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DN TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014

THE DAILY NEWS

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

MOVE YOUR CAR

YOUTH BRINGS RUNS

SEE THURSDAY’S COPY OF THE DAILY NEWS FOR A MAP OF THE CARNIVAL

Late Nite Carnival will take over C1 tonight until Sunday

WHAT Cars parked in commuter lot C1 and the Duck Pond lot must be moved

WHEN Move by 9 tonight, lasting until Sunday

WHERE TO PARK

NUMBER OF PARKING SPACES AFFECTED

WHY The yearly Late Nite Carnival will light up the area Friday

North of Worthen Arena and south of the L.A. Pittenger Student Center or the top floors of the McKinley Avenue and Student Center Parking Garages

Offense powered with freshmen reduces impact of lost leadership

679

OR ELSE

spaces

Cars left will be ticketed and could be towed

SEE PAGE 6

RECEIVERS RETURNING

JORDAN WILLIAMS KEVON MABON

72 7

Catches

Catches

1, 050 93 Yards

Yards

10 0

Touchdowns

« The torch has been passed down

DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

A Muncie Sanitary District truck drives through flooding on North Ball Avenue to unclog the sewer drains and reduce flooding. Gaps in insurance coverage can keep students from getting reimbursed for flood damage.

to Jordan. Now it’s his job to pass it down to the KeVonn [Mabons] and these other guys so they can learn how to work. »

Flooding damage may cost students

KEITH GAITHER, wide receivers coach

BECOMING ‘THE GUY’

Homeowner’s, renters insurance do not always cover disasters |

RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER rmpodnar@bsu.edu

A couple inches of rain last week called attention to gaps in insurance coverage when property was damaged from flooding. Junior marketing major Kirsten Mesch and junior telecommunications major Jack Smith experienced a COVERAGE OF close call Thursday INSURANCE when their North Ball Avenue house FOR STUDENTS flooded. • Personal possessions Smith said drains • Liability for bodily injury were clogged in • Additional living expenses front of his house, causing water to SOURCE: bsu.edu drain into their basement. It rose from an inch to between two and three feet. “The flood was absolutely ridiculous,” he said. “I got home that morning and had to park uphill and take my shoes off just to get up to my house — it was out of control.” Smith said they cut the power to the washer and dryer, which were located in the flooded basement. Luckily, they said, only a “Scrabble” board was ruined. For previous flooding that caused more damage, their landlord reimbursed them, Mesch said. But not every renter is as lucky. Standard homeowner’s or renters insurance does not cover flood damage, according to the National Flood Insurance Program. Jon Nagy, attorney for Beasley and Gilkskin in Muncie, formerly worked for American Family Insurance and said landlords often have a policy that protects their own investment against forces like hail, fires and floods. This policy is often just for the landlords’ individual coverages and does not include tenants.

See FLOOD, page 4

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Receivers take control as opportunities arise

A

DAKOTA CRAWFORD SPORTS EDITOR

|

@DakotaCrawford_

s he took the field for Ball State’s first spring practice, Jordan Williams realized he wasn’t just another contributor. The junior, surrounded by a largely unproven group of receivers, looks to become a leader in the coming season. See FOOTBALL, page 6

Pool of student applicants biggest yet Incoming freshmen so far have highest GPA, SAT, ACT scores KAITLIN LANGE CHIEF REPORTER | kllange@bsu.edu Ball State’s pool of applicants for the 2014-15 academic year so far is not only larger than previous years, but also smarter. As of publication, 17,749 students have applied — the largest number in the university’s history, said Tom

MUNCIE, INDIANA

TODAY IS DRAW A PICTURE OF A BIRD DAY. PUT A BIRD ON IT.

Touchdowns

Taylor, vice president for Enrollment, Marketing and Communications. He said the previous record was set in 2010 with more than 17,000 when Indiana required every university to allow free applications for one week to encourage more people to apply. Taylor said most of the students who applied were just those who decided to apply to more colleges, simply because it was free. “We feel really good that we exceeded that without a ton of artificial bump of free applications,” he said. “It’s been a really positive trend in terms of applications and interest

in the institution.” Taylor said he expects about 200 more applicants before the start of the Fall Semester. Of the current applications, 66.4 percent of students are Indiana residents. So far, accepted students’ ACT and SAT scores and GPAs are higher than they were last year at this time, said Taylor. The average ACT score of students accepted is 24, one point higher than last year’s. The SAT score is 33 points higher at 1,662, and the average GPA is 3.52, 0.05 higher than last year’s numbers.

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter.

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

AVERAGE ACT SCORE

24

AVERAGE SAT SCORE

1,662

AVERAGE GPA

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

3.52

SOURCE: Tom Taylor, vice president for Enrollment, Marketing, and Communications THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

FORECAST TUESDAY Periods of rain High: 54 Low: 37 6. RAIN

! TOGA PARTY

As of publication, 17, 749 students have applied for the 2014-15 academic year. The following shows scores for students the university accepted.

See ENROLLMENT, page 4

1. CLOUDY

CONTACT US

ADMITTED STUDENTS FOR 2014-15 SO FAR

7. PERIODS OF RAIN

12. SCATTERED FLURRIES

5-8 p.m. THE RETREAT

15. HEAVY SNOW

16. SLEET

13. SNOW SHOWERS

17. FREEZING RAIN

PRIZES FOR THE BEST TOGA! FROZEN GREEK YOGURT SAMPLES 19. RAIN/SNOW MIX

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

Expect more clouds and scattered showers for today and a warm up for Thursday with a high near 68. - Michael Behrens, WCRD chief weather forecaster 9. SCATTERED SHOWERS

TONIGHT

11. SNOW FLURRIES

3. PARTLY CLOUDY

20. THUNDERSTORMS

5. SUNNY

VOL. 93, ISSUE 109

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

10. DRIZZLE

Gyros Greek Spaghetti Chicken Souvlaki Greek Beef Spirals Moussaka Spanakopita Baklava 18. WINTRY MIX

AND MUCH MORE Meal card swipe or $7.85 with meal plan $9.95 + tax without meal plan


PAGE 2 | TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY

CORRECTION

Monday’s article “Godfrey leads weekend’s offensive charge” stated the Ball State baseball team scored 63 runs over the weekend. This is incorrect; the team scored 33. The Daily News regrets this error.

NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

5 THINGS TO KNOW

1.

FORT HOOD SUSPECT REQUESTED LEAVE PRIOR TO SHOOTING

CORRECTION

In the article “Former candidate to be next year’s SGA pro tempore” in Monday’s paper, it stated Bryan Kubel was a former Empower slate candidate. This is incorrect; Kubel worked on the campaign for Cardinal Connection. The Daily News regrets this error.

TODAY

POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

WEDNESDAY Mostly sunny High: 57 Low: 31 04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

3. COST TO FACTOR IN TRACKING STANDARDS ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Tony Tyler, the director of the International Air Transport Association said Monday he wants to see a globally agreed tracking standard established by the end of this year, which also takes into consideration the cost on airlines in order to avoid another disappearance like that of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Tyler said the cost of tracking will have to be examined in any decision. “Clearly, cost is one of the issues

FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) — Army investigators on Monday released a more detailed timeline of last week’s fatal shootings at Fort Hood, describing an eight-minute rampage in which the suspect fired 35 shots over an area spanning the equivalent of two city blocks. Three people were killed and 16 others wounded in the shooting spree before the suspect, Spc. Ivan Lopez, killed himself, authorities said. During a news conference Monday, Army spokesman Chris Grey said the shootings at the Texas post followed an argument related to Lopez’s request for taking leave, but he didn’t indicate whether it was granted or describe circumstances behind the request. A spokesman for Lopez’s family said last week that Lopez was upset he was granted only a 24-hour leave to attend his mother’s funeral in November. That leave was then extended to two days.

that will have to be considered when we are looking at what to do about it,” Tyler said. He said the point of establishing a global standard for tracking is that “the traveling public has a right to expect that aircraft won’t disappear like this — can’t disappear like [the missing Malaysia flight].” Tyler said regulation must be driven by the United Nations’ International Civil Aviation Organization.

4. NO SELFIES AT WHITE HOUSE OLYMPIANS SAY

MCT PHOTO

Army Michael Clift participates in a candlelight vigil Friday for the victims of the Fort Hood shooting in Killeen, Texas.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) — A handshake? Sure. A selfie? No way. Some American Olympic athletes say they were asked to keep their cellphones pocketed last week when they visited the White House and met with President Barack Obama. The request came after the selfie Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz took with the president. Many criticized it as a marketing ploy after Samsung used the picture in an advertisement.

“I was a little bummed,” said Nick Goepper, a bronze medalist in slopestyle skiing. “I thought about trying to sneak one, but they were pretty adamant about it. I’m sure if they would’ve allowed it, there’d be 150 people with selfies with the president right now.” The White House confirmed that the athletes were asked not to take personal photos with Obama. The White House insisted there was no outright prohibition of selfies.

2. END OF WINDOWS XP SPELLS TROUBLE FOR SOME 5. ALLEGED BRAIN THIEF FACES NEW CHARGES NEW YORK (AP) — Microsoft will end support for the persistently popular Windows XP today, and the move could put everything from the operations of heavy industry to the identities of everyday people in danger of hacking. An estimated 30 percent of computers being used by businesses and consumers around the world are still running the 12-year-old operating system. “What once was considered lowhanging fruit by hackers now has a big

THE FORECAST

neon bull’s eye on it,” said Patrick Thomas, a security consultant at Neohapsis’s firm based in San Jose, Calif. Microsoft has released a handful of Windows operating systems since 2001, but XP’s popularity and the durability of the computers system was installed on kept it around longer than expected. While users can still run XP after today, Microsoft said it will no longer provide security updates, issue fixes to non-security related problems or offer online updates.

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A bloody fingerprint and stolen items sold online have led to additional charges being filed against an Indianapolis man who allegedly took human brain samples from a medical history museum, prosecutors said Monday. Two additional counts of burglary and an additional count of theft were filed against David Charles, 21. Stolen items that had been sold on eBay were recovered when the pur-

chaser became suspicious after seeing reports of similar items that were determined stolen from the Indiana Medical History Museum, the news release said. Court documents in December alleged he broke into the museum several times, stole jars of preserved brain samples and other tissue from long-dead psychiatric patients to sell online. Investigators were tipped off by a San Diego man who became suspicious about six jars of brain tissue he’d bought on eBay for $600.

THURSDAY Mostly sunny High: 68 Low: 42 04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

FRIDAY Thunderstorms High: 61 Low: 47 20 - THUNDERSTORMS

SATURDAY Mostly sunny High: 69 Low: 46 04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by AJ 278 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens ASST. NEWS EDITOR Ashley Dye

FEATURES EDITOR Bethannie Huffman 72HRS EDITOR Kourtney Cooper

SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile GRAPHICS EDITOR Stephanie Redding

DESIGN EDITORS Daniel Brount Ellen Collier

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITOR Cooper Cox

TACO TUESDAY!

24/7 Crossword

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Taylor Irby ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty

$2 OFF PULLED PORK OR BRISKET TACOS $1 CLEO’S SHOTS • $2 DOUBLE WELLS • $2 ANY PINT

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Sudoku

By Michael Mepham

Level: MEDIUM

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY

ACROSS 1 Parking lot attendant 6 False friends 11 Brillo competitor 14 St. Teresa’s home 15 Just beginning to learn 16 Demolition need 17 High-maintenance Gonzales? 19 Native Nebraskan 20 Power co. service 21 Pitcher Maglie 22 Dove call 23 Off-the-cuff stuff 26 Took a chance on 28 Cinque e uno 29 Naps, say 33 Versatile bean 34 Fond du __, Wisconsin 35 Like a blue moon, in old Rome 36 Hand-holding group dances 39 Sacred synagogue cabinets

41 Muse of poetry 43 Forum robe 44 Rahm Emanuel, vis-àvis Chicago 46 Felipe or Matty of baseball 47 Outdated PC monitor 48 Curly tormentor 49 December drop-in 51 __ to the city 52 Bee bites 55 One in the game 57 Curved part 58 Feverish 60 In need of sharpening 61 Round-bottomed cooker 62 Overeating bird tempting Sylvester? 67 Eden outcast 68 Spooky 69 “Sesame Street” roommate 70 “L.A. Law” co-star Susan

71 Sports page data 72 Sporty sunroofs

DOWN 1 Airport shuttle, often 2 Many a Monopoly prop. 3 More than a fib 4 Respected village figure 5 President after Polk 6 Like “stewardess” nowadays, briefly 7 “I __ what you did there” 8 Meadow moms 9 Storm-tracking device 10 In vogue 11 Bullwinkle pal who’s been working out? 12 En pointe, in ballet 13 Waited in line, say 18 Harsh 23 Muslim religion 24 Stiller’s partner

25 Fussy Disney mouse? 27 Smudge on 49-Across’s suit 30 Poet Teasdale et al. 31 Refrain syllables 32 Kept under wraps 37 Shake hands (on) 38 Mythical man-goat 40 “It won’t be long” 42 Yield 45 Periods of power 50 Way off base 52 Cut, as logs 53 Valuable stash 54 Driving hazard 56 Bright-eyed 59 Actress __ Flynn Boyle 60 Salon supplies 63 __ for tat 64 Record producer Brian 65 Gratuity 66 “Right!”

ballstatedaily.com

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY

TACO TUESDAY! $2 OFF PULLED PORK OR BRISKET TACOS $1 CLEO’S SHOTS • $2 DOUBLE WELLS • $2 ANY PINT


TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

B B

BALL BEARINGS | BALLBEARINGSMAG.COM | @BALLBEARINGS BALL BEARINGS PHOTO MAGGIE KENWORTHY

Students take notes in a military science class. These classes aim to give the soldiers the knowledge they need to operate in the field.

in thomas’ words

I ENDED UP HAVING TO PAY FOR THIS PAST SEMESTER AT BALL STATE WITH STUDENT LOANS AGAIN.

Alex Thomas, an Indiana National Guardsman

WHAT’S HAPPENING THE NATIONAL GUARD ALLOWS SOLDIERS TO EARN THEIR DEGREE WHILE IN SERVICE. BUT OVER THE PAST YEAR, THERE HAS BEEN AN ISSUE WITH GUARDSMEN NOT RECEIVING COVERAGE.

THE INDIANA NATIONAL GUARD • ENLIST IN THE NATIONAL GUARD • ATTEND ONE OF THE NINE STATE COLLEGES • WILL PAY UP TO 100 PERCENT OF GUARDSMEN’S TUITION COST • WILL USE NGSG AND FTA TO PAY AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE TOWARD EVERY SOLDIERS’ TUITION AND FEES FOR THE SPRING 2014 SEMESTER • ASKED THE STATE LEGISLATURE TO LOOK INTO INCREASING THE APPROPRIATION FOR THE GRANT IN THE FUTURE

ROUGHLY $3.5 MILLION AMOUNT THE INDIANA GENERAL ASSEMBLY APPROPRIATED FOR THE 2013-14 ACADEMIC YEAR

FIGHTING for

BENEFITS SURGE IN SOLDIERS CAUSES SHORTAGE IN AID FOR TUITION, FEES

F

STORY // LAUREN HUGHES, BALL BEARINGS REPORTER

rom responding to emergency situations in our cities to fighting overseas, soldiers still make time to further their college education. The National Guard helps by allowing soldiers to earn their degree while in service. The Indiana National Guard offers guardsmen up to 100 percent of their tuition cost by enlisting in the National Guard and attending one of the nine state colleges. But over the past year, there has been an issue with guardsmen not receiving coverage. Due to the substantial increase in number of soldiers attending state universities and applying for the National Guard Supplemental Grant, they ran out of money to be distributed as of December 2013. Because of this change, many student soldiers wonder how they will pay for college without the grant assisting them. Maj. Jeffrey Coomler, Education Services Officer of the Indiana Army National Guard, explained that the Indiana General Assembly appropriated roughly $3.5 million in funds for the 2013-14 academic year. Of that, it used $2.6 million in the fall, which caused the Indiana National Guard Education and Incentives Office to prioritize the use of what was left. Coomler said the biggest reason for the increase in applications for the grant is the fact that “fewer soldiers are deployed in support of the war on terror than at any other time in the

last 12 years.” But, Coomler said the Indiana National Guard still tries to find ways to help pay for schooling without going too far into debt. “National Guard soldiers have a second funding stream to pay for college called Federal Tuition Assistance,” he said. Anyone who was eligible to receive the Federal Tuition Assistance was pushed away from the NGSG. Guardsmen are required to use FTA and were notified about this option by email. The message stated there wouldn’t be enough money for student soldiers in the spring, but listed the processes they would need to complete for the Indiana National Guard to still pay for their school. Former student Alex Thomas is a soldier in the Indiana National Guard. He said when he joined, it said he would receive some benefits such as a paid college education. When he returned from basic training in Georgia, he tried to figure out what he needed to do to sign up for classes again at Ball State. The university advised him to find the paperwork on the GoArmy website to receive tuition coverage. When the government shutdown happened, it became even more difficult for Thomas to get the needed funds. “I ended up having to pay for this

past semester at Ball State with student loans again,” Thomas said. He later found out about the NGSG and applied for the upcoming Spring Semester. Unfortunately, Thomas didn’t meet the FASFA deadline, so he could not receive the grant either. He now is at Ivy Tech Community College because of the National Guard Supplemental Grant’s being taken from not having full funding to pay for Ball State tuition. “Thankfully, I still have the $2,500 from the Federal Tuition Assistance program that will cover all of my tuition and a little bit more at Ivy Tech,” Thomas said. “So I can still pursue my education.” Despite Thomas’ issues with the NGSG, he was still able to transfer to a school that was affordable enough for the FTA to cover his education. For this Spring Semester, the Indiana National Guard is using a combination of the NGSG and FTA to pay as much as possible toward every soldiers’ tuition and fees. Soldiers attending Ball State received up to $4,500 for the Spring Semester and currently are working to pay as much of the difference as they can by using the remaining NGSG fund balance. The Indiana National Guard has asked the State Legislature to look into increasing the appropriation for the grant for future years to come.

$2.6 MILLION OF THE FUNDS WERE USED IN THE FALL

ABOUT 74 PERCENT OF THE FUNDS HAVE ALREADY BEEN USED FOR THIS ACADEMIC YEAR

bALL bearings Online TO READ MORE STORIES FROM BALL BEARINGS MAGAZINE VISIT ballbearingsmag.com

BALL BEARINGS PHOTO MAGGIE KENWORTHY

Backpacks and school supplies line the gym. The students start their day with physical training.

BALL BEARINGS PHOTO MAGGIE KENWORTHY

Students learn troop positions during a class. Exercises taught in the course are designed to work the entire body.


PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

NEWS

Some professors have hourlong commute 1 instructor budgets $300 each month to get to Ball State KARA BERG STAFF REPORTER | knberg2@bsu.edu Not everyone has a five-minute walk across campus or a 10-minute drive to get to class in the morning. Some professors commute more than an hour to get to work multiple times a week. Lisa Beck, an instructor of physiology and health science, lives in Bluffton, Ind., making her commute to and from campus around 70 minutes, traveling three times a week. She said since her roots are

in Bluffton, where her family lives and her husband works, she wouldn’t want to move. Beck also graduated from Ball State and said teaching at the university is her dream job. “I love Ball State ... [and] I love teaching health — I love it,” Beck said. “I can’t even explain how much I love teaching it.” But even though driving takes up more than two hours of her day, Beck said she doesn’t mind the drive. “It’s a fun way to just relax and kind of just have some me time because as soon as I get here, I have students all day, and as soon as I get home, I have my husband and my mother-in-law [whom] we take care of,” she said. However, Beck said when the

LISA BECK,

an instructor of physiology and health science

Commute:

weather was bad, she had to permit three hours to drive to Ball State. “I was waking up at 5:30 in the morning to come here, and that was not fun,” she said. She said she spends about $16 on gas for a round trip. “I always have to balance that if I need to come down for a meeting or training,” Beck said. “I budget about $300 a month, but it stresses me when gas gets a little more expensive.” When she first started teaching here two years ago, she said she ended up having to get her oil changed every six weeks because she was driving to the university five days a week. She said she is not alone in her long commute.

Distance

• Per round trip: 91-122 miles • Per semester: 4,368-5,856 miles

• About 70-minutes Cost: • Teaches classes three times a week • Per round trip: Approximately $16 • Drives from Bluffton, Ind. • Per semester: Approximately $768

“I’d say at least half of our department [drives more than 40 minutes],” Beck said. Sam Minor, an associate professor of art, lives in Kokomo, Ind., and his one-way commute is a little more than an hour. He’s been a professor at Ball State for 24 years and moved to Kokomo six years ago because of a relationship. He said because he was thinking of retiring soon, it wouldn’t be practical to change jobs to avoid the commute. Minor also said he didn’t mind the drive. “One of the many reasons I commute is because I really do enjoy working with the students,” he said. “If it were not for the quality of students at Ball State, that drive would

be much harder.” He said on his usual morning, he gets up at 4:30 a.m. and is out the door in an hour, getting him to Ball State before 7 a.m. “I like my hour before classes, and I really enjoy that time in the morning,” Minor said. “Sometimes, the commute home is a little harder if I’m tired, but I really enjoy that time in the morning because I really like that time by myself.” Minor said he has a Prius he drives when the roads are clear, which saves him money on gas. In the winter, he has a truck with four-wheel drive. He said he has to pay $30 for gas for one round trip when he drives the truck. Dennis Hickle, an instructor

SAM MINOR,

an associate professor of art Commute: • Little more than an hour •T  eaches classes three times a week • Drives from Kokomo, Ind.

of accounting, commutes from the southeast side of Indianapolis. It takes him a little more than an hour to get to campus. “I enjoy the environment [at Ball State] and what really makes it worth the drive is the drive is fairly relaxing because I’m going away from traffic,” Hickle said. “I’ve often said if I had to make the reverse commute and travel to Indianapolis in the morning and back in the afternoon, there’s no way I would do it because there’s so much traffic and it’s so much more stressful.” He said he wouldn’t want to move closer to Muncie because that would force his wife to drive into traffic each morning and afternoon to Indianapolis.

DENNIS HICKLE,

an instructor of accounting

Commute:

• Little more than an hour •T  eaches classes three times a week • Drives from Indianapolis

PRESIDENT SEARCH TO NARROW DOWN BY END OF MONTH Committee to give 2-3 suggestions to Board of Trustees

|

EMMA KATE FITTES MANAGING EDITOR managingeditor@bsudailynews.com

Flooding on North Ball Avenue caused water to rise above the curb by approximately a foot and flood front yards Thursday.

DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

FLOOD:

University not liable for student property | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “A tenant who suffers a loss like personal property, typically that is not something that is generally covered under landlord policy,” Nagy said. He recommends students purchase renters insurance to protect their belongings and because it includes provisions of bodily injury liability, if someone were to be injured in their residence, which could get expensive otherwise. He said students can get a fair policy including decent coverage for $40 to $50 a month if they buy insurance to only cover what they actually need. He said students probably only need a policy that covers $5,000, the lowest available. For students in residence halls who may assume that their property is insured by Ball State, this isn’t necessarily true. According to the Residence Hall Policy, Ball State does not carry insurance for students or their property. However, students who rent from the university must purchase renters insurance. Still, the university would reimburse students if damage occurred due to flooding,

STUDENT RENTERS INSURANCE PERSONAL POSSESSIONS ARE PROTECTED FROM:

• Fire • Smoke • Lightning • Vandalism • Theft • Other disasters

• It started four months ago. • The names of candidates are not released because it’s a closed search. • The presidential search committee will recommend its top two or three finalists to the Board of Trustees. • So far the board has narrowed down the pool of 22 candidates to five. • President Jo Ann Gora will officially retire at the end of June 2014 after 10 years.

A presidential search committee member said the committee will likely recommend its final two candidates to replace President Jo Ann Gora during the last week of April. Wayne Estopinal, Board of Trustee member on the search committee, said they are doing background checks and calling references before setting up interviews with the five current candidates. Each interview is scheduled to last a couple hours, he said. Estopinal said the Board of Trustees will likely hold its interviews for the finalists and find a time to have the candidates on campus afterward. “Certainly, somebody that is making a very important decision in their career — like becoming the president of our university — we want them to come to campus,” he said. “... As Dr. Gora demonstrates every day, this is an all-in job. So we want them very, very comfortable with their setting. We’d also like them to meet a few of the people that they could potentially be working with.” He said the search would most likely remain confidential at that point, as long as there are multiple candidates who have concerns about having their information publicized. “I think, given the realities of today and how quickly names spread and things of that nature, I think the candidates probably, even more today than

10 years ago, appreciate that this is a closed search,” he said. Estopinal was involved in the committee that helped select Gora in 2004, the first time the university used a closed search. While the committee received negative feedback from the university 10 years ago, Estopinal said he hasn’t run into any backlash this year. Gora visited campus anonymously in 2004 before she was announced as the new president of the university. She attended a women’s basketball reception at the Alumni Center. “We acted like lost parents checking out a college campus for an aspiring college student,” Gora said to the Daily News in 2004. “And we didn’t eat any of the [banquet’s] food because we had not been invited.” Estopinal said Gora was a great outcome of a closed search. “Jo Ann has done, and continues to do, an incredible job for the university,” he said. “She hasn’t taken her foot off the gas one minute since she announced her retirement. So we can only hope that we can find someone of her dynamic personality and her commitment.”

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

2013-14 APPLICANTS

ENROLLMENT: Official says school’s image improving

SOURCE: bsu.edu

said George Edwards, associate director of Residence Hall Facilities and Housing. LaFollette Complex is currently undergoing some repairs for small leaks from the winter that were found last week. Edwards said he walks campus twice a year to specifically check that drains are open and there are no leaks in joints on the roofs. He said he hopes to find small leaks before they become larger problems. “[Walking on the roof], that’s the only way to know [if there is damage],” Edwards said.” [I use] binoculars and look up sides and on the roof. We look down to see tops of windows to see if there are any openings that need to be caulked and taken care of.” Smith said he wished he

SEARCH FOR NEW PRESIDENT

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Freshman nursing majors Shae Baugh and Katie Staton and freshman business major walk through puddles Thursday in the Quad.

knew more about his responsibility for property before the flood, even though he didn’t lose anything from the basement flood last week. “I would like to know more about how old houses are,” Smith said. “When we moved in, the house looked like every house, but there are cracks in the foundation where all the flooding went in. I know nothing about renters insurance, and I would want to know about that if I had more stuff in the basement.”

PART OF THEIR DAY Wiley Flak and Randy Wright of the Muncie Sanitary District scraped build up out of storm drains Thursday to lessen flooding. “There’s about 500 other places just like this one,” Wright said. They follow calls from residents and landlords wherever water isn’t draining properly. They get calls every two to three minutes. Their department has about 20 people, Flak said, but there are more helping out. “They tell us to work all night, we work all night,” Wright said.

– EMMA KATE FITTES

President Jo Ann Gora said the university has been raising admission standards for about the last seven years. “I believe that we will see a very academically strong class for this 2014,” Gora said in an interview with the Daily News on March 26. “The most important thing for me is to continue to raise the profile of our students because that will lead to the ever increasing strength of the university.” Taylor said more people with higher scores are becoming interested in the university because of the university’s increasingly positive image. “I think we’re on a good projector,” he said. “We continue to get a lot of positive attention. People have a great deal of respect for the kind of education we offer.” Gora said she is “delighted”

16,793

students applied at this time last year

23

average ACT score

1,629 average SAT score 3.47 average GPA

with the outlook of the future Ball State freshmen. “A university’s reputation is really based on the quality of its students, the quality of its faculty and the quality of its alumni,” she said. “When you bring in strong students and you provide them with excellent mentoring, you produce strong graduates and the institutions reputation can only advance with that kind of formula.”


TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FORUM

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| ‘EXISTENTIA ACADEMICA’

Austin Russell draws “Existentia Academica” comics for the Daily News. His views and opinions don’t necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Follow Austin’s character Sarah Jessup on Twitter @TheMuscularArms and Ellison Wright @Ellison_Wright. Write to Austin at abrussell@bsu.edu or follow him on Twitter @arussthebus.

FORUM POLICY The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor,

guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed.

The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides

this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842

U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

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Make checks payable to: The Ball State Daily News

DN Classifieds AJ 276 Muncie, IN 47306 Phone: 765.285.8247 Fax: 765.285.8248

Help Wanted

Ball State Students! Want a "Cool" Job this Summer? Apply at www.homecityice.com Home City Ice Co. in Muncie is now Hiring for Route Delivery Drivers. Weekends and Holidays in summer are a Must. Clean Driving Record a Must. 50-60 hours a week in Summer, and part time around your classes in Spring and next Fall. Pay averages between $8 and $14 per hour. This is hard work, and rewarding for those who are motivated to succeed. Apply Online Today! Construction Comp. needs Girl Friday type secretary part time flexible hours 765-747-9814 MUNCIE ELKS is currently hiring Bartenders for the summer golf season. Please apply in person at 909 N. County Road 500 W. Mon-Fri 9am-4pm Part time office work. $7.25 per hour. near BSU. 765-717-9331 Summer help All American Homes, Decatur, IN. Call 260-724-9171 for more info

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Apartments For Rent

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Apartments For Rent

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****** 4 bdrm, completely renovated apt. Avail August. Great location. 2 blks from campus. Util Paid. No pets. 896-8105 ******* 3 bdrm Apts. 2 blks from campus. Avail May or August. Economical. Util Paid. No Pets. W/D DW A/C. Off street parking. 896-8105 ******** 1,2,3,4 bdrm Apts. Best locations. Avail. May or August. From $250 each. Some or all Util. paid. Walk to class. A/C, DW, W/D 896-8105 ********* 1 bdrm apts. Avail. May or August. 3 blks from campus. A/C, DW, W/D. Off st. parking. Util paid. No pets. Great locations. 896-8105 ********** Affordable! Walk to class. Great locations on 1,2,3,4 bdrm apts. Avail. May or August. Part or all Util. paid. A/C DW W/D. Off st. parking. No pets. walktoballstate.com 896-8105 ****1, 2 & 3 BR avail. Great floor plan, central air, DW only 3 blks to campus! THE 400 APARTMENTS (765) 288-6819 www.400apartments.com

***Now leasing for the 2014/2015 !!! 1,2,3,4 br apts, 514 N Martin, school yr. 1 Bdrm apt. $460/mo + W/D, C/A, Individual/Aug leases utils, Studio apt. $410/mo + util. (765)730-2473 www.signaturet.com W/D. Bar-Tel Apartments, 1616 W. Gilbert St. Visit www.bsrentals.com !!!!! SPRING SPECIAL 50% off 1st or call Doug at 765-744-3593 month's rent. 2, 3 & 4 Bdrm apts/houses avail May or Aug. 1 & 2 bd newer units. W/D, D/W, Great locations 2 blks from campus. Micro, A/C, private, near BSU. $475 All utils pd, A/C, D/W, W/D, off st 765-717-9332 prkg. 765-896-8105 www.greatbsurentals.com

U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

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Apartments For Rent

170

1 or 2 br apts available May or August 2014-may or may not include utilities. Required application fee of $35.00 and security deposit for all application forms submitted. Showing appointments will be arraged. Contact Kerry @284-6313 or 744-2998 or email @ kwiggerly@prudentialindiana.com

Houses For Rent

!!! 3-6 Bdrm house close to campus, w/laundry rm.,deck, paved off st. prkng. $350 each includes heat, water & sewage. Aug lease. No pets. lori2260@comcast.net or 765212-8992

*Ad must be submitted to dnclassified@bsu.edu to be eligible. * The Daily News has the right to revise or reject any advertisements. * The Daily News assumes no liability for content of the advertisement.

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Houses For Rent

2 Bdrm, basement apt, W/D, $450 rent, utils included. Avail Aug. 765-748-4934 3 Bd apt, util pd, 50 inch TV, 2 ba. W/D. close to BSU. $315/person. 315 South Mckinley 744-4649

!1505 Kimberly (behind LaFollette) 4@$300; 4bds; great house/yard /loc. full bsmt W/D May 760-3002

3 Bdrm upstairs apt, $1000 rent/ month. includes util, close to campus, avail Aug. 765-748-4934

*** 2 blks to Village. 3 & 4 bdrms for Rent. A/C, W/D, No pets. Avalible August. 1. Call 286-2808

3Lg BR, 2bath- 2 blocks 2 campus August 2014 move-in. NICE! All Appliances, All electric, AC, DW, in-unit W/D, off-street parking http://www.cardinalvillas.com to see--Call or text (765)744-6323

****4 bdrm 2 bath at 825 W. Ashland W/D, C/A, all utils paid, $365/mo, No pets,Aug. lease. Call 216 N Dill st. 1 bdrm 325 + electric 2bdrm 450 + gas & elec.3bdrm 600 765-760-2202 + gas & elec. off st prkg. aug-aug ***4 bdrm, 2 Ba. 1804 W Charles 765-730-3365 close to campus nice W/D C/A prkg. 300 each + util 765-744-5008 2713 Beckett. 4 bdrm, 2 ba. 2 car gar. $295/person + utils. Aug.-Aug. or www.munciecollegerentals.com Lease. Quiet area, lots of parking ***RATCHFORD PROPERTIES*** Call 765-254-9992 • Great Apts. & Houses! 3 Bdrm, 2 Ba. W/D hookup, lg living • Best Locations for 1,2,3,4 BR space. 524 Alameda. $675 + utils on & Near Campus 765-730-3029 • Affordable Prices! • Some Utilities Paid! • Laundry Facility / NO Pets. 3 Brdm Homes from $167/month ea. Now,May,Aug. 765-744-1079 ***CALL OR TEXT 748-6407*** joecoolproperties.blogspot.com www.ratchfordproperties.com 3 or 4 bdr C/A, C/H ,W/D + Utils. 1,2,3,4 bdrms. Lease 2014-2015. Ball Ave 4 blks from Bethel Aug www.clunerentals.blogspot.com 1st. 765-289-3971 765-744-1400 or 729-9321 4 BDRM, 1 & 1/2 bths, C/A, gas 1604 W. Adams. Lg 3 bdrm. W/D heat, W/D,o ff-street parking.1608 $275 per person + util. No pets/ New York, garage, close to BSU smoking. Avail Aug. 1. Call 765-748-8425 765-284-5741 3 bdrm 2 ba, W/D, D/W 1011 N 1800 West Bethel, 3-4 bdrm. avail Wheeling Aug lease $850 May. 744-7862 729-0978

FREE INTERNET! Clean & quiet 1 bdrm apts, close to BSU. On site WS/DR,cedarsatbsu.com,286 2806 Huge 6 bdrm. 615 North Dicks. Aquatine apartments. 1 block from campus. all utilities paid. No pets. Avail May. 896-8105. Village area studio apts, & 2 bdrm apts Call Asset Management 2819000

Utilities paid. 811 W. Main. Unique mansion,1 br apt.765-744-0185 bsuoffcampus.com.

1 bdrm apt. Hardwd fls. Aug lse. Ashland Ave. Some utils pd. Walk to BSU. No Dogs. 317-727-5847

***BSU apts, close to campus, 1,2&3 bdrm,utils includ off-st prkg, Call765-228-8458 or 765-749-4688

1, 2 & 3bdr apts. Some utils pd. 1- !! 3 & 4 bds NY & Bethel from $275 4 blks from BSU. No Pets. Avil Aug each BSU alum landlord call 1st. 765-289-3971 317-507-1490 for info

170

Houses For Rent

Houses For Rent

1904 N. Maplewood. 2-3 bdrm. 4 & 5 bdrm houses, 3 blcks to stuGarage, Full basement, New Bath. dent center. W/D, plenty of parkMay or Aug lease.765-744-7862 ing. Really nice. Call 765-228-3883 www.ludwickrentals.com 2 bdrm very nice house + sunrm, bsmt, gar, W/D, C/A, near BSU, 4 bdr, Hrdw floors. W/D, off street prkg, Pet friendly, Walk dist to camAug lse. 765-215-4591 pus, $325 + util. Call Eric at 3172 bdrm, 1 ba, D/W, W/D, A/C, 825-8683 www.ballurental.com bsmt., gar., VERY CLEAN, close to 4 Brm House @1220 Neely BSU, $700/mo. (260)444-8481 @1225 Marsh st. Avail Aug 1, 2011 Washington behind Student 2014. $1200/mo + utils 765-649CEnter. 3 bdr water & sewage paid. 8377 no pets. avail Aug. 4, 5, or 6 bdrm. $300/ea. all utils inWalktoballstate.com 896-8105 clud. lrg. ba., W/D, off st prkg, 501 2105 W Parkway. 4-5 Bdrms, 3 Full N. Alameda. (765) 744-8269. Ba. Beautiful home, all new appl. newly renovated, 1 blk from BSU, 812 west North st. 2 BD, off st parking, Aug lease, $600 a month in$1,500/mo + ult. thecampusedge.com 765-286-2806 lcuding utlities. 765-744-7574

!!!5 BRw/ private swimming pool, built in fire pit, lg deck, bike racks, 2 lg Ba, off st. prkg, W/D, C/A, D/W, landlord does yard & pool maint. $1,100 a month May or Aug lease 765-405-1105, leave message.

Affordable village living University Village Apartments 1000 mo free cable reserved parking 765-729-9618 www.bsurentals.com

170

Great location, 1312 Abbott, 5 Bedroom, 2 bath, C/A, $290/per + utilities, Aug-Aug lease. Call 765-254-9992 May Lease: 1201 W University. Lg 6BD, 3 Full BA, Totally renovated. 3 LR's All new appl. $300 EA+util. thecampusedge.com 765-286-2806 May Lease: 1926 W Jackson, 4BD, 2 BA, hardwood floors, bsmt. walk to BSU, $1,500/mo. 765-286-2806 Newley renovated. 1-6 BR homes. Close to BSU. W/D, A/C, D/W. thecampusedge.com 765-286-2806 Nice 3 bdr. Close to BSU. 2 ba. Avail. Aug. A/C, stove, fridge, W/D. $395 /ea, utils incl. 765-348-6413 www.jahrentals.com, Nicest houses on campus. Many extras. Even a 6 bdrm. Also student parking available. Call 286-5216. Village area 4 bdrm house, newly remodeled 1413 W. University $1400 a month, Call Asset Management 281-9000

Visit us online Today’s birthday (4-8-14) ___ (c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchyTribune Information Services.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

This year of creative fertility begins with an Aries Mercury bang. Communications uncork your thriving. Home roots strengthen as your circle widens. Resolve past conflicts with compassion. Review structures, plans and priorities before 5/20. Make repairs, and release clutter. Summer brings a fun game. A personal revelation in autumn sparks a passion for freedom and truth. Play with artistry and finesse.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 6. You’re especially lucky in love today and tomorrow. It’s your lighthearted demeanor. Talk about what’s most important to you, and discover something new about yourself. Play with friends and family, and learn a new game. Share your appreciations with the ones who’ve earned them. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 5. Household issues demand attention today and tomorrow. Fix something that doesn’t work as you’d like. Desires align with the energy to fulfill them. Dig in the garden, and sow seeds for future beauty and sustenance. Someone’s happy to help if you ask. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today is a 6. Get into the books today and tomorrow. Study new developments, and check all angles. Compare financial notes. A new assignment’s coming. Watch out for hidden agendas or a misunderstanding. Present confidence in your communications. Talk, rather than action, gets farther. Get your data together.

Cancer (June 2-1July 22) Today is a 7. Today and tomorrow could get profitable... gentle persistence works better than force. Enlist some help with a project. Lay a new foundation. Stay out of somebody else’s argument. Your efforts could seem blocked... try a charm offense. Move slowly and prepare.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 6. Your efforts could seem stuck. Push too hard and there’s breakage. Your friends are a big help today and tomorrow; they come to the rescue. Align your new course with your core values and principles. Rely on the team to help sort it all out.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 7. Consider the consequences of actions before taking them. Use your power responsibly and with compassion. Don’t strain or push too far. Keep your goals in mind. Avoid expensive distractions and timesucks. Go for practical, achievable outcomes. Say what you want and your network provides.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 6. Work takes priority today and tomorrow, but circumstances may not follow plans. You could overstep bounds if you force the action. There’s still a way to win. Flexibility and a sense of humor advance your cause. Anticipate changes, and roll with them. Rest and relax.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 5. Stick close to home today and tomorrow, and take time for quiet contemplation. Consider a loved one’s wishes. Handle old jobs to make way for new. Let go of some distracting baggage you’ve been carrying around. Pick it up later if you want. Or not.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 6. Make time for an outing over the next few days. It’s a good time to set longterm goals. Rather than launching into action, consider different strategies and directions first. Study, research, and enjoy fascinating conversation with someone who enjoys the same subject.

www.ballstatedaily.com

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 6. For the next two days, track calls, orders, and income carefully. Review financial arrangements, keep paperwork current, and rely on your schedule and budget. Consider an investment in your own education. What would you love to learn about? Speculate, and get feedback from a partner. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 6. A new associate could become a valuable partner. Keep your promises, and plug away to get the work done. Avoid office scandals, gossip or controversy. Someone’s willing to help, so create a winwin situation. Trade, barter and negotiate for creative solutions. Collaborate. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 5. Actions could seem blocked or thwarted. Huddle up and put your heads together. Take it slow. Focus on making money today and tomorrow. Make note of what works (and doesn’t). Review what needs to be done before the pace quickens. Breathe deep.


PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY TODAY Check to The seeBall thisState evening online baseball team takes if the to men’s the road golf team in a nonconference can climb intomatchup the lead of its tournament. against Butler.

SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

Coming a closeSteven loss against XXXDAYoffKicker Toledo, the Ballto State softball Schott adjusts his new role team travels west to face as a starting player in college Purdue football.for an in-state game.

THURSDAY XXXDAY FindCheck out who out the howDN asports couple staff injured voted Ball asState the best athlete of football players the week, are doing in their in weekly their recovery awards.processes.

FRESHMEN

EFFECT After losing key seniors, 4 new players bring offensive firepower DAVID POLASKI ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

Upperclassmen typically carry the offensive burden for baseball teams, but Ball State is an exception. The Cardinals stand at 2210 overall and 7-1 in the MidAmerican Conference, just half a game behind the Central Michigan Chippewas for first place in the MAC West. The team has veteran seniors such as Sean Godfrey and T.J. Weir leading the team, but youth has provided sparks for both the offense and pitching staffs. Ball State has four freshmen who are batting over .300 and playing strong defense, making last year’s graduation of players such as center fielder Wes Winkle and infielder Billy Wellman negligible. “We have a lot of really good

young players who have displayed their talent from the beginning,” head coach Rich Maloney said. “I didn’t know how they were going to react, but they came in and weren’t intimidated.” The losses left sizable gaps in talent and leadership, ones that could be difficult to replace. Winkle spent a lot of time running and diving to catch balls that were nearly out of reach while Wellman was a consistent infielder. With question marks dotting Ball Diamond, Alex Call and Caleb Stayton have stepped up. Call occupies center field and is hitting .336 while committing just two errors. Stayton controls first base and has the second highest batting average

|

@DavidPolaski

on the team with .348. With the other young players, an offense that was inconsistent at best last season has risen to be one of the most lethal in the MAC. The Cardinals are scoring 6.3 runs per game, a full run higher than what the 2013 team averaged at the end of the season, and is currently hitting .292. The top of the lineup is getting on base, allowing for RBI opportunities for the middle of the order. “It felt like every time I went up to bat, there were guys on base for me to knock in,” Sean Godfrey said after Sunday’s win against Eastern Michigan. “Players get into a rhythm and the offense starts putting up a lot of runs.” Supporting the rookie batters

is fellow freshman pitcher Zach Plesac. Plesac has stepped in after the team lost Chris Marangon, becoming the most consistent pitcher for Ball State. He made his debut Feb. 16, when he pitched in a doubleheader against Morehead State and Wofford, picking up two wins in the process. He leads the team in wins with six and his ERA is the lowest on the pitching staff at 2.30. On Sunday, he pitched 6.2 innings and allowed just one run, leading Ball State to a weekend sweep of Eastern Michigan. “I didn’t know how [the freshmen] would do in their first year,” Maloney said. “At the end of the day, when you have a talented bunch that works really hard, there’s going to be success.”

OFFENSIVE STATISTICS 2014 SEASON Freshmen have carried the Ball State baseball team. Here is their production compared to the other eligibility standings on the team.

ON BASE PERCENTAGE

LEGEND Freshmen

Freshmen

Seniors Sophomores

Seniors

.365

Sophomores

.356

Juniors

Juniors

HITS

Percentage of total hits 11.1

48.5

17.3

SOURCE: ballstatesports.com

.318

RBI

Percentage of total RBIs Freshmen Seniors Sophomores

23.1

.410

Juniors

45.3 33 14 7.8

DN GRAPHIC AUSTIN RUSSELL, STEPHANIE REDDING AND MATT McKINNEY

FOOTBALL: Slot position becomes possibility for Mabon when season begins

DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Sophomore wide receiver Jordan Williams attempts to shake the Kent State defense during a game Oct. 12 at Scheumann Stadium. Williams is expected to be a leader for the team this season.

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “I was like, ‘Wow. I’m a junior now,’” he said. “Every rep counts now; time is ticking.” With the departures of wide receivers Willie Snead, Jamill Smith and Connor Ryan, Ball State lost three of its top four wideouts from the 2013 season. The voices that kept players focused are gone now. Williams is now left to fill those voids. Sometimes, it’s a matter of picking up other players or making a play to get the offense back on track. Either way, wide receiver coach Keith Gaither said the focus needs to be there every day. “[Williams] took the step,” he said. “He can be a leader. He can be a captain on this football team. The only way you can be that is by being a worker every day.” Sometimes, talented play-

ers don’t exert themselves in practice, simply because they don’t have to. They rely on pure athleticism to succeed. Gaither said that’s not the case with Williams. The 6-foot-2 receiver didn’t register a catch his freshman season. Before Ball State played in the Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl in December 2012, though, Gaither saw Williams

start to practice like a “real ball player.” That’s why Williams’ 67 catches for 1,050 yards and 10 touchdowns last season was no surprise to Gaither. He’s been watching Williams mature for two full seasons, and there’s no sign of him slowing down. “[Growing] has been fun,” Williams said. “To get out here and do that with this team has been a blessing.” Now, Williams is focused on being the best player he can be. He looks forward to the opportunity to increase further his production. For the first time in his Ball State career, Williams is going to be “the guy” for this team. “The torch has been passed down to Jordan,” Gaither said. “Now, it’s his job to pass it down to the KeVonn [Mabons] and these other guys so they can learn how to work.” Mabon, a junior himself, is no stranger to putting in work on the field. After missing much of last season with a broken collarbone, Mabon is using spring practice to “learn the ropes.”

$30 per team

$2 to watch

Profits go to Muncie’s Little Red door

April 9 BALL gym

Register @ 4:30p

Play @ 5p

Even though Mabon is in his third season with the team, he’s working on fundamentals within the offense. Route running and making catches — sometimes as many as 150 in a single practice — are commonplace. He’s working to learn multiple roles, too. Since the second spring practice, Gaither has moved Mabon around and experimented with him as a slot receiver. Williams and Mabon hope to complement each other in a manner that keeps defens-

es from bracketing both of them in any given formation. Reading defenses and making adjustments on the fly is an important aspect of their mental game. Knowing the entire field means Mabon can lend advice to any teammate that needs it. He is looking forward to being a leader on the field, too. “[Williams and I] wanted to start immediately,” Mabon said. “We had to sit behind those guys for two years. We feel like it’s our team now; we lead the way.”

Gaither said they can’t afford to hang out in the back during practices any more, they have to be the go-to guys. But he’s confident it will come in time — spring practice is just the next step in testing his veterans. Watching players develop off the field is as important as the wins they get on air for Gaither. “It’s not how many bowl rings or trophies you get,” he said. “It’s seeing a kid improve. To me, that’s why you coach.”


DN 4-8-14