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DN TUESDAY, MARCH 4, 2014

THE DAILY NEWS

INCREASED STUDENTS IN MILITARY Economic hardships, student loan payments cause recent grads to enter into Army, Navy

Russian troops ignore U.S., EU warnings

MARDI

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

Country tightens grip on Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula

SEE PAGE 4

SEE PAGE 3

GRAS

BIG CELEBRATIONS Fat Tuesday parties, origins vary in different countries |

COMPILED BY ANA OLVERA

M

ardi Gras: the celebration that gives people the chance to eat their hearts out with no regrets. Take a look at how people in the United States, Brazil and France celebrate. See MARDI GRAS, page 5

DN PHOTO DANIEL BROUNT DN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Bullpen comes through during crucial moments Team had rebound after ugly blowout, won three of four

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DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Senior Sean Godfrey swings at the Akron pitch during the second game of the Akron double-header in 2013. Over the weekend, Godfrey scored a run and batted in three.

MUNCIE, INDIANA

ON THIS DAY IN 1861, ABRAHAM LINCOLN BECAME PRESIDENT.

ANTHONY LOMBARDI STAFF REPORTER ajlombardi@bsu.edu

For the third weekend in a row, the Ball State baseball team came away victorious in three of its four games. “Once you get used to winning, losing becomes even that much harder because you like the way it feels when you win,” head coach Rich Maloney said with a laugh. “I hate to lose, and you want to develop that mentality in your program.” One day after getting shutout 0-13 by Liberty on Saturday, the Cardinals and Flames faced off again. This time, the matchup proved to be much more competitive. The Cardinals raced out to an early lead, when junior left fielder Brandon Estep’s sacri-

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fice fly scored TOP senior Sean Godfrey from PLAYER third base in the top of the first inning. An RBI double in the second and a Godfrey ZACH PLESAC, two-run home a freshman run in the pitcher fourth extended Ball State’s Record: 4-0 ERA: 0.66 lead to 4-0. Innings Pitched: C a r d i n a l ’ s 13.2 senior start- Earned Run: 1 ing pitcher Walks: 4 Clay Maner- Strikeouts: 16 ing started the game with three shutout innings, but he allowed two runs to come across in the bottom of the fourth, cutting Ball State’s lead in half. The score remained 4-2 until the bottom of the seventh, when Liberty second baseman Ryan Seiz made a RBI double to make the score 4-3.

See BASEBALL, page 6

TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter. 1. CLOUDY

City shoveling law goes unenforced City Council member says citing for code doesn’t fit in budget |

KARA BERG STAFF REPORTER knberg2@bsu.edu

Despite the amount of snowfall this winter season, one little known law isn’t being enforced in Muncie. City law dictates that by 10 a.m. each day, residents must shovel sidewalks in front of their house or face a $20 fine. “You need to shovel them, period,” said Duke Campbell, superintendent of the Department of Public Works in Muncie. Campbell said it is a resident’s responsibility to keep sidewalks clear for use, especially for people who may face difficulties moving through snow. Although the ordinance says sidewalks have to be shoveled, Campbell said they haven’t ticketed anyone this year. Linda Gregory, Muncie City Council member, said the ordinance is not enforced be-

FORECAST

0 TICKETS

have been written for failing to clean sidewalks $20 FINES

can be received 10 A.M.

is when owners or occupants of any buildings are required to clear their sidewalks cause it costs too much for the two code enforcers to write up every person who doesn’t shovel their sidewalks. “There are lots of laws not enforced,” Gregory said. “The main reason is there isn’t enough money in the budget to pay for code enforcement. There’s no way they could take on writing citations for every sidewalk that isn’t shoveled.” Bill Mitchell, a junior information systems major, said he doesn’t own a shovel and doesn’t plan on buying one just because of the ordinance.

Today will have another cold start in the single digits. Snow chances return Wednesday. - Michael Behrens, WCRD chief forecaster

TODAY Partly cloudy High: 26 Low: 6 2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

SIDEWALK FINES

3. PARTLY CLOUDY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

5. SUNNY

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

See SIDEWALKS, page 4 THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

VOL. 93, ISSUE 93

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | TUESDAY, MARCH 4, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

5 THINGS TO KNOW

1.

IRAN CUTS ITS SUPPLY OF URANIUM THAT IS NEAR ATOMIC GRADE

TODAY

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WEDNESDAY Scattered snow showers High: 31 Low: 16 14 - SCATTERED SNOW SHOWERS

3. LAW WOULD ALLOW ADS ON SCHOOL BUSES INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Big yellow school buses could become rolling billboards if a bill approved by the Indiana Senate makes it all the way through the General Assembly. School buses would be allowed to carry ads in the Indianapolis neighborhoods of Franklin Township and Beech Grove and in Zionsville, a small community just northwest of Indianapolis, as part of a pilot program. Franklin Township schools drew the

VIENNA (AP) — Iran is cutting its stock of uranium that is closest to atomic weapons-grade as mandated in a deal with six world powers, the head of the U.N. nuclear agency said Monday. But Yukiya Amano noted the agency remains short of money to be able to monitor Tehran’s compliance with the agreement. As part of the six-month interim deal, Iran is to dilute half of its 20-percentenriched uranium to a lower grade suitable for use as reactor fuel. Amano told the International Atomic Energy Agency’s 35-nation board that process “has reached the halfway mark.” The other half of the uranium is to be changed into oxide, a precursor of nuclear fuel that is relatively difficult to reconvert to 20 percent. Iran has told the agency it now is working on facilities to carry out that transformation.

rage of parents when it outsourced transportation to a company that charged for bus rides. The plan was later dropped after it led to serpentine waiting lines of cars belonging to parents who refused to pay the charge. The idea of bus advertisements is to give cash-strapped school districts a way to raise revenue without increasing taxes. Several districts already sell advertising on their high school stadiums.

4. PEOPLE ABUSE FREE MEDS FROM FRIENDS CHICAGO (AP) — Most people who abuse addictive prescription painkillers get them for free from friends or relatives, while drug dealers are a relatively uncommon source for those at highest risk for deadly overdoses, a government study found. People who abuse the most frequently often doctor shop; more than 1 in 4 who used these drugs almost daily said they had been prescribed by one or more physicians. Almost

YUKIYA AMANO MCT PHOTO

as many said they got them for free from friends or relatives. Only 15 percent of the most frequent abusers said they bought the drugs from dealers or other strangers. Those abusers “are probably using at much greater volumes and simply asking a friend for a pill now and then is not going to be sufficient,” said Dr. Leonard Paulozzi, a researcher at the CDC. The study said two-thirds of abusers used the drugs infrequently.

2. EGYPTIAN POLICEMEN GET 10 YEARS FOR DEATH 5. PARADE DEAL OVER GAY VETERANS STALLED CAIRO (AP) — A court sentenced two policemen Monday to 10 years in prison for the 2010 brutal beating death of a young Egyptian that became a rallying cry for the protesters who overthrew longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak. Rights groups, however, said the years-long wait before anyone was held accountable for the killing of 28-yearold small businessman Khaled Said in the port city of Alexandria highlights that the wider problem of police abuse,

THE FORECAST

a major grievance of the 2011 protesters, remains unresolved. Photographs of the dead Said’s face, disfigured by what appeared to be a brutal beating, were posted on the Internet and became a rallying cry against torture and other police brutality under Mubarak. Activists used a Facebook page set up in Said’s memory to call for the protests that ultimately forced Mubarak from power in February 2011. Authorities had long denied the killing.

BOSTON (AP) — A gay rights advocacy group said Monday that it is pushing for gay people to be allowed to march “openly and honestly” in Boston’s St. Patrick’s Day parade, but an agreement has not been reached with parade organizers. It appeared Saturday as if Boston Mayor Martin Walsh had brokered a deal between MassEquality and parade organizers to allow gay military veterans to march under the group’s

banner, but the deal was not finalized even after both sides met a day later. The sticking point is whether and how members of the group can identify themselves in the parade. “LGBT people need to be able to identify themselves as LGBT people,” Kara Coredini, MassEquality executive director, said. “It’s as simple as that. There’s a lot of ways that can be done, and that is a conversation we’re having now with organizers.”

THURSDAY Mostly sunny High: 29 Low: 18 04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

FRIDAY Partly cloudy High: 48 Low: 22 03 - PARTLY CLOUDY

SATURDAY Rain/snow mix High: 37 Low: 30 19 - RAIN/SNOW MIX

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by AJ 278 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens ASST. NEWS EDITOR Ashley Dye

FEATURES EDITOR Bethannie Huffman 72HRS EDITOR Kourtney Cooper

SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Taylor Irby ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty

ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile GRAPHICS EDITOR Stephanie Redding

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITOR Cooper Cox

TUESDAY $2.00 Bells Two Hearted

24/7 Crossword

DESIGN EDITORS Daniel Brount Ellen Collier

Sudoku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Michael Mepham

Level: Medium

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY

ACROSS 1 AMERICAN REVOLUTION SUPPORTER 5 CRACKED FIXTURE ACROSS FROM INDEPENDENCE HALL 9 SUITOR 14 LOSER IN A FABLE 15 ICE FORMATION 16 GARDEN VIOLET 17 BIG NAME IN DOOR-TODOOR SALES 18 ETERNALLY 20 MORAL PRECEPT 22 ARCTIC INHABITANT 23 SUFFIX WITH MANHATTAN 24 IN THE KNOW 27 SOAK UP SOME RAYS 28 URL LETTERS 31 “LET’S MOVE ON TO SOMETHING ELSE” 35 DAVIS OF “DO THE RIGHT THING” 36 GEOLOGIC PERIODS 37 BUILDING SAFETY PROCEDURE 42 OBSTRUCT 43 PAPER TRAY UNIT

44 SOME STUDIO-BASED EDUCATORS 51 BRIEF MISSIONS? 52 DRILL SERGEANT’S ADDRESS 53 BARBECUE RESIDUE 54 ON THE __ VIVE: ALERT 55 DEBATE FOCUS 57 TOOK A CUT 59 WHAT 3/4/2014 IS, AND A HINT TO 18-, 31-, 37- AND 44-ACROSS 64 ILL-CONSIDERED 65 WORD BEFORE CIRCLE OR CHILD 66 SHORE PHENOMENON 67 ATTACKING THE TASK 68 REPLY TO, “WHO WANTS TO CLEAN UP THIS MESS?” 69 CRY OF PAIN 70 BALLPOINTS DOWN 1 “CONSIDER THIS SCENARIO ...” 2 MUST 3 ONE WITH PRESSING

CHORES? 4 ONE IN A POOL 5 PAL 4 LIFE 6 “XANADU” BAND 7 LOUGHLIN OF “FULL HOUSE” 8 CRUDE SHED 9 SUPPORT FOR A BROKEN DIGIT 10 POWER UNIT 11 “GIVE ME __!”: START OF A HAWKEYE’S CHEER 12 PHILOSOPHY SUFFIX 13 BILL, THE “SCIENCE GUY” 19 WAIKIKI FEAST 21 THIS AND THIS 25 “__ MIRACLE!” 26 BEACH BUCKET 28 VILLAGERS BELOW THE GRINCH’S CAVE 29 HAVE A YEN FOR 30 OZ. AND KG. 32 STEEP-WALLED CANYON 33 CREATURE 34 PEARLY WHITES 37 TURN, AS PANCAKES 38 ELECTRICAL PARTICLES 39 “CHEERS” ACTRESS PERL-

MAN 40 OZ. OR KG. 41 GEEK SQUAD PROS 42 MONEY VIP 45 GUARANTEE 46 GO UP 47 UNLIKELY TO DISAPPOINT 48 COMPARE APPLES TO APPLES? 49 TAKES TO JAIL 50 TOURIST ATTRACTIONS 55 NEWS PIECE 56 ACTRESS FALCO 58 FOOD TRUCK OFFERING 59 SNORKELING AID 60 YEAR, SOUTH OF THE BORDER 61 TUNNELER’S EXPLOSIVE 62 RUCKUS 63 EVERGREEN WITH ELASTIC WOOD

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SOLUTION FOR MONDAY

$2.00 Bells Two Hearted


TUESDAY, MARCH 4, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

FEATURES B B FIGHTING FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

Gadgets &gizmos story // aubrey smith

Stress can quickly pile with the challenges of a college student’s life. Check out these underrated products that will solve your everyday troubles.

Geek it out WI-FI DETECTOR SHIRT

No need to crack open a laptop or check a phone to see the reception strength. This T-shirt will detect Wi-Fi. The bars will glow according to how strong the connection is in a particular area. SOURCE: Tampa Bay Times

Ultimate chef master PLUCK: SUNNY SIDE OUT

Staying healthy is even easier now with a yolk extractor. Place it over a cracked egg, squeeze the silicone and let the magic do the rest. You’ll have perfect egg yolks in no time. SOURCE: caboodle

Simple problems THE BAG CAP

COLLEGE EXPENSES Army, Navy enlistment rises due to student debt DERREK TIPTON STAFF REPORTER | dmtipton@bsu.edu

A

crumbling economy and student loans are leaving college students with a few options only in jump-starting their careers. One of the most common options is joining the military. Lt. Col. Wes Russell, the recruiting and operations officer for Ball State’s ROTC program, said the top two reasons college graduates join the military is to protect their country and for economic reasons. In Indiana, students with debt will accumulate an average of $27,886, according to the Institute for College Access and Success. “Sometimes, the military becomes an option for [students] to pay back loans they may have or to simply have a job for the next four to six years,” Russell said. Kathleen Welker, a public affairs officer for Army Recruiting Command at Fort Knox, Ky., said the Army brought in 4,727 graduates with bachelor’s degrees in 2013, which is slightly up from the 4,319 graduates who joined in 2012. But over at the Air Force, spokesman Michael Dickerson said the Air Force brought in 2,566 active-duty recruits, which is down from the 4,270 recruits in 2012. After he graduated with a telecommunications degree from Ball State in 2004, the job market looked bleak to Lt. j.g. Adam Demeter, public affairs officer at Navy Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. He spent most of his time moving from place to place, trying to find a job that suited him. He was an assistant manager at a clothing store, a construction worker and worked a part-time job at a news station. Then one day, his sister brought him a card from a Navy recruiter, and he realized military service might be the answer. “I was working and I was doing fine, but I wasn’t happy,” Demeter said. “The Navy offers security that you can’t find anywhere else.” In 2013, a study by the Center for College Affordability and Productivity found that 48 percent of employed college graduates have jobs that do not require a bachelor’s degree. With a bachelor’s degree, graduates can apply to a version of Officer

Candidate Schools in all branches of the military. Demeter said it can be challenging to get accepted to OCS because a bachelor’s degree does not guarantee acceptance. He discovered his college grades would hurt his chances of being accepted, so he enlisted instead. Eventually, he worked his way into OCS. The duration of training at these schools vary depending on the branch, but the training typically takes around two to three months to complete. Candidates are evaluated on physical and mental characteristics to determine if they are fit to be in a leadership position. After completion, OCS graduates have a guaranteed spot in the military as an officer. Russell said some students choose another option, if they decide they want to join the military after college graduation. They can attend a 28-day Leader’s Training Course at Fort Knox, Ky., which is an accelerated version of what ROTC cadets learn in college. After the course, they can go back to school to complete a master’s degree. “They will get their master’s degree paid for and then become an officer in the military,” Russell said. Demeter said college graduates should utilize the skills they picked up in school to have a more successful career in the military. “Things I learned in college helped me when I joined,” he said.

«toSometimes, the military becomes an option for [students] pay back loans they may have or to simply have a job for the next four to six years.» LT. COL. WES RUSSELL, recruiting and operations officer for Ball State’s ROTC program

DN ILLUSTRATION MARCI TAYLOR

Many students suffer from the stale consequences of a once good chip bag, but now they don’t have to worry. The Bag Cap keeps the freshness locked in. Attach your bag to the Bag Cap and then flip the lid open and shut.

SOURCE: The Green Head

Residence hall life ROCKET LAUNCHER

Don’t even try to hit the snooze button with this alarm clock. When the alarm rings, the rocket shoots off. In order to stop the alarm, return to the rocket to the launch pad. SOURCE: Paramount Zone

bALL bearings Online check out more gadgets for each category at ballbearingsmag.com

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PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, MARCH 4, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

NEWS

Russia moves troops to Ukraine | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS KIEV, Ukraine — Russian troops said to be 16,000 strong tightened their stranglehold on Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula on Monday, openly defying the U.S. and the European Union and rattling world capitals and stock markets. The West struggled to find a way to get Russia to back down, but with little beyond already threatened diplomatic and economic sanctions, global markets fell sharply over the prospect of violent upheaval in the heart of Europe. For its part, Moscow reiterated its price for ending the crisis: restoration of a deal reached with the opposition less than two weeks ago to form a national unity government in Kiev that represents pro-Russian as well as Ukrainian interests, with new elections to be hosted by December. Ukraine, meanwhile, accused Russia of piracy for blocking two of the besieged country’s warships and ordering them to surrender or be seized.

Russia says Yanukovych requested troops

Ukraine’s fugitive President Viktor Yanukovych requested Russian soldiers in the strategic Crimea region “to establish legitimacy, peace, law and order,” Russia’s U.N. ambassador said Monday, contradicting the president’s own comments last week, while Ukraine’s ambassador said 16,000 troops are now deployed there. The third emergency Security Council meeting in four days came amid fears that the Kremlin might carry out more land grabs in pro-Russian eastern Ukraine. Russia faced demands from almost all council members to pull out its troops and got no support for its military action from close ally China. “With the exception of one member of the Security Council — the Russian Federation — we have heard overwhelming support for the territorial integrity of Ukraine and for peaceful dialogue,” U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power said.

Ukraine’s divided loyalties

European Union leaders called a special summit for Thursday, where they are expected to freeze visa liberalization and economic cooperation talks with Russia if Moscow hasn’t taken steps to calm the crisis in Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula. EU foreign ministers said they also have stopped preparation for the G8 summit, which is set for June in the Russian resort of Sochi. EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said the EU would give Russia until the Thursday show clear signs of goodwill, including a willingness to open talks and a withdrawal of Russian troops to their barracks in the Crimea.

The United States’ reaction

In Washington, the State Department warned of a “dangerous escalation” and said the U.S. would hold Moscow directly accountable for any threat to Ukraine’s navy. Russia is “on the wrong side of history” in Ukraine, President Barack Obama said, adding that continued military action would be “a costly proposition for Russia.” Speaking to reporters in the Oval Office, Obama said the U.S. was considering economic and diplomatic options that will isolate Russia and called on Congress to work on an aid package for Ukraine. Still, it was not clear what the West could do to make Russia retreat. The clearest weapon at the disposal of the U.S. and the EU appeared to be economic sanctions that would freeze Russian assets and pull the plug on multibillion dollar deals with Russia. Already the economic fallout for Russia was being intensely felt. Russia’s stock market dropped about 10 percent Monday and its currency fell to its lowest point ever against the dollar. But the economic consequences of antagonizing Russia also were acute for Western Europe. The EU relies heavily on Russian natural gas flowing through a network of Ukrainian and other pipelines.

Russian soldiers stand guard next to a Ukrainian military base in the town of Bakhchysarai in the Crimea.

Tense standoff in Crimea

Forces of Russia’s Black Sea Fleet based in Crimea and additional Russian troops sent to the peninsula have seized or blocked Ukrainian air bases, air defense missile batteries and other military facilities, and garrisons throughout the region. Ukraine’s military acknowledged that “practically all” of its military facilities in Crimea have been surrounded or taken over. Russian forces overtook a ferry crossing linking Crimea with Russia, which would allow a quick military buildup in Crimea if Russia chooses to do so. Armed people also have sealed a narrow strip of land linking the peninsula with mainland Ukraine. The Ukrainian military said Russia has recently brought four navy ships from other seas to the Crimean port of Sevastopol. The Russians have demanded that Ukrainian soldiers in Crimea lay down their weapons. Some have agreed and left or joined pro-Russia forces. But others have refused and barricaded themselves at their bases.

MCT PHOTO

EU halts Russia talks

Ukraine’s loyalties have been sharply divided between the Russian-speaking east and south, where people favor close ties with Moscow, and the west, where residents want to integrate more closely with the European Union. Ukraine’s armed forces reflect that divide. Units stationed in Russian-speaking regions are mostly manned by local residents who don’t necessarily support the new government in Kiev. That raises doubts about their loyalties in case of a military conflict with Russia. The Ukrainian military’s reluctance to confront the Russians became obvious in Crimea, where a newly named Ukrainian navy chief went over to the pro-Russian local government, a day after his appointment. Regional officials said thousands of Ukrainian servicemen have done the same, but that claim can’t be independently confirmed.

Campus master plan sees delays Updated questions on website request space use details RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER | rmpodnar@bsu.edu

DN PHOTO LAUREN CHAPMAN

President Jo Ann Gora receives a key to the city from the Muncie Common Council and Mayor Dennis Tyler on Monday evening. Gora will retire from Ball State in June after 10 years.

GORA RECEIVES KEY TO CITY OF MUNCIE President Jo Ann Gora was honored by the Muncie Common Council on Monday evening and received a key to the city. Councilman Julius J. Anderson presented the award and lauded Gora’s efforts with immersive learning to get students involved in Muncie. In her acceptance, Gora thanked Mayor Dennis Tyler and council. “We are privileged to live in this community,” Gora said. “What is good for the university is good for the community. And what is good for the community is good for the university.” Tyler read the inscription from the plaque, which detailed Gora’s contributions to the city in her 10 years as president of the university. In response, Gora expressed the joy she and her husband, Roy Budd, feel working for the community. “I am proud to live in Muncie,” she said. – LAUREN CHAPMAN

The campus master plan will not be complete until next year, and one consultant said there is “still a lot to be done.” The original goal was to complete the plan by the end of this academic year, but consulting firm SmithGroupJJR said it will work over the summer to complete the recommendations and come back to campus one more time in the fall. “Our hope is to have direction far enough along to garner strong input before the end of this semester,” consultant Michael Johnson said. “A lot of refinement is happening.”

Gregory Graham, a university architect, said pushing the plan back isn’t necessarily a setback. “It will always be an evolving plan,” he said. Masterplan.bsu.edu will host new questions today regarding student’s ideas about specific space use, like where they meet to collaborate with professors and how far they are willing to walk from parking to campus. “We are looking for continued refinement,” Johnson said. “Our hope is rather than casting a broad net, we are asking clarifying questions about ideas that have been discussed to get further clarity as we angle toward [the] refinement stage.” SmithGroupJJR consultants visited campus last week to share original ideas from the plan. The plan will address McKinley Avenue, the Quad and physical classrooms, and

the group has identified a specific plan for each area. Graham said because McKinley Avenue gets traffic from cars, buses, trucks, bicycles and pedestrians, adding parallel bike lanes near the Cow Path and accompanying bike storage is an option for the future. He said current open spaces like the Quad can be enhanced to connect other existing open spaces. “Right now, there is disjointedness from [the] old Quad to newer Quad areas,” Graham said. Johnson said the academic master plan influences the campus master plan 100 percent. The academic master plan also is currently in development. “We’re working side by side with that team,” he said. “They are helping us to determine what physical implications come out of academic goals.”

ment major Josh Berry said he always shovels his sidewalks in the winter. “I’m in a fraternity, so we have shifts when we have to shovel,” Berry said. Berry said he thought people should always shovel,

just to make their lives a little easier. “It’s hard to walk around when people don’t,” he said. “I’ve seen a bunch of people fall. I actually started walking in the streets because they’re clearer.”

SIDEWALKS: Many residents don’t shovel, students say walking is easier in streets

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “We just walk in the street,” Mitchell said. “There’s no point in shoveling because no one else shovels their sidewalks either.” Junior graphic arts manage-

Graham said the data analysis revealed a deficit in lab space classrooms, an example of something the university may address in the future if the areas of science, technology, engineering and medicine take a larger role in the academic plan. Johnson said the consulting firm wants to connect the campus plan to the academic plan with classroom space that “better meets needs of 21st century learning.” Graham said the consultants will make preliminary presentations to the Board of Trustees in the near future. He stressed the importance of the plan’s ability to be flexible based on future needs, economics and direction. Graham said it is hard to define exactly when projects are likely to happen when planning so far into the future. “[The] further you get out, it becomes cloudier,” Graham said.

DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

The Muncie public works department superintendent said the city hasn’t fined for unclear sidewalks this winter.


TUESDAY, MARCH 4, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FEATURES

MARDI GRAS: Continents participate in cultural customs, wear traditional colors | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

AMERICA

The most popular celebration stateside is undoubtedly in New Orleans.

Celebration

King’s Day, or Twelfth Night, usually celebrated Jan. 6, marks the beginning of the carnival season. However, the 12-day period leading up to Mardi Gras is the most eventful with more than 70 parades. While an abundance of alcohol and flashes of nudity may first come to mind, most parades and festivities are actually family-friendly. The official colors are purple, gold and green — representing justice, power and faith, respectively. Colored beads were

MARDI CRAWL

originally tossed to people who exhibited the color’s meaning. Other throws, or items tossed from floats, are cups, stuffed animals and plastic coins. When Mardi Gras celebrations first began, masks allowed people to hide their identities and socialize with people outside of their social class. Now during parades, masks are worn by float riders only, who are required to wear them by law. On Mardi Gras, the public can wear masks, too.

Food

King cakes are popular during the carnival season. King cake parties are hosted on or after the Twelfth Night to honor the three wise men who visited baby Jesus. A tiny, plastic baby is hidden inside the braided Danish pastry

SAVAGE’S ALE HOUSE Hours: 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. Specials: $1 off Bell’s Draft THE LOCKER ROOM Hours: 11 a.m. to 3 a.m. Specials: $2 Long Island Iced Teas

YOUR GUIDE TO MARDI GRAS DRINK SPECIALS AND LIVE MUSIC

and whoever finds it in their slice must host the next king cake party.

FRANCE

The day before Ash Wednesday became known in France as Mardi Gras from the tradition of feasting on eggs, meat and dairy products.

Celebration

The Carnaval de Nice is the largest carnival and Mardi Gras celebration in France. The twoweek celebration consists of the Carnival Parade and Flower Parade, the two main events, as well as a rock ’n’ roll parade, a Zumba party and a traditional burning of an effigy. The Carnival Parade features large figurines, some made of traditional papier mache, and 18 floats designed around the year’s

$2 Drink shot $2 Pints $2 Wells SCOTTY’S BREWHOUSE Hours: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Specials: $5 48-ounce domestic

Don’t forget your friend’s birthday!   

theme. Street theater and music groups participate in the parades as well. The Flower Parade features 20 flower-covered floats with float riders throwing flowers into the crowd.

Food

Beignets, a pillowy, fried doughnut covered in powdered sugar, is a popular treat during Mardi Gras in France.

BRAZIL

The largest Mardi Gras celebration in the world is the annual Rio Carnival in Rio de Janeiro. Around half a million tourists make their way to Rio each year to participate in the five-day celebration.

Celebration

More than 70 samba schools — social clubs or groups repre-

pitchers $6 48-ounce Thr3e Wise Men pitchers $7 48-ounce Samuel Adams pitchers $5 Thr3e Wise Men bullet fills $8 Thr3e Wise Men growler fills

$10 off bottle of wine DILL STREET Hours: 8 p.m. to 3 a.m. Specials: $3 pitchers “After Scotty’s Party� BE HERE NOW Hours: 6 p.m. to 3 a.m.

AJ 276 Muncie, IN 47306 Phone: 765.285.8247 Fax: 765.285.8248

Ball State Students! Want a "Cool" Job this Summer? Apply at www.homecityice.com Home City Ice Co. in Muncie is now Hiring for Route Delivery Drivers. Weekends and Holidays in summer are a Must. Clean Driving Record a Must. 50-60 hours a week in Summer, and part time around your classes in Spring and next Fall. Pay averages between $8 and $14 per hour. This is hard work, and rewarding for those who are motivated to succeed. Apply Online Today! MUNCIE ELKS is currently hiring Bartenders for the summer golf season. Please apply in person at 909 N. County Road 500 W. Mon-Fri 9am-4pm

Veterinary Hospital has an immediate opening for a part-time receptionist/veterinary assistant.Apply online at:http://www.amcvet.com/site/view/165299_Employment.pml No Phone Calls Please.

IN NEED OF EGG DONORS & SURROGATE MOTHERS all expenses paid, must be 21-35 yrs old more info at surrogatemothers.com or 317-996-2000

 !!! 3 & 4 bdrm apts, 514 N Martin, w/d,central air. Aug leases, (765)730-2473 www.signaturet.com

!!!!! SPRING BREAK SPECIAL 50% off 1st monthĘźs rent. 3 & 4 Bdrm apts/houses avail Aug. Great locations 2 blks from campus. All utils pd, A/C, D/W, W/D, off st prkg. 765-896-8105 !!!!3 bdrm apt., W/D, Walk to campus, off st. prkg., Call today for an appointment! 877-867-5118

***Now leasing for the 2014/2015 school yr. 1 Bdrm apt. $460/mo + utils, Studio apt. $410/mo + util. W/D. Bar-Tel Apartments, 1616 W. Gilbert St. Visit www.bsrentals.com or call Doug at 765-744-3593 1 bdrm apt., W/D, Walk to campus, off st. prkg., Call for an appointment today! 877-867-5118 1 bdrm Nice, walk to BSU W/D, A/C, Avail Aug. We Pay Utils! No pets. $450/mo 317-439-3763

!!Utilities paid. 811 W. Main. Unique mansion,1&2 br apt.765-744-0185 bsuoffcampus.com.

1&2 bdrm apt. Hardwd fls. Aug lse. Ashland Ave. Some utils pd. Walk to BSU. No Dogs. 317-727-5847

****** 4 bdrm, completely renovated apt. Avail August. Great location. 2 blks from campus. Util Paid. No pets. 896-8105

1, 2 & 3bdr apts. Some utils pd. 14 blks from BSU. No Pets. Avil Aug 1st. 765-289-3971

******* 3 bdrm Apts. 2 blks from campus. Avail May or August. Economical. Util Paid. No Pets. W/D DW A/C. Off street parking. 896-8105

2 Bdrm, basement apt, W/D, $450 rent, utils included. Avail Aug. 765-748-4934

******** 1,2,3,4 bdrm Apts. Best locations. Avail. May or August. From $250 each. Some or all Util. paid. Walk to class. A/C, DW, W/D 896-8105 ********* 1 bdrm apts. Avail. May or August. 3 blks from campus. A/C, DW, W/D. Off st. parking. Util paid. No pets. Great locations. 896-8105 ********** Affordable! Walk to class. Great locations on 1,2,3,4 bdrm apts. Avail. May or August. Part or all Util. paid. A/C DW W/D. Off st. parking. No pets. walktoballstate.com 896-8105

1875 The Mardi Gras Act establishes the celebration as a legal holiday in Louisiana. 1979 Due to narrow streets, parades enter the French Quarter in New Orleans for the last time.

SOURCES: mardigraneworleansonline.com, nola.com, content.time.com, nicecarnaval.com, francetoday.com, rio-carnival.net, sambadrome.com neworleansonline.com, mardigrasneworleans.com

Sour Apple BIG SHOT PUBS Hours: 11:30 a.m. to 3 a.m. Specials: $2 Newcastle bottles $2 Jameson $2 Absolut

Specials: $3 Upland pints and bottles 75 cent Retro cans BUFFALO WILD WINGS Hours: 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. Specials: Coors Light, Jameson and Guinness each mixed with

      

        

Office Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 am - 5 pm www.bsudailynews.com/classifieds



!!! Studio apt village area, very unique $425 inclusive Aug lease no pets. By appt. only. lori2260@comcast.net or 765-212-8992

1699 French explorer Pierre Le Moyne introduces Mardi Gras to the Louisiana territory, according to the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation.

   �   � New Category in the DN Classifieds! Absolutely Free

DN Classifieds 

1582 Pope Gregory XIII declares Mardi Gras to be a Christian holiday.

FREE! FREE! FREE! ABSOLUTELY FREE!

Make checks payable to: The Ball State Daily News



HISTORY OF MARDI GRAS

senting a neighborhood of Rio — parade during the carnival showcasing a particular theme. Only the 12 leading schools perform during the Samba Parade, the largest in the carnival, at the Sambadrome Marquês de Sapucaí, a stadium with a half-mile runway. Each school’s 3,000 to 5,000 members wear costumes detailed with feathers, gems and metallic colors. Schools dance down the runway to samba music alongside decorative floats. The top six schools are chosen on Ash Wednesday and perform once more at the Champions Parade the following Saturday.

3 Bd apt, util pd, 50 inch TV, 2 ba. W/D. close to BSU. $315/person. 315 South Mckinley 744-4649 3 Bdrm upstairs apt, $1000 rent/ month. includes util, close to campus, avail Aug. 765-748-4934 Affordable village living University village apartments 1000 mo free cable reserved parking 765-729-9618 www.bsurentals.com Aug lease, 1 2 & 3 bdrm. 1 blk South of BSU Village.$250-350/mo ea. +Utils. No pets. 765-288-3100



*Ad must be submitted to dnclassified@bsu.edu to be eligible. * The Daily News has the right to revise or reject any advertisements. * The Daily News assumes no liability for content of the advertisement.



***RATCHFORD PROPERTIES*** !! 3 & 4 bds NY & Bethel from $275 •Great Apts. & Houses! each BSU alum landlord call •Best Locations for 1,2,3,4 BR on & Near Campus 317-507-1490 for info •Affordable Prices! •Some Utilities Paid! Laundry Facil!!! 4 Bdrm, Very Nice, close to Vil- ity, NO Pets. lage, A/C, D/W, deck, off st prkg, ***CALL OR TEXT 748-6407*** Aug lease, no pets. $350 ea. www.ratchfordproperties.com 765-747-9503 1,2,3,4 bdrms. Lease 2014-2015. www.clunerentals.blogspot.com !!! 6 bdrm. 3 ba. single house clos 765-744-1400 or 729-9321 to campus, w/laundry rm.,deck, paved off st. prkng. $350 each in- 2 bdrm + sunrm, full bsmt, gar, cludes heat, water & sewage. Aug W/D, A/C, near BSU, Aug lse. lease. No pets. lori2260@com- 765- 215-4591 cast.net or 765-212-8992 2 Bdrm, extra room, nice, walk to BSU, A/C, W/D, $560 a month, no !!!4 Bdrm house. North Ball. Close pets.Avail Aug. 317-439-3763 to Rec Center & CAP building 2 Bdrms. 219 N. Dicks Street. Aug bsuoffcampus.com 765-744-0185 lease. bsurentalhouses.com 371-408-4040 !!!5 BRw/ private swimming pool, built in fire pit, lg deck, bike racks, 2 lg Ba, off st. prkg, W/D, C/A, D/W, landlord does yard & pool maint. 5 @ $250 ea. May or Aug lease 765-405-1105, leave message. !!3 or 4 bdrm house, W/D, Walk to campus, off st. prkg., Call for an Appointment today! 877-867-5118 3 bd 2 bath house, W/D A/C,close to campus, August 2014-July 2015 Lease Call 765-759-5510 Leave a msg. ****4 bdrm 2 bath at 825 W. Ashland W/D, C/A, all utils paid, $380/mo, No pets,Aug. lease. Call 765-760-2202

***BSU apts, close to campus, 1,2&3 bdrm,utils includ off-st prkg, Call765-228-8458 or 765-749-4688

FREE INTERNET! Clean & quiet 1 bdrm apts, close to BSU. On site WS/DR,cedarsatbsu.com,286 2806

***4 bdrm, 2 Ba. 1804 W Charles close to campus nice W/D C/A prkg. 300 each + util 765-744-5008 or www.munciecollegerentals.com

1 bd. Avail Aug. close to Village area. All util. paid. A/C. off st parking. No pets. Free wifi. 760-4529

Very Nice 1 Bdrm Apts & 2 Bdrm Homes. May & Aug. taycorpproperties.com 765-281-0049

**Lg 5 bdrm 2 ba. 2 kitchens spilt 2bdrm down 3bdrm up 723 Reserve St. 765-228-8458 or

2204 N.Maplewood Ave. Close to BSU Nice! 2 bdrm, W/D, fridge, stove, off-st prkg. No pets, no smoking. $250/each +util. May or Aug lease. UALA member. Call 765-288-2663 or 765-730-2237

2713 Beckett. 4 bdrm, 2 ba. 2 car gar. $295/person + utils. Aug.-Aug. Lease. Quiet area, lots of parking Call 765-254-9992 3 Bdrm, 2 Ba., Nice! Walk to BSU, UTIL pd! W/D, A/C, avail aug, No pets. $990/mo. (317) 439-3763

3 Brdm Homes from $167/month ea. Now,May,Aug. 765-744-1079 joecoolproperties.blogspot.com

3 or 4 bdr C/A, C/H ,W/D + Utils. Ball Ave 4 blks from Bethel Aug 1st. 765-289-3971 3/4 Bedroom, 2108 N. Ball Ave. August lease, $975 plus utilities. Call 317-716-7174 3 bdrm 2 ba, W/D, D/W 1011 N Wheeling Aug lease $850 729-0978

 4 BDRM, 1 & 1/2 bths, C/A, gas heat, W/D,o ff-street parking.1608 New York, garage, close to BSU 765 748 8425 4 Bdrm, 2 Ba., Nice! Walk to BSU, UTIL pd! W/D, A/C, avail Aug, No pets. $1200/mo. (317) 439-3763 4 Brm House @1220 Neely @1225 Marsh st. Avail Aug 1, 2014. $1200/mo + utils 765-649-8377 4 Lg bdrms, 2 baths. 824 W. Beechwood. Behind SAE. C/A, D/W, W/D. Call 286-1943 4, 5, or 6 bdrm. Lrg. rooms, 2 lrg. ba., W/D, off st prkg, all utils includ. 501 N. Alameda. (765) 744-8269. 5 Bdrm. 1.5 Ba. 1428 W. Gilbert. Close to village. W/D bsmt, Off-srt prkg. Call 286-1943

5 Large Bedrooms 829 W. North St.

Spectacular 3 baths big rooms Dishwasher, Central Air, W/D $275/each Avail Aug 1. 749-9792

Great location, 1308 Abbott May to May lease, 3 bdrm 1 ba, 2 car garage, A/C. 765-254-9992 Great location, 1312 Abbott, 5 Bedroom, 2 bath, C/A, $290/per + utilities, Aug-Aug lease. Call 765-254-9992 Newley renovated. 1-6 BR homes. Close to BSU. W/D, A/C, D/W. Rent:$300-$400 ech. 765-286-2806 Nice 3 bdr. Close to BSU. 2 ba. Avail. Aug. A/C, stove, fridge, W/D. $395 /ea, utils incl. 765-348-6413 www.jahrentals.com, Nicest houses on campus. Many extras. Even a 6 bdrm. Also student parking available. Call 286-5216.

Visit us online Today’s birthday (3-4-14) ___ (c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Creativity, organization and partnership form keys to prosperity this year. Consider energy like gold, and spend thoughtfully. Streamline routines for efficiency, prioritizing fun at home and with family. Summer brings romantic sparks through August, when career takes off. Stick to proven basics, and strengthen foundations. Balance action and relaxation. Look for love and find it.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)Today is a 5 -- Unfulfilled expectations could provoke an unpleasant situation. Physical changes are required, and delays could interfere with travel. Delegate what you can. Enjoy the game, without taking expensive risks. Walk with gentle steps, watching the path ahead. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 5 -Delight in the comforts of home today and tomorrow. Clean and reorganize for practical functionality and beauty. Avoid travel and expense, or stepping on someone’s toes. Shrewd business people do well now. Follow a leader you respect. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)Today is a 6 -- Guard against technical glitches, as work action heats up today and tomorrow. Study the angles, map out the path and take notes. Don’t tell everybody your plans. Schedule some private time. Love works wonders.Your heart sings.

Aries (March 21-April 19)Today is a 6 -- Test a new theory. Fill the orders and rake in the money. Don’t believe everything you’ve learned, and watch where you’re going. Start your shopping list. Call if you’re going to be late. Maintain objectivity. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 7 -- You’re hot today and tomorrow. Take care not to provoke jealousies. Reject a far-fetched scheme in favor of a practical solution. Tempers could flare. The answer, for now, is negative. Postpone expansion. Soothe ruffled feathers.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 5 -- Ask a female for her opinion. It’s getting fun, today and tomorrow. Guard against impulsive behavior. Rushed preparations could backfire. Rest for the busy action ahead. Increase organization. Invite friends over rather than going out. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 5 Expect new directives over the next few days, leading to a rise in status. Promises alone won’t cut it. Check for financial leaks. Move slowly. Encourage the girls to participate. Have the facts. Play passionately.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)Today is a 5 -Review your data.You’ll be glad you did. Be sensitive to a loved one’s wishes. Family comes first. Curtail spending on entertainment. Enter a two-day contemplative phase. Assess your efforts, and monitor spending closely. Provide motivation.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)--Today is a 5 -- Check for a change in plans. There’s no need for haste. Travel compels but could be complex today and tomorrow. New problems develop. Develop a backup plan, and confirm reservations. Apply what you’ve learned.

www.ballstatedaily.com

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)Today is a 5 -- Play fair or the victory is worthless. Get ready for more publicity. The next few days are good for financial planning with shared resources. Avoid reckless spending. Take strategic, rather than impulsive, actions to save time and energy. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)Today is a 6 -- Develop strong partners today and tomorrow. Compromise is required, or sparks may fly. Consider the consequences of words and actions. Avoid waste and expensive errors. Check out insider information. Don’t go shopping yet. Figure out strategy. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 5 -- Don’t rush the job. Stick rigorously to instructions. Work interferes with socializing; yet resist temptation to cut corners. Fulfill promises you’ve made today and tomorrow. Think twice before you borrow.You’re learning how to do without.


PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, MARCH 4, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

TODAY Follow the Ball State men’s basketball team as it travels to Eastern Michigan for a conference matchup.

BASEBALL: Strong pitching brings team victories during weekend road games | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The Flames proceeded to load the bases with two outs in the inning, but Ball State senior relief pitcher Tyler Jordan’s pitching helped the Cardinals escape with the lead still intact. Liberty would threaten again in the eighth and ninth innings, but once again Ball State freshman Zach Plesac stepped on the mound and delivered a performance to seal the victory and move the Cardinals to 9-3 on the season. “It would be easy to say that [Liberty] is a really good team, but that’s not how we think,” Maloney said of the way his team responded to its previous meeting with the Flames. “We want to be that team. We want to be the team that they’re saying is going to regionals.” Besides the first matchup against Liberty, Maloney’s bullpen played a vital role in the team’s three wins. In those games, the Cardinals’ bullpen pitched 12.6 innings, racking up 13 strikeouts while allowing one run to cross home plate. “It’s huge,” Maloney said. “It gives the team a lot of confidence to know that [the bullpen] can hold somebody at bay. ... You could say without question that the bullpen has been a very important piece.” Jordan made appearances in all three of Ball State’s wins over the weekend, pitching 5.2 innings, picking up a save and getting the Cardinals out of the seventh inning, bases-loaded jam in the team’s final game. Plesac also continued his start to his college career by earning his fourth victory

WEDNESDAY The Ball State women’s basketball team faces Northern Illinois at home as the season’s end draws near.

UPCOMING MEN’S BASKETBALL at Eastern Michigan | Eagles’ Record: 17-12 After beating Central Michigan in its final home game and snapping a 10-game losing streak, Ball State will attempt to earn a needed road victory this evening. For a team that sits at 0-13 on the road, winning an away game seems like a tall order, especially against Eastern Michigan. “We got a real good test this week because Eastern’s defense speaks for itself,” Ball State head coach James Whitford said. Ball State last played the Eagles on Feb. 12, where opposing center Da’Shonte Riley controlled the game on defense. Ball State lost as it committed 21 turnovers. Freshman Zavier Turner was a standout for Whitford as the 5-foot-9 point guard was praised for his ability to distribute the ball effectively with eight assists and five turnovers. Over the past three games, Turner averaged 5.7 assists and 3.7 turnovers. Senior guard Jesse Berry has improved in scoring, averaging 18.3 points during the last six games.

DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Senior Tyler Jordan throws a baseball during a game last season. In Sunday’s game against Liberty, Jordan pitched 1.2 innings.

and second save over the weekend. His performances could make him a candidate for his second conference pitcher of the week award. Even freshman B.J. Butler came out of the pen pitching like a veteran, tossing three shutout innings in the team’s 5-4 win over Rider on Saturday. While the starting pitchers try to find their groove

FRIDAY After a weekend sweep, the Ball State men’s volleyball team takes on Belmont Abbey at home.

to start the 2014 season, the bullpen has done its part in helping Ball State race out to its 9-3 record. “It’s just a matter of time before our starting pitchers get back to their consistency level,” Maloney said. “We know they can get there, and I think when that happens, we will have a chance to be an awfully good team. ... It’s a journey.”

NEW LOWERED RATES!

TEAM COMPARISON STATS

Points per game Points given up per game Field goal % Assists per game Turnovers per game

Ball State Opponent 66.3

66.7

73.9

61.4

.406

.413

13

10.6

16.8

12.4

CARDINALS TOP PLAYER CHRIS BOND • Points per game: 12.7 • Field goal %: .447 •Average rebounds per game: 6.1 • Average minutes per game: 31.5 • Total steals: 28

DN 3-4-14  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News on March 4, 2014.

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