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Amended proposal advances to Senate Committee passes marriage bill, could go to vote by end of week LAUREN CHAPMAN AND ASSOCIATED PRESS | news@bsudailynews.com The Indiana Senate Rules Committee passed the amended House Joint Resolution 3 on Monday, sending it the Republican-heavy Indiana Senate. A vote in the Senate could come within the week. The constitutional amendment passed with its second sentence eliminated, which allows the legal recognition of domestic partnerships in Indiana. The panel voted 8-4 on Monday afternoon along party lines to advance the measure, following three hours of testimony from supporters and opponents. Sen. Tim Lanane spoke in opposition to the constitutional marriage ban near the end of discussion. He said there is no rational basis for Indiana to move forward with HJR-3. “I think proposals like HJR-3 speaks more to our past and not for our future,” Lanane said. The House approved the proposal last month after removing language that also would ban civil unions. The amendment won broad bipartisan support in 2011 and must pass the legislature again this session to go to voters in a November referendum. The House’s move to remove the civil union language could delay the referendum for two years. The second sentence’s continued elimination provided hope for organizations in opposition to HJR-3. Freedom Indiana campaign manager Megan Robertson released a statement on HJR-3’s passage to the Senate.

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See HJR-3, page 4

CAMPAIGNS COMMENCE FOR SGA

NFL

After coming out, player will face critics, many other obstacles

Two slates are running for next year’s executive board, so get to know them with a breakdown of plans

SEE PAGE 3

SEE PAGE 4

WHO RULES THE ROADS? Pedestrians, vehicles compete for right-of-way on campus

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C

CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS NEWS EDITOR news@bsudailynews.com

ars speeding through campus often have people debating whether to step out or toe the line. Walkability is a major concern for students, evident in its inclusion in the campus master plan. The issue isn’t entirely new either — the McKinley Beautification project, started in 2005, also aimed to make the road more appealing and safe. Jon Hunsberger, a graduate student in urban planning, went on masterplan.bsu.edu to voice his concerns about making campus streets safe. He argued vehicles should yield to pedestrians when they are trying to cross McKinley Avenue. “But the vehicle clearly rules,” he said. According to Indiana codes, vehicles are required to stop when a pedestrian “is upon the half of the roadway upon which the vehicle is traveling or when the pedestrian is approaching closely from the opposite half of the roadway.” University Police Chief Gene Burton said this law can be confusing for students trying to safely cross a street as well as the motorists driving through campus. See CROSSWALKS, page 4

« It shouldn’t take an accident to precipitate change. » JON HUNSBERGER, a graduate student in urban planning DN ILLUSTRATION ASHLEE HAYES

Defensive-minded opponents could cause problems Size disadvantage hurts team, difficult schedule continues for Cardinals DAVID K. JONES CHIEF REPORTER | @dkjones_BSU

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Freshman forward Franko House looks for an open teammate to pass the ball to during the Toledo game Saturday at Worthen Arena. House has played in 21 games this season.

tage over Ball State — just one Eagle is listed shorter than 6 feet. The Eagles have 12 players listed at 6-feet-3 or taller, forcing mismatches from the top of the key to the bottom. Whitford said Eastern Michigan utilizes its size to take advantage of smaller opponents. “You can’t mimic their length,” Whitford said. One name that the Cardinals will hear a lot Wednesday is 6-foot-8 forward Glenn Bryant. Bryant scores 10.5 points per game and averages 5.5 rebounds a game for his team. “I recruited him in high school,” Whitford said. “He’s so bouncy, he’s long and bouncy — he’s a real gift for [Eastern Michigan].” Whitford made it clear that Bryant doesn’t play the center position in Eastern Michigan’s zone defense, but one of the wing positions. “You’re looking for a shot on the wing, the guy closing out on you is 6’8” with probably a 7-foot wingspan.” Whitford said. In a typical zone defense, teams align

Ball State is having a difficult time finding ways to prepare for its next two opponents. The 4-17 Cardinals have not had a height disparity since facing Utah in November, which can cause challenges for Ball State’s offense. Now, two of the top 50 defensive teams in the country travel to Worthen Arena in Eastern Michigan and Bowling Green. “They’re two unique teams,” Ball State head coach James Whitford said. “They both have great size.” Eastern Michigan is known for its gritty zone defense, which ranks 34th in the nation in defensive efficiency. The Eagles hold opposing teams to 37.1 percent in field goal percentage. It also is a team that has a size advan-

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Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter. 1. CLOUDY

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in a 2-3 formation where the two guards or the quickest players on the floor guard the area between the free-throw line and the three-point line. The wing positions that Whitford mentioned are responsible for the corners and the low post, depending on where the ball is. The Cardinals had to make adjustments to its roster due to the right hip injury of senior Tyler Koch. Freshman guard Quinten Payne has progressed due to Koch’s injury.

Today will have sunshine, cold highs in the teens and wind chill values below zero. A slight warmup begins Wednesday. - Cody Bailey, WCRD assistant chief weather 5. SUNNY forecaster

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

See BASKETBALL, page 3 THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

VOL. 93, ISSUE 81

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

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TEAM COMPARISON

Eastern Michigan Ball State 67.3 63.8 Average PPG 62.8 72.0 Defensive PPG .421 .398 FG % .371 .461 FG defense 11.2 12.2 Assists per game

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PAGE 2 | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

5 THINGS TO KNOW

1.

LAWYERS DISCUSS TRIAL PARTICULARS OF BOSTON BOMBER

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WEDNESDAY Partly cloudy High: 26 Low: 13 03 - PARTLY CLOUDY

3. FEMA PROVIDES $20 MILLION TO REBUILD HOUSTON (AP) — A federal agency is granting $20 million to a rural Central Texas town to help rebuild two schools destroyed in last year’s deadly fertilizer plant explosion, town and federal officials said Monday. The Federal Emergency Management Agency will provide the West Independent School District with the money it needs to rebuild a high school and an intermediate school, Mayor Tommy Muska told The Asso-

BOSTON (AP) — The trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzkokhar Tsarnaev is expected to last three months, plus another six weeks if he is convicted and jurors have to decide whether he should be put to death, prosecutors said Monday. The trial estimate was included in a joint status report filed in court Monday by federal prosecutors and Tsarnaev’s lawyers ahead of a Wednesday hearing. Defense lawyers said they want a trial date no earlier than September 2015. Prosecutors did not include a request for a trial date, but said during a hearing in November that they hoped to have the trial this fall. Tsarnaev, 20, has pleaded not guilty in the attack last April that killed three people and wounded more than 260 others. Authorities said he and his older brother, Tamerlan, built and planted two pressure cooker bombs near the marathon finish line. Tamerlan Tsarnaev died following a shootout with police during an escape attempt four days after the marathon.

ciated Press. It will cost about $60 million to rebuild the two facilities. He said the school district’s insurance company will cover about $45 million and the FEMA money will pay for the rest. “That’s wonderful news,” Muska said. The schools were among dozens of homes and buildings destroyed when the chemical fertilizer ammonium nitrate blew up during a fire in April at the West Fertilizer Co.

4. FLOODING SPREADS TO TOWNS NEAR LONDON

MCT PHOTO

LONDON (AP) — The River Thames has burst its banks after reaching its highest level in years, flooding riverside towns upstream of London. Residents and British troops piled up sandbags to protect properties from the latest bout of flooding, but the river overwhelmed their defenses in several places Monday, leaving areas including the center of the village of Datchet underwater. The Environment Agency has issued

14 severe flood warnings — meaning there’s a danger to life — along the Thames east of Windsor, about 20 miles from London. Its chief executive, Paul Leinster, said “extreme weather will continue to threaten communities this week” with more Thames flooding expected today. There were no flood alerts for the part of the river that flows through London.

2. WORLD CUP CONSTRUCTION LEADS TO DEATH

5. COLO. STUDENT DIES AFTER SUICIDE BY FIRE

SAO PAULO (AP) — Work remains underway at the World Cup stadium in the jungle city of Manaus despite a Brazilian union’s threat to strike to protest a worker’s death at the venue. The strike did not happen Monday because leaders from several unions said they are trying to gather more workers to their movement. Local World Cup organizers and the company in charge of the stadium’s construction said the Arena da Amazo-

WESTMINSTER, Colo. (AP) — A 16-year-old student who set himself on fire at a suburban Denver high school nearly two weeks ago has died, police said. Vincent Nett died from his injuries at around 5 p.m. Sunday, Westminster Police Department police investigator Cheri Spottke said. The boy was burned over 80 percent of his body and had been in critical condition at a local hospital.

nia is nearly 97 percent completed, with only minor details keeping it from being inaugurated sometime this month. A 55-year-old Portuguese man was killed in an accident Friday while disassembling a crane that was used to install the stadium’s roof, becoming the third worker to die at the venue in less than a year. Union leader Cicero Custodio said workers want to protest the lack of proper security conditions at the site.

According to police and fire reports, the boy doused himself with an accelerant before lighting himself on fire in an apparent suicide attempt in Standley Lake High School’s cafeteria Jan. 27. Police said he did not make any threats before he lit himself ablaze. A custodian used a fire extinguisher to put out the fire before it could spread. Several students were in the cafeteria at the time, but none were injured.

THURSDAY Partly cloudy High: 33 Low: 22 03 - PARTLY CLOUDY

FRIDAY Scattered snow showers High: 30 Low: 11 14 - SCATTERED SNOW SHOWERS

SATURDAY Scattered snow showers High: 29 Low: 22 14 - SCATTERED SNOW SHOWERS

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens ASST. NEWS EDITOR Sam Hoyt

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz 72HRS EDITOR Kourtney Cooper

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SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

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MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Taylor Irby ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty

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ACROSS 1 SCALE ON WHICH DIAMOND IS ASSIGNED A “10” 5 OWL’S QUESTION? 8 “MUSIC __ CHARMS ...” 12 THE SEGO LILY IS ITS STATE FLOWER 13 MAP OUT 15 NYMPH REJECTED BY NARCISSUS 16 ACTRESS ELISABETH 17 DECK OPENING 18 WORK ON JERKY 19 WWII AIRCRAFT CARRIER PLANE 21 IOWA NATIVE 23 TAX-SHELTERED NEST EGG 25 HIPPY DANCE 28 1963 NEWMAN FILM 29 OUSTED IRANIAN 33 ARCTIC “SNOWSHOE” CRITTERS 34 QUIZZICAL SOUNDS 35 BEARS OWNER/COACH WHO WON EIGHT NFL TITLES IN FOUR DIFFERENT DECADES

37 SINGER PIAF 38 SOUP BASE 39 LUXURY CRAFT 40 QUIET “QUIET!” 43 “ULYSSES” ACTOR MILO 44 QUAINT PRONOUN 45 “ISN’T __ BIT LIKE YOU AND ME?”: BEATLES LYRIC 46 SOLVERS’ CRIES 47 TREMULOUS GLOW 50 EXCEPT 54 BEELINE 59 “HAVA NAGILA” DANCE 60 DIFFERENT 62 WORKER WELFARE ORG. 63 PROGRESS SLOWLY 64 ORGAN WITH CHAMBERS 65 SON OF ODIN 66 SINISTER CHUCKLES 67 “REVENGE IS __ BEST SERVED COLD” 68 SEVEN: PREF. DOWN 1 SOFT STUFF 2 WILL-WISP LINK 3 TRUCK

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SECOND, SAY 41 JEANS BOTTOM 42 POUNDS 48 ADO 49 MARS NEIGHBOR 50 __ TZU 51 FINE-TUNE 52 B’WAY SEATING AREA 53 SOUNDS FROM THE STANDS 55 SHAKESPEAREAN VERB 56 1975 WIMBLEDON WINNER 57 HIT THE MALL 58 ANTLERED DEER 61 GINZA AGREEMENT

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY Trying to turn around its season, the men’s basketball team will play Eastern Michigan.

SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

FRIDAY After winning all its games last weekend, the women’s softball team travels to George Mason.

The Ball State men’s volleyball team plays its second conference match, this time on the road against Quincy.

Difficult tasks await open player

NFL MUST PREPARE FOR GAY ATHLETES

Locker room pranks, media circus bring increased scrutiny | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Michael Sam will face a daunting set of challenges that most rookies don’t have to deal with when making the already formidable jump from college to the NFL. The U.S. college football Southeastern Conference’s codefensive player of the year is about to find out if America’s most popular sport, rooted in machismo and entrenched in locker room hijinks, is ready for its first openly gay player. First, he’ll have to find a team willing to put up with the media circus that will surround him. Then, he’ll have to find acceptance like he did at Missouri, where his sexuality was a non-issue during a 12-2 season. Only now, he’ll face opponents and their fans who know he’s gay. He might even face cheap shots and teammates hesitant to shower alongside him or undress in his presence. While several teams and coaches said Monday that Sam’s sexual orientation wouldn’t affect his draft status, former NFL punter Chris Kluwe, who contends his championing of gay rights led to his release from the Minnesota Vikings last year, wasn’t so sure. “The majority of players will be supportive of Michael Sam or just won’t care,” Kluwe said. “You’ll have isolated guys here and there who might try to make a fuss about it, but players by and large are very much, ‘Hey, we’re here to do a job, we’re here to go out and play football.’ “In terms of the coaching [and] front office side, I think there’s where issues are going to arise because they are going to look at this like, ‘Hey, is this going to cause a distraction for the team?’ And by distraction, they mean, ‘We’re not really OK with having a gay player on our team, we can’t come out and say that, so we’re going to use the word distraction,’” Kluwe added. “And unfortunately, those are the people who determine if you’re employed or not.” John Elway has a unique perspective running the Broncos’ front office now after a Hall of Fame playing career, and he said Monday he’d have no problem drafting Sam. “We will evaluate Michael just

MCT PHOTO

Missouri Tigers defensive lineman Michael Sam plays during a college football game against Florida on Oct. 19, 2013. Sam could become the first openly gay NFL player.

like any other draft prospect: on the basis of his ability, character and NFL potential,” Elway said. “His announcement will have no effect on how we see him as a football player. Having spent 16 years in an NFL locker room, the bottom line is that it’s about treating others with respect and earning that respect. By all indications, it appears Michael has done just that throughout his football career.” “If anybody can come in and help us win games and be successful — black, white, yellow, straight, gay — I don’t think it matters,” said

OLYMPIC HALFPIPE CAUSES PROBLEMS

KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia — Rider after rider took a crash course Monday night on an Olympic halfpipe that looked only half ready with less than 24 hours until men’s competition is set to start. There were dozens of falls, very few big tricks and a lot of complaining during a practice session that was pushed from morning to night while workers tried to make fixes. American Danny Davis labeled the halfpipe as “garbage” Sunday. Riders said the steeply vertical pitch of the halfpipe has largely been corrected. But the bottom of the pipe is bouncy and slow. American coach Mike Jankowski said riders were simply going to have to deal with the conditions presented to them. –

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

new Green Bay quarterbacks coach Alex Van Pelt. Before Sam revealed his sexual orientation, he was projected as a mid-round draft pick. Kluwe said reports that Sam’s draft stock could drop because he revealed his sexual orientation “basically could have been lifted from any American sporting paper in the 1940s when Jackie Robinson was about to enter Major League Baseball. It’s like we’ve been here before. Why do we have to keep doing the same thing?” What will help Sam is landing on a team with strong veteran

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 When starting freshman forward Franko House is not in the game, senior Chris Bond plays the backup power forward position to give Payne a shot at minutes in the empty small forward position. “He’s had two good games in a row,” Whitford said.

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MATT McKINNEY KILLER CROSSOVER MATT McKINNEY IS A JUNIOR JOURNALISM MAJOR AND WRITES ‘KILLER CROSSOVER’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO MATT AT MDMCKINNEY@ BSU.EDU.

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leadership, something that was lacking in Miami, where tackle Jonathan Martin walked away at midseason, alleging guard Richie Incognito led daily harassment with racial, aggressive and sexually charged comments. Incognito was suspended for the final eight games and Martin’s career was thrown in limbo. Eagles All-Pro guard Evan Mathis said Sam will face obstacles no matter what. “Current generations will look back at marijuana prohibition and gays having to fight for equal rights and think how primitive those times were.”

When a University of Missouri defensive end announced he was gay, it was announced as a “barrier-breaking” move. But Michael Sam’s move shouldn’t be. The barrier shouldn’t even be there. He will be the first openly gay NFL player if he’s picked up by a team in early May. If Sam isn’t drafted, it won’t be because of anything on the football field. After all, Sam racked up 11.5 sacks to lead the SEC. However, because of his size and athleticism, Sam looks to be a late-round pick. Late-round picks usually have to find their niche on special teams before earning a role in their positions. So, how would Sam fit in with the Minnesota Vikings? Its special teams coach reportedly said things like, “We should round up all the gays, send them to an island, and then nuke it until it glows.” Not exactly a forward-thinking sentiment or the most welcoming situation. The majority of NFL players will accept Sam as seen on social media and through press conferences. It won’t be an issue, at all. Even within the Bible Belt, there is acceptance. Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck said he would have “no problem” with a gay teammate. Still, the locker room mentality is not as progressive as some of society. “Unfortunately, [being gay is] a lot more OK in society than it is in lots of locker rooms,” one NFL scout said to Sports Illustrated. “Some locker rooms are still stuck in the ’50s.” And that’s totally true. In texts released between former Miami Dolphins Richie Incognito and Jonathan Martin, the true nature of most NFL locker rooms was unveiled. Incognito and Martin would constantly call each other gay slurs and talk about who to blame for “gay tendencies.” Adding to the negativity of the Dolphins’ locker room last year, wide receiver Mike Wallace tweeted, “All these beautiful women in the world and guys wanna mess with other guys SMH...” He later retracted the tweet and apologized, saying he just didn’t understand the concept of being gay. As if that’s anything to be confused about. His gut instinct shows his true colors — he wasn’t comfortable with gay teammates, as they waste their masculinity on other men. And recently, Jonathan Vilma, a linebacker for the New Orleans Saints, said he was worried about a fellow player looking at him in the shower. “Imagine if he’s the guy next to me and, you know, I get dressed, naked, taking a shower, the whole nine, and it just so happens he looks at me,” Vilma said. “How am I supposed to respond?” Well, you’re supposed to respond exactly how you would respond if anybody else happened to look at you. A gay man in a locker room isn’t automatically on the prowl for sexual partners — he may just be glancing around a room. Sam’s decision is and should be applauded, but it shouldn’t be shocking. The NFL clearly has a way to go before being 100 percent accepting of openly gay athletes. Someday, a professional athlete will come out and it won’t lead ESPN, CNN and other major news sites. That day isn’t today, and you can thank NFL players and the culture they live in for that.

artmartmuncie.com

“He’s moving in the right direction.” The Mid-American Conference schedule has not been kind to the Cardinals as the team sits at 1-9. Ball State has eight games left on its regular season schedule and plays four games at home. The Cardinals play the Eagles on Wednesday with a 7 p.m. tip.

THE CARDINALS’ TOP PERFORMERS ZAVIER TURNER, A FRESHMAN GUARD • 12.4 points per game • .383 field-goal percentage • .421 3-point percentage • 21 steals • 84 turnovers

CHRIS BOND, A SENIOR FORWARD • 11.9 points per game • .452 field-goal percentage • .314 3-point percentage • 24 steals • 50 turnovers


PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

NEWS

North Korea revokes offer to deliberate U.S. prisoner American detainee has been in custody for more than a year | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS SEATTLE — The family of a Washington state man imprisoned in North Korea for more than a year expressed alarm and sadness Monday after an invitation was canceled for a U.S. envoy to visit Pyongyang and discuss Kenneth Bae’s release. Terri Chung, Bae’s sister, said in a statement, however, that relatives are encouraged by a growing number of people — including the Rev. Jesse Jackson — calling for her brother’s freedom. “It has been 474 days since Kenneth has been detained in the DPRK,” the statement said, referencing the nation’s official name, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. “Kenneth is just an ordinary American father of three who is desperately trying to return to his family.” The statement continued, imploring U.S. and North Korean leaders “to work together to let this U.S. citizen come home to his family.” Bae, 45, of Lynnwood, a suburb about 15 miles north of Seattle, had been living in China for seven years. He was taken into custody in November 2012 while leading a tour group into a North Korean economic zone. The cancellation, announced by the State Department on Sunday, comes only days after a detained Bae told a pro-Pyongyang newspaper that he expected to meet this month with U.S. envoy on North Korean human rights issues, Bob King. The move signals an apparent protest of upcoming annual military drills between Washington, D.C., and Seoul, South Korea. North Korean officials also said the U.S. has mobilized nuclear-capable B-52 bombers

He explained it to mean that a vehicle must stop if a pedestrian is literally standing in the street, although he did say many students believe pedestrians always have the right-of-way. Cars do not have to stop for students waiting to cross the street, though. The line grays, however, when a pedestrian steps out ahead of a car coming to a crosswalk. Legally, the vehicle has to stop, but pedestrians are liable if they fail to cross in a safe manner without giving a vehicle ample room to stop, according to Indiana’s 9-21-17-5 code. Burton said he understands that there may be some confusion on when, and even where, a pedestrian can cross on McKinley Avenue. The brick inlays on McKinley Avenue are there to take the place of white lines painted on the street, signifying a crosswalk, Burton said. But these may not constitute a legal crosswalk, according to Indiana’s 9-21-17 code. “There is reasonable reason for debate on [crosswalks],” he said. “People are usually talking about signs or painted markings.” Jason P. posted on the master

“We remain determined to defeat HJR-3, but we are grateful that the committee voted today to keep at bay the extremely dangerous second sentence that would permanently prohibit civil unions, domestic

T

Kenneth Bae, an American missionary WHAT

North Korea imprisoned an American citizen WHEN

November 2012 North Korea WHY

Bae was arrested on accusations by the North Korean government of planning to bring down the government through religious activities.

plan website that he believes McKinley Avenue should be for the exclusive use of pedestrians and bicycles, with a lane for shuttle buses exclusively to ensure students couldn’t get hit by cars. “There is really no reason for cars to drive through campus, except shuttle buses,” he said. Sue Weller, director of facilities, business services, and transportation, said stopping traffic through the avenue, even with stoplights for pedestrian traffic, would cause more trouble than it’s worth. She said instead, drivers should be aware of students crossing the street and drive appropriately. “If anyone is standing out in the road, good judgement says you are going to stop,” Weller said. Although several students have posted on the master plan website voicing their concerns, she said she isn’t aware of pedestrian traffic being an issue. “We will address the issue if students feel unsafe,” Weller said. Hunsberger offered his advice, saying signs and speed bumps would be a strong incentive to changing the driving culture on Ball State’s campus. “It shouldn’t take an accident to precipitate change,” he said.

partnerships and other legal protections for same-sex couples,” Robertson said. Gov. Mike Pence said he supports the original proposal and has refused to comment further as lawmakers hash out the details.

|

rmpodnar@bsu.edu

CARDINAL CONNECTION

WHERE

during training near the Korean Peninsula. North Korea called the planned drills a rehearsal for invasion, a claim the allies deny. On Monday, State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said King was still prepared to meet with North Korean leaders in the future. The State Department also has said Jackson, the civil rights leader, has offered to travel to North Korea at the request of Bae’s family. “We support the efforts, of course, of the family but also of Reverend Jackson to bring Kenneth Bae home,” Harf said. Analysts said North Korea has previously used detained Americans as leverage in its standoff with the U.S. over its nuclear and missile programs; North Korea denies this. The North accused Bae of smuggling in inflammatory literature and trying to establish a base for anti-government activities at a border city hotel. Chung said Bae’s Christian faith got him into trouble. In August, North Korea also rescinded an invitation for King to visit, saying Washington had perpetrated a grave provocation by flying B-52 bombers during military drills with South Korea.

RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER

wo groups have started campaigning for the executive board of next year’s Student Government Association. On Monday night at the convention, the slates Cardinal Connection and Empower accepted nominations to run. Alex Sventeckis, SGA elections board chairman, said there were no campaign violations and slates were officially permitted to start campaigning when the convention closed. Elections will be Feb. 24 and Feb. 25.

WHO

HJR-3: Opponents continue fight against amendment

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Cardinal Connection, Empower announce candidates, discuss plans for next year

QUICK FACTS

CROSSWALKS: University suggests walkers, drivers take caution on campus | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Student government kicks off campaigns

NICK WILKEY Presidential nominee

EMPOWER

Empower, the second slate, is made Cardinal Connection was the first to up of presidential nominee Jes Wade, accept its nomination. vice presidential nominee Gabi Bunn, The slate includes presidential nomitreasurer nominee Connor Saum and nee Nick Wilkey, vice presidential secretary nominee Bekki Kimani. nominee Carli Hendershot, secretary Wade, a junior telecommunications, nominee Rahissa Engle and treasurer sales and promotion major said she nominee Sidney Staples. met Bunn and Saum through a leadJunior risk management and ership class. They then asked Kimani insurance major Wilkey is no stranger to join their slate. to SGA elections; he was the vice presi“We kind of threw the idea around dential candidate for Fusion last year. and we decided to roll with it,” Wade His older brother, Chris, was the presisaid. dent of SGA with Alliance during the Saum, a junior human resources 2012-13 school year. management major who He started thinking of his serves on the Interfraterslate for this year’s election in nity Council for Phi Sigma mid-October. Kappa, said Empower is a “I approached Carli and Racohesive enough group that hissa, and they gave me the confidence to know we would ELECTIONS ’14 knows its weaknesses and strengths. do a good job as a slate and “We feel like we have adequate actually accomplish all of our platform strength for all of our points, but my points,” Wilkey said. favorite is the implement of leaderCardinal Connection boasts a memship on campus,” Saum said. “We ber of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transwant to partner with Excellence in gender and queer community as well Leadership to make an emerging as racial diversity. Engle, a sophomore leaders retreat available to all grades, psychology and sociology major, said freshmen through seniors.” these weren’t the primary factors that Junior marketing major Bunn said brought them together. their life experiences are what set “It wasn’t even about the diversity,” their slate apart. She said because she said. “Nick approached each of us they have had a lot of diverse leaderbecause he realized each of us repreship positions, they represent a good sented a different part of campus. It’s amount of the students on campus. not just the fact that we are all differ“We said that we would give it our ent races, it’s that we can all bring new all or we weren’t going to do it at all,” ideas. We want to unite campus.” Bunn said. “I think we’re very driven.” Staple, a junior telecommunications Empower’s platform encompasses major, said no one will be underrepreSafety, Diversity, Leadership and Trasented if their slate becomes the execudition. The slate wants to educate stutive board. dents on safety, promote equal treat“We plan on implementing new valment of diverse students, encourage ues, new goals,” he said. “No matter growth and collaboration between what your race or background or ethleadership and maintain Ball State nicity is, that’s not going to hinder you traditions for the future. because we can all come together and Junior public relations major accomplish a main goal.” Kimani said she does not think there Cardinal Connection’s platform is Emis a weak part to their platform. bark, Engage, Envision and Commit. The “We listened to what people had group wants to embark on new ideas, to say about what’s going on at the engage with organizations, envision a Ball State campus,” Kimani said. “So I better campus and commit to students. think all of our slate is strong.” Sophomore political science major Collectively, Empower has four Hendershot said she is ready to assume years of SGA service. Wade is in her responsibility as a member of the exfirst year as a senator and Bunn has ecutive board. She is currently the Specbeen a senator for three years, while trum representative for SGA and a mulSaum and Kimani said they have sat ticultural adviser. in on SGA delegations. “I really want to dedicate myself to a In addition to the slate nominations, community that has given me so many 12 senators were nominated and apwonderful opportunities,” Hendershot proved for the following term, which said. “I really want to connect the stuwill start in April. dents to a welcoming environment at Slates will have three chances to apBall State.” pear before the student body in a seThree members of Cardinal Connecries of debates, the first of which will tion have prior SGA experience. Wilkey be between vice presidential candiwas a senator for two years, including dates at 7 p.m. Thursday at in the L.A. one year as a member of Campus CounPittenger Student Center Cardinal cil and University Senate. Hendershot Hall B. is in her second year as a senator and Kara Berg contributed to this story. Staples is in his first.

JES WADE

Presidential nominee

SGA

CARLI HENDERSHOT Vice presidential nominee

RAHISSA ENGLE Secretary nominee

SIDNEY STAPLES Treasurer nominee

GABI BUNN

Vice presidential nominee

BEKKI KIMANI Secretary nominee

CONNOR SAUM Treasurer nominee

U.S. CONSIDERS DRONE USE ON CITIZEN Government faces barriers to attacking American resident | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — The case of an American citizen and suspected member of al-Qaida, who is allegedly planning attacks on U.S. targets overseas, underscores the complexities of President Barack Obama’s new, stricter targeting guidelines for the use of deadly drones. The CIA drones watching him cannot strike because he’s a U.S. citizen. The Pentagon drones that could are barred from the country where he’s hiding, and the Justice Department has not yet finished building a case against him. Four U.S. officials said the American suspected terrorist is in a country that refuses U.S. military action on its soil and that has proved unable to go after him. And Obama’s new policy said American suspected terrorists overseas can only be

killed by the military, not the CIA, creating a policy conundrum for the White House. Two of the officials described the man as an al-Qaida facilitator, who has been directly responsible for deadly attacks against U.S. citizens overseas and who continues to plan attacks against them that would use improvised explosive devices. The officials said the suspected terrorist is well-guarded and in a fairly remote location, so any unilateral attempt by U.S. troops to capture him would be risky and even more politically explosive than a U.S. missile strike. White House press secretary Jay Carney said Monday that he would not comment on specific operations and pointed to Obama’s comments in the major counterterrorism speech last May about drone policy. “When a U.S. citizen goes abroad to wage war against America and is actively plotting to kill U.S. citizens, and when neither the United States, nor our partners are in a position to capture him before he carries

out a plot, his citizenship should no more serve as a shield than a sniper shooting down on an innocent crowd should be protected from a SWAT team,” Carney said, quoting from Obama’s speech last year. Under new guidelines Obama addressed in the speech made to calm anger overseas at the extent of the U.S. drone campaign, lethal force must only be used “to prevent or stop attacks against U.S. persons, and even then, only when capture is not feasible and no other reasonable alternatives exist to address the threat effectively.” The target also must pose “a continuing, imminent threat to U.S. persons” — the legal definition of catching someone in the act of plotting a lethal attack. The Associated Press has agreed to the government’s request to withhold the name of the country where the suspected terrorist is believed to be because officials said publishing it could interrupt ongoing counterterror operations. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they

USE ON AMERICANS •U  .S. drones have killed four Americans since 2009. • In 2011, a drone strike killed Anwar al-Awlaki, a former Virginia resident, and Samir Khan in Yemen. •T  wo weeks after the strike on al-Awlaki, a drone killed al-Awlaki’s 16-year-old Denver native son, Abdulrahman. •T  he last American killed in 2011 from drone strikes was Jude Kenan Mohammed in Pakistan. He was a former North Carolina resident. SOURCE: The Associated Press

were not authorized to discuss the classified drone targeting program publicly. House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers, R-Mich., complained last week that a number of terrorist suspects were all but out of reach under the administration’s new rules that limit drone strikes based on the target’s nationality or location. Two of the U.S. officials said the Justice Department review of the American suspected terrorist started last fall.


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

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FORUM POLICY The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor, guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed. The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community: U.S. SEN. JOSEPH REP. SUE ERRINGTON DONNELLY Indiana District 34 B33 Russell Senate Office 200 W. Washington St. Building Indianapolis, IN 46204 Washington, DC 20510 1-800-382-9842 (202) 224-4814 SEN. TIM LANANE U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER Indiana Dist. 25 U.S. 6th District 200 W. Washington Street 508 Cannon House Office Indianapolis, IN 46204 Building 1-800-382-9467 Washington, DC 20515 U.S. SEN. DAN COATS (202) 225-3021 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

Will Long is a sophomore print making art major and draws “ArtGod� for the Daily News. His views do not necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Will at wclong@bsu.edu.

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1 or 2 br apts available May or August 2014-may or may not include utilities. Required application fee of $35.00 and security deposit for all application forms submitted. Showing appointments will be arraged. Contact Kerry @284-6313 or 744-2998 or email @ kwiggerly@prudentialindiana.com 3 Bd apt, util pd, 50 inch TV, 2 ba. W/D. close to BSU. $315/person. 315 South Mckinley 744-4649 Affordable village living University village apartments 1000 mo free cable reserved parking 765-729-9618 www.bsurentals.com Aug lease, 1 2 & 3 bdrm. 1 blk South of BSU Village.$250-350/mo ea. +Utils. No pets. 765-288-3100 Cardinal Villas close to campus 3 bdrm 2 ba. W/D in every unit, utils paid, free wifi call 317-679-0681 FREE INTERNET! Clean & quiet 1 bdrm apts, close to BSU. On site WS/DR,cedarsatbsu.com,286 2806 Lrg 2 bdrm apt. Close to campus. A/C, Util paid, off-st. prkg. $700/mo Aug. lse. NO pets. 288-9521.

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Focus on optimal health and work this year, for extraordinary results. You’re learning tricks for powerful performance (especially through August). Include practices for physical, mental and spiritual growth. A spring cleaning at home makes space for a new stage in romance and partnership (solar eclipse, 6/10). Spend time with young people for inspiration, fun and play. Grow your love.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)Today is an 8 -- Conditions seem shaky. Encourage compromise on the team. Don’t gossip about your job. Check the regulations. Work out the budget with a partner. You don’t need whistles and bells. Integrate your insights. Present a balanced report. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)Today is a 9 -- Quiet productivity gets more accomplished than meetings. Focus on health and service. Take care of yourself and others. Rest, and remind others to do the same. Avoid big expense or hassle. Postpone appointments if you need. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)Today is a 7 -- Plan some social fun. Direct your actions logically. Turn down public for private today. Try not to provoke jealousy. Controversy could arise. Ignore someone who says it can’t be done. Pay attention to intuition. Admit impracticalities.

Aries (March 21-April 19)Today is a 6 -- Prepare for all the contingencies you can imagine, and don’t make promises you can’t keep. Spend time on organization and planning before taking action. Another illusion bites the dust. Abundance is available again. Exceed expectations. Taurus (April 20-May 20)Today is a 7 -It’s getting easier to advance, although communications could slow or get twisted. Don’t tell everything. Offer extra service. Good work leads to more assignments. Help a goofy friend stay calm. Allow yourself a little treat. Gemini (May 21-June 21)Love grows, even if it’s not quite as expected.You’ve got the upper hand. Don’t talk about it. Avoid an argument with the one who signs your paychecks. Be respectful. Find a sweetheart deal.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)Take care if you must travel now. Abundance is available. Don’t rush blindly forward, though. Meditation delivers keen personal insight. Expand it by sharing it. Heed advice from a female. Go down a new road.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 6 -- Gamble another day. Focus on the jobs you love and delegate others. More complications could arise, with unstable conditions. Keep to the plan, despite temporary confusion. Cautiously advance while reviewing options. Reassure someone who feels Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)--Today is a 7 -- Chaos and misunderstandings could slow the action. It’s a good time to relax and recharge. Keep it frugal. Negotiate your way out of a corner.You can succeed. Offer advice only if asked. Get insight from a dream.

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Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)-Today is a 7 -- Unexpected circumstances could interfere with the plans. Keep the faith. Don’t forget to do an important job at work. Learn as you teach. Schedule a family discussion for later. Small steps forward add up. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)Today is an 8 -- A lucky break opens a new door. Study the options. Don’t take anything for granted. Use what you have.You’re especially charming now. Exploration through travel or the eyes of another inspires you. Sort through your stuff. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)Today is a 7 -- Clear up confusion before proceeding. Double-check financial documents and paperwork. Listen to all the considerations, regarding upcoming expenses. Budget to make it work. Remain firm but not rigid. Talk to your family before signing.


PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

B B LEADERSHIP TIPS Leader benefits

SUCCESSFUL LEADERS inspire others

I

getting ahead with leadership, humility and zeal

Student Leaders

28.2%

71.8%

story // Aiste Manfredini Editor’s Note: The Daily News is working with Ball Bearings to bring readers stories from the magazine each week. Check every Tuesday for more stories from Ball Bearings’ print, tablet and online products.

sat amid 1,200 climate activists in a noisy conference room, patiently waiting for former Vice President Al Gore to speak at the 23rd Climate Leader training last summer. Feeling nervous but relieved, I knew that I wasn’t sitting alone as a young leader. As it was my first leadership conference, I didn’t know what to expect, but I was excited to be part of the global cultural movement. During the three-day training, I was surrounded by hundreds of people from places as close as Chicago and as far as Dhaka, Bangladesh. A variety of inspirational speakers at the conference included the Climate Reality Project’s Maggie Fox and Mario Molina; the National Wildlife Federation’s Larry Schweiger; the storytelling specialist and co-creator of The Meatrix, Jonah Sachs; and outstanding Kim Wasserman, who helped lead the successful campaign to close down Chicago’s two killer coal plants. One week later, I found myself in San Francisco to attend the Global Brigades Student Leadership conference at the University of California at Berkeley. There, I learned how to empower members in my Global Brigades chapter at Ball State, an organization that is devoted to global health and sustainable development. I was immediately moved by Orion Haas, former director of mobilization at Global Brigades, when he spoke about leading through the art of inspiration. Haas urged students to practice passion, clarity and direction throughout their journey as a leader. Taking the extra steps to attend both conferences wasn’t easy — mentally or financially — but those steps encouraged me to take advantage of my collegiate leadership opportunities, which shape decisions that I make today and will make in the future during my career. It’s crucial for us to lead and take advantage of as many opportunities as possible while they’re available. Come graduation, we’ll be at the bottom again. If that disappoints you, don’t let it — there’s a powerful and valuable life skill that employers look for during the interview process but often struggle to find, which is the ability to lead. “Leadership is defined by how you present yourself on an everyday basis,” said Lauren Berger, Ball State assistant director of student life. “It’s not about having a specific title or a specific position, it’s really about you as a person and your character and the vision that you have.” Berger works with Ball State’s student leadership programs, the Excellence in Leadership Speaker Series and oversees the leadership minor. She said anyone can be a leader and that it’s about the things you do and the opportunities that you take that make students stand out as leaders. “When leadership is done well and when students learn what leadership is and make an impact in their community, I think that is really how students can take those skills and develop them into their future work as a professional and student leader,” Berger said. The moment you begin your journey at Ball State, make sure to get involved on campus and look for opportunities outside of the classroom, whether it’s a student organization, internship or job. “Find something that you’re passionate about,” Berger said. “Find something that you get really excited about that’s outside of the classroom, that’s going to challenge you to do something different.” Berger said anyone can lead and that it’s all about combining the skills, experiences and passions that students have while simultaneously figuring out how to make good decisions and make an impact on a community, college or organization. It seems like college students are more involved and wellrounded than ever before and involved in more than just one activity. That’s why it’s important to find that one thing that you’re really good at and passionate about and put your full focus on it.

students define leadership

KOURTNEY DILLAVOU, An architecture major “Leadership means more than just taking charge of a situation and overseeing what other people are doing. In order to be a leader, one must want to achieve a goal enough to be able to motivate others to want to achieve that goal so that it actually happens.”

BB

WIL MITCHELL, An undecided major “Leadership means leading by example and making others inspired to do what you do. You set an example for people and a lot of people come to you for help and trust you.”

“It’s better to be good at one thing than seven different things,” Berger said. “But it’s also good for students to have a variety of different experiences. It’s about loving to do all those things.” Adam Kuban, director of the Louis E. Ingelhart Scholars at Ball State, shares a different perspective on leadership. “Freshman sometimes come in knowing right off the bat where they want to go and what they want to do,” Kuban said. “What I want them to do is explore not just what leadership is to them, but also how exactly they got to the point where they believe what they do about leadership.” He urged students to ask questions about why someone was so influential to them and what influential means so they can explore what leadership is. “It would be useful for students to have had some deeper intellectual conversations about what leadership means so they can talk about that intelligently and they’re not caught off guard by it,” Kuban said. It’s important that we push ourselves out of the comfort zone because down the road when we’re all working professionals, we may be in a major leadership role. It might be unpleasant and we might have regrets, but it’s important to remember that it’s a learning experience that takes effort, patience and commitment. Carson Weingart, president of Ball State’s Student Honors Council, said leadership, at its core, is about inspiring other people. “I think it’s wrong to assume that being a leader is getting people to think like you do,” Weingart said. “The best leadership experiences that I’ve had is where I’m able to inspire people to do things in their own way and to get them to think of things and then take ownership of those things.” Weingart said he is encouraged by the positive leadership from millennials. During his time at Ball State, Weingart learned that not everyone is a leader. “There’s a real difference between leaders and managers,” he said. “Managers are really good at being given a plan and then they have to implement it and they have to tell people, ‘This is what someone above me says you need to do.’ And that’s a great thing to have, but leaders have to set the vision. “I’ve always looked up to Walt Disney because he didn’t step out as, ‘Oh, I want to run a multibillion company.’ He just had an idea and he was able to inspire other people and create that organizational culture that’s made that company what it is today.” After listening and observing leaders from all walks of life at both conferences, it made me realize that leadership is not about entitlement or power. It’s about building a passion for something you believe in. A zealous leader isn’t always the president of an organization or the captain of a sports team. It can be anyone who has a vision with a purpose and someone who leads by example. “The best thing you can do in college is to spend your first year just sitting on the sidelines and observing, and that’s what I did with the Student Honors Council,” Weingart said. “Never join an organization with the intent of running it. It’s just like traveling to a different country ... you have to immerse yourself in the culture first and then decide if this is somewhere I can grow or do I need to find somewhere else.” He said leadership is important because good leaders allow followers to do their best work. “One of the qualities of leaders that people most respect is when they’re amazing without having to say that they are,” Weingart said. Take those extra steps and explore your passions because you never know when the doors will open up for new opportunities that you may never gain back. Acts and visions of leadership will not only help you find your passion in life but can also make a significant difference to your community and the world.

Kyle Starns Major: Social Studies Education “When you lead you learn and build characteristics that are qualities for education in life in general. There will be challenges and you may fail in areas of life but it’s just something you need to overcome.”

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Non-student Leaders

39.1% 60.9% graduation percentage csus.edu

LEADERSHIP TIPS 1. You are not superhuman Know your limits and put importance in quality of work versus quantity. 2. Get over yourself It’s about the organization as a whole, not about you. Credibility is the foundation of leadership. 3. Believe in yourself If people don’t believe in you, they won’t follow you. 4. trust rules Trust is the social glue that holds individuals and groups together. 5. Leadership is heartFELT Leaders show authentic appreciation for others.

opportunities

381

student organizations at Ball State EAch organization Offers multiple opportunities for student leadership


DN 2-11-14