Page 1

DN TUESDAY, FEB. 4, 2014

THE DAILY NEWS

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

Lack of salt hits before storm University suggests everyone be careful on sidewalks, roads |

CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS NEWS EDITOR news@bsudailynews.com

As Central Indiana prepares for extreme snowfall, Ball State announced it is running low on salt used to clear roadways and sidewalks.

HOW YOU

The university sent an email to students Monday warning them to take extra precaution while walking or driving on campus because facilities personnel will not be able to treat all areas of campus. The email came a day ahead of hazardous weather. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for today from 1 p.m. until 1 p.m. Wednesday, with the potential for 7-10 inches of snow in Muncie. “Everybody wants salt, and there

« Everybody wants salt, and there is none around.

We are calling all over the place trying to find some » KEVIN KENYON, associate vice president of facilities is none around,” said Kevin Kenyon, associate vice president of facilities. “We are calling all over the place trying to find some.” Rain followed by colder temperatures Monday led to an abundance of ice. Kenyon said the ice, coupled with the prospect of more snow,

will lower the university’s already dwindling salt supply. He said the de-icer Ball State has left is in individual bags that are cumbersome to open in bulk, and may still leave much of campus untreated.

See SALT, page 3

spin IT

Record store gets in tune with how albums can change lives of various music listeners JEREMY ERVIN STAFF REPORTER

H

| jrervin@bsu.edu

olding a vinyl album of Dr. Dre’s “The Chronic,” Pete Lansinger remembers first hearing it in the passenger seat of his brother’s ’97 Chevrolet Corsica when he was 13 or 14. Lansinger shared his story in what was the recently released first episode of the Village Green Record’s Album Testimonial Series, which chronicles the stories of people and the albums that have changed their lives. At the time, Lansinger said he didn’t know what chronic was and the fact that the album sleeve mimicked a package of Zig-Zag rolling papers didn’t register in his mind. He just knew he felt cool riding with his 16-year-old brother in New Castle, Ind., in a beaten-up car with a booming sound system. “You picture yourself walking in slow motion, that kind of thing, like this is badass,” Lansinger said in the testimony. “But I’m in New Castle, Ind., in a ‘97 Corsica.

What’s going on? Why do I feel so cool? You turn the music off and instantly, you look around like, ‘F--k, I’m not doing anything cool. We’re going to Dairy Queen.’” VGR’s Album Testimonial Series, which will consist of 25 episodes, is set to release two videos a week. So far, VGR has released six videos. The idea for the project began years ago in a conversation between Travis Harvey, owner of VGR, and his friend Julian Dalrymple, who became the project’s director.

See VGR, page 4

DN PHOTOS COREY OHLENKAMP

A DARING DUEL Indianapolis fights against trafficking City is better prepared to deter local sex trade after 2012 Super Bowl ALAN HOVORKA CHIEF REPORTER | afhovorka@bsu.edu Sport of fencing compares to rapid ‘game of human chess’ SEE PAGE 4

MUNCIE, INDIANA

TODAY IN 1938, “SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS” CAME OUT. HOW ‘BOUT THEM POISONED APPLES?

Arrests for sex trafficking in Indianapolis have increased in the years after the city hosted the 2012 Super Bowl. The preparation for the event allowed the Indiana Protection for Abused and Trafficked Humans Task Force, in conjunction with other anti-human trafficking organizations, to provide appropriate training and resources to law enforcement and other parties for

identifying and helping victims of human trafficking. Police officers, hotel service workers, child protection services and other personnel were unable to properly identify instances of sex trafficking prior to the national football event. The groups contributed to 42 arrests in the two years after, according to the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department. The office of the Indiana Attorney General defines sex trafficking as a segment of human trafficking where sex is commercialized regardless of the age of the worker. Jon Daggy, a detective sergeant for the IMPD in the Human Trafficking Vice Unit, said the more

than 40 arrests have been on charges of promoting prostitution. Currently, there are four cases in the Indiana court system. “We see about a couple of cases a month,” he said. “Before the Super Bowl, we were hardly getting any. I credit the outreach [programs].” The increase in arrests does not necessarily mean the amount of trafficking has gone down, but instead may be because of an increase in awareness. “I would say even though there hasn’t been a change in overall numbers, the atmosphere around Indianapolis has changed because we can now take appropri1. CLOUDY 2. MOSTLY CLOUDY ate action,” Daggy said.

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INDICATORS • Living with an employer • Poor living conditions •Multiple people in a cramped space • Inability to speak to an individual alone • Answers appear to be scripted and rehearsed • Employer is holding identity documents • Signs of physical abuse • Submissive or fearful THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

Contact law enforcement if a person has been identified as a victim. If they have already escaped their situation, the National Human Trafficking Resource SUNNY 3. PARTLY CLOUDY Center has4. MOSTLY resources on5. SUNNY where to direct them to get help. THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

See TRAFFICKING, page 3

SOURCE: State Department THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

6. RAIN

FORECAST

7. PERIODS OF RAIN

9. SCATTERED SHOWERS

Snow, anywhere from 6-8 inches, will fall this afternoon and continue tonight before exiting the area by Wednesday. - Cody Bailey, assistant chief weather forecaster

TODAY  Heavy snow High: 26 Low: 19 11. SNOW FLURRIES

12. SCATTERED FLURRIES

13. SNOW SHOWERS

VOL. 93, ISSUE 77 10. DRIZZLE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY

CLARIFICATION

A story printed Monday had the headline “Lack of LGBT dorm potential for issues.” This headline does not accurately represent the views of the sources in the story. The Daily News should have published “Differing views on LGBT issues may pose challenges in dorms.”

NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

5 THINGS TO KNOW

1.

MCT PHOTO

COMPANY WILL KILL STRAY DOGS IN SOCHI BEFORE GAMES BEGIN

TODAY

THE FORECAST POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

TUESDAY Heavy snow High: 26 Low: 19 15 - HEAVY SNOW

3. SYRIAN GOVERNMENT’S AIR ATTACKS KILL 18 BEIRUT (AP) — The Syrian government extended its intense aerial campaign against rebel-held areas of the northern city of Aleppo on Monday, conducting a series of airstrikes that killed at least 18 people, including five children, activists said. President Bashar al-Assad’s air force has pounded opposition areas of the divided city since mid-December, reducing apartment blocks to rubble and overwhelming already strapped hospitals and medical clinics with the wounded. On Sunday, government aircraft also targeted areas of

SOCHI, Russia (AP) — Thousands of stray dogs have been living amid the mud and rubble of Olympic construction sites, roaming the streets and snowy mountainsides, and begging for scraps of food. But as the games drew near, authorities have turned to a company to catch and kill the animals so they don’t bother Sochi’s new visitors — or even wander into an Olympic event. Alexei Sorokin, director general of pest control firm Basya Services, told The Associated Press that his company had a contract to exterminate the animals throughout the Olympics, which open Friday. Sorokin described his company as being involved in the “catching and disposing” of dogs, although he refused to specify how the dogs would be killed or say where they would take the carcasses. The dogs have been causing numerous problems, Sorokin said Monday, including “biting children.”

east Aleppo under rebel control, killing nearly 40 people. Monday’s air raids hit the districts of Hanano, Qadi Askar and Mouwasalat, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The group, which monitors the conflict through a network of activists on the ground, said helicopters dropped crude bombs — barrels packed with explosives, fuel and scraps of metal — on the neighborhoods, causing immense damage. Amateur videos posted online provided a window on the carnage.

4. FARM BILL NEARS PASSAGE, IMPACTS FOOD WASHINGTON (AP) — Cuts to food stamps, continued subsidies to farmers and victories for animal rights advocates. The massive, five-year farm bill heading toward final passage this week has broad implications for just about every American, from the foods we eat to what we pay for them. Support for farmers through the subsidies included in the legislation

helps determine the price of food and what is available. And money for food stamps helps the neediest Americans who might otherwise go hungry. The legislation could reach President Barack Obama later this week. The House already has passed the bipartisan measure and the Senate was scheduled to pass the bill this week after a test vote Monday.

2. ABORTIONS DECLINE TO LOWEST SINCE 1973

5. MAN SAYS HE WAS AT SEA FOR 13 MONTHS

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. abortion rate declined to its lowest level since 1973, and the number of abortions fell by 13 percent between 2008 and 2011, according to the latest national survey of abortion providers conducted by a prominent research institute. The Guttmacher Institute, which supports access to abortion, said in a report issued Monday that there were about 1.06 million abortions in 2011 — down from about 1.2 million in 2008. Guttm-

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — It’s a story that almost defies belief: A man leaves Mexico in December 2012 for a day of shark fishing and ends up surviving 13 months on fish, birds and turtles before washing ashore on the remote Marshall Islands thousands of miles away. But that’s what a man identifying himself as 37-year-old Jose Salvador Alvarenga told the U.S. ambassador in the Marshall Islands and the nation’s

acher’s figures are more up-to-date and in some ways more comprehensive than statistics compiled by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. According to the report, the rate fell to 16.9 abortions per 1,000 women ages 15-44 in 2011, below the peak of 29.3 in 1981 and the lowest since16.3 in 1973. Guttmacher and other groups for abortion rights have been apprehensive about the recent wave of laws restricting abortion access.

officials during a 30-minute meeting Monday before he was taken to a local hospital for monitoring. Alvarenga washed ashore on the tiny atoll of Ebon in the Pacific Ocean last week before being taken to the capital, Majuro, on Monday. “It’s hard to imagine how someone might arrive on Ebon out of the blue,” Ambassador Tom Armbruster in Majuro said. “Certainly, this guy has had an ordeal.”

WEDNESDAY Scattered snow showers High: 27 Low: 5 14 - SCATTERED SNOW SHOWERS

THURSDAY Partly cloudy High: 14 Low: -4 03 - PARTLY CLOUDY

FRIDAY Mostly sunny High: 18 Low: 6 04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens ASST. NEWS EDITOR Sam Hoyt

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz 72HRS EDITOR Kourtney Cooper

SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Taylor Irby ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty

ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile GRAPHICS EDITOR Stephanie Redding

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITOR Cooper Cox

TUESDAY $2.00 Bells Two Hearted

24/7 Crossword

DESIGN EDITORS Daniel Brount Ellen Collier

Sudoku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Michael Mepham

Level: Easy

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY

ACROSS 1 FIND THE ANSWER TO 6 CHICAGO MAYOR EMANUEL 10 “THE WIZARD __”: COMIC STRIP 14 BIRD-RELATED 15 BLUE BONNET SPREAD 16 MUSICAL SYMBOL 17 HOSIERY SUPPORT ITEM 19 ASTRONAUT SHEPARD 20 JAI __ 21 SUFFIX WITH BILLION 22 SUBWAY ENTRANCE 23 BARBECUE VEGGIE EATEN WITH ONE’S HANDS 26 SOUTHWESTERN DESERT 29 ACTOR STEPHEN 30 WASHER MAKER 31 SNORKELING SITE 37 “WHEEL OF FORTUNE” PURCHASE 38 HOSE NOZZLE OPTION 39 HDTV BRAND 40 ICE CREAM DRINK 43 PLAY THE COQUETTE 45 DEBTOR’S LETTERS 46 AWARD HUNG ON A WALL

47 1988 U2 ALBUM AND MOVIE 53 BE A HAM 54 OBOE INSERT 55 FANCY CRACKER SPREAD 59 1990S VICE PRESIDENT 60 WIMBLEDON FEATURE 62 CURLING APPLIANCE 63 MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR PRESIDENT 64 DAMAGING BUG 65 CONG. MEETING 66 DAZZLES 67 KIND OF REPTILE FOUND AT THE STARTS OF 17-, 23-, 31-, 40-, 47- AND 60-ACROSS DOWN 1 IT’S A LONG STORY 2 AVOCADO SHAPE 3 COIN ONCE TOSSED INTO ITALIAN FOUNTAINS 4 POPE’S PLACE, WITH “THE” 5 WSW’S OPPOSITE 6 RED-BREASTED BIRD 7 OLDS MODEL 8 TROJAN BEAUTY WHOSE FACE LAUNCHED A THOU-

SAND SHIPS 9 WITTY REMARK 10 PAINTING THE TOWN RED 11 __ ACID: PRENATAL VITAMIN INGREDIENT 12 “BOOT” COUNTRY PREFIX 13 STAR IN THE CONSTELLATION CYGNUS 18 RED INSIDE 22 “THE GIVING TREE” AUTHOR SILVERSTEIN 24 EGG CELLS 25 HIGHCHAIR FEATURE 26 SIR COUNTERPART 27 BYGONE SCIENCE MAGAZINE 28 THE SLAMMER 31 TAX SEASON VIP 32 MORK’S PLANET 33 ARCTIC EXPLORER JOHN 34 “ER” ACTOR LA SALLE 35 STATIONERY HUE 36 KARMA 38 CAGE’S “LEAVING LAS VEGAS” CO-STAR 41 LITTLE TABBIES 42 ONE AND ONLY

43 WINTER MALADY 44 SATIRIZE WITHOUT MERCY 46 DEGREES FOR MANY PROFS. 47 LONGTIME MORNING COHOST, FAMILIARLY 48 WHAT IT IS “WHEN THE MOON HITS YOUR EYE LIKE A BIG PIZZA PIE” 49 BARCELONA BULLS 50 ARCHERY MISSILE 51 HARLEM RENAISSANCE WRITER ZORA __ HURSTON 52 CLASSROOM FIXTURES 56 SUBTLE GLOW 57 ARDUOUS JOURNEY 58 FRENCH I WORD 60 STUDENT’S STAT. 61 “CSI” NETWORK

ballstatedaily.com

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY

$2.00 Bells Two Hearted


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

Report says Ind. jobs are strong Unemployment falls as state generates 1 in 11 jobs in nation PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER | RACHEL rmpodnar@bsu.edu Indiana’s unemployment is higher than the national average, but several factors are leading to a better job market. A Ball State economist said one in 11 jobs nationwide are created in Indiana. But the state unemployment rate is at its lowest point since October 2008, according to data from the Indiana Department of Workforce Development. Michael Hicks, a Ball State professor and director of Center for Business and Economic Research, said the state’s economy is encouraging to

UNEMPLOYMENT RATES City, county and state Muncie: 7.3 percent Delaware County: 7.0 percent Indiana: 6.9 percent Surrounding states Illinois: 8.6 percent Kentucky: 8.0 percent Michigan: 8.4 percent Ohio: 7.2 percent SOURCE: Indiana Department of Workforce Development

businesses. “Between 2009 and 2012, I attribute [the decrease in unemployment] to rebound from recession, which really clobbered manufacturing,” he said. “Since then the favor-

able business climate in Indiana has to be playing a role in recovery.” According to the state’s DWD, Indiana created 42,600 new jobs in 2013 and boasts more individuals returning to the workforce, a sign of economic health. The Indiana Economic Development Corporation tried to capitalize on Indiana’s job creation success by advertising around 2012’s Super Bowl to attract companies from New York to Indiana. The campaign ran digital advertisements near MetLife Stadium for two weeks before the game, spending $20,000, according to The Indianapolis Star. “No little-town blues here, just a AAA credit rating, budget surplus and lower taxes,” ads said.

James Mitchell, Career Center associate director, said many students stay in Indiana after graduation. Students using Career Center internship searches typically rank Indiana as their main geographic preference and the Midwest as their second. “I think there are a large number of our students who come from Indiana and who would like to stay in Indiana,” he said. The “brain drain” — earning degrees in one state and leaving for another state after graduation — is a real concern, he said, but one that is being fought. “There are a variety of initiatives trying to recruit and keep new talent here in Indiana,” Mitchell said. About 100,000 graduates, more than 50 percent of

Student groups protest against Keystone pipeline Candlelight march joins national rally to stop construction

|

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Sophomore environmental science major Derek Tepe reaches for a candle to light during the vigil as a part of a nationwide movement to protest the Keystone XL Pipeline. Senior psychology major Ariana Brown lights a candle next to Tepe during the vigil at Frog Baby on Monday. Around 10 students participated in the vigil and they walked around campus to pass out fliers.

said. “Muncie cares. We’re out here, and we’re not supporting the Keystone XL pipeline.” Kourtney Dillavou, a senior landscape architecture major and cofounder of Go Fossil Free, helped organize the last-minute vigil to protest the upcoming legislation. “It’s [a] non-violent, civil disobedience act against Keystone XL,” she said. “Obama will be making his decision about how he feels,

so this is our last fighting chance at having him say no.” The group eventually left their candles behind and headed inside to hold signs and leave fliers. Brown also helped to lead the group of 10 protesters, made up of seven students and a family of three from the Muncie community. “We threw this together last night,” she said. “This is a lot of people. With 24 hour no-

tice on a school night in the cold, this is great. I’m pretty happy with the turnout.” Dan Kaiser, a sophomore architecture major, said sustainability is a part of his future career. “I’m just really passionate about sustainability,” Kaiser said. “Something like [the pipeline] needs to be talked about. People need to know because eventually it’s going to affect all of us.”

SALT: Students in wheelchairs wary of icy pathways | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Crews will continue to plow, but Kenyon urges students to be aware of slick sidewalks and parking lots. The lack of salt isn’t from a lapse of funding, but a lack of availability, Kenyon said. “We can’t create [salt] out of thin air,” Kenyon said. “We are probably pushing the envelope a little bit [regarding finances], but we are budgeted for the worst case

scenario.” Sydney Comer, president of Alliance for Disability Awareness, said the ice and the snow make it harder for any students to cross campus. Those who use a wheelchair, as she does, can find it nearly impossible. She said she and other members of ADA use Ball State’s shuttle system as their primary way to get to classes. Comer said the conditions

could become a problem for her if the university can’t clear paths to and from shuttle pickup points. Even if the shuttles run, Comer said she is worried a lack of road salt could lead to slowed schedules and make some students late. To prepare for this, she said students with disabilities try to contact professors and inform them that winter weather could bring delays. “It’s a yearly event, so we do

try to attempt to reach out to faculty to have them understand that it is a struggle,” Comer said. She said professors tend to be understanding when she arrives to class a little behind schedule. Still, running into issues while trying to get to class is always in the back of her mind. “[Snow and ice] creates wear and tear on the transportation we use and ourselves,” Comer said.

TRAFFICKING: More arrests aren’t necessarily progress | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Though police experience greater success in arresting traffickers, keeping workers out of the trade remains a different story. Daggy said workers must rescue themselves. “The cases fizzle out because the people we recover end up going back,” he said. “They end up going back to traffickers because of the dynamics of that life. ” The arrests face another

Indiana receives grant to demolish abandoned homes Federal government supplies $75 million for 4,000 properties

LAUREN CHAPMAN UNIFIED MEDIA ONLINE EDITOR lechapman@bsu.edu

Several of Ball State’s conservation groups came together Monday night to join a nationwide protest against the Keystone XL oil pipeline. The U.S. State Department released its report Friday about the pipeline, a proposed construction project to drill oil through Canada and the U.S. President Barack Obama will make a response to the project. The report said the pipeline will create nearly 2,000 construction jobs, but carbon emissions from the pipeline would be equivalent to running around 300,000 ONLINE passenger vehicles for one year. Go Fossil Free Ball State and Activists share S t u d e n t s for Creative their message Social Activbit.ly/1kIO3bh ism members hosted a candlelight vigil at Frog Baby and walked through Robert Bell Building and Art and Journalism Building. Ariana Brown, a senior psychology major and SCSA president, said the candlelight vigil was an unorthodox choice, but it sent a message about the cause’s importance. “We want people to know that Muncie is there, too,” Brown

alumni, are Indiana residents, a whole,” he said. according to data from the “As a consequence, they are Alumni Center. Other states more likely to suffer higher with large alumni popula- levels of unemployment betions include Ohio, cause we have a less Florida and Illinois, educated workforce with around 5,000 here.” alumni each. Delaware County Delaware Counhas the third-highest ty does not share percentage of Ball the same economic State alumni, around growth as other parts 11,000 people. Marof the state. According ion and Hamilton to DWD, at 7 percent, MICHAEL HICKS, counties have higher it scored the 25th Center of Busi- alumni populations. highest unemploy- ness and EcoMitchell said most ment rate out of In- nomic Research graduates that stay in diana’s 92 counties. director Delaware County do Muncie’s unemployso for Ball State or IU ment rate is 7.3 percent. Health jobs. Hicks attributed the differ“There are a good number ence in employment numbers of people who have Ball State to a lack of education. degrees,” he said. “There are “Educational attainment in people that stay here but it’s Delaware County is poorer for very specific, niche areas than the state or the nation as like Ball State.”

roadblock when the victims withdraw from the cases and don’t testify. “They’re the ones who have to choose to face their traffickers in court,” he said. “No one can make that choice for them.” Super Bowl XLVI acted as a springboard for the takeoff of awareness and training programs in combating human trafficking, Daggy said. A Global Alliance Against Traffic In Women study from 2011 refutes that human

trafficking increases at large sporting events. The study said this myth is a result of misinformation and stereotypes. However, Daggy disagrees. “Anytime there is a big event — sporting event or convention — human trafficking increases,” he said. “People that work in the human trafficking are migratory by nature.” People involved in human trafficking tend to look for the largest events or popula-

tion centers, he said. The study by GAATW claims the media publish stories on this subject without solid evidence and create the hype surrounding the idea that large sporting events attract commercial sex. “The media tend to sit on two extremes of the situation,” Daggy said. “Some overhype it while others say it’s not an issue. The truth is usually somewhere in the middle.”

INDIANAPOLIS — A $75 million federal grant to demolish thousands of blighted houses will make a “small dent” in the number of abandoned properties plaguing Indiana, state officials said Monday. Lt. Gov. Sue Ellspermann and housing leaders said knocking down blighted and abandoned homes will help maintain property values and reduce crime. The money comes from the Hardest Hit Fund, which is used to help unemployed or low-income homeowners keep their houses. Officials estimate about 4,000 of the state’s more than 50,000 abandoned homes will be flattened but concede that represents only a dent in efforts to clean up affected cities. “It’s a very, very large problem, particularly in larger municipalities,” said Mark Neyland, director of asset preservation for the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority. “If we really wanted to, we could probably find 4,000 homes just within the Marion County area to be demolished.” RealtyTrac reported about a third of Indiana’s foreclosed houses are abandoned. That’s one of the highest percentages in the country. Indianapolis also was ranked among the top 20 metro areas with the highest number of abandoned homes last year. State officials said there are about 10,000 to 12,000 blighted and abandoned homes in the city. Cities and counties can apply for a portion of the grant starting this month. Preference will be given to municipalities with plans for the properties after

STEPS TO DEMOLISH ABANDONED HOUSES IN INDIANA 1. A report of an abandoned property can be sent to the Health and Hospital Corporation. 2. An inspector will check the reported property within five days. 3. The owner of the property will be notified within days after the inspection. 4. Another inspection will be made within 14 days. 5. A violation will be made, confirmed the property as vacant. 6. A hearing will be within 45 days. 7. The property will be ordered to be repaired or demolished within 45 days. 8. Demolition will take place. SOURCE: indy.gov

demolition, places riddled with former methamphetamine labs and areas where programs to deal with abandoned housing already are in place. Money will go to both urban and rural areas, where grants could yield greater results. In those areas, Neyland said, a few demolitions could make a greater difference in neighborhood quality. Only about 20 homes in Lawrence are uninhabitable and abandoned, Mayor Dean Jessup said. Grant money from another program is funding demolitions of three abandoned homes that burned to the ground, and a former hotel that had become a hub of prostitution and drugs is another site the city hopes to redevelop, he said. “Many of things in that neighborhood are not, shall we say, beautiful anymore,” Jessup said. “We see an opportunity there.”


PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

FEATURES

WEDNESDAY Is language getting dumbed down among things like the textspeak and the doge meme? Read to find out.

FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

Have you seen Boxed Water around? Find out what it is all about and why Ball State is now jumping on the bandwagon.

THURSDAY Get the scoop on weekend entertainment. REO Speedwagon and “Bring It On: The Musical” will take the stage.

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Sophomore computer science major Cole Ludwig, left, and sophomore criminal justice major Spencer Sabinske fence with sabres on Jan. 28 in the Student Recreation and Wellness Center during a Ball State University Fencing Club meeting.

The clanging of metal against metal and the rubbery squeaks of Chuck Taylor sneakers filled the room as students dueled, shuffling back and forth and brandishing their weapons. The Ball State University Fencing Club members practiced the fencing fundamentals: wielding weapons with finesse and seeking out their opponents’ weaknesses. “It’s the closest thing you’ll ever get to playing live chess,” Charlie Campbell, a junior interpersonal communications major, said.

MIND GAMES

Finesse, combat

in fencing

Sport is about wielding weapons with cunning, strategy

Brian Koby taught fencing for 12 years before he became coach of the club in 2008. Koby leads students through a series of warmup routines that include stretching arms and legs and loosening joints before practice begins. “Fencing is as much physical as it is mental,” he said. Although fencing is multiple centuries old, modern fencing has roots in the 18th century during the Italian Renaissance, according to

Fencing.net. From there, the French improved the sport and fencing schools in Spain became well-known by the 19th century.

WEAPON OF CHOICE

The club uses the three traditional weapons called foil, épée and sabre. The foil is built for touch, being light and thin, with the chest being the only target. The épée is sturdier, built for support and stabbing while the entire body is the target. The sabre is used as a slashing weapon, but only the waist up is a target. Weapons are designed to bend easily and dis-

tribute the force of a stab evenly throughout the blade, causing less harm to the opponent.

COMBAT WITHOUT DANGER

The fencing club plans to travel to eight different competitions this semester. Injuries from fencing can include muscle strain or sprain, tendinitis, cartilage tears, punctures, torn tendons, fractures and lacerations. But all injuries are relatively uncommon. The most common injuries that occur in the Ball State club are bruises, the occasional blister, puncture or small lacerations. “It’s one of the safest contact [and] com-

bat sports out there,” junior general studies major Elise Miller said. “We tend to have lower rates of injury than ping pong.” According to an American Journal of Sports Medicine study of injuries in the 2008 Olympics, fencing’s injury rate was 2.5 percent. Other sports like snowboarding, soccer, taekwondo and field hockey had rates of more than 20 percent. Fencers of all ages are required to wear a chest guard, gloves and a mask, also referred to as whites, and are completely covered with a thick canvas. However, the property surrounding the fencers can take a beating. One such instance was when the club performed at the Olympic-themed Late Nite event. “They set us up in a tiny room with super low ceilings, which we told them might not be the best location,” Miller said. “During the first bout, one of our members went for a cool swing at their opponent’s head and accidentally sliced open a ceiling tile.” For more information, visit bsufc.iweb.bsu.edu.

LANGUAGE OF FENCING

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Fencing has been a part of the Olympics since the 1896 Summer Olympics. Here are Olympic definitions of the language of fencing. •E  n garde: The starting position for fencing •É  pée: A thrusting sword originally created from the dueling sword, similar in length to a foil but heavier, with a larger guard and a much stiffer blade • F oil: A thrusting sword with a flexible rectangular blade and a smaller guard than the épée •R  apier: A thrusting sword with an elaborate hilt and a long, slender, pointed blade, developed in the 16th century and the precursor to the épée • Sabre: The modern version of the slashing cavalry sword, similar in length and weight to the foil but able to cut with the blade as well as hit with the point • Strip or piste: The fencing field •W  hites: term used to describe fencing clothes

Junior medical technologies major Elizabeth Haywood helps two new students learn the basic techniques of fencing Jan. 28. Members of the club compete at a variety of competitions across the country.

SOURCE: Olympic.org

VGR: Record store creates project to tell stories of lives changed by single album | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “People can talk about a song,” said Harvey, who also produces the series. “Usually, it’s like, ‘I like that song,’ or ‘That song was so cool.’ But it’s rarely ever that ‘this song helped me’ or ‘changed me’ or ‘empowered me.’ Albums are a lot more like life. ... Albums are usually a handful of songs that span a lot of different emotions and thoughts of life.” After a few years in project purgatory, timing and circumstances aligned and the series

moved forward. Harvey contacted nearly 100 customers, friends, musicians, comedians and other artists to participate. Over two days, Dalrymple and Harvey joined with Chicago-based cameraman and gaffer Steven Clay to interview 50 subjects for the series. The team plans to release half of those, but Harvey said he’s open to continuing the series. The videos are simple. Only a few minutes each, they’re shot plainly in black and white and feature the person and their album only. There’s

no theme music or elaborate background competing for the viewer’s attention. “We were set on trying to share them in the most naked sense — to share their stories without there being a whole lot of an editorial position,” Harvey said. In one video they shot, a young woman struggles with the loss of her teacher and mentor. Another is an account from a Ball State professor recalling the first time he listened to the Beatles as a boy. A man explains how an album by thrash-metal

band Pantera inspired him to come out of the closet. Harvey describes himself and his store as believing in “full-on albums” in an artistic and ideological sense. He argued that the connections between tracks on an album can make a more complete artistic statement than just an individual song. The idea of cohesive albums that communicate a message when pieced together was created decades ago and brought on by prolific bands like the Beatles.

“There came the idea in the ’60 of having a theme album,” said Andrew Crow, Ball State director of Choral Activities. “All of the songs weren’t just individual tracks, but were linked together by some common element, idea or even a narrative. The Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ was innovative in that way.” Harvey likened the testimonial series to what it’s like to be a record store owner. He said after he started VGR eight years ago, he has listened to countless customer

stories where they share their lives and their music. Harvey said over the years, he’s developed a personal relationship with the customers and their favorite music. Harvey said customers’ relationship with music is a story worth telling in itself. “We didn’t want people to talk about why the album sold millions,” he said. “... We want to talk about why the album was sold to them and it connected to them. If it’s a terrible record, that’s OK if it meant something to you.”


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FORUM

Got beef? Join the conversation. Email us at opinion@bsudailynews.com to get your voice out there.

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MENTAL FORTITUDE WILL AID TEAM DURING ROAD MATCHES DAVID POLASKI DAVE’S DIGS DAVID POLASKI IS A JUNIOR JOURNALISM AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS MAJOR AND WRITES ‘DAVE’S DIGS’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE PAPER. WRITE TO DAVID AT DMPOLASKI@ BSU.EDU

If Ball State can stay collected and win at IPFW, the team can do the same almost anywhere. It would have been easy and understandable for the men’s volleyball team to be rattled Friday night. Ball State faced a hostile crowd of 1,060, hundreds more than they’ve seen this season. Everyone was packed inside a small venue with the seating arrangement aligned so the fans were precariously close to the players at all times. They screamed, yelled, insulted and taunted the Cardinal servers and bench players throughout the match. After many points in which a Ball State player made an error, he walked back to his spot while opposing fans pointed fingers

and threw jeers from just a few yards away. Not once was a finger pointed back. After occasional blocks and kills from IPFW, the Mastodon bench would erupt. They’d roar, bench players running onto the court to give high-fives, literally beating their chests and punching the air, creating as much ruckus and chaos as possible. Not once did Ball State complain. Instead, the Cardinals admirably kept calm and proceeded to upset the then-No. 14 team that did everything it could to shake its concentration. That mental fortitude propelled Ball State through the match, and the players need it in other venues as the season continues. Even libero David Ryan Vander

Meer said he was proud of how his team responded to IPFW’s antics. Give credit to Vander Meer for not coming unglued after receiving a yellow card for the most trivial of matters. He wasn’t mouthing off to an official, like IPFW was after close calls that didn’t go its way. He wasn’t arguing with an opponent or acting unsportsmanlike. He was tying his shoe. It’s a stall tactic to buy time, but not one that ever gets penalized. The Cardinals were visibly stunned when the yellow card went up. But Ball State didn’t let the surprise call get to them and went on to win the set. It’s a lesson the team will take with it

FORUM POLICY The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor,

guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed.

The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides

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this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com

while playing opponents, such as Lewis, on the road that often bring large, frantic crowds. Ball State’s talent is emerging and the last thing the Cardinals can afford is to fail from losing its cool. Early in the match, an upset IPFW bench player stood up and began walking toward an official, yelling at him. The official turned and began walking toward the player, who quickly sat down. The official laughed and said to IPFW head coach Arnie Ball, “I’d love to hear from you, but not him.� Luckily for head coach Joel Walton’s team, IPFW may be the roughest environment his team has to play in this season. The intimidating crowd with the

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842

U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

AJ 276 Muncie, IN 47306 Phone: 765.285.8247 Fax: 765.285.8248

Answering Serv/Security Co needs p/t operators. Must type min 40wpm. 2nd&3rd shift. Some weekend hrs. Call Debby 765-288-2951 “Find a job thatĘźs right for youâ€?... Where itĘźs warm & sunny too! Be a FL elementary K-5 Teacher! 2014-15 School Yr. $1200 Relocation to Ft. Lauderdale Area. We offer great 1st yr teacher program w/ mentor teachers. Drug & background check req. Full fringe benefits, health, life insur, disability & FL retirement system. Email resume to cseflorida@aol.com. Visit our city at www.sunny.org & our school at www.charterschool.com.

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To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

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Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)Today is a 5 -- More planning is required at home. Seek answers from a professional money manager. Go to extra trouble to keep costs down.Voice your opinions. Favor optimistic approaches. Relax into domesticity, and leave big decisions for another day. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)Today is a 6 -- Don’t let a discouraging remark stop you. Don’t talk back, or gossip. Improve morale by indulging in simple pleasures. Be careful not to double-book. Finish an important job before relaxing. Get productive in peace and quiet.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)Today is an 8 -- It looks like everything works. Ask probing questions to check. Advance planning helps. Don’t throw your money around. Leave it stashed. Quietly assume more responsibility. Not everyone needs to agree. Eat well, and rest mind and body.



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bench antics could have been enough to rattle more experienced players. But it didn’t rattle Ball State, and it can’t if the team wants to win in other arenas. Ball State must bring a mentality of knowing everybody wants to see them fail and feed on it. Playing for the passion of exciting your home crowd is strong. Playing for the passion of bringing an opposing crowd to a dead silence is even stronger. It’s what the team must strive for to upset Lewis and No. 2 Loyola. Friday night, Ball State proved it’s possible. Though maybe Vander Meer should tie his shoes a little tighter before matches, just in case.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is an 8 -- Navigate a disagreement about priorities. Don’t over-extend. Notice where the cash is going. Create or grow a nest egg. Check for errors in your assumptions. Point out the potential. Postpone your trip until conditions improve.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 6 -- Hand over some of the cash, but be careful. Don’t fund a fantasy. Spend intelligently. Set priorities. Others vie for your attention. Get yourself a useful treat, and relax into a peaceful pursuit. Take it easy.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)Today is a 6 -- Discuss how to allot resources. Slow and easy does it. Take care not to step on toes. Prepare documents. Don’t touch savings. Postpone purchases if possible. Get everyone aligned on it first. Focus on romance.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 7 -Confront a barrier. Take notes. Stick to your budget. Be respectful and polite. Stay home instead of going out. Don’t play poker, either. Stay cool. Postpone a celebration. Get involved in a passionate, relaxing (inexpensive) diversion.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)Today is a 6 -- Postpone household chores. Focus on making money, or it could fall short. Hold your temper, and handle a family matter privately. Carefully choose the course of action. Not everyone agrees. Wait a few days for a romantic tryst.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)--Today is a 6 -Expect some resistance, with the possibility of error high. Don’t talk about work in progress. Use caution, and don’t push (no matter how much your partner wants it). Stash away enough to keep the budget. Rest.

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Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)- Today is a 7 -- Take care of important details.Your partner applauds your effort. Push your personal agenda. New information disrupts old assumptions. Keep an open mind. Magnetic personalities come together. Work could intrude on family bliss. Postpone a private moment. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)Today is an 8 -- Don’t borrow or lend today. Others could get confrontational. Energetic friends stir emotions. A better time will come. Consider options carefully before choosing the right path. Put the oxygen mask on yourself first. Calibrate your power. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)Today is a 6 -- Don’t spend your money on entertainment alone. Wait for a better time. Get into creative work.You obsess over finishing touches. Be honest, above all. Modifications may be required. Take care traveling. Quiet productivity can be fun.


PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY The Ball State men’s basketball team tries to improve its 4-15 record when it travels to Buffalo.

SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

THURSDAY After a close loss to Kent State, the Ball State women’s basketball team takes on Central Michigan at home.

FRIDAY Ranked No. 15 in the latest AVCA poll, the Ball State men’s volleyball team travels to Virginia to face George Mason.

ANATOMY OF A FREE THROW Youth abundance gives team options MEN’S BASKETBALL

Foul shots require focus and muscle memory to perfect DAVID K. JONES CHIEF REPORTER

Whether it’s the first half or the game is on the line, free throw shots play an important role. The Ball State men’s basketball program emphasizes the act of drawing fouls and getting to the free-throw line. Freshman guard Quinten Payne is one of the players who specializes in the art of the foul shot. “We usually shoot about two minutes worth be-

THE BREAKDOWN

Quinten Payne is a freshman guard who has shot 75 percent from the free-throw line. Ball State has five free-throw shooters who shoot more than 70 percent. Freshman guard Zavier Turner leads the team with 87.9 percent. The athlete gets a feel for the basketball to find the “sweet spot.” The player then dribbles a few times or uses a routine to set up the shot. Before bending their knees to perfect their form, the player takes a short look at the rim.

One hand should be placed on the side of the ball to guide it to the basket, neutralizing any extra rotation.

The other hand should be placed in the middle of the ball with fingertips parallel to the basket.

The player releases the ball at the peak of their shot, letting it spin off the thumb and the fingertips to create a backward spin.

The shooter holds their form in the air for a second to ensure they have the proper spin on the ball, which is called a followthrough.

|

@dkjones_BSU

tween every couple drills,” Payne said. “It probably goes around 30 or 40 free throws per person.” That’s roughly 600 free throws in a single practice. Payne shoots 75 percent from the foul line. “They’re one of the most important things,” Payne said. “A lot of guys can find their ways of shooting the ball really well — it’s just an easy way of getting your game going.”

Four freshmen play key roles in rotation throughout season DAVID K. JONES CHIEF REPORTER | @dkjones_BSU At the beginning of the season, the Ball State men’s basketball team exhibited youth, experience and variety in its roster. Cardinals head coach James Whitford would commonly use a rotation that consisted of four freshmen, Zavier Turner, Franko House, Mark Alstork, Quinten Payne, and sophomore Bo Calhoun as they started off 2-2. “That’s the team you’re going to see all season,” Whitford said. “The way we play, you can’t just play six or seven guys. And that’s going to force guys to step up.” Since the start of Mid-American Conference play, Whitford starts Turner, House and Alstork to complement seniors Chris Bond and Majok Majok. Payne watched his minutes dwindle down after his foot injury in mid-December, and senior guard Kindon Crowder has benefitted. The Cardinals now sit at 4-15 following the overtime loss to Northern Illinois on Saturday. The Huskies exposed the Cardinals’ lack of a backup point guard and a second option in the post, something that the team has missed since November. Majok fouled out with 15

BALL STATE TOP PLAYERS ZAVIER TURNER

.379 field goal percentage, .426 three-pointer percentage, 12.1 points per game CHRIS BOND

.448 field goal percentage, .333 three-pointer percentage, 11.7 points per game MAJOK MAKOK

.563 field goal percentage, .000 three-pointer percentage, 11.1 points per game seconds left in regulation, forcing Ball State to rely on Calhoun and then House on the inside during the extra period. “We don’t really know how to run offense through him at center,” Whitford said about House playing for Majok. “I thought it made it awkward for us.” After undergoing a second wrist surgery, senior Matt Kamieniecki redshirted this year to recover. Kamieniecki was projected to start in the front court with Majok, and his absence was felt immediately with a season-opening loss to Indiana State. Kamieniecki is known for his rugged rebounding style. The 6-foot-8 Clarkston, Mich., student-athlete averaged 3.4 points and four rebounds per game in his 74 games as a Cardinal. Though his averages are low, he brought intangibles that the Cardinals are missing. Jauwan Scaife graduated and became a graduate student manager for the team.

Last year’s starting point guard Marcus Posley transferred to Indian Hills. Turner was expected to take over the point guard position and lead the team. Turner has started all but one game, averaging 32.4 minutes per game. He started off the season averaging 17.7 points and shooting 71 percent from three-point distance through his first three games. Those numbers have dipped, but he still leads the team in all three categories. While he is no longer No. 1 in the nation for free throw percentage, he sits at No. 3 with 87.9 percent. “I love coaching him,” Whitford said. “He’s my type of kid.” Whitford has a 2014 recruiting class he’s hoping can fill voids. He recruited a pair from Arsenal Tech, Jeremie Tyler and Rashaun Richardson. Tyler is a 6-foot-2 combo guard who excels at scoring the basketball. Richardson is a 6-foot-7 forward who can play both forward positions and plays solid defense. Whitford also signed Sean Sellers from Greensburg, Ind. Since his freshman season, the 6-foot-6 wing has started. When his senior season started, he was already the leading scorer and rebounder in his school’s history. Whitford said Sellers has a high basketball IQ. The final product for Whitford comes originally from Canada, Francis Kiapway. This 6-foot-2 guard is an outside shooter playing in Connecticut.

BALL STATE UNIVERSITY

RICH DEMILLO Distinguished professor of computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology Director of the Center for 21st Century Universities Lumina Foundation Fellow Chief scientist at the Qatar Computing Research Institute

“NEW ECOSYSTEMS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION: THE ROAD AHEAD” Tuesday, February 4 7:30 p.m. | Pruis Hall

DN PHOTOS BREANNA DAUGHERTY DN GRAPHIC LAUREN CHAPMAN

DeMillo discusses how 2012 brought a global conversation about the nature and value of universities that defined a new ecosystem for higher education and looks to the road that lies ahead.

JEFF SELINGO Contributing editor and former top editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education Professor of practice at Arizona State University Author of College (Un)bound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students

“COLLEGE (UN)BOUND: THE FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION” Monday, February 10 7:30 p.m. | Pruis Hall Selingo explores the college of tomorrow—how families will pay, what campuses will look like, how students will learn, and what skills will lead to success in the job market. Free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the Academic Long-Range Planning Steering Committee.

DN 2-4-14  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News for Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014.

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