocked when he started vomiting after passing out. “You hear stories all the time of students who died of alcohol poisoning and a lot of times, they weren’t alone,” France said. “If someone had just called, they could have saved their life.” France said State Sen. Jim Merritt of Indianapolis re-

quested the SGA legislation. In October 2013, Merritt and Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller gave a presentation on the law during Ball State’s Alcohol Awareness Week. She said the lawmakers were asking student leaders to inform campus about the law. After tossing around a few ideas, France said the executive board of SGA decided that Summer Orientation would be the best possible way to reach a large and captive audience. “The best way that we knew was to go to an audience that is already required to be somewhere — they are already attentive, they are excited about college,” France said. “There is no way for us to reach every single student. Even if we do a campus-wide email, the number of students who read those are slim. That’s why we went with orientation because four years from now, every student will have heard this information.” Jones-Hall trained orientation leaders May 28. “I talked to them from a [perspective of] ‘you’ve all been

somewhere social on this campus where you have seen situations that feel a little uncomfortable and getting a little out of hand,’” she said. “We need other students to step in at this point and not be a bystander.” Jones-Hall said the timing for the conversation with freshmen is optimal as students tend to abuse their freedom shortly after their first encounter with it. “Helping those students understand, ‘Welcome to freedom, but with freedom comes responsibility and here is a law that will help you,’” she said. Sen. Merritt said the first two weeks in college and away from home are maybe the most challenging time for students who are newly liberated. “If they can get through understanding the challenge of that freedom and behaving responsibly, then the rest of their college career, they are going to be fine,” he said. The Indiana Lifeline Law will offer immunity to those that dial 911 and remain at the scene as law enforcement attempts to save the victim.

INDIANA LIFELINE LAW • The law provides immunity for certain crimes if a bystander is seeking medical services for someone in an emergency. • Bystanders can be pardoned for public intoxication, minor possession, minor consumption and minor In order to receive immunity, the person must demonstrate what the law calls “acting in good faith,” which includes providing their full name and other relevant information to law enforcement. Merritt said law enforcement officers will likely not bring charges against the bystander if they behave in a responsible and cooperative manner. The law says it will pardon the person for crimes of public intoxication, minor possession, minor consumption and minor transport. However, it also states that the law cannot interfere with procedures or limit the ability to prosecute other offenses like

transport if they cooperate with law enforcement by remaining at the scene and providing information to authorities. • Immunity does not apply to crimes like providing to a minor, drunken driving and possession of a controlled substance. For more info, go to Indianalifeline.org. providing to a minor, operating while intoxicated or possession of a controlled substance. “There are exceptions to the rule,” France said. “It’s all on a case-by-case basis.” This year, the Lifeline Law was expanded to include immunity for the crimes in situations pertaining to any medical emergency. Merritt said without alcohol-specific language, it takes out the guess work people have to do when someone is suffering. “I wanted, and the Legislature agreed with me, to remove all hurdles from a minor ... calling 911, rather than trying to figure out what’s wrong with the person,” Merritt said.


THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

DRAFT: Former players Godfrey, Weir, Bautista hope to be chosen

GOLF

ACADEMIC ALL-MAC HONORS 4 PLAYERS

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

SEAN GODFREY

Ball State had four members from its golf teams named to the Academic All-Mid-American Conference Team on Wednesday. Both the men’s and women’s teams had two student-athletes receive the honor. The men’s team tied with two other schools for most selections on the team, while the women’s team was only one of four to have a pair of golfers makes the team. Jenna Hague and Sarah Westaway were the two honorees on the women’s side. Hague is a junior finance major and carries a 3.651 GPA. This is her second consecutive year receiving the honor. Westaway graduated in May with a 3.73 GPA in school health education. Hague broke the school record for stroke average this year among other honors. Westaway was named the MAC Sportswoman of the Year for women’s golf. Karley Dobois and Mary Welch received honorable mention for the all-academic team. On the men’s side, Tyler Merkel and McCormick Clouser were named to the team. Merkel has now made the team three years in a row, while Clouser was honorable mention last season. Merkel graduated this spring with a 3.866 GPA in business administration. Clouser, a junior, carries a 3.857 GPA in mathematical economics. Merkel also received the inaugural MAC Medal of Excellence last month. He ranks second in Ball State history in scoring average.

The Cardinal with the best chance to be selected in this year’s draft, Sean Godfrey, finished his collegiate career as one of Ball State’s finest allaround hitters. “I’m a guy who is going to give everything I have day in and day out,” Godfrey said. “I feel that my time here at Ball State, I’ve learned the importance of being a team player. ... That’s something I’m going to carry on with me as I move up to the next level.” On a team that regularly started six underclassmen, Godfrey led with his play on the field. The senior outfielder started all 57 games, posting a .333 batting average for 79 hits in 257 at-bats, while blasting nine home runs to go along with 57 runs batted in. Godfrey also contributed to the Cardinals’ conference leading offensive attack by scoring 48 runs and stealing 21 bases in 26 attempts. His 2014 campaign marked only the third time since 2011 that a player finished a season hitting nine home runs, 20 doubles, 50 RBIs and 20 stolen bases. The other two players to accomplish this feat, George Springer and Chris Burke, were drafted by the Houston Astros in the first round and the San Diego Padres in the 18th round, respectively. Head coach Rich Maloney said although he has not

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PLAYER COMPARISON Nestor Bautista 3.55 ERA 3-1 W-L 25.1 Innings pitched 21 Hits 15 Runs 17 Walks 25 Strikeouts

.265 batting average. Weir finished the season with an 8-2 pitching mark, as well as recording a save.

NESTOR BAUTISTA

DN FILE PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Nestor Bautista pitches against Bowling Green on March 21 at Ball Diamond. Bautista was a left-handed relief pitcher for the Cardinals who may be picked in the 2014 First-Year Player Draft.

heard where Godfrey may be taken, he fully expects it to be somewhere in the draft’s first 10 rounds. On Friday, Godfrey worked out at Great American Ballpark for the Cincinnati Reds and followed that with a trip to Detroit where he participated in position drills and took batting practice for the Tigers. Wherever he is ultimately drafted, Godfrey said he’s ready to step in and show that organi-

zation it made the right choice.

T.J. WEIR

T.J. Weir began the 2014 season as the No. 2 starter in the Cardinals’ pitching rotation, but after delivering several dominant outings, he found himself as the team’s new No. 1. From that point on, the right-handed hurler was one of the most consistent pitchers in the country. Weir appeared in 19 games as

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a pitcher, starting 15 of them, and finished the year tied 9th in the nation with 117 strikeouts in 99.2 innings pitched. The player he’s tied with, North Carolina State’s Carlos Rodon, is a consensus top 10 pick and could be taken by the Houston Astros with the first pick in the draft. In addition to the strikeout totals, Weir also pitched to a 3.61 earned run average while holding opposing hitters to a

If a player is a hard throwing, left-handed pitcher, there will most likely always be a roster spot in an MLB organization. At least, that is the hope of former Ball State relief pitcher Bautista. After a subpar junior season as a starting pitcher, where he held an earned run average over nine, Maloney moved Bautista to the bullpen in hopes that a change would prove beneficial. It did, as Bautista responded to the move by posting a 3.55 ERA, while allowing 21 hits in 25.1 innings pitched. The senior also recorded 25 strikeouts to go along with 17 walks and 10 earned runs. His .233 batting average against was the lowest on the team with a minimum of 14 appearances. Bautista has worked out for the New York Mets and the Washington Nationals.

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Get connected with campus Today’s Birthday (06/05/14). Discipline with healthy routines pays off this year. Your fitness, career and leadership advance, and finances boom into July, when buzz travels farther and success comes through communications. Authorize agreements and collaborations. Increase your involvement with passionate causes. Pull strings and call in favors to make greater impact, especially after October’s eclipses. Your love is powerful medicine. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is an 8. A balanced checkbook is only part of the story. Provide well for family. Love grows by leaps and bounds. Express it without words. Let your imagination run wild. When choosing, pick the practical option.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 6. Get a referral or expert opinion. A lucky break seems possible. Major obstacles are past. Teach what you want to learn better. Leave your money in the bank, and get your team involved.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 7. You’re looking especially great now. Don’t brag about it, just enjoy. Pay attention to what someone else needs. Creative design makes a job go faster. A difficult situation is making you stronger.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7. Pick up the pace, and toss the ball to a teammate. Send in the big guys. Use clear persuasion. Research what you need. Organize your schedule prioritizing peaceful time. Trust your own good sense.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today is a 7. A windfall drops unexpected largess into your lap. Consider options for best management. Decrease your obligations, one by one. Intention works better than arguments. Do the homework, and impress. Get your plan together.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 6. Increase meditation, in a quiet space. Your team pulls through with what’s needed. Let the experts handle it. Send out the news. Clear clutter. You can’t do it all... go slow to avoid breakage.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Today is an 8. Arrange connections ahead of time. Visit a museum or beautiful place. Let others know what you need, and pursue it with discipline. A female smoothes and soothes. Accept a generous offer of support.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7. As you practice, keep streamlining the routine for efficiency. You’re achieving mastery. Keep saving resources. Hide treasures and antiques carefully, and do what you promised, for better or worse. Problems sort themselves out. Patience.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 7. Invest in work you love. Relax and enjoy it. Creative jobs pay well. Ask for more. You can do this. Keep it practical, and get farther than expected. Dine with someone interesting. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 7. A dream assignment develops. Follow a profitable hunch, and use your secret weapon. Avoid stepping on toes. You’re gaining respect. Postpone travel, purchases and obligations, unless your team can handle the logistics. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is an 8. It’s a very interesting, even beautiful moment. Travel with a companion can be nice. Keep the faith. Adjust to changes. Your crew pulls through. Validate and motivate them. Analyze the basic structure. Lead by example. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is an 8. Work faster, and make more money. Curtail travel or new obligations. Your love’s empowered, sweet as honey. Friends keep you inspired. Straight, compassionate talk serves everyone. Accept someone else’s idea and assistance.

(c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchyTribune Information Services.

B A L L S T A T E D A I L Y . C O M


PAGE 6 | THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

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MEDIA WORKSHOP for EDUCATORS

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Saturday, June 21 Course Offerings Going Online: Advanced WordPress Interactivity Journalism Curriculum Development Adobe InDesign: Trends & Techniques Photojournalism: Trends & Techniques Journalistic Writing

DN 6-5-14  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News for Thursday, June 5, 2014.

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