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DN WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19, 2014

THE DAILY NEWS

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

BSUDM doubles day goal for event

MCT PHOTOS

UNUSUAL

Student group raises 2-day cost of stay in Riley Hospital for charity |

JACOB BURBRINK UNIFIED MEDIA REPORTER jmburbrink@bsu.edu

In 24 hours, Ball State University Dance Marathon raised $15,090.03, double the goal set for its Tuesday fundraiser. During the fundraising event for Riley Hospital for Children, the Facebook page for the organization posted videos every hour that showed people who have benefited from the services of Riley Hospital. The goal of the event was to raise $7,500, which is the cost of staying at Riley for one night. The one-day fundraiser came a few BY THE NUMBERS days before this year’s Dance Marathon event, which raised in 24 hours will start at 2 p.m. Saturday and end at 2 a.m. Sunday is the cost of staying at in the Field Sports Riley for one night Building. Zach Brown, director of media re- average amount per hour lations for BSUDM, said the group decided to double its goal after passing it at around 5 to 6 p.m. Brown said if they never tried, BSUDM would not know if the group could do it. In the final hours before the end of the fundraiser, the financial officer showed BSUDM was receiving $900 to $1,000 an hour. “We were thrilled,” Brown said. “We went for it, and we were happy for the results that we got.” The group ended up raising more Tuesday than the entirety of the first BSUDM in 2009.

PETS

$15,090.03 $7,500

$900-$1,000

Apartment restrictions causes students to own sugar glider, herps

D

MOTTO: “We stand for those who can’t.”

WHEN 2013 TOTAL

2 P.M.-2 A.M.

DANIELLE GRADY STAFF REPORTER | dagrady@bsu.edu

on’t be surprised if you meet Katie Emberton and see a small, furry head with black eyes filled with curiosity peeking out of her pocket. It’s probably just Bruce Wayne — Bruce for short. He’s one of two of this freshman English education major’s sugar gliders. Sugar gliders are small, squirrel-like creatures with skin flaps between their feet and hands. The marsupials get their name from their ability to spread out their skin flaps and jump fluidly from place to place. They can glide up to 148.5 feet in a glide, according to the North American Sugar Glider Association.

BSUDM

SATURDAY

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY KATHERINE EMBERTON

One of freshman English education major Katie Emberton’s sugar gliders poses with her cat at her home. Emberton got the idea to own sugar gliders after attending the Indiana State Fair and seeing some about five years ago.

$196,228.20

2014 GOAL $250,000 #QUARTER MILTHRILL

Emberton first saw sugar gliders on a trip to the Indiana State Fair about five years ago, when a group had sugar gliders available for the crowds to observe in-between exploring various fried foods and viewing more traditional animals. “My dad had just moved into an apartment, and he wanted some sort of small animal,” she said. “The apartment wouldn’t allow dogs. My dad’s not exactly a cat person, and he said, ‘Oh, that’d be perfect.’ That’s how we bought the first one.” This glider became Bruce, named after the superhero vigilante Batman. See PETS, page 3

ALUMNUS TO SIMULATE MISSION ON MARS Burris students learn about space, planet through partnership |

ALAN HOVORKA CHIEF REPORTER afhovorka@bsu.edu

INSIDE

Five important details Breaking down key points about Thursday’s conference matchup SEE PAGE 6

MUNCIE, INDIANA

THE OLYMPICS END SUNDAY. THE UNITED STATES HAS 20 MEDALS.

A 60-year-old Ball State alumnus will experience a simulation of life on Mars, and he’s bringing some fourth-grade students along for the ride. Ron Williams, director of the neuropsychology department at the Fort Wayne Neurological Center, and five other scientists from around the world will join together as an astronaut crew March 21 to simulate life on Mars. This is in conjunction with the University of Hawaii as part of its Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and

Simulation program. As part of the project, Williams will work with teachers in various schools, including Burris Laboratory School, because he said it is an experience to have this form of involvement with space exploration in the classroom. “What usually happens is that manned-space missions will do classroom outreach projects from space to students,” he said. “We are trying to emulate that because this is a mock mission to Mars.” Christy Wauzzinski, an instructor of intermediate education for Burris, will coordinate with Williams through email, Skype or pre-recorded video over the course of the four months to incorporate the students into his research to allow them to actively participate. The specifics of what they will be doing are still up in the air, she said.

“We decided that it would be best if we allow the students to decide what they want to do with him,” Wauzzinski said. Each crew member has individual projects and a network of schools involved. She said a scientist from France going on the simulation will take seeds from some schools and try to grow them in the Mars-like conditions. “That’s pretty cool, and if the children want to do something similar, we will,” she said. “It’s really up to them.” Wauzzinski said the most important aspect of this project is that it creates excitement in the classroom that is quite contagious. “The thought of having direct contact with some[one] doing something like this gives students motivation to learn,” she said.

MAUNA LOA “LONG MOUNTAIN”

The volcano’s name, “Mauna Loa” means “Long Mountain” in Hawaiian. 85 PERCENT

It covers half of the Island of Hawaii and by itself amounts to about 85 percent of all of the other Hawaiian Islands combined. ERUPTED 33 TIMES

It is among the world’s most active volcanoes, having erupted 33 times since its first documented eruption in 1843. THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

DEVOID OF LIFE

This site of the program is on an old lava field that is devoid of life and resembles conditions on Mars.

See MARS, page 3

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

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Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter. 1. CLOUDY

VOL. 93, ISSUE 86

FORECAST

We can expect a 40 degree high and a wintry mix overnight. Rain may change to snow as the overnight low drops to freezing temperatures. - Ashley Baldwin, a WCRD forecaster

TODAY Partly cloudy High: 40 Low: 32 2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

SOURCE: hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maunaloa THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

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5. SUNNY

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PAGE 2 | WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY

CORRECTIONS

The Daily News published an story Tuesday sourcing Matt Lemons as the deputy director of communications and media for the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration. This is incorrect; her real name is Marni Lemons.

NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

The Daily News also reported that Nick Wilkey, the president candidate on the Cardinal Connection slate, had three years of experience in student government. This is incorrect; Wilkey has two years of experience as a senator and spent one year on Campus Council and University Senate.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chairman of a three-member U.N. commission of inquiry, retired Australian judge Michael Kirby, urged Kim Jung Un to take “all necessary and reasonable measures” to stop crimes against humanity and insure that they are properly investigated and prosecuted. Kirby added, however, there was no indication the North Korea would do so. The investigative commission’s 372-page report is a wide-ranging indictment of North Korea for policies including political prison camps with 80,000 to 120,000 people, state-sponsored abductions of North Korean, Japanese and other nationals and lifelong indoctrination. “They are wrongs that shock the conscience of humanity,” Kirby said, comparing them with Nazi atrocities. Speaking to reporters after the release of the report, Kirby said it was impossible not to include Kim’s name in the list of suspects because of what he described as the government’s totalitarian nature. Kirby referred to prison camps, which North Korea said do not exist. “However, the satellite images show the prison camps and we had testimony, which is quoted in the report, which tells the stories of the prison camps” that include starvation and stunted growth in babies, he said. North Korean officials did not cooperate with the panel’s investigation, saying in correspondence last year that the country “totally and categorically rejects” the probe ordered by the U.N.’s 47-nation Human Rights Council, which is based in Geneva. The commission’s three members — which also include Sonja Biserko of Serbia and Marzuki Darusman of Indonesia — said the findings are based on testimony from 80 witnesses at four public hearings in Seoul, Tokyo, London and Washington last year plus more than 240 confidential interviews with victims and others.

NORTH KOREA

THE FORECAST POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

THURSDAY Thunderstorms High: 54 Low: 30 20 - THUNDERSTORMS

FRIDAY Partly cloudy High: 42 Low: 28 03 - PARTLY CLOUDY

SATURDAY Rain and snow High: 40 Low: 25 19 - RAIN/SNOW MIX

SUNDAY Mostly cloudy High: 30 Low: 20 02 - MOSTLY CLOUDY

BRIEF HISTORY 1945: After the end of World War II, Korea is divided between the Soviet northern half and American occupation forces in the south. 1948: Kim Il-sung establishes the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea as premier. 1950: The Korean War begins.

WHAT NORTH KOREA IS BEING ACCUSED OF:

1994: Kim Jong Il takes control of North Korea after his father, Kim Il-Sung, died.

• 80,000 to 120,000 people in political prison camps • State-sponsored abductions of North Koreans • Lifelong indoctrination • Publicly executing people for stealing food • Forcing people to go without food, although not making them starve to death • Executing several political prisoners in prison camps • Executing people because they are Christian • Abducting women from other countries • Using police forces to beat children to death that stole food • Enslaving prisoners within the national prison system • Physically torturing political prisoners • Forcing female political prisoners to engage in sexual acts for food • Imprisoning people due to association with prisoners • Imprisoning people who try to leave the country

He is unlikely to face prosecution because China, one of five vetowielding members of the U.N. Security Council, usually opposes such referrals to the International Criminal Court. It takes a unanimous vote to punish a country. “We think we should establish a constructive dialogue to solve the disputes over the human rights issues based on equal footing and mutual respect,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said. “It will not help the situation to bring the issue to an international court.”

SOURCE: United Nations Human Rights Council

SOURCE: The Associated Press

WILL KIM JUNG UN FACE PERSECUTION?

2011: Kim Jong Il dies and his son, Kim Jong Un, takes over as Supreme Leader of North Korea. 2013: Jang Song Thaek, an uncle of Kim Jong Un, lost an all powerful posts based on many charges. 2013: Kim Jong Un executes Jang Song-Thaek. SOURCE:telegraph.co.uk, time.com

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SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by AJ 278 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens ASST. NEWS EDITOR Sam Hoyt

FEATURES EDITOR Bethannie Huffman 72HRS EDITOR Kourtney Cooper

SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Taylor Irby ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty

DESIGN EDITORS Daniel Brount Ellen Collier

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITOR Cooper Cox

WEDNESDAY

Stay, play, and get a new do, Dog. McDonald’s Kennel Crossword

ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile GRAPHICS EDITOR Stephanie Redding

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Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

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44 SANS SERIF, E.G. 45 RAZOR-BILLED DIVER 46 “ISN’T __ SHAME?” 47 SUDDEN JETS 50 STUDY GUIDES FOR LITERATURE STUDENTS 56 COUSIN OF EDU 57 MUNICIPAL RIBBON CUTTER, OFTEN 58 RAPPER __ SHAKUR 62 FEMME FATALE 64 SANDWICH CHOICE 66 LIST CATCHALL 67 SCI-FI STAPLES 68 REST OF THE AFTERNOON 69 MODERNIZE 70 MESSY DIGS 71 HOW COAL MAY BE PRICED DOWN 1 LAUNCHPAD THUMBS-UPS 2 REVIEW, BRIEFLY 3 LONG (FOR) 4 INHERITANCE 5 NAKED 6 POTENT ‘60S-’70S PONTIAC 7 STARS IN KANSAS’ MOTTO

8 ANIMAL TRAIL 9 KHAKIS, E.G. 10 TIMELINE CHAPTER 11 DECEITFUL SORT, ON THE PLAYGROUND 12 SAP SUCKER 13 CENTURY UNITS 18 “VERY FUNNY” TV STATION 22 GOOD START? 25 ARCHITECT SAARINEN 26 IN __ OF: REPLACING 27 CONNECTION RATE MEAS. 28 COWBOYS QUARTERBACK TONY 29 FIT TO BE TIED 33 GETTY COLLECTION 34 LE CARRÉ’S SMILEY, FOR ONE 35 GET-UP-AND-GO 37 FASTENER WITH FLANGES 38 SEEKS, WITH “FOR” 40 PICASSO’S “THIS” 41 PROVIDE WITH NEW WEAPONRY 42 __ EGG 48 “THE DICK VAN DYKE SHOW” SURNAME

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS/FEATURES

PETS: Student owns frogs, turtle rather than dog, cat | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 His tendency to engage in a flight-like means of transportation garnered him the comparison. Emberton described the action as “falling with style.” Eventually, her family adopted a male and a female sugar glider from an older couple who were no longer able to take care of the animals. The female sugar glider died soon after. Her partner, Taz, would steal her food. “We tried our hardest to get her to eat,” Emberton said. “We would separate them temporarily for them to eat, but it just wouldn’t work out. She was a little too far gone when we got her.” Emberton said her sugar gliders enjoy climbing on humans and curling up in tight corners. It might take a while for a sugar glider to warm up to someone, but when they do, they display their affection in different ways than other animals. “When cats and dogs get used to a person, cats will do the head bumping thing where they bump their head on your knee and dogs will sit on your lap,” she said. “But sugar gliders, when they get used to you, they will jump on you from other people.” Another sign of fondness reveals itself when a sugar glider attaches itself to the face of the person it prefers. “It’s kind of frightening, at first, because this thing just jumps onto your face,” she said. “But it’s their way of saying, ‘I trust you and I know you’ll catch me.’” Emberton’s favorite part of owning sugar gliders comes when someone new notices the large birdcage where Taz and Bruce reside. Reactions range from immediate recognition and interest to fear of the unfamiliar critter. She had to leave her sugar gliders with her father before leaving for Ball State at the beginning of last semester. Not seeing her sugar gliders and other pets takes a toll on

RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER

“It’s something that’s very real, where a lot of things to them aren’t, and so it will be incorporated across all of Williams’ desire to incorporate Burris in his lifelong goal stems from his time as a graduate student at Ball State and the past success he has had with working with the university on research projects. “My time at Ball State was all fun,” he said. “We had to work, but I had a very close group of graduate students. We were like brothers and sisters. Most of us still have contact to this day.” The sentiments he felt with his fellow graduate students are something he hopes to recreate with his international crewmembers. The simulation will take place on a flattened lava field on Hawaii’s Mauna Loa, the planet’s largest volcano at 13,680 feet above sea level. The lava field sits at 8,000 feet, and it is the most Marslike location on the planet because of its lack of life. Williams will be the resident psychologist in HI-SEAS’ second group of astronauts. Overall, this group’s specialties include engineering, microbiology, physics and psychology. During the four-month program, Williams will study the quality and quantity of sleep and how it relates to psychological behavior. He also will research how light exposure affects mood and sleep patterns. However, his main concern, will be to see how these ideas lead to the interactions between crewmembers and how they can be improved, especially if there are problems. “If after a couple months we’re not getting along, we’re homesick or some personalities don’t match well and some of the goals of the overall or individual missions fall behind the timetable, why is that?” he said. The crew will live in a dome habitat 36 feet in diameter and 13,570 cubic feet in volume. Williams’ interest in space

|

rmpodnar@bsu.edu

Q: J ack Hesser, SGA president pro tempore: What sets you apart from past slates Alliance and SPARK?

A: C onnor Saum, Empower treasurer candidate: “Not to discount

the skill sets that they have, but I want to reiterate that we are servant leaders. We servant lead, whether it is behind the scenes or vocally. I believe we can be a good base for the organizations and do things behind the scenes.”

SGA

A: N  ick

Wilkey, Cardinal Connection presidential candidate: “We are more diverse than slates in ELECTIONS ’14 the past. We represent a little bit more — [past slates] represented a lot — we represent a little bit more.”

Q: K yle Pierce, student member on the Board of Trustees: What is your weakest platform point and the other slate’s strongest?

A: W  ilkey: “Our weakest platform point, only because it will take

a lot of effort, is the food pantry. It will take a lot of work to get it done, but I know we can do it. I think their Frog Baby scholarship is the strongest point, but my concern is how they will fund it after the first year.”

A: Jes Wade, Empower presidential candidate: “Everyone on this

campus obviously thinks safety is not a feasible option, so we’re going to play into the cards. It’s something we are going to work on whether we are in office next semester or not. We want to see students being safe. I really like the leadership aspect. I like that you guys think leadership is important on this campus.”

ONLINE

PHOTO PROVIDED BY KATHERINE EMBERTON

One of freshman English education major Katie Emberton’s sugar glider explores a small home. Emberton’s sugar gliders are named Bruce Wayne and Taz.

her, but she said she remains confident in her dad’s ability to care for them. “They’re really great pets for anyone that wants one, and they don’t count as exotic pets so you don’t have to get a license for them,” she said. “But if somebody’s thinking of getting a sugar glider, definitely do your research. There are a lot of places that say certain things about them that really aren’t true.”

OWNING ‘HERPS’

Without pets, Nathan Golub, a senior wildlife biology major, just doesn’t feel complete. So when a strict apartment pet policy coupled with the demanding responsibilities of college, Golub decided to have “herps” as pets. The term herps encompasses all reptiles and amphibians. Golub owns three types of herps, three dyeing poison dart frogs, a red-eyed tree

frog and a false map turtle. Despite the name, Golub’s dart frogs do not secrete a harmful poison. “When I tell [visitors] I have dart frogs, they’re like, ‘Oh, how is that legal?’” he said. “It’s actually perfectly legal because they’re not any more dangerous than any other frog.” Golub said his dart frogs only display lethal characteristic in their natural habitat, where a diet of toxic insects gives them their name. He purchased the vivid black, yellow and blue frogs at the Indianapolis Reptile Show. Golub also received a fruit fly kit from the vendor who sold him the frogs. This way, Golub can make his frogs’ food source by breeding the fruit flies himself in jars. Golub said herps, as coldblooded animals, don’t require as much sustenance as other pets that are endothermic, like dogs. This makes it

MARS: Former Cardinal says space race sparked interest in simulation program

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

ALL-SLATE DEBATE FOCUSES ON GOALS

as a child in the 1960s led him to this opportunity. To him, it’s a bucket list item. “I remember our teachers taking us down to the cafeteria in second grade to watch Alan Shepard being launched into space,” he said. “I remember following the Gemini missions very closely. It was exciting that science fiction was in the making to be real, and every young person was excited about that.” In the summer of 1966, Williams and five of his friends got together and created a life-size model of the Gemini spacecraft. They would sit inside of it in lawn chairs and sleeping bags and pretend to go on missions. Nearly 50 years later, the memory of that summer would move one of his friends involved with the HI-SEAS project to encourage Williams to apply for one of the six spots available among the crew.

THE LAST HI-SEAS MISSION RESEARCH SUBJECTS • The primary study of the last mission was to look at food, mood and nasal issues in relation to food preparation time, the repetition of foods, perception of aromas, acceptability of those foods and consumption of food in a confined isolated setting similar to that of what an astronaut would experience on a mission. •Some of the crew’s research conducted in the last mission centered around: - sleep and lighting - c ontamination of food in confined spaces in addition to hygiene monitoring and improvement - r educing microbial growth on clothing by looking into ways to create antimicrobial textiles and creation - incorporation of robotic companions on a mission as a means of stress relief because it is currently impractical to bring domestic pets into space SOURCE: hi-seas.org/?p=1644

Nomination forms for the JOHN R. EMENS Outstanding Senior Award, sponsored by the Office of Student Affairs, are available for pick up in the Student Center, room 133.

Applications must be returned to AD 238 by: 5:00 pm on Wednesday, February 26, 2014.

easier to care for herps on a college budget and schedule. He describes his herps as hands-off animals. “[The frogs] get stressed out easily,” Golub said. “They’re not something that you can hold. It’s kind of something that looks pretty, and you just watch it like a fish tank.” Handling tree frogs and dart frogs with a dry hand can actually burn their skin, Golub said. As for his false map turtle, he said it either dislikes being held or acts indifferent to the ordeal. No visitors to Golub’s apartment have ever given a dramatically negative response to his choice of companions. “Overall, it’s a very positive response,” he said. “People are very excited to see and interested to see these different animals that aren’t really normal pets.”

For more debate coverage go to http://bit.ly/1gDjCCG

EMPOWER

JES WADE

• Junior with 1 year in SGA Senate • Presidential candidate: Authored one resolution and sponsored one*

GABRIELLE BUNN

• Junior with 2 years in SGA Senate • Vice presidential candidate: Sponsored nine bills*

CONNOR SAUM BEKKI KIMANI •Junior with no SGA experience • Treasurer candidate

• Junior with no SGA experience • Secretary candidate

CARDINAL CONNECTION

NICK WILKEY

• Junior with 2 years experience, 2 as a SGA senator •Presidential candidate: Authored four orders and 10 resolutions*

CARLI HENDERSHOT

•Sophomore with 2 years in SGA Senate • Vice presidential candidate: No bills or resolutions*

SIDNEY STAPLES

• Junior with 1 year in SGA Senate • Treasurer candidate: Authored one resolution*

RAHISSA ENGLE

• Sophomore with no SGA experience • Secretary candidate

* All bills or resolutions refer to those that have passed through SGA Senate


PAGE 4 | WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

E S L U P E TH

MUSIC NOTES

from WCRD 91.3

Live Music

LINEUP LEISHA JENKINS WCRD GUEST REPORTER

|

lajenkins@bsu.edu

TONIGHT

NEW BAND

7:30 P.M. Ball State and Avon High School Brass Ensemble at Sursa Hall 10 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT Blue Sky Carnival Band: Band in Residence at Be Here Now 8 P.M. TO 11 P.M. Comedy Night at The Heorot

THURSDAY

ON THE

BLOCK 3-man band hopes to impact listener’s lives, make music, lyrics organic, emotional BRYSON MAESCH WCRD GUEST WRITER | bkmaesch@bsu.edu

Fresh on the Muncie music scene, Old Habits rings in the funk of a new generation. Guitar player and vocalist Joe Trinite, bass player and backup vocalist Jared Sullivan and drummer Sam Gordon found their common ground to share their talents on Ball State’s campus. Trinite and Gordon were roommates, and Sullivan came into the picture when Trinite visited an ex-girlfriend. They had wound up in the same place and learned about each other’s musical abilities. “The first time we played together was outside,” Sullivan said. “It started with a jam, then we incorporated the bass and drums to Joe’s guitar and lyrics until we got the sound we wanted.” The band members agreed that their purpose for making music goes way deeper than simply making money or building publicity. They strive to reach out to listeners’ emotions and to feel closure through the music they create. Old Habits’ goal is to make people think and impact lives, even if it’s in a small way. “We try and make our music more organic, unlike most music that is processed and generic,” Gordon said. “Joe writes lyrics that are very real and honest.” Old Habits has been together for about five months, and the musicians see themselves progressing in the years to come. Rocky Votolato, the Lumineers, Pink Floyd and the Red Hot Chili Peppers are a few well-known bands that have influenced Old Habits’ style and sound. Some of the band’s old-school sound can be attributed to some of the members’ mentors. Sullivan’s uncle and

Trinite’s dad both influOLD HABITS enced the young musicians by teaching them LISTEN TO OLD HABITS: joetrinite.bandcamp.com how to play and supported their music. CONNECT ON TWITTER: The group said it Joe Trinite: @joetrinite Jared Sullivan: @jaredsullivan3 seeks to speak to the Sam Gordon: @sammy_geezy next generation. Courage and confidence are huge parts of the band’s message because those are the two things the band said creates change. Old Habits has the motto: “You got to believe you can do it before anyone else believes you can.” The resounding theme on its upcoming EP is the wide emotional scope of the songs from upbeat tunes to songs for the glum. Old Habits said it did that on purpose to connect with listeners on a personal level with each song. However, the band hasn’t been able to put out as much music as it wants. Between going to classes, the musicians’ personal lives and writing music, the time left to record is rare. “I expected the EP to be out by now, but the days are so busy we don’t have much time,” Trinite said. The future is full of questions for the trio, but they said the outcome will be bright, as long as they change listeners’ lives. “We want to spread our music out as far as we can,” Sullivan said. “Our goal is to reach out to people and have our music help them in some way.”

SCHOOLBOY Q DROPS NEW ALBUM

HENDRIX MAGLEY WCRD GUEST COLUMNIST | hjmagley@bsu.edu

Kendrick Lamar’s “good kid, m.A.A.d City” topped the hiphop charts in 2013, but this year it might be somebody else from Top Dawg Entertainment taking the title. Schoolboy Q has long been in the shadow of Lamar, the leader of the pack. However, his new album may just place Schoolboy Q on the throne. His new album, “Oxymoron,” will drop Tuesday, and it is already shaping up to be one of the top hip-hop albums of the year. The first single off the album, “Collard Greens,” which features Lamar, cracked the top 30 on the Billboard hip-hop charts last year and still gets airplay on hip-hop and R&B stations across the United States. As soon as the single was sent to radio stations, hip-hop heads were anxious to see what he would do next. Schoolboy Q went on to release two more tracks from the upcoming album: “Break The Bank” and “Man of the Year.” The latter track just entered the top

40 on the Billboard hip-hop charts. Schoolboy Q released the track listing Feb. 3. The album is full of big-time features as well as producers. Notable producers include DJ Dahi (“good kid, m.A.A.d City”), Tae Beast (Ab-Soul) and The Alchemist (Action Bronson, Curren$y and Eminem). The features on the album are even bigger. Schoolboy Q recruited 2 Chainz, Kurupt, Raekwon and Tyler, The Creator as well as TDE members Lamar and Jay Rock. Schoolboy Q has continuously promoted the album on his Twitter account and has reached 542,000 followers. He also announced that there would be a tour for the “Oxymoron” album. The tour will make 67 stops but not in Indiana. The closest stops will be in Chicago, Grand Rapids, Mich., and Columbus, Ohio. The tour also makes stops across Europe. If the rest of “Oxymoron” is like the released three singles, then this album will be in strong contention for the best hip-hop album of 2014.

8 P.M. TO 2 A.M. Greek’s Pizzeria teams up at Be Here Now, featuring Apathy Wizards, The Stampede String Band, Mandee Price and Ulrich Ellison 9 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT Open mic night at The Heorot

FRIDAY 9 P.M. TO 2 A.M. The Chicago Typewriters, No Coast, Injecting Strangers and Cardboard Casanova at Be Here Now 8 P.M. TO 11 P.M. Peterson Dunn Ivy and Friends at The Heorot’s Valhalla Room 7:30 P.M. TO 9:30 P.M. “Monty Python’s Spamalot” at Muncie Civic Theatre

SATURDAY 7:30 P.M. TO 2 P.M. Power Pop Extravaganza: Follow Me Forward, Don’t Call It A Comeback, the Red Streak, Part Time Hero and Farraday at Be Here Now 7:30 P.M. Eric Bibb and Ruthie Foster at Pruis Hall 7:30 P.M. Ball State Symphony Orchestra at Sursa Hall

PERFORMANCES IN THE AREA Blue Sky Carnival Band

Blue Sky Carnival Band is a “new wave of second-line music.”

Apathy Wizards

Muncie’s Apathy Wizards boasts “a wide variety of genre-bending songs.”

Injecting Strangers:

Injecting Strangers is from Cincinnati. The band draws on themes from old horror movies for lyrics and combine this with funk and rock inspired music to achieve “theatrical indie rock-opera style.”

Cardboard Casanova:

Cardboard Casanova brings high energy with “strong melodic influence … heavy styling and simplistic writing ideals.”

Follow Me Forward:

Follow Me Forward is an indie-pop band out of Indianapolis.

Don’t Call It A Comeback:

Don’t Call It A Comeback is a pop-punk, Indie band from Indianapolis.

Part-Time Hero:

Part-Time Hero is a local, six-piece, pop-punk band.

Farraday:

Chicago-based Farraday is a female-led, pop-punk band.

Eric Bibb and Ruthie Foster:

Grammy nominees and longtime friends Eric Bibb and Ruthie Foster are collaborating to bring “joyful roots music” to audiences.

ONLINE

Hear ‘em for yourself. Go online to ballstatedaily.com to hear songs from the bands. bit.ly/1bKeM7o


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

SPORTS

TODAY The Ball State men’s basketball team travels to Central Michigan for a conference game.

SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

THURSDAY Coming off a loss to Akron, the Ball State women’s baksetball team faces Miami on the road.

The No. 13 Ball State men’s volleyball team takes on the top-ranked Loyola Ramblers at Worthen Arena at 7:30 p.m.

Trip north offers possibility for road win Struggling teams meet while trying to fix low records K. JONEs CHIEF REPORTER | DAVID @dkjones_BSU After enduring a winless threegame home stand, Ball State embarks north for a road trip to try and reverse its fortunes. The significance of one win holds power for the 4-19 Cardinals as the team looks to defeat the 8-16 Central Michigan Chippewas. One win against the Chippewas would give the Cardinals its second MidAmerican Conference victory this year as well as the first road win. “We keep talking about banging on that wall; you never know when it’s going to break through,� Ball State head coach James Whitford said. “If you stop banging, it’s never breaking through — no one here is

feeling sorry for themselves.� The metaphorical wall that Whitford is eluding to is the barrier that has separated Ball State from winning this season. The Cardinals are 1-11 in MAC play and 0-11 on the road. Four of the final six regular season games are away from Worthen Arena, which adds the pressure for Ball State to perform well on the road. Central Michigan pressures more than most MAC teams. “They press for 40 minutes; they’re very unusual in the way they play,� Whitford said. “Their best three-point shooters are their four and their fivemen. Those guys very rarely post up.� Central Michigan owns the second-highest scoring offense in the conference scoring 73.7 points per game. The Chippewas also give up the secondmost points scored, allowing 73.5 points per game. “They press you on makes, misses, dead balls ­— it’s the

best thing they do by far,� Whitford said. “Their half-court defense isn’t very good statistically speaking.� The Chippewas own the same record as the Cardinals in the MAC, both sitting at 1-11. Central Michigan relies on its starting sophomore guard, Chris Fowler, as much as Ball State relies on freshman guard Zavier Turner. Fowler leads the Chippewas with 18 points per game. “They’re difficult to deal with on offense.� Whitford said. Getting the ball inside the three-point arc is a point of emphasis to the first-year head coach. “Their interior defense is not strong, we have to take advantage of that,� Whitford said. “They’re not big, and they don’t defend inside particularly well — they try to mask that in a number of different ways but that’s no secret, they know it and we know it.� Whitford’s assessment of the Chippewas defense sets up the

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possibility for a big game from Ball State’s only true post presence, senior Majok Majok. The 6-foot-9 center averages 10.7 points per game and 10.1 rebounds per game, which ranks 15th in the nation. “Us being able to get the ball inside and score inside or at least force [Central Michigan] to double inside is important,� Whitford said. As well as senior guard Jesse Berry has been playing for the Ball State, Central Michigan focusing inside instead of the perimeter is ill-advised. Berry has recently become the top three-point shooter in Ball State school history, making six shots from deep Saturday against Bowling Green. His record holds at 206 made attempts with a possibility of more to come. “He just started playing well about two-and-a-half weeks ago, but he was really practicing well much later than that,� Whitford said.

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DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Senior guard Jesse Berry drives the ball past Bowling Green player Cameron Black on Saturday at Worthen Arena. So far this season, Berry has an average of 10.5 points per game.

1, 2 & 3bdr apts. Some utils pd. 14 blks from BSU. No Pets. Avil Aug 1st. 765-289-3971 1,2,3,4 Brdm apartment homes avail! FREE high-speed wifi, FREE cable (HBO), & all utils included! www.villagepromenade.com 3 Bd apt, util pd, 50 inch TV, 2 ba. W/D. close to BSU. $315/person. 315 South Mckinley 744-4649 Affordable village living University village apartments 1000 mo free cable reserved parking 765-729-9618 www.bsurentals.com Aug lease, 1 2 & 3 bdrm. 1 blk South of BSU Village.$250-350/mo ea. +Utils. No pets. 765-288-3100 Cardinal Villas close to campus 3 bdrm 2 ba. W/D in every unit, utils paid, free wifi call 317-679-0681 FREE INTERNET! Clean & quiet 1 bdrm apts, close to BSU. On site WS/DR,cedarsatbsu.com,286 2806 Lrg 2 bdrm apt. Close to campus. A/C, Util paid, off-st. prkg. $700/mo Aug. lse. NO pets. 288-9521.



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 2204 N.Maplewood Ave. Close to BSU nice 2 bdrm, W/D, fridge, stove, off-st prkg. No pets, no smoking. $250/each +util. May to May lease. UALA member. Call 288-2663 or 730-2237 2713 Beckett. 4 bdrm, 2 ba. 2 car gar. $295/person + utils. Aug.-Aug. Lease. Quiet area, lots of parking Call 765-254-9992 3 & 4 Brdms, W/D, D/W, C/A, off-st parking, Aug-Aug. call Rob for showing 765-748-7278 3 Bdrm House full basement Near BSU campus off street prkg W/D, A/C,Aug-Aug 765-215-4591 3 Bdrm, 2 Ba., Nice! Walk to BSU, UTIL pd! W/D, A/C, avail aug, No pets. $990/mo. (317) 439-3763 3 Brdm Homes from $167/month ea. Now,May,Aug. 765-744-1079 joecoolproperties.blogspot.com 3 Brdm, 1 full Ba. 2000 1/2 W Jackson. Close to campus. W/D, parking at back. $285ea, all util pd. 765-284-3646 or 765-744-5008 www.munciecollegerentals.com 3 or 4 bdr C/A, C/H ,W/D + Utils. Ball Ave 4 blks from Bethel Aug 1st. 765-289-3971 3/4 Bedroom, 2108 N. Ball Ave. August lease, $975 plus utilities. Call 317-716-7174 4 bdr Very Nice, Hrdw floors. W/D, off street prkg, Walk dist to campus, Call Eric at 317-825-8683 www.ballurental.com 4 BDRM, 1 & 1/2 bths, C/A, gas heat, W/D,o ff-street parking.1608 New York, garage, close to BSU 765 748 8425 4 Bdrm, 2 Ba., Nice! Walk to BSU, UTIL pd! W/D, A/C, avail Aug, No pets. $1200/mo. (317) 439-3763

 4 bdrm, 2 bath @328 North Meeks $375 each inclds maid, alarm, W/D, A/C, parking, No Pets, Call Kayla at 847-912-3967 July-July Lease 4 Lg bdrms, 2 baths. 824 W. Beechwood. Behind SAE. C/A, D/W, W/D. Call 286-1943 4, 5, or 6 bdrm. Lrg. rooms, 2 lrg. ba., W/D, off st prkg, all utils includ. 501 N. Alameda. (765) 744-8269. 5 Bdrm. 1.5 Ba. 1428 W. Gilbert. Close to village. W/D bsmt, Off-srt prkg. Call 286-1943

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Spectacular 3 baths big rooms Dishwasher, Central Air, W/D $275/each Avail Aug 1. 749-9792

6 Bdrm, 3 Ba, 3 blks from campus. All utils pd, A/C, D/W, W/D, off st prkg, garage, no pets, avail Aug. 760-4529 For Rent. 1121 W Rex 3 BD. W/D. newly remodled.2.5 car garage. Great Location. 765-520-9404 Great location, 1308 Abbott May to May lease, 3 bdrm 1 ba, 2 car garage, A/C. 765-254-9992 Great location, 1312 Abbott, 5 Bedroom, 2 bath, C/A, $290/per + utilities, Aug-Aug lease. Call 765-254-9992 Newley renovated. 1-6 BR homes. Close to BSU. W/D, A/C, D/W. Rent:$300-$400 ech. 765-286-2806 Nice 3 bdr. Close to BSU. 2 ba. Avail. Aug. A/C, stove, fridge, W/D. $395 /ea, utils incl. 765-348-6413 www.jahrentals.com, Nicest houses on campus. Many extras. Even a 6 bdrm. Also student parking available. Call 286-5216.

Visit us online Today’s birthday (2-19-14) ___ (c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Disciplined efforts bring success wherever applied this year. Creativity bubbles with inspired magic, especially until August. Put your heart into it, and career leaps ahead. Balance this work with downtime, relaxation and healthy practices. Find joy in simple pleasures. Summer and autumn get especially romantic. Build partnership and family teamwork through listening and communication. Grow love in your garden.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)Today is a 9 -- Keep track of spending, as it could provoke controversy or a domestic disagreement. Organize your infrastructure. Prepare the marketing materials. Handle overdue tasks, and clean house. Manage your work well and an authority approves. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 9 -- Make plans and establish the rules. An agreement could be elusive, with a communications breakdown. A great idea on paper doesn’t work in practice. Don’t gossip about work. Let your partner do the talking. Listen for the gold. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)Today is a 9 -- Talk over a possible purchase with someone you love. Don’t put your money down yet.You can get farther faster now. Dish out the assignments, and get into the game. Small, disciplined steps can have big impact.

Aries (March 21-April 19)Today is a 9 -- Be respectful and don’t hold a grudge or you’ll be hurting yourself. It’s okay not to make changes yet, but prepare for speed. Caring for others is your motivation. Don’t gamble or waste your money.

Cancer (June 22-July 22Today is an 8 Set long-range goals. Work in private. A female gives the green light on a project. Don’t get cocky or make expensive promises. Map the pitfalls. Do the extra credit problems. Leave the past in the past

Taurus (April 20-May 20)Today is a 9 -Something that worked before doesn’t work now. Take it slow. Get set to change romantic direction. Avoid provoking jealousies. Simplify matters. Fall back and re-assess your position. Wait to see what develops. Prioritize health.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 9 -- A roadblock slows the action. A female helps you find harmony about it. Think it over. A conflict of interests needs to get worked out. Rest up for it. Advance quickly after that. Consider all options.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)Today is a 9 -- It’s not a good idea to spend now. Figure out your next move. Begin a new money-making venture. Track sales closely. Support a loved one emotionally, rather than financially. Don’t believe everything you hear.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)--Today is a 9 -- The work pace picks up; postpone travel. It’s difficult to reach an agreement and could get intense. Don’t get stopped by past failures. List obvious problem areas. Discuss priorities and responsibilities. Handle the onrush, and invoice later.

www.ballstatedaily.com

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)Today is a 9 -Listen to your partner’s ideas carefully. Hold back your criticism and avoid a conflict. Resist an impulse. Keep costs down. Postpone a financial discussion. Use your own good judgment on how to proceed. Provide leadership. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)Today is an 8 -- Curtail your enthusiasm and avoid a hidden danger. It’s not a good time to travel or start new projects. Make sure you know what’s required before committing. Consult a respected elder. Rest and recharge. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 9 -- Give kind words, not expensive treats. Begin a new work project. An important document arrives. New evidence threatens complacency. Take action for home or family. Don’t give in to a friend’s complaints. It works out.


PAGE 6 | WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

SPORTS

5 SETS

TO TAKE AWAY DAVID POLASKI ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

1 2 3 4 5

|

@DavidPolaski

OUTSIDE ATTACKING

Ball State’s Marcin Niemczewski’s performance could go a long way in effecting the outcome of Thursday’s match. The sophomore outside attacker leads the MIVA in kills per set with 3.74 and the offense has run through him throughout most of the season.

VARIED OFFENSE

Loyola will counter Niemczewski with a few of its own offensive threats. Not only does Joseph Smalzer serve well, he and Thomas Jaeschke are fourth and fifth in the MIVA in kills per set with 3.47 and 3.39. The duo has helped lead Loyola to being the team with the second highest kills per set the conference.

DN FILE PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Senior outside attacker Larry Wrather takes a backcourt bump during the opening points of the match against Sacred Heart on Jan. 11 in Worthen Arena. In Thursday’s game against Loyola, Wrather said he wants to take advantage of home court to win.

TEAMS FIGHT FOR FIRST

DANGEROUS DUO

Ball State’s middle blockers will play a key role in neutralizing the Loyola offense. Ball State’s senior outside attacker Larry Wrather said he thinks senior middle attackers Kevin Owens and Matt Leske have the ability to wreak havoc. The pair has led Ball State to the top of the MIVA with 3.67 team blocks per set.

Early during conference play, Ball State tries to avenge postseason loss to No. 1 Loyola

|

DAVID POLASKI ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR @DavidPolaski

Ball State walked off the court last spring with its 13 match winning streak shattered, players wondering what went wrong. But when the Ball State men’s volleyball team hosts No. 1 Loyola on Thursday night, the team will be focused on the task at hand. Ball State will have a chance to knock off the team that eliminated it from the 2013 Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association Tournament. “We really want to go out there and kick their butt,” said Ball State junior libero David Ryan Vander Meer. For the second time this season, Ball State is taking on a No. 1 ranked opponent. The

BLOCKING ABILITY

Loyola brings strong blocking of its own. Nicholas Olson, a 6-foot-10 middle blocker, leads the MIVA in individual blocks per set at 1.49. Ball State will have to back the powerful Olson off the net in order for Niemczewski and Wrather to have success attacking.

CONFERENCE MATCHUP

These two teams are the only teams in the MIVA who are undefeated in conference play and whichever team wins will take over possession of first place for the time. Home court advantage has been crucial in the past. Ball State knocked off Loyola 3-1 last season at Worthen Arena, while Loyola won both of the matches in Chicago.

Q+A WITH JOEL WALTON

JOEL WALTON,

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL HEAD COACH

Q: What stands out to you as what Loyola does best? A: Loyola’s serve is probably one of their best attributes starting with Joe Smalzer. He gets back behind the line and hits the ball with a very good pace, hits a little bit of a side spin to his serve and he locates the ball in a position on the court that makes it hard for passers to get their team in system.

Q: What do you expect to see out of the offense? A: W  e want to run our middles. Matt Leske and Kevin Owens

are two very gifted attackers on our team. When we’re passing the ball up to the net, we get to involve them quite a bit in our offense and then it opens up other opportunities for Marcin Niemczewski, Larry Wrather and Shane Witmer.

For more, go to bsudaily.com

HEAD COACH

« They have great

team unity, and when they approach a match, there’s a certain demeanor that they have that helps them play great volleyball night in and night out. »

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Ramblers’ offense, which Joseph Smalzer leads, is averaging 1.68 aces per set. Smalzer leads the country with 33 aces this season — six more than UCLA’s Gonzalo Quiroga, who is in second. The curve of Smalzer’s serve makes it difficult to defend. While spinning downward, his serve can also curve sideways, a rarity in volleyball. The senior averages nearly one ace per set, a statistic Ball State head coach Joel Walton said was ludicrous. “Passers aren’t used to seeing the curve he puts on the ball,” he said. “There’s variety in placement, there’s variety in spin and he’s a very good server.” It’ll be up to players like Vander Meer, senior outside attacker Larry Wrather and

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junior outside attacker Shane Witmer to neutralize the Loyola serve. Wrather said he wants to take advantage of home court to counter the Ramblers’ power. He said if Ball State can handle its visitor’s serves right away, Loyola will back off and become less aggressive. This is not an easy task against a team that has the second most aces per set in the MIVA and that’s made even tougher because Ball State has occasionally struggled receiving serves this season. By receiving well, Ball State can pass to one of its many offensive threats in the front row. Wrather said the Cardinals can get one-on-one chances and take advantage to make the Ramblers un-

LARRY WRATHER,

A SENIOR OUTSIDE ATTACKER

« Their serve is really, « If they get at you really good and as a passer, it makes it hard to run our offense, and it’s why they’re such a good team. »

and know you’re uncomfortable, then it increases the pressure. But if you can handle them right out of the gate, they’ll tone it down a little. »

comfortable. Witmer also stressed the importance of making Loyola feel out of its element. “As far as blocking and our middles at the net, we can make them uncomfortable more than other teams can,” he said. “We’ll have our best chance to win if we can get them off the net and frustrate them.” By returning serves accurately and backing Loyola off the net, Ball State can force the team out of its system. Walton said whichever team settles in quickly and stays calm under pressure will have the advantage. Behind him, Ball State players warmed up by jumping rope while laughing, teasing each other. There’s nothing uncomfortable about that demeanor.

SHANE WITMER,

A JUNIOR OUTSIDE ATTACKER

« They serve great,

but their ability to pass the ball to the net and have three hitters ready to attack at the net is probably their biggest strength. »

DN 2-19-14  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News for Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014.

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