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DN eddie MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014

THE DAILY NEWS

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

izzard

a force majeure

Comedian breaks barriers with multilingual tour, universal humor ASHLEY DYE AND EVIE LICHTENWALTER

‘FORCE MAJEURE’ INDIANAPOLIS WHERE

Old National Centre at 502 N. New Jersey St. WHEN

8 p.m. Wednesday COST

$52 to $71.50 after fees

Follow the link to buy tickets, bit.ly/1hNy09t

Eddie Izzard, who stops in Indianapolis this week with his “Force Majeure” tour, is anything but conventional. “I am starting with human sacrifice and asking the question, ‘Why the hell did we ever do that?’” Izzard said. “Why would gods want us to take one of these human units and say, ‘We’ve destroyed one of the things you’ve built.’ How did anyone ever sell that?” The global tour started in March 2013 and is taking the surrealist comedian to 25 countries on five continents, making it the most extensive comedy tour ever, according to a press release. Izzard, 52, combines a mixture of ambition, performing in English, French and German, and a bit of noise for “Force Majeure” — a French phrase that means a greater force. “I’m constantly looking for ways to make it fun, different, and this is a very positive way of doing it,” Izzard said. “The number of countries is a good reach.”

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features@bsudailynews.com

He said his audience tends to be students or former students, people who are open minded and progressive. “It tends to be switched on to open minded ... ‘cool in their head’ people,” he said. “... People who have cool minds and are thinking positively and openly and ‘where can we go in the future.’” His own plans after Wednesday’s performance at the Old National Centre include hopping on a plane to France.

Q&A WITH EDDIE IZZARD Read more about the comedian’s life on his vast, global tour + PAGE 4

NORMANDY

Izzard will take a break from the U.S. leg of the tour to fly more than 4,000 miles to Normandy for the 70th anniversary of DDay on Friday. That night, he will perform three back-toback, hour-long shows in German, English and French, speaking in the languages of the thousands who died on that day.

See IZZARD, page 4

PHOTO PROVIDED BY AMANDA SEARLE

Ball State opens orchids’ ‘better home’ HOLDING PERIOD $1.35M greenhouse BRINGS ‘SUCCESS’ to display collection, FOR EVALUATIONS takes name of alumni

Policy sees more course form responses by pushing back release date of grades HOVORKA CHIEF REPORTER COURSE EVALUATION | ALAN afhovorka@bsu.edu

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ALAN HOVORKA CHIEF REPORTER afhovorka@bsu.edu

The visitors paced themselves through Ball State’s new greenhouse Saturday, examining the vibrant variety of orchids. However, some people took the time to congratulate an emotional Cheryl LeBlanc, the greenhouse’s curator. “I’m just proud to have [the orchids] in a better home,” LeBlanc said. “It’s been such an amazing turnout.” Alex Salmins, an alumnus and a former three-year greenhouse employee, stepped away from the tour to give LeBlanc a quick hug. He came from Indianapolis for the opening. “My favorite part of my job was spending time with Cheryl,” he said. “I liked hearing her passion. [The greenhouse] is something special.” LeBlanc has worked since March, when the greenhouse was handed over to Ball State, to have the facility ready for its opening. More than 300 people volunteered to help her.

Completion rate of course evaluation forms has ranged in the 60 percent area since Ball State started its grade holding policy two years ago. Form response rate for the entire university was 63 percent and 64 percent for this past Fall and Spring Semesters, respectively. The forms are used to evaluate the quality of a course and how successful the faculty member was at communicating the material, goals and expectations. Students can suggest improvements, as well. Classes evaluated must have four or more enrolled students. The process involves a set of university core questions and can include additional ones if the instructor, department or college chooses. The average score of the core questions is 4.2 for the university on a fivepoint scale. However, these numbers may vary from department to department and from college to college. In 2012, the university created its grade holding policy, which adds a holding period on student grades for a few days. Response rate was 48.25 percent that spring before the policy took place. Once it did, the rate rose to 69.7 percent in fall 2012. Evaluations are handed out before the end of a semester and the submission period ends before final grades are

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

President Jo Ann Gora, alumnus Joe Rinard, his daughters and others prepare to cut the ribbon Saturday at the new Dr. Joe and Alice Rinard Orchid Greenhouse. The greenhouse will house the Wheeler-Thanhauser Collection, the largest collegiate collection of orchids.

After 20 years of working with the collection, she will now work full time in the greenhouse. The new $1.35 million Dr. Joe and Alice Orchid Greenhouse in Christy Woods will replace the old one as home to the Wheeler-Thanhauser Collection, the country’s largest collegiate collection of orchids. The new facility was dedicated to the Rinards. Alice Rinard

INDY CIVIC HACK DAY

was a Ball State alumna who received her master’s in speech and audiology in 1963 and had a love of flowers. She died from metastatic breast cancer in 2010. Joe Rinard is a Ball State alumnus and a retired dentist. “Ball State called me up and told me the story and what they wanted to do,” he said. “And I said, ‘Why not?’” The 3,600-square-foot facil-

ity will house the entire orchid collection of about 1,800 by the end of the summer. Some orchids in the collection are endangered or from tropical regions. There are approximately 25,000 to 30,000 species of orchids. Indiana is home to 43 native species of orchids — Hawaii is home to three.

See ORCHID, page 6

NBA

PACERS CAN’T BEAT HEAT

Tech people use open date to solve city’s problems

A columnist reflects on a promising season that self-imploded

SEE PAGE 3

SEE PAGE 5

MUNCIE, INDIANA 1. CLOUDY

ORIENTATION BEGINS TODAY. WELCOME TO BALL STATE.

CONTACT US

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter. 6. RAIN

7. PERIODS OF RAIN

3. PARTLY CLOUDY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

FORECAST TODAY Mostly cloudy High: 81 Low: 68

9. SCATTERED SHOWERS

RESPONSE RATE

The university implemented a grade holding policy for all semesters after spring 2012. Since then, students have filled out more of the forms to avoid waiting longer for their grades. Completed Offered Fall 2011 62.42 percent completed

Spring 2012 48.59 percent completed

Fall 2012 69.70 percent completed

Spring 2013 58.77 percent completed

Fall 2013 64 percent completed

Spring 2014 63 percent completed SOURCE: James Jones, director of the Office of Research and Academic Effectiveness DN GRAPHIC

posted. Faculty members do not receive their evaluations until the final grades are posted. The grade holding policy doesn’t make James Jones, director of the Office of Research and Academic Effectiveness, concerned about the quality of the responses. “I made a comparison [of the data] with the grade holds and without,” he said. “They were virtually identical.” THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

See EVALUATIONS, page 3 THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

VOL. 93, ISSUE 125

5. SUNNY

Scattered thunderstorms are possible every day this week. Strong to severe storms may be possible Wednesday. -- Michael Behrens, WCRD chief weather forecaster 10. DRIZZLE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

5 THINGS TO KNOW

1.

U.S. DEFENDS SWAP OF TALIBAN CAPTIVES, PROMPTING DEBATE

TODAY WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration will unveil today a plan to cut earth-warming pollution from power plants by 30 percent by 2020, setting in motion one of the most significant actions to address global warming in U.S. history. The rule, which is expected to be final next year, will set the first-ever national limits on carbon dioxide, the chief gas linked to global warming from the nation’s power plants. They are the

largest source of greenhouse gases in the U.S., accounting for about a third of the annual emissions, and make the U.S. the second largest contributor to global warming on the planet. The regulation is a centerpiece of President Barack Obama’s plans to reduce the pollution linked to global warming, a step that the administration hopes will get other countries to act when negotiations on a new international treaty resume next year.

4. GAY MARRIAGE TAKES EFFECT IN ILLINOIS

MCT PHOTO

Camp 5 at Guantanamo Bay

CHICAGO (AP) — Gay and lesbian couples across Illinois can be legally wed as the Midwestern state becomes the latest in the U.S. to allow same-sex marriage. Sunday marked the first day all of Illinois’ 102 counties can issue the licenses to same-sex couples. It’s also the first day couples statewide who have civil unions can ask to convert those to a marriage. The celebration is anticlimactic

for some because 16 counties had started issuing marriage licenses following a February federal court ruling. Gov. Pat Quinn signed the law in November. Equality Illinois, a gay-rights advocacy group, estimates about 1,300 same-sex licenses have been issued since then. Bernard Cherkasov is the group’s CEO. He called Sunday “a historymaking day in Illinois.”

2. SUSPECT IN JEWISH KILLINGS WENT TO SYRIA

5. DUNKIN’ DONUTS PATRON SOUNDS ALARM

PARIS (AP) — A suspected French jihadist who spent time in Syria has been arrested over the shooting deaths of three people at a Belgian Jewish museum, prosecutors said Sunday, crystalizing fears that European radicals will parlay their experiences in Syria into terrorism at home. When Mehdi Nemmouche was arrested in southern France on Friday, he was in possession of firearms, a large quantity of ammunition and a video claiming responsibility for the May 24

CARLE PLACE, N.Y. (AP) — A Dunkin’ Donuts customer looking for a morning cup of coffee was in the right place at the right time with the right equipment. Authorities said an ambulance technician wearing a personal carbon monoxide detector entered the store in Carle Place, N.Y., at around 4 a.m. Friday. The tech’s detector went off once they were in the building, indicating

EDITORIAL BOARD

attack at the Jewish Museum in Brussels, a Belgian prosecutor said. In a one-minute rampage that deeply shook Europe’s Jewish community, a gunman opened fire at the Brussels museum. In addition to the fatalities, another person was gravely wounded. Authorities raised anti-terror alert levels as they searched for the attacker. But it was ultimately a customs inspection in the French port city of Marseille that turned up Nemmouche.

NEWS EDITOR, COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye

POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

TUESDAY Scattered thunderstorms High: 83 Low: 70 21 - SCATTERED T-STORMS

3. OBAMA TO UNVEIL GLOBAL WARMING PLAN

WASHINGTON (AP) — Five years a captive from the Afghanistan war, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is back in American hands, freed for five Guantanamo terrorism detainees in a swap stirring sharp debate in Washington over whether the U.S. should have negotiated with the Taliban over prisoners. U.S. officials said that Bergdahl’s health and safety appeared in jeopardy, prompting rapid action to secure his release. Republicans said the deal could place U.S. troops in danger, especially if the freed detainees return to the fight — one called it “shocking.” Sen. John McCain said of the five detainees, “These are the hardest of the hard core.” Gen. Joseph Dunford spoke of the excitement that spread through U.S. ranks when the sergeant’s release was confirmed. “You almost got choked up,” he said. “It was pretty extraordinary.” Tireless campaigners for their son’s freedom, Bob and Jani Bergdahl thanked all who were behind the effort to retrieve him.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Matt McKinney

THE FORECAST

FEATURES EDITOR Evie Lichtenwalter

SPORTS EDITOR Anthony Lombardi

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty

high levels of the poisonous gas. The technician hustled the employees out of the fast-food joint and notified authorities. The fire department confirmed high levels of carbon monoxide. An investigation found a vent in one of the ovens was the problem. No injuries were reported. Carbon monoxide is odorless and colorless and prolonged exposure can be fatal.

DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein

WEDNESDAY Scattered thunderstorms High: 81 Low: 67 21 - SCATTERED T-STORMS

THURSDAY Scattered thunderstorms High: 77 Low: 64 21 - SCATTERED T-STORMS

FRIDAY Scattered thunderstorms High: 77 Low: 60 21 - SCATTERED T-STORMS

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by AJ 278 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

ballstatedaily.com

Get connected with campus 24/7 Crossword ACROSS 1 A rather long time 5 Be of use to 10 Greenside golf shot 14 Kauai cookout 15 Alabama civil rights city 16 Titled nobleman 17 Baby book milestones 19 Baghdad’s country 20 Even if, briefly 21 Prepares, as a violin bow 23 Backup player’s backup 27 Dusk-dawn link 28 Steeped brew 29 Low mil. rank 31 Commotions 35 Actor Kilmer 37 Road Runner chaser __ Coyote 39 Hershey’s chocolateand-peanut-butter products 43 Prepare beans, Mexican-style 44 Square dance lass 45 Island in a computer game 46 NHL tiebreakers 47 Zadora of “Hairspray” 50 “Wait a __!” 52 Bliss 58 Fill with bubbles

EDITED BY RICH NORRIS AND JOYCE LEWIS

59 Purple flower 61 Cold War country: Abbr. 63 Penultimate bowling game division 66 Hired hood 67 Baseball bobble 68 Sport __: family cars 69 Sharpen 70 Steed stoppers 71 Spanish muralist José María DOWN 1 __ Romeo: Italian sports car 2 Feeling of remorse 3 Target in alien-attack films 4 Japanese fish dish 5 Long-eared beast 6 Doggie doc 7 On the ball 8 Non-domestic beer, e.g. 9 Film collie 10 Hang on (to) 11 Boisterous behavior 12 Savings option, briefly 13 ASAP kin 18 Lawsuit basis 22 Amazed 24 Distinguished soprano, say 25 Pole or Croat

Sudoku CROSSWORD SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY

26 Campground users, briefly 30 Driver’s license prerequisite 31 Frizzy do 32 Loses on purpose? 33 Summer, at ski resorts 34 Orchestra sect. 36 Chair support 38 Tech co. known as Big Blue 40 All keyed up 41 Poet Ogden 42 Peter Fonda title role 48 More absurd 49 Clothes 51 Young cow 53 Sci-fi pioneer Jules 54 Artist Rousseau 55 Computer invader 56 Tickle pink 57 Snitch, when identifying the bad guys 60 “__ la vie!” 61 “That smells disgusting!” 62 Jack of “Barney Miller” 64 Freight measure 65 Baseball roundtrippers: Abbr.

LEVEL: EASY | BY MICHAEL MEPHAM

SUDOKU SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY


MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

Event asks for help from hackers Indy Civic Hack Day creates solutions for city problems

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CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS CHIEF REPORTER castephens@bsu.edu

Some of the state’s greatest tech thinkers met in Indianapolis to create programs and applications looking to combat some of the city’s largest problems. Indy Civic Hack Day pitted several groups of computersavvy teams against each other Saturday to solve problems, including reducing calls to the Mayor’s Action Center about trash information and creating maps to predict and stop traffic accidents. The event was part of the National Day of Civic Hacking, which aims to help communities across the country offer more access to data and to solve problems. Andrew Baumann, a Ball State senior computer science major, was at the event

to help create a map of Indianapolis road conditions and accidents to help predict problem areas. Baumann was working with his team of Indy Xterns, Indianapolis-area tech interns who live together on IUPUI’s campus, working and learning from each other to create the next must-have app. He said the experience of living with several tech-minded individuals offered a chance to create new products and ideas. Learning outside of the classroom is the only way to learn what the real world will be like after graduation, Baumann said. “Classrooms are great, but you learn everything on the job,” he said. “The only way to learn and work on projects that matter are on internships.” Also at the event was Steve Hodges, director of product development at MOBI Wireless Management. His team wanted to create a system to help Hoosiers get information

about trash and recycling. He said they were using their Saturday to try to make the Indianapolis mayor’s job just a little bit easier and also to try to save taxpayer’s money. “A lot of us just want to give back,” he said. Teams accessed city data to make their projects through an open data portal created by Socrata, a Seattle-based company that works with governments to pool information into one easy-to-access place. Jesse Romine, a regional director for Socrata, said competitions like Indy Civic Hack Day offer a place for collaboration between companies to create something for the greater good of Indianapolis. “These types of [collaborative events] can create innovations that don’t even exist today,” he said. Indianapolis’ tech industry is growing. The city was ranked by Forbes in late 2013 as one of the top 10 metros in the country for creating tech jobs. Baumann said the number of jobs and relative lack of

‘Brady Bunch’ star dies in Texas at 88

Ann B. Davis saw fame for portrayal of housekeeper Alice | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Emmy-winning actress Ann B. Davis, who became the country’s favorite and most famous housekeeper as the devoted Alice Nelson of “The Brady Bunch,” died Sunday at a San Antonio hospital. She was 88. Bexar County, Texas, medical examiner’s investigator Sara Horne said Davis died Sunday morning at University Hospital. Bill Frey, a retired bishop and a longtime friend of Davis, said she suffered a fall Saturday at her San Antonio home and never recovered. Frey said Davis had lived with him and his wife, Barbara, since 1976. More than a decade before scoring as the Bradys’ loyal Alice, Davis was the razor-tongued secretary on another stalwart TV sitcom, “The Bob Cummings Show,” which brought her two Emmys. Over the years, she also appeared on Broadway and in occasional movies. Davis considered her ordinary look an asset. “I know at least a couple hundred glamour gals who are starving in this town,” she told

the Los Angeles Times in 1955, the year the Cummings show began its four-year run. “I’d rather be myself and eating.” She said she told NBC photographers not to retouch their pictures of her, but they ignored her request and “gave me eyebrows.” As “The Brady Bunch” theme song reminded viewers each week, the Bradys combined two families into one. Florence Henderson played a widow raising three daughters when she met Robert Reed, a widower with three boys. In her blue and white maid’s uniform, Davis’ character, Alice MCT PHOTO Nelson, was constantly clean- Actress Ann B. Davis, who played Alice ing up messes large and small, Nelson on the “Brady Bunch,” has died. and she was a mainstay of sta- She was 88. bility for the family. “I think I’m lovable. That’s the Davis in 1926, in Schenectady, gift God gave me,” Davis told N.Y., and grew up in PennsylvaThe Associated Press in a 1993 nia. She said she used her midinterview. “I don’t do anything dle initial because “just plain to be lovable. I have no control.” Ann Davis goes by pretty fast.” She was stage-struck since 6 Davis’ face occupied the cenwhen she and her twin sister, ter square during the show’s Harriet, earned $2 with their opening credits. Her love interest was Sam the Butcher, puppet show. She attended the University of Michigan, joking played by Allan Melvin. “I’m shocked and saddened! that she was a premed student I’ve lost a wonderful friend and “until I discovered chemistry.” She graduated in 1948 with a colleague,” Henderson said. “The Brady Bunch” had a degree in theater. She told the successful run until 1974 and AP in 1993 that she got her big break while doing a cabaret has lived on in reruns. She was born Ann Bradford act, singing and telling jokes.

EVALUATIONS: Faculty look at forms to find trends, add to overall annual reports

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 There would be cause to worry if the policy required students to fill out evaluations to get their grades, Jones said. “You’d probably have more people being angry when they fill out the evaluation,” he said. “Now, they are just angry and [don’t] have to fill out an evaluation.” The university did try a positive incentive for the Fall Semester in 2011. Students who completed their evaluations were entered to win one of six iPad 2s. Response rate for that semester was 62.4 percent. “It was a last-minute experiment from the administration — evaluations had already been open for some time then,” Jones said. “[It was a] one time kind of thing.” He said the grade holding policy has been largely successful. “Without the grade hold, we were in the low,” Jones said. “Now we are in more of the 60s. [The response rate] roughly increased 10 points.” Greg Nelson, a senior sports administration major, said he began doing all of his evaluations when the grade holding policy took place. Prior to the policy, he filled them out only when he had a good class or instructor. The holds haven’t changed his approach to answering.

“Besides the fact that I do them all, I still do them honestly,” he said. Aside from evaluating instructors, another way the forms could be used is to evaluate the effectiveness of a program, said John Jacobson, dean of the Teachers College. “You aggregate those evaluations and then could see how the ratings and how well the faculty have delivered that program,” he said. For department heads and deans, they can’t rely on one testing method to evaluate faculty performance for salary changes, tenure, contract renewal or continued teaching of a course, said Jacobson and Michel Mounayar, associate dean for the College of Architecture and Planning. Once a year, faculty have to file an annual report to their chairperson or dean. The report includes the course evaluations along with peer evaluations and other components. Jacobson said the Teachers College tries to keep a fair balance and not favor one particular measuring method for determining a faculty member’s effectiveness. He said there are some departments that favor course evaluations more than others. However, Jacobson has taught at three other universities and said he favors Ball

State’s method the most for its multifaceted approach. He said other universities will get private companies to conduct evaluations, which helps compare universities to one another. “It’s something Ball State shouldn’t do,” he said. “What we have works.” Kirsten Duff, a sophomore nursing major, fills out her evaluations to get her grades on time. “They are repetitive and some are long,” she said. “I don’t know how much a professor will gain by me filling it out. It’s not in-depth.” Faculty look for trends in course evaluations and then through the comments to find outliers and a consistency of response, said Mounayar and Elizabeth Riddle, chairperson for the English department. “What you want to do, as a faculty member, is look at patterns [in the data] for what went well in methods and administration,” Mounayar said. For Riddle’s department, they look at every evaluation. “We look at every evaluation, we’ve always done this for the past 30 years I have been here,” she said. “Also, it’s not all black and white. You need to look at the context [of the evaluations]. They’re helpful, and we take them seriously.”

INDY CIVIC HACK DAY At the event Saturday, people were asked to solve problems by accessing an open portal of Indianapolis data. The local event was part of the National Day of Civic Hacking. LOCAL CHALLENGES

• Help the Indianapolis Mayor’s Action Center reduce the number of incoming calls from citizens requesting trash-related information. • Help create new visualizations and heat maps, using accident and Indiana State Police open data. • Help create new visualization/app for a variety of local data sets. capable people to fill those positions means anyone with the drive to learn has a chance at getting a good paying job in technology. “I can get any job I want,” he said. “Options are almost limitless if you are passionate about [technology].”

DN PHOTO CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS

Andrew Baumann, a senior computer science major, works with his Indy Xterns team to create a map of traffic accidents Saturday at Indy Civic Hack Day.

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PAGE 4 | MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

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IZZARD:

COMEDIAN TALKS ABOUT GOD, DARTH VADER, HUMAN SACRIFICE, DINOSAURS, SQUIRRELS WITH GUNS | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 All of the money earned from the Normandy shows will benefit charities, including the German charity Stolpersteine, an art installation by Gunter Demnig. The German artist memorializes Holocaust victims by placing their names on brass plaques. These plaques sit at more than 610 addresses from where Nazis took their victims in Germany, Austria, Hungary, the Netherlands, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Norway and Ukraine, according to the project’s website. Izzard said he has noticed that since 1945, Germany has worked to erase intolerance and create a positive image. “Anyone under the age of 85 cannot be at all blamed for any [Nazi activity],” Izzard said. “You’ve got to be 85 or over to be someone who was really involved and say, ‘Yes, Come on. Hitler really is doing a great job.’ Anyone else is too young. It’s almost a completely clean slate.” As a test run for Normandy, Izzard performed the three languages in late March at a Yale University show. “It was scary,” he said. “Yale was a great test because I didn’t know if I could do it, and it worked.” Between switching from German to French and ending on English, Izzard said one aspect got stuck: his cursing. “Whenever I was [meaning to swear] in French, I swore in German,” he said. “I said ‘Scheiße — no, no, I mean

merde.’ My swearing comes from more of a gut place.” He plans to switch it up for the Normandy shows. He’ll start with German and then perform the second set in English to “reset” his mind. “With English, I’ll be happy and then I’ll get into French,” he said. “And we’ll see if I’m swearing in German or not.”

MANY LANGUAGES

Izzard’s three-language performances haven’t satisfied his thirst to do big things — his goal is to add even more languages with Spanish, Russian and Arabic. Previously in Madrid, he performed for 15 minutes in Spanish after doing the show in English. “Now that I’m getting Spanish on board as my fourth language, that means the whole of the Caribbean, Central America and South America are opening up as places to play,” he said. To make his shows work in multiple languages, he needed to create jokes based on universal humor. “I talk about God and Darth Vader and human sacrifice and dinosaurs and squirrels with guns and all this kind of very surreal stuff,” Izzard said. “... They get it around the world.” Once he put together his jokes in English, he went to his brother, Mark, for the German translation. Unlike his usual performances, Izzard had to learn the German as a script instead of just going with the flow. “That’s how I get really good,” he said. “... Line by

line by line, adding it to my memory.” Izzard also practices German in conversations to improve his ability to ad lib at the shows. And when he messes up, he said people will correct him to help him learn and perform in the conversational style he’s known for. But despite writing as much universal humor as possible, some jokes don’t exactly translate. One bit Izzard performs is about the ancient Greek and Olympic idea of a healthy mind and a healthy body. In English, Izzard speaks about how bodies are typically in good shape when they’re young. For his kicker, he jokes that “when we get to adults, our bodies become like two weasels covered in gravy, nailed to the back of a tractor.” In Berlin and Hamburg, Izzard said he received laughter for the line in the three weeks it took before he was able to say it properly in German. “I realized that the imagery was verbally funny, but not visually funny ... it doesn’t make sense,” he said. “Our bodies do not look like ‘two weasels covered in gravy, nailed to the back of a tractor.’ But there’s a certain musicality to ‘covered in gravy, nailed to the back of a tractor.’ It’s a certain rhythm.” In German, that rhythm doesn’t flow and is staccato, making it a bumpy ride for listeners. Once he realized the audience was

1987 Izzard makes his first stage performance at London’s Comedy Store after spending most of the early 1980s as a street performer.

1980s

SOURCE: eddieizzard.com, press release

laughing not at the joke but rather his attempts to say it, he came up with a different image to tell German audiences.

IZZARD

After being born in South Yemen in 1962, Izzard grew up in Northern Ireland, South Wales and Bexhill in England. He got his comedic start by street performing and first performed on stage in 1987 at London’s Comedy Store. Izzard has starred on screen in movies and in TV shows, such as NBC’s “Hannibal” and Showtime’s “United States of Tara.” He received a Tony nomination for best actor for his stage performances. His “Force Majeure” tour isn’t the first time he’s done something big, either. At the age of 47, he ran 43 marathons in 51 days in 2009, raising about $2.7 million for charity. “I did it as a bit of an adventure, as a healthy thing for myself,” he said. “And I’ve noticed all wild animals are fit, so I thought I would do this and let’s see what happens.” Heavily influenced by Monty Python, Steve Martin and Richard Pryor, Izzard’s absurdist comedy is something he hopes leaves people laughing and thinking. “I want people to be entertained and to have something to think about,” he said. “That’s my perfect landing. ... Hopefully, this is intelligent and very silly.”

EDDIE IZZARD’S CAREER

1996 Izzard has a part in “The Secret Agent,” his first United States-produced film. He also met and befriended comedian Robin Williams.

1990s

1991 He breaks into mainstream comedy after getting a spot on AIDS benefit Hysteria 3.

Q&A WITH EDDIE IZZARD Q: What is one of the biggest things that you want people to take from your show? A: I am starting with human sacrifice and asking the question, “Why the hell did we ever do that?” Why would gods want us to take one of these human units and say, “We’ve destroyed one of the things you’ve built.” How did anyone ever sell that? Because it was obviously a human who told that. It must have been a high priest who said, you know, “I think human sacrifice is the way to go, guys.” No logic. I want people to be entertained and to have something to think about. That’s my perfect landing.

Q: What is like to have tour dates back to back?

A: It sort of keeps going, and it’s a tricky thing to stay on top of things and stay relaxed. And I sort of want to have a day or two days to do absolutely nothing, but I don’t seem to get it at the moment. I have to stay healthy. If you get ill, it’s very hard to get out of illness when you’re on tour because you’re working so hard. I just have to keep drinking water, stay on top of the health, try to eat healthily, but you have to be an athlete in body and mind when you’re doing this.

Q: Could you tell us a little about your Normandy performance? A: Well, I said if we’re going to do the tour now, I’m going to have to pull out

2005 He is involved in a British government adcampaign to promote recycling.

for a couple of days to go to the 70th anniversary. ... Twenty-five million Russians died and people forget that without them, we wouldn’t have won the second World War. I thought I should go there and be a part of the commemoration.

And I thought, “Hey, I could do a gig in English and French.” Those would be languages they were fighting against, obviously, the people speaking German. And then I thought since ’45, Germany has tried to be a very positive country and I just learned to do it German, so why not do it in German, as well? It hit me. I’ll do three gigs, in three languages in three hours. ... That would be positive, and we could give the money to charity. ... The idea is for people that fought for democracy and freedom in World War II, and after World War II, which brings the Germans in, as well.

Q: What was it like performing three languages at the Yale test run?

A: It was scary. I had done French into English before, I did that up at Montréal and I’d also done it at Geneva, as well. I did English and then French … With English breaking up the German and French, it should make it a little easier, a bit like resetting your mind with English. With English, I’ll be happy and then I’ll get into French and we’ll see if I’m swearing in German or not. Yale was a great test because I didn’t know if I could do it and it worked.

2011 Izzard guest stars in season three of “United States of Tara,” starring alongside Toni Collette and John Corbett.

2000s

1999 His U.S. breakthrough occurs when his comedy special “Dress to Kill” airs on HBO. He went on to tour throughout America, the United Kingdom and France.

2010s

2009 The comedian runs 43 marathons in 51 days for a British charity, Sports Relief. He covered more than 1,100 miles.

2013 He launches his extensive comedy tour of 25 countries on five continents, known as “Force Majeure.” DN GRAPHIC

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY ANDY HOLLINGWORTH


MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

SPORTS

PACERS’ TALENT WAS THERE, BUT MATURITY WASN’T ANTHONY LOMBARDI LOMBARDI’S LOCKER ANTHONY LOMBARDI IS A SENIOR JOURNALISM MAJOR AND WRITES ‘LOMBARDI’S LOCKER’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO ANTHONY AT AJLOMBARDI @BSU.EDU.

This was supposed to be the Pacers’ year. After pushing the Miami Heat to the brink of elimination in last season’s Eastern Conference Finals, this was the year the Pacers were finally going to rise up and defeat “The Mountain” — for “Game of Thrones” fans. Paul George was ready to prove it was his time to be recognized as one of the elite talents in the NBA, and Roy Hibbert showed he could be a force in the paint against the “bigs” of Miami. The front office had addressed the lack of bench production by adding Luis Scola, C.J. Watson and Chris Copeland to the roster during the offseason and Lance Stephenson had matured from his college days at Cincinnati. Lastly, Frank Vogel had three years of coaching experience on his résumé. A 16-1 start to the season only further instilled hope in the Pacers nation that this team possessed all the tools necessary to beat LeBron James and the two-time defending champion Heat. After all, to a lifelong Pacers fan, the 2013-14 team looked eerily similar to the 2003-04 version that finished the regular season with a franchisebest mark of 61-21. Those Pacers demonstrated many of the same qualities the current team displayed through the first couple months of the season. They were a group who prided themselves on strong defense, finishing the regular season ranked third out of 29 teams in defensive rating and opponents’ points per game, and they ran their offense from the inside-out through power forward Jermaine O’Neal. In fact, if you compare the makeup of both rosters, the similarities are even more glaring. The 2003-04 team featured a starting lineup of a lackadaisical point guard in Jamaal Tinsley, the

face of the franchise on the wing in Reggie Miller, a head case in his own right in Metta World Peace, a consistent rock at power forward in O’Neal and a center in Jeff Foster, from whom you never knew what to expect. Sound familiar? Both teams’ benches also stack up comparably, with the 2003-04 team getting the slight nod. Sixth man Al Harrington and backup point guard Anthony Johnson led the “old” Pacers off the bench with a combined 19.5 points per game, while Scola and Watson combined for 14.2 points per game this season. Despite dominating during the regular season, the 2003-04 Pacers ultimately fell short of an NBA title, losing in the Eastern Conference Finals to the Detroit Pistons in six games. Again, sound familiar? Well this is, for the most part, where the similarities between the two teams end. The 2003-04 record-breaking team’s start of 14-3 was a few paces behind this year’s start, but unlike this year’s team, they played consistent basketball for the entirety of the season. Where the current Pacers went through multiple losing streaks of two or more games in the second half of the season, the 2003-04 Pacers never lost more than two games in a row the entire season. This season’s team limped into the playoffs, losing nine of its final 15 games before narrowly escaping the eighth-seeded Hawks in a sevengame, first-round series. The veterans for the 2003-04 Pacers would have never allowed the team to fall into that deep of a funk. The team entered the postseason winning 11 of its final 13 games and swept the

Boston Celtics in four games that were each decided by double digits. Even though the team eventually lost in the conference finals to the Pistons, I was not angry — they didn’t lack effort and instead lacked immaturity and downright stupidity. The same cannot be said for this year’s team. Whether it was rumors of George impregnating a Miami stripper then offering her $1 million to get an abortion, Stephenson blowing kisses in James’ ear, Hibbert and his max contract finishing playoff games with no points or rebounds or the 25-point blowout loss in an elimination game to the Heat, the current Pacers proved they were not ready to take Indiana to the promised land. There are plenty of areas for improvement this offseason. Larry Bird, team president of basketball operations, will be sure to take a hard look at all of his options. The team recently announced that Vogel will return for his fifth season as the Pacers’ coach, but the decision on whether to bring back freeagent-to-be Stephenson still looms, as does what to do with Hibbert and his lackluster play. One position I believe the team needs to address is the play at point guard. I like George Hill, and I think he can play a role on a championship team, but I don’t see it coming as a starter. Rumors have circulated for awhile that Bird likes Celtics’ point guard Rajon Rondo, and if Boston shows any willingness to trade him, the Pacers need to be all over it. Whatever happens, it is sure to be an interesting offseason for Pacers fans. As Cubs fans around the world have learned to happily say, “We’ll get ’em next year.”

Potential bribery casts Cup doubts Former FIFA member faces investigation by league officials | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS GENEVA — Organizers of the 2022 World Cup in Qatar have denied fresh allegations of wrongdoing after a British newspaper report questioned the integrity of choosing the emirate as tournament host. The Sunday Times said a “senior FIFA insider” had provided “hundreds of millions of emails, accounts and other documents” detailing payments totaling $5 million that Qatari official Mohamed bin Hammam allegedly gave football officials to build support for the bid.

Bin Hammam was a member of FIFA’s executive committee for 16 years and key power broker until being expelled in 2012 for financial corruption during his time as Asian Football Confederation president. The Qatar 2022 organizing committee’s statement Sunday stressed that Bin Hammam “played no official or unofficial role in the bid committee.” However, most FIFA executive committee voters in December 2010 were bin Hammam’s longtime colleagues. Among them, Ricardo Teixeira of Brazil, Nicolas Leoz of Paraguay and FIFA vice

president Jack Warner of Trinidad and Tobago have since resigned while under investigation for corruption. “The Qatar 2022 Bid Committee always upheld the highest standard of ethics and integrity in its successful bid,” the Qatari statement said, adding “we vehemently deny all allegations of wrongdoing. We will take whatever steps are necessary to defend the integrity of Qatar’s bid and our lawyers are looking into this matter.” The Sunday Times alleged that bin Hammam paid for cash gifts, hospitality and legal

fees for some FIFA colleagues, including Warner, and dozens of African football leaders. FIFA ethics prosecutor Michael Garcia has received the new evidence to help his investigation of the 2018 and 2022 World Cup bidding contests, the newspaper reported. Garcia was scheduled to meet with Qatari bid officials today. “We are cooperating fully with Mr. Garcia’s on-going investigation and remain totally confident that any objective enquiry will conclude we won the bid to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup fairly,” the Qatari statement said. FIFA declined comment Sunday about the reports, which revived calls for the 2022 World Cup vote to be re-run.

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Ball State fans knew Jenny Gilbert as their All-American, slugging left fielder. But now, fans of the Akron Racers will see Gilbert as a rookie trying to make her name. Gilbert was drafted 10th overall to the professional softball team and was the first outfielder taken in this year’s National Pro Fastpitch Draft. The Akron Racers are 1-1 and one tie through its first three games of the summer, all of which were against the Chicago Bandits. Gilbert is 1-8 in her first three professional at bats, with her first hit coming in the team’s most recent contest Saturday. She also scored her first run in the contest. Gilbert has already found herself hitting in the middle of the Racers’ lineup, and if her college career is any indication of what she is capable of, she could be there to stay. – STAFF REPORTS

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community: REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842 SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467 U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623 U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814 U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

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Get connected with campus Today’s Birthday (06/02/14). Stand for your deepest ideals this year in the most fun way. Discipline with health practices reaps extra rewards. Expansion occurs with finances (until July 20), and then shifts to advance your career through communications. Social gatherings benefit you professionally. Launch a passionate venture after October eclipses (10/8, 10/23). Patiently nurture a dream. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 7. Harmony requires concentration. Don’t present your project until it’s ready. Others give you a boost. Confess your worries, and work things out. It’s easier than you think. Get organized to advance a level.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is an 8. Wait to see what develops. Keep it practical, or there’s trouble. Avoid stepping on anyone’s toes. Prioritize tasks and synchronize schedules. Friends help you advance. You’re gaining points with someone you admire.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is an 8. Research could interfere with your socializing. “All things in moderation,” serves today. Guard against overspending or overeating. Upgrade your image with accessories or a new haircut. Do your homework first so you can play.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is an 8. Use good judgment regarding a controversy. Keep your social schedule, to positively impact your income. You’re spurred to take action on a project. Dig in the garden for a fat harvest. Get physical.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7. Avoid risky business. Keep your credit cards locked away. New career opportunities surface. Work the numbers, before choosing. Get farther with a partner. Your past deeds speak well for you. Invest in fundamentals.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 6. Get comfortable, without frills or great expense. Consider possible career investments. Review the material, and choose the way to play it. Confirm your intentions. Loved ones support you all the way. Celebrate together.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today is a 7. Don’t gamble with the rent. Draw upon hidden resources for the effect you’re after. Move quickly to maintain your advantage. Insist on quality ingredients. Visualize getting what you want. Spend time outdoors.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8. Collaborate on a creative project. Discover new tricks and practice them. Carefully select what to spend on. Track your budget, and find the perfect compromise. Make beautiful music together with someone you admire.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 7. In a stalemate, don’t ask for favors. There may be a temporary clash between love and money. Apply finishing touches to creative work and beat a deadline. Tap into a secret energy source.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Today is a 7. Costs may be higher than expected. Postpone a celebration. Humility is a virtue. Go over the details carefully, and acknowledge everyone who contributes. You’re creative and efficient. A status rise is possible.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7. You receive the final figures. Patience wins today. Don’t spend if you don’t need to. Encourage another’s enthusiasm, and compromise on who does what. You can complete a project. Keep a low profile.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is an 8. Balance work assignments. Every little bit counts. Show appreciation to someone who helped out. Put in some overtime, and repay a favor. Completion leads to new status. Good planning increases your holdings.

(c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchyTribune Information Services.

B A L L S T A T E D A I L Y . C O M


PAGE 6 | MONDAY JUNE 2, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

NEWS

YOU’LL LIKE THE WAY YOU WORK.

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

The Dr. Joe and Alice Orchid Greenhouse opened Saturday and has a greenhouse, a display room and a cold house. The building will house the largest collegiate collection of orchids, the Wheeler-Thanhauser Collection.

Many of the bloomed flowers on display for the opening ceremony were on loan from places around Indiana. Only a third of the Wheeler-Thanhauser Collection was on display. The new greenhouse is phase one of the entire project. Phase two will include a teaching collection, a classroom and space for research. Currently, the old greenhouse will be used for this purpose until phase two has the funding. In 1971, the university founded the collection, housed in the old orchid greenhouse. A project to create a new one began in the 1980s, but it was shelved. When President Jo Ann Gora was applying for the job as university president, she said she picked up a book on Indiana. The only thing mentioned about East Central Indiana was the orchid collection. “When I came here, I saw there was so much more and I resolved to change that,” she said. “Wheeler was poorly constructed and that needed to change.”

LeBlanc said one of the big problems with the old greenhouse was the climate control wasn’t reliable, and it could hurt the plants. The new space will allow for enhanced education on ecology and the environment because it is a “living botanical laboratory,” said Michael Maggiotto, dean of the College of Sciences and Humanities. “The new greenhouse will allow us teach about how a species adapted so well to ecological diversity,” Maggiotto said. However, the educational value is varied. The new greenhouse will double as a display for the art of students and community members. “Expect creative students, such as writers and artists, to come here in greater numbers now with this new space,” Maggiotto said. Already at its opening, art students and community members have contributed a variety of pieces. A tree made out of cork acts as a planter and hanging from the ceiling are tapestries with painted

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| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

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ORCHID: Greenhouse to double as display for art, enhanced space for education

UNIFIED MEDIA DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

President Jo Ann Gora speaks Saturday at the opening of the Dr. Joe and Alice Rinard Orchid Greenhouse. The project cost $1.35 million.

We guarantee it. Dimensions | W: 223.335 px H: 226.22 px

exotic and tropical butterflies and a large metal cicada. On Saturday, LeBlanc pointed to a vanilla orchid. “We will be able to teach where our food comes from,” she said. LeBlanc held up a jar of vanilla orchid roots, which provides vanilla extract. “It’s more than a place for pretty flowers,” she said.

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