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DN

ACTIVIST’S

TUESDAY, NOV. 5, 2013

THE BALL STATE

GUIDE

THE DAILY NEWS

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

UPD says stabbing incident is false

Students can get behind a megaphone, cardboard sign to stand for their cause CONSTANCE HARCOURT CHIEF REPORTER

Students have seen their fair share of mock waterboarding, giant posters of mangled fetuses and shouting this semester as protests and demonstrations have landed on campus. “Having a venue where you can exchange ideas in a respectful and thoughtful manner is really a great thing,” Thomas Gibson, assistant vice president of student affairs, said. Protesting isn’t simply for activists of decades past or religious groups — any student can be on the other side of the microphone and express their views to the masses.

University plans not to press legal charges against student EMMA KATE FITTES AND CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS | news@bsudailynews.com

The university does not have plans to press charges against a student who they say falsely claimed he was assaulted on campus, a university spokesperson said. “Any disciplinary action that he may or may not face will be handled by the student judiciary process,” said Tony Proudfoot, associate vice president for marketing and communications. Andrew Pizzano, a sophomore fundamentals of management and communica- ANDREW PIZZANO tion studies major, reported a sophomore around 11:30 p.m. Oct. 26 fundamentals of that a white man wearing management and a tan or brown sweatshirt communication approached him in a park- studies major ing lot near Worthen Arena and demanded his wallet and cellphone. Pizzano said the man then pulled out a knife and stabbed him in the arm.

See STABBING, page 3

TWEETS FROM ANDREW PIZZANO @andyyyconda

My new excuse for everything “but I just got stabbed...” Oct. 27

@andyyyconda

I can’t decide which is worse: getting stabbed last night or playing Calvin Johnson in fantasy this week. #probablythelatter Oct. 27

@andyyyconda

My stab wound keeps oozing. #gross Oct. 28

|

cmharcourt@bsu.edu

BE PREPARED

Matt Smith, a senior history and political science major, protested on campus against indefinite detention in Guantanamo Bay and for the support of a legislative piece in closing the detainment facility. Amnesty International, a student group, took around three months to prepare for the protest. Since the demonstration was scheduled for early in the semester, Smith and a few other students started preparing during the summer.

See PROTESTS, page 6

DN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION JONATHAN MIKSANEK

SOME OF BALL STATE’S PROTEST HISTORY From the late ‘60s, Ball State’s rabble-rousing history is chronicled in “Ball State University: An Interpretive History” by Anthony Edmonds and Bruce Geelhoed. The Daily News also has recorded its fair share of protests.

August 2012: Outside The Atrium, students gathered to educate people about the Chick-Fil-A controversy and push for its removal from campus. The chain restaurant openly discriminated against the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community.

April 1969: Four state universities raised tuition from 1969-1970. Ball State’s yearly tuition increased from $340 to $540, and 1,500 students attended a rally to protest the legislature shortfall that led to the tuition raise. October 1969: The Ball State chapter of the national Vietnam Moratorium Committee formed. The group carried out a ceremony with about 120 people and read the names of soldiers killed in the Vietnam War in front of the Administration Building. October 1969: During the lead-up to the Vietnam Moratorium, students created a campus-wide underwear raid. The Daily News reported 600 male students participated in a panty raid. As retaliation, 75 women hosted a jock strap raid in the gymnasium and men’s residence halls. May 1970: This was Ball State’s largest demonstration against the war with several thousand students and faculty. They opposed the military action in Cambodia and the deaths of students at Kent State University during a protest.

May 1970: More than 600 people gathered in front of the Administration Building in reaction to a threat to burn a dog to protest the Vietnam War by the Hoosier Anti-War Coalition. The HAWC rebutted at the protest to say they were not really going to harm a dog — they were trying to create outrage about the “thousands of human beings are being burnt and killed daily in Southeast Asia,” according to one HAWC representative at the scene. March 1974: Several hundred people streaked on Riverside Avenue over the period of three days. About 2,000 students jammed the avenue and blocked off the street. Some streakers threw rocks and bottles at the police trying to quell the mass streak, which led to the end of the odd demonstration with no clear purpose.

August 2013: A group of students in orange jumpsuits were mock waterboarded in front of Bracken Library. Amnesty International, a student group, protested on campus against indefinite detention in Guantanamo Bay and for the support of a legislative piece in closing the detainment facility. October 2013: Missionaries to the Preborn, an antiabortion organization, protested across campus. The group had to be relocated because of violations of university policy and complaints of “disturbing” images.

– ANNA ORTIZ

DN PHOTOS JONATHAN MIKSANEK SOURCES: The Daily News, “Ball State University: An Interpretive History” by Anthony Edmonds and Bruce Geelhoed

NOTE: His Twitter account was deleted sometime Monday.

Campus multicultural clubs feel safe INCREASE IN RENT Report revealed COULD FOLLOW zero hate crimes BUS REFERENDUM for past 3 years PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER | RACHEL rmpodnar@bsu.edu

Leaders of Ball State multicultural organizations said the members of their communities feel safe on campus. The 2013 Campus Security Report showed that no hate crimes were reported in 2010, 2011 or 2012, but it is only required to report hate crimes that occur on university-controlled property. Michael Gillilan, director of

student rights and community standards, said the report indicates no crimes were committed on basis of bias in categories of race, gender, ethnicity, religion, disability or sexual orientation. Romelle Taday, president of the Asian American Student Association, said it is “incredible” there are no hate crimes. She didn’t hear of any hate crimes against Asians, Asian Americans or any international students. “[Ball State] has been able to maintain a safe environment for minorities and the international students who may be feeling different or unaccepted on campus,” she said. Dairick Wade, president of

the Black Student Association, said if the report has no hate crimes, it may not necessarily mean there are none, but it is encouraging. “I honestly think it’s a little surprising that it’s zero hate crimes,” he said. “You would think with 20,000 students there would be at least one hate crime.” As a resident assistant, Wade has received training on situations like hate crimes and sexual harassment so he would understand the importance of reporting crimes, but he said he doesn’t think the student body shares this knowledge.

See REACTIONS, page 3

REPORTING INCIDENTS

•S  tudents who experience a crime or incident motivated by bias are encouraged by the university to use the bias incident reporting form to report the incident, even if the perpetrator is not known. • Anonymous reports can be filed and any report received will be addressed within a day. The report asks to describe the nature of the incident, where it occurred, what the motivation may have been and gives responders the option to remain anonymous. • Students who file a report will receive assistance to decide if they want to file a police report or a report with the Office of Student Rights and Community Standards, and may be directed to counseling or help if they have been absent from classes. All help is given at the request of the student who reports.

Muncie Community School’s bus system rides on local vote

|

CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR news@bsudailynews.com

SOURCE: Michael Gillilan, director of student rights and community standards

STORY OF A CAP STUDENT

Many architecture majors cope with their demanding schedules together SEE PAGE 6

SEE PAGE 4

SPORTS

Late free throws seal exhibition THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

MUNCIE, INDIANA

HAPPY NON-PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION DAY.

CONTACT US

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Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

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If the local referendum to continue paying for Muncie Community Schools busing passes after a vote today, Ball State student’s rent may rise with property taxes. Chris Hiatt, owner of Hiatt Printing and several rental properties around Muncie, said in an interview with WCRD that he has already sent out a letter informing his renters of the ramifications of the referendum. “[The letter is] me telling them that I am going to incur this additional cost and that this cost will affect their rent,” he said. Businesses that incur this cost will be forced to raise their prices to cover the additional property taxes, which could be up to a maximum of 39.39 cents for every $100. Hiatt said the average increase in tax dollars will between $200 to $400 yearly, which will then be passed on

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

See REFERENDUM, page 3 THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

VOL. 93, ISSUE 44

5. SUNNY

FORECAST TODAY Mostly cloudy High: 62 Low: 45 1. CLOUDY

to renters, who are often the poorest of Muncie residents. “How can you be concerned?” Stacy Walker, a Muncie bus driver, asked after hearing Hiatt’s statement. “You can’t be concerned [about those in poverty] and hurt them in the same sentence.” Mark Burkhart, MCS chief financial officer, said although Hiatt may say he cares about those in poverty, those are the exact same people the referendum looks to help. He said the loss in a bus service would affect students living in poverty the most because they have no other way to access their public education. Burkhart said the rate has already been set for the first of the seven years the referendum would cover at 22 cents, lowering any previous estimates for a tax increase. Another problem Hiatt has with the referendum is his belief that the consequences of failing to raise the tax rate are “felicitous.” He also said he believes the school system is using a threat to students as a way to further their own goals.

2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

Clouds and a chance of sprinkles are forecasted for today. Steady rain will move in tomorrow, but the sun will return Thursday. - Michael Behrens, WCRD chief weather forecaster 5. SUNNY 4. MOSTLY SUNNY 3. PARTLY CLOUDY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

21. SCATTERED THUNDERS


PAGE 2 | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

5 THINGS TO KNOW

1.

ANTI-BIAS GAY RIGHTS BILL PASSES IN SENATE AFTER 61-30 VOTE

TODAY

THE FORECAST POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

WEDNESDAY Rain High: 61 Low: 49 06 - RAIN

3. GIANT SAC CAPITAL TO PAY $1.8 BILLION NEW YORK (AP) — SAC Capital Advisors will plead guilty to criminal fraud charges, stop investing money for others and pay $1.8 billion — the largest financial penalty in history for insider trading — to resolve criminal and civil claims against the hedge fund giant, the government announced Monday. The government said in a letter to judges presiding over Manhattan cases that the “proposed global resolution” of the criminal and civil cases against SAC

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate pushed a major anti-bias gay rights bill past a first, big hurdle Monday, a clear sign of Americans’ greater acceptance of homosexuality nearly two decades after the law prohibiting federal recognition of same-sex marriage. The vote of 61-30 essentially ensured that the Senate has the votes to pass the Employment Non-Discrimination Act that would prohibit workplace discrimination against gay, bisexual and transgender Americans. A final passage, possibly by week’s end, would cap a 17-year quest to secure Senate support for a similar discrimination measure that failed by one vote in 1996, the same year Congress passed and President Bill Clinton signed the Defense of Marriage Act. Reflecting the nation’s shifting views toward gay rights and the fast-changing political dynamic, seven Senate Republicans joined with 54 Democrats to vote to move ahead on the legislation.

Capital Advisors and related companies also includes an agreement that SAC will cease operating as an investment adviser and will not accept any additional funds from third-party investors. The company will pay a $900 million fine and forfeit another $900 million to the federal government, though $616 million that SAC companies have already agreed to pay to settle parallel actions by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission will be deducted.

4.EGYPT’S MORSI DEFIANT DURING HIS TRIAL CAIRO (AP) — Ousted President Mohammed Morsi refused to wear a prison jumpsuit, entering the caged dock in a dark business suit as his co-defendants applauded. He defiantly questioned the legitimacy of the court and proclaimed himself still Egypt’s leader. His fellow Muslim Brotherhood members chanted, “Down with military rule!” Morsi’s long-awaited trial got off to a chaotic start Monday, with out-

MCT PHOTO

bursts and interruptions, and it was quickly adjourned until Jan. 8. The dramatic first public appearance for Morsi since the July 3 military coup that removed him from power was meant to be a step toward due process. Instead, it highlighted the challenges facing Egypt’s interim authorities as they attempt to close a chapter of his presidency, while his Islamist supporters seek to disrupt the effort.

2. TEHRAN RALLY SHAKES FIST AT AMERICA

5. VOTERS TO DECIDE IN ELECTIONS TODAY

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — In Tehran’s largest anti-U.S. rally in years, tens of thousands of demonstrators joined Monday in chants of “death to America” as hard-liners directed a major show of resolve against President Hassan Rouhani’s outreach to Washington more than a generation after crowds on the same streets stormed and occupied the U.S. Embassy. Such American-bashing protests occur every year outside the former embassy

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — From rural Iowa to urban New York, voters across America will render judgment in a slate of political contests Tuesday, including in New Jersey and Virginia where gubernatorial race outcomes could highlight the Republican Party division between pragmatists and ideologues. Elsewhere, Colorado voters will set a tax rate for marijuana. New York City will elect a new mayor for the first time in 12 years,

compound to mark the anniversary of the 1979 takeover following the Islamic Revolution. But the latest demonstration had a dual purpose of sending the boldest warning yet to Rouhani’s government over whether it can expand dialogue with the U.S. or offer the concessions needed to possibly settle the nuclear impasse with the West. The choice of Jalili as the main speaker to the crowd showed how high the rifts reach in Iran.

while Boston’s mayoral race pits white collar against blue collar, and Detroit’s spotlights the city’s bankruptcy — just three of the many mayoral contests from coast to coast. Republican and Democratic strategists alike said Tuesday’s contests are more defined by candidate personalities and region-specific issues than political trends likely to influence next year’s larger fight for control of Congress. Turnout is expected to be low across the country.

THURSDAY Mostly sunny High: 48 Low: 39 04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

FRIDAY Mostly sunny High: 50 Low: 32 04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

SATURDAY Partly cloudy High: 55 Low: 35 03 - PARTLY CLOUDY

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Steven Williams

NEWS EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes ASST. NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz ASST. FEATURES EDITOR Jeremy Ervin

SPORTS EDITOR Matt McKinney ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

72HRS EDITOR Ryan Howe FORUM EDITOR Devan Filchak

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Corey Ohlenkamp ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Jonathan Miksanek

DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITOR Daniel Brount

Updated 24/7 Crossword

Sudoku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Michael Mepham

Level: Mild

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.

ACROSS 1 SLEEPS OUT UNDER THE STARS 6 NYC GAMBLING OUTLETS CLOSED IN 2010 10 TRANSCRIPT FIGS. 14 COOKIES IN SOME PIE CRUSTS 15 GATHER IN A FIELD 16 LATIN FOR “ELBOW” 17 REUTERS OR BLOOMBERG 19 GEOLOGICAL AGE 20 LOS ANGELES-TO-SAN BERNARDINO DIRECTION 21 SAUSAGE UNIT 22 PRODUCE SELLER’S KIOSK 23 MACHO MAN 25 CHIPS IN A CHIP 27 TOP USN RANK 30 NUTRITIONIST’S RECOMMENDATION 34 WEDDING PARTY 36 POPEYE’S OLIVE 37 “ALAS!” 38 AT FULL SPEED 39 BASIC BIOLOGICAL MOLECULE

40 SKIER’S SPOT 41 FOOD __: LISTLESSNESS AFTER A LARGE MEAL 42 CRANBERRY SOURCE 43 LOST COLOR 44 “MY GOOSE IS COOKED!” 48 CAVITY FILLER’S DEG. 49 NOT SKILLED IN 50 LENDS A HAND 52 BOLDLY STATES 54 HAY HOLDER 56 COUNTY OF THE BLARNEY STONE 60 PARTING WORD WITH AN AIR KISS, PERHAPS 61 AROMATIC PLOT, AND WHERE TO FIND THREE DIFFERENT PLANTS HIDDEN IN 17-, 30- AND 44-ACROSS 63 SASES, E.G. 64 DANCER KELLY 65 TOUR LEADER 66 HOMER SIMPSON OUTBURSTS 67 HOME RUN GAIT 68 MORE THAN ROTUND

DOWN 1 ICE CREAM HOLDER 2 LENGTH TIMES WIDTH 3 KITTEN CALLS 4 UPDATES A WIKI PAGE, SAY 5 ORG. THAT ISSUES ABOUT 5.5 MILLION NEW NUMBERS ANNUALLY 6 ZESTY TWIRLS MAKER 7 GRACELAND’S ST. 8 INFORMAL “LIKEWISE” 9 CLOAK-AND-DAGGER TYPE 10 HONDURAS NEIGHBOR 11 “KINDLY STAY ON THE LINE” 12 IN A BIT, OLD-STYLE 13 GOLF BUNKER FILLER 18 EPOXY, E.G. 22 HOG HOME 24 “WHAT HAPPENED NEXT?” 26 STANLEY CUP ORG. 27 CHINESE COUNTERS 28 SICK KID’S TLC GIVER 29 SOUTHERN FLORIDA COASTAL RESORT CITY 31 SOUND IN “CUBE” BUT NOT “CUB” 32 LIKE ELECTRIC GUITARS

33 WEST YORKSHIRE’S LARGEST CITY 35 DOROTHY PORTRAYER IN THE FILM “THE WIZ” 39 SASSAFRAS SODA 40 DROVE TOO FAST 42 PUSH-UP TOP 45 QB SCORES 46 WAGER OVER DARTS, E.G. 47 FORMER “THE VIEW” COHOST LISA 51 CANCEL AT NASA 52 SERVED TO PERFECTION? 53 RISTORANTE GLASSFUL 55 RIVER OF PISA 57 COMICS DOG 58 CHERRY AND RUBY 59 “OH! SUSANNA” JOINT 61 ALT. 62 IN THE PAST

www.ballstatedaily.com

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY:


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

Students more likely to have identity stolen Consumers ages 20 to 29 make up 21 percent of cases

|

PAIGE SOUTHERLAND STAFF REPORTER pesoutherlan@bsu.edu

More than just friends and followers may see information posted online, and 21 percent of reported identity theft is happening to consumers between the ages of 20 and 29, according to the Consumer Sentinel Network. “The student body should care about this subject because in college, you are preparing yourself for the real world, and if you’re not careful about protecting your identity, then the repercussions of what that person does could ruin your chance of future employment or opportunities that could’ve been available to you before,” said Nick Combs, vice president of Ball State’s Finance Society. According to the Consumer Sentinel Network, 57,491 identity theft reports were from consumers between the ages of 20 and 29. Rosnellys Pérez, a senior criminal justice major, has once fallen victim to identity theft. After making an online purchase from a clothing website, Pérez got a notification of a $35 purchase made from her account in Minnesota. “So my bank called me and asked me if I did that purchase,” she said. “I said ‘no,’ and it took three days for them to return the money.” Pérez had no easy access to

money for the next three days because her account numbers and card numbers had to be changed. “I was broke for three days,” she said. “And I had to order my card to be replaced. I was cardless for a week and that was stressful. Now, I just shop in websites that are popular and recognized.” Dan Boylan, a Ball State finance instructor, said students also need to be aware of what they are putting on their social media sites. “[Identity theft is] rising because the information that you can get on other people online is so easy and so accessible,” he said. The Better Business Bureau of the United States and Canada names identity theft as one of the most common crimes. “The reason that I’m not surprised at all is if someone robs a bank, we all know about it,” Boylan said. “But if someone steals your identity, nobody knows about it, so it’s kind of like a hidden crime.” According to Social Security Administration and Boylan, there are six ways to deter yourself from this problem: shred financial documents, protect your social security number, don’t give out personal information, never click on links sent on unsolicited emails, don’t use obvious passwords and keep personal information in a safe spot. “Once you know about it, you need to take action immediately because once you are aware that there is identity theft, now the burden of proof is on you,” Boylan said. The Social Security Admin-

istration recommends placing a “fraud alert” on your credit reports, contacting the fraud departments for each company, filing a police report and reporting the theft to the Federal Trade Commission. With identity theft impacting college students, Albert DiBenedetto, a junior physics major, said he is cautious when it comes to protecting himself. “It’s important to protect your identity so you don’t get any of your really important records stolen or invaded,” he said. “I change my passwords whenever it prompts me to. I started doing this about two years ago. It didn’t really start until I got here to Ball State. When I got my bank account, that’s when I was just being careful with my money and making sure that if anything happens, I could at least trace it back.”

operation. Bentz, who had been with the International School since it opened in August 2009, is among several former staff members worrying about their futures and financial security. He has been his family’s sole financial provider since his wife lost her job five years ago. Finding a full-time teaching job at this point is unlikely with the school year well underway and district budgets set, Bentz said. However, he lives outside Waldron in Shelby County, which Bentz said is close enough to a number of schools where he might have an opportunity to be a substitute teacher. Bentz tried to keep the mood at school light during Friday’s final day, playing a bugle between classes in place of a bell that was moved over the summer to a larger facility that was supposed to accommodate imminent growth. He might as well have been playing taps. While most students quickly were settling into new schools, teachers and staff

members were scrambling to land new jobs so they won’t face an economic hardship after their final paychecks arrive in two weeks. The International School is not offering a severance package to its paid staff. While unemployment benefits are available, state law sets those at less than half of workers’ regular wages. Angelo Achuil, who taught social studies part time at the International School, said the school’s closing turned his world upside down. He moved to Columbus from southern Sudan in Africa several months ago to pursue teaching, he said. He got his job with the International School while simultaneously holding a full-time job at Columbus Container, which he said pays the bills. His plan was to pay for his family in Sudan to join him at the end of the school year. But his abrupt departure from the International School has persuaded him to return to his family in Sudan, barring a surprise teaching job that comes along in the next few weeks.

IDENTITY THEFT COMPLAINTS BY AGE Data gathered in 2012

20–29: 21 percent 30–39: 19 percent 40–49: 18 percent 50–59: 17 percent

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS COLUMBUS, Ind. — Shawn Bentz was a full-time music and history teacher just days ago. Today, he is out of work after the Ball State-owned charter International School of Columbus closed because of financial problems. He has applied at Lowe’s, Walgreens and other businesses. “I’m not going to be picky,” he told The Republic. “I’ll take anything that comes along.” Bentz is among 13 teachers and four staff members left without jobs after the charter school, for Grades 7-12, closed Oct. 25. The International School shut its doors two days after Wednesday’s board vote to close the school at 3136 S. National Road. The board could not raise $250,000 that would have been needed to keep the school open throughout its fifth year of

70 and older: 8 percent 19 and younger: 6 percent

SOURCE: ftc.gov

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS PENNSVILLE, New Jersey — Relatives of the suspect charged in last week’s Los Angeles airport shooting offered sympathy Monday to the family of the federal officer who was killed, saying they were “shocked and numbed” by the deadly rampage. An attorney for the family of Paul Ciancia said his relatives expressed hope for the recovery of the other victims and regret for the travel disruption caused by the attack on the nation’s third-busiest airport. Family lawyer John Jordan read a brief statement outside the town hall in Pennsville, where Ciancia grew up. “Paul is our son and brother. We will continue to love him and care for him and support

him during the difficult times ahead,” Jordan said on the family’s behalf. The relatives, who had not spoken publicly, said they were cooperating with FBI and other law-enforcement agencies. Jordan, who is also the town’s municipal judge, declined to take questions. Ciancia, a 23-year-old unemployed motorcycle mechanic, is accused of shooting his way past an airport checkpoint with a .223-caliber rifle he pulled from a duffel bag. He was wounded in a shootout with airport police. He faces charges of murder of a federal officer in the death of Transportation Security Administration screener Gerardo I. Hernandez and committing violence at an international airport. In the Ciancia family’s neighborhood in New Jersey, stop signs at either end of the street were adorned with sticker advertising Infowars.com, a website that discusses many

– THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DN GRAPHIC STEPHANIE REDDING

REACTIONS: Coordinator says awareness is key | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

RELATIVES OF LAX SUSPECT OFFER VICTIMS SYMPATHY Ciancia will face charges of murder of a federal officer

FORT WAYNE, Ind. — A jury ended its first day of deliberations in the reckless homicide and drunken driving trial of an Indianapolis police officer charged in a fatal crash. The Fort Wayne jury got the David Bisard case Monday afternoon and deliberated about three hours before quitting for the evening. It’s due to resume this morning. Bisard’s patrol car crashed into two motorcycles stopped at an Indianapolis traffic light in August 2010, killing a 30-yearold man and seriously injuring two other people. Allen County Judge John Surbeck dismissed one juror Monday for researching blood-alcohol tests online in violation of Surbeck’s instructions. Two other jurors previously were excused, leaving no alternate jurors remaining. If an additional juror were dismissed, the case would end in a mistrial.

60–69: 11 percent

NEED TO KNOW RIGHTS WHEN IT COMES TO IDENTITY THEFT:

• You are provided one free credit report each year. • You have the right to obtain documents relating to fraudulent transactions made or accounts opened using your personal information. • You have the right to obtain information from a debt collector. • If you believe that information in your life resulted from identity theft, you have the right to ask that a consumer reporting agency block that information from your file. • You may prevent businesses from reporting information about you to consumer reporting agencies if you believe that the information is a result of identity theft. Source: Dan Boylan, Ball State instructor of finance

Charter closure leaves 17 jobless Ball State owned, school fails to raise needed $250,000

JURY OPENS DELIBERATIONS IN IND. OFFICER’S DRUNK DRIVING TRIAL

of the same anti-government ideas officials said Ciancia mentioned in a hand-written note found in his bag. There was no way to tell who put the stickers on the signs. Orange construction cones blocked the family’s long driveway, and two police officers were at the auto-body shop owned by Ciancia’s father, also named Paul. On Monday, the FBI revisited the suspect’s Sun Valley apartment — the same duplex that agents searched Friday after the attack. A man was escorted out of the apartment and drove away in a black Hyundai — the same type of car that a law enforcement official said was seen in surveillance video dropping Ciancia off at the airport minutes before the shooting began. Ciancia told investigators that an unwitting friend gave him a ride. The FBI would not identify the man or discuss the investigation.

CHARTER CLOSURE WHO

13 teachers and four staff members are left without jobs after the Ball Stateowned charter International School of Columbus, for Grades 7-12, closed Oct. 25. WHAT HAPPENED

The International School shut its doors two days after Wednesday’s board vote to close the school at 3136 S. National Road. The board could not raise $250,000 that would have been needed to keep the school open throughout its fifth year of operation. SOURCE: The Associated Press

Achuil said he has enough money in the bank to get back to Sudan. Gail Platter, an art teacher at the International School from the time it opened its doors, said she was putting together a résumé that emphasizes her communication skills in preparation for her job search. In the meantime, she said she is able to live off her husband’s salary.

WOUNDED TSA OFFICER SPEAKS AFTER LAX ATTACK LOS ANGELES (AP) — A Transportation Security Administration officer who was wounded in a gunman’s deadly attack at Los Angeles International Airport is speaking out for the first time. Thirty-six-year-old Tony Grigsby was shot twice in the right foot during Friday’s attack. He walked with a cane Monday as he read a statement outside his South Los Angeles home. Grigsby said he was trying to help an elderly man get to safety when the gunman shot him. He said that even after being wounded, his main concern was helping people who came up to him. Grigsby was a friend of Gerardo Hernandez, the officer who was killed. He fought back tears as he called Hernandez a wonderful person who will be missed. Authorities said Grigsby plans to return to work after he recovers. – THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Beyond hate crimes, students may experience bias, which is when someone is targeted because of a prejudice against them. Bias is not a crime, however. If a student experiences a hate crime or bias incident, they can report it using the bias incident report form on bsu.edu. Taday said she would encourage any student who came to her with a problem to file a report, but she personally is not aware of the systems Ball State has in place. Katie Slabaugh, Ball State’s Title IX deputy coordinator who responds to the reports, said she receives few reports and a shortcoming of her position may be the lack of awareness. “I don’t know if that is more of an awareness on the part of campus,” she said. “It has been better publicized in the past, and I don’t think it resulted in more reports.” She said she does not regularly reach out to the multicultural organizations on campus to make sure they are aware of reporting procedures. Jovan Rodriguez, president of the Latino Student Union, said he has never experienced any hate crimes or bias incidents on campus.

“I have felt safe and comfortable to be myself during all of my time here,” he said. “I can say Ball State is very accepting of diversity and offers multiple organizations that strive to promote diversity.” International students, Taday said, have a more difficult time, but Ball State has structures in place to help. “Coming to a new country is scary, especially coming for school,” she said. “But with them being involved in organizations like ASA, they are warming up to transition from an international student to just a student on campus.” Wade said they will talk about bias if someone brings them up at BSA meetings. As an RA, he has heard of incidents like derogatory words written on community boards, but it isn’t something that comes up frequently. “We are aware of those biases and things like that happening,” he said. “I think it’s something less prevalent in our society today, but it is something we need to be aware of. People still have biases towards the black community or other minority communities, as well.” Spectrum declined to be interviewed for the story.

REFERENDUM: State won’t rule on waiver until vote | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “Targeting the children for the purpose of addressing their agenda is despicable,” he said. “I think [the tax] is unnecessary, we think it has been launched under suspicious means.” According to Indiana law, a school district must inform the public three years in advance and also must get permission from the state before ceasing operation. MCS has asked the state for a waiver of the three year law, and the state has decided to withhold judgment on the waiver until a vote on

the referendum. Walker said she hopes those voters can stop thinking about their wallets and instead, think about how the cease of operation will impact the children. “We hope that [the referendum] does pass,” she said. “We don’t want to have to look the kids in the eye and tell them we are taking their school buses away.” Hiatt said when it is all said and done, today’s vote is on an increase in taxes. “At the end of the day when you go to the voting box, it is simply a tax,” he said. “There is no mention of children in the referendum.”

STABBING: University may seek disciplinary action | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “Upon investigation, university police have determined that the report of an assault and attempted robbery on campus is not true, and no other person was involved in the injury,” a university spokesperson said in an email. Pizzano told the Daily News on Oct. 27 that he called his friend Betsy Stein, a resident assistant, who took him to IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital. He said he was checked in at midnight. University Police Department officers were already there for another situation, he said, and they were told about Pizzano’s stabbing story. The university sent one email notifying students of the reported stabbing nearly at around 1 a.m. Oct. 27 from Joan Todd, executive director of public relations. Under the student code

of conduct, should the university choose to take disciplinary action, one offense is “providing false testimony or false information in the judicial process or knowingly making unfounded accusations against another individual.” The university will not discuss any medical or disciplinary issues. False reporting, according to Indiana state law, is a Class B misdemeanor or a Class A misdemeanor if the false informing “substantially hinders any law enforcement process.” In Indiana, a Class B misdemeanor could be imprisoned for a maximum of 180 days and fined up to $1,000. If it is found to be a Class A misdemeanor, the punishment could be a maximum imprisonment of one year and a fine of up to $5,000. Pizzano did not return a phone call, an email or social media messages.


PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

WEDNESDAY With a 5-0 conference record, the football team take on Central Michigan University at 8 p.m.

Lauren Grant’s time with the volleyball team is profiled in part four of a series that looks at each senior volleyball player.

THURSDAY Steve Shondell leads his 22-5 volleyball team against the University of Toledo in its final home match.

Strong second half Freshmen fuels comeback win play key role in exhibition

Offense struggles in first 20 minutes, makes adjustments

Six young players lead new offense in three point victory DAVID K. JONES STAFF REPORTER | @dkjones_BSU

|

EVAN BARNUM-STEGGERDA CHIEF REPORTER @Slice_Of_Evan

After nearly a decade of success as an assistant, firstyear head coach James Whitford had an eerie feeling walking into the locker room down by 15 to a National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics program. Marian University, coming off a loss to Nova Southeastern University, was doing whatever it wanted, whenever it wanted and dominated the first half and made Ball State’s 62-59 victory seem like an impossibility at the time. “I felt like I was in an episode of ‘Twilight Zone,’” Whitford said. “I went in there at halftime and told [assistant] Bill [Wright], ‘this is going to be the shortest tenure in the history of Ball State coaches.’” Whitford was kidding with his comment, but fans at Worthen Arena had to be anxious watching an all too familiar, stagnant offense that sputtered out 22 points in the first half — last year’s team only scored 22 points or fewer in a half six times. Marian’s lineup, laden with 11 upperclassmen, took advantage of a Ball State team facing the learning curve of Whitford’s fast-paced offense that pushes the ball. Ball State turned the ball over 13 times in the first half compared to eight made shots. Whitford compared the team’s panicked offense in the first half to an imaginary sellout crowd at Worthen Arena scrambling for the exits after a pulled fire alarm. All the worries of a program in transition came to fruition with only 28 days of practice under its belt, trying to find the proper balance. “I think we were still okay,” freshman point guard Zavier

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Freshman guard Zavier Turner goes up for shot against Marian University on Monday at Worthen Arena. Turner put 18 points on the board with a 62-59 win.

Turner, the lone bright spot for Ball State in the first half said. “It was our first game. We felt a little rushed, and everybody was nervous.” The nerves found their way down to the defensive end as well, as a fairly simple offense produced a 51.7 percent field goal percentage for Marian in the first half. False motion and backdoor cuts along with drive and kicks yielded shoot around-type looks from behind the arc and uncontested layups for the Knights. In the second half, Ball State showed flashes of potential against a tiring Marian team. Four of their eight players

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

logged at least 33 minutes, and the fatigue started making the Knights foul instead of moving their feet. By the 14 minute mark, Ball State was in the bonus, and made 11 of its 40 second half points from the free throw line after Marian’s seventh team foul. The offense started clicking when a concerted effort was made to give senior forward Majok Majok the ball closer to the basket. Majok said Whitford had told him to look for deeper paint position at the half, which was much easier to find against a gassed Marian team. Also, invading the paint

for Ball State was freshman Franko House, whose 10 second half points spurred Ball State in crucial moments. Three freshmen, House, Turner and Quinten Payne combined for more than half of Ball State’s points with 35, while the returning scorers like seniors Chris Bond, Tyler Koch and Jesse Berry, who did not start, had 13 points together. “I wish I could tell you this is how we drew it up, but it wasn’t,” Whitford said. “This is an exhibition game, and the purpose is to get better. We’ll get better from it. We needed this, and we’ve got a long way to go.”

Fredrich, Marx bring experience Senior duo have leadership skills Shondell desires

|

DAVID POLASKI ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR @DavidPolaski

On the top defense MidAmerican Conference, senior Catie Fredrich is the rock that anchors the Ball State women’s volleyball team. Ball State leads the MAC in opposing hitting percentage at .149, in large part to the efforts of the Cardinals defensive specialist who has 456 digs on the season. A mark that is fifth best in the MAC. She was thrown into the fray early, playing in every match as a freshman and playing in 107 out of a possible 109 sets that season. The constant play allowed Fredrich to groom her skills early on and develop into a defensive specialist that Ball State can rely on. “She was really mature when she came in here, way beyond her years,” head coach Steve Shondell said. “It’s like she’s been college all her life.” In her freshman year, the team went 24-5 and 14-2 in the MAC, and she said the immediate experience allowed her to adjust to difficult environments quickly. Competing in so many matches early on was intimidating for her. “The girls that were out on the court were way older than me for the most part because they were a bunch

of seniors and I was a freshman,” Fredrich said. “Yeah, it was scary.” Regardless of the fear, Fredrich flourished in her new role. Her sophomore season, she increased her role on the team as she started each match as the libero and had 562 digs, the 10th most in Ball State history. Even as a young player, Fredrich wasn’t a stranger to everybody on the team. She and senior Kylee Baker knew each other from club play. Baker played for Club Fusion Volleyball while Fredrich played for the Milwaukee Sting, two clubs that Baker described as “playing each other every weekend.” After getting used to seeing each other on opposite sides of the court, Fredrich and Baker were suddenly next to each other and playing for a common goal. Now seniors, the pair have been playing together for four years. “It’s been fun,” Fredrich said. “More like funny,” Baker responded. A middle blocker, Mindy Marx didn’t have the luxury of a redshirt season to develop like some athletes have. Instead, she was asked to play a role on a talented 2010 team, making 13 starts having a season-high 12 kills against the University of Toledo. “This girl has matured more than any other girl in Ball State history,” Shondell said about middle blocker Mindy Marx. “She came in a

beach girl, and she’s going out a model student athlete.” Sophomore Jenna Spadafora described Marx as her best friend on the team, someone who is optimistic and can always provide a laugh during tough times. But not just moral support. Spadafora said she’s become better at volleyball because of Marx. Spadafora looks at her not just as a friend but also a mentor and leader due to Marx’s seniority. Marx has seen action in more than 100 matches and brings the experience and savvy Shondell said he looks for in a senior leader. “She’s a soft spoken competitor,” Spadafora said. “When it comes down to it, she’ll always be able to put the ball away because she knows how much it means for the team.” Learning behind Lisa Scott, named to the 2012 First Team All-MAC Conference, Marx took over the starting position this season. Shondell said heading into the 2013 season that he hoped she would develop into the No. 1 offensive option. She hasn’t disappointed, playing in every match and currently ranks second on the team in kills with 250. In wake of injuries this season, Marx has seen her role increase, tallying eight kills in a win against Eastern Michigan University on Saturday for senior night. Marx has given Ball State nearly 700 kills throughout her career to go along with more than 200 combined

SENIORITY

CATIE FREDRICH, SENIOR LIBERO CAREER STATS: • 119 matches • Seven-time MAC West Defense Player of the Week • 2011 First Team All-MidAmerican Conference • 1,842 digs

MINDY MARX, A SENIOR MIDDLE BLOCKER CAREER STATS: • 105 matches played • 684 career kills • 263 career blocks • 736 career digs • Career-high 14 kills vs. Central Michigan University in 2012 solo and assist blocks. Even with the statistical accolades, kills and blocks aren’t what come to mind when Spadafora thinks about Marx. “She’s the go-to person if you need to smile, and that’s what I love about her,” Spadafora said.

James Whitford started off his first head coach season at Ball State with an exhibition win, but it was anything but comfortable. Ball State knocked off Marian University 62-59, with Ball State trailing most of the game. The Cardinals were led by freshmen in the exhibition debut. The freshmen players combined for 84 played minutes. Five of the six freshmen saw action in the game. Zavier Turner played 30 minutes, Franko House played for 20, Mark Alstork had 19 minutes and Quinten Payne was on the floor for 15 minutes. Freshman walk-on Kaleb Mallory dressed, but he did not play. Turner outscored everyone in Worthen Arena with 18 points on 7-12 shooting. “I wasn’t really out there to outshine anybody,” he said. “My coach said I needed to be aggressive offensively, so I took what the defense gave me.” House bullied his way to 12 points and four rebounds in his debut. House scored all of his points in the second half by getting position deep in the paint and throwing his 248-pound frame around drawing fouls and getting to the foul line. House went 2-4 at the free throw line. “It came within the flow of the offense,” House said. “I just had to attack the rim as aggressively as I could.” With House and Turner being the bright spots for the Cardinals,

PLAYER COMPARISON

Z. Turner F. House Freshman Freshman Year 7-12 5-6 FG Attempts 18 12 Points 3 4 Rebounds 3 1 Turnovers 30 20 Minutes they also had a reliable post presence all game. Senior forward Majok Majok finished the night with a double-double scoring 12 points and grabbing 13 rebounds. Whitford paced the sidelines nearly the whole game as he coached his team to a threepoint victory. “[Zavier] has the heart of a lion,” he said. “He obviously helped us win the game. I love coaching him, he’s my type of kid.” Turner is projected to be the start in the backcourt with senior leader Jesse Berry. Monday was a quiet night for seniors Chris Bond and Tyler Koch. The two forwards combined for four points and eight rebounds in 49 minutes of play. “As we go down the road Jesse, CB and Tyler will score the ball more,” Whitford said. Ball State starts the regular season in Terre Haute, Ind., against Indiana State University on Saturday. “They are a great team, and it will obviously be a test for us,” Whitford said. “That will be a great challenge. I know they have Jake Odum and are picked to finish second in the Missouri Valley Conference, but our concern is about us.”

4 DOWNS

FOOTBALL

Cutting down big plays on defense a key in game against Central Michigan University DAKOTA CRAWFORD CHIEF REPORTER | @DakotaCrawford_

1

CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY’S COOPER RUSH HAS MATURED

Redshirt freshman Cooper Rush first took the field against the University of New Hampshire in the second game of the season. He finished the day 19for-32 passing with 326 yards and three touchdowns. From there, he posted three consecutive games with multiple interceptions, all in losing efforts. Central Michigan has won two of its last three games, led by Rush’s five touchdowns and 58 percent completion percentage over that span. LEMBO’S TAKE: “He looks like a seasoned veteran quarterback. He’s really, really improved, his confidence has grown, and he looks really poised. He’s making plays now, and it seems like Central Michigan has a good grasp of what he can do. There seems to be a real comfort level there.”

2

BALL STATE IS ALLOWING TOO MANY BIG PLAYS

Ball State has given up 16 plays of 30 or more yards this season, four for touchdowns. The secondary has broken down for opposing big plays many times this season. Part of it may be the youth in the back end of the defense. Freshmen Martez Hester, Dae’Shaun Hurley and Tyree Holder have all received playing time this season. LEMBO’S TAKE: “You feel like there are plenty of things you

could be doing better. We had three or four breakdowns on defense that really hurt us and resulted in big plays for [the University of] Akron.”

3

THE CHIPPEWAS BRINGS DEFENSIVE SIZE

The Chippewas have two defensive tackles that play inside. Leterrius Walton, a junior, has the ability to get in the backfield to wreak havoc. He has 6.5 tackles for loss, second on the team. He also has one sack. Next to him, Kelby Latta, a 312-pound redshirt freshman, has 14 tackles and 1.5 tackles for loss. LEMBO’S TAKE: “Big defensive line – probably one of the bigger units that we’ll see all year. Probably similar to the group from North Texas in terms of their size up front.”

4

SENIOR CORNERBACK JEFF GARRETT IS PLAYING WELL

Garrett is one of the more veteran players of the defense. He has 36 tackles, with 3.5 for a loss. He also has a team-leading four interceptions, and he is second in the Mid-American Conference in interceptions. LEMBO’S TAKE: “He’s playing the way you want a veteran senior to play. I’d like to think when opposing coaches turn on the film and watch Jeff Garrett now, they’re saying, ‘That’s a pretty good corner.’”


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FEATURES

WEDNESDAY Open enrollment has students perusing Rate My Professor. Professors share their disdain for the chili pepper rating.

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November is here and the chills are settling in. Don’t look like the little brother from “A Christmas Story� and take these stylish tips.

THURSDAY Ball State students express their deep, abiding love for “My Little Pony� together every week. See what’s the deal.

AHOY! ‘BLACK FLAG’

JEREMY ERVIN NO SLEEP TILL MUNCIE JEREMY ERVIN IS A SOPHOMORE JOURNALISM MAJOR AND WRITES ‘NO SLEEP TILL MUNCIE’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO JEREMY AT JRERVIN@BSU.EDU.

“Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag� is the beautiful love child of “Sid Meier’s Pirates!� and the “Assassin’s Creed� franchise. The game combines open world pirate roguery with all the trim and trappings that make up the “Assassin’s Creed� series. It can be difficult to decide what to do. Do you want to go spear hammerhead sharks to increase your ammunition capacity or do you want to make some money raiding and pillaging? Every activity offers its own rewards that encourage you to explore the entire game. A big selling point of the series has always been the environment. “Assassin’s Creed� made its name by creating sprawling, beautifully designed, living, breathing cityscapes. While cities on the map, like Kingston and Havana, offer some parkour potential, some fans of the series may find the lack of towers or flying buttresses troubling. However, the true platform for freely roaming is the open ocean. The map is a scaled down version of Caribbean, including Cuba, the tip of Florida, Mexico and Haiti. While the larger settlements require load screens access, the entire ocean and tons of smaller settlements flow seamlessly together. The transition from going from land to sea is simple, and the ship brings an entirely new layer to the game. You’re free to do whatever you want, however you see

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fit. At any time, you can step away from the wheel, dive into the ocean and swim. Ubisoft took the naval battle aspects from last time and brought them to a whole new level. On the sea, every ship is a potential prize. As you purchase improvements, you’ll find yourself viewing that frigate or gigantic Man-of-War on the horizon as a target instead of a sign to split. Pull up next

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Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 9 -- You’re even smarter than usual. A conflict of interests shows up at your door. Try to understand other people’s feelings and it goes easier. Get outside perspectives. Keep your finances ethical.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is an 8 -- Finish old jobs and new ones flourish and spark over the next month. Pad the schedule for setbacks. Decline an expensive invitation. Listen to a wise relative or a realistic friend. Spice your creation with subtlety.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is an 8 -- Travel looks tempting, but postpone until tomorrow, if possible (or just dance with some surprises). Ignore someone who says you’ll fail, and make a list of goals. Plan actions and strategies to support your team.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is an 8 -Be careful. For four weeks, work gets exceptionally fun. Don’t get distracted while chopping. What could thrive in such a creative environment? Make a mess and find out. Spend time in contemplation. Keep it practical.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 9 -- At first, the task may seem impossible. Looking at it more closely or from a different angle reveals new data. Gather new income now.You find your comfort zone, and confidence soars.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is an 8 -- Imagine yourself in an earlier time. You’re especially popular, but your social life could cause a problem at home. Find the perfect balance by communicating your passion and acknowledging your support team.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 9 -- Don’t let obstacles slow you down. Practice with your teammate to break records. Get old business handled. The next month is good for saving money and handling finances. Go for fast, fun productivity.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7 -- Luscious romance takes center stage. Dance your way into the spotlight. Others give you support in your career, but you have to be willing to receive it. Postpone travel for now.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 7 -- Don’t throw money at the problem or you could very well make it worse. Worrying about it won’t take you anywhere. Use patience and brains. Define how you’d like it to go. Someone finds that very romantic.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 9 -- Participate socially this month, and get lost in fascinating philosophical conversation. Others are looking to you for a decision. Once you commit you’ll find freedom, and release. And others can make their own. Perform an anonymous good deed.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 8 -- Female magnetism pays a big role in today’s successes. Strengthen partnerships this month. Costs may be higher than expected. Proceed with caution, but you can handle it. Compromise, delegate and don’t underestimate the power of cookies.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)Today is an 8 -- Opposition to your ideas could arise. They probably have a good reason. Try their shoes on, and walk a mile, before responding. At least you’ll get some exercise and learn something new. Make your own choices.

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PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

FEATURES

‘ABANDON DAY IN THE LIFE SERIES:

ALL HOPE ye who enter here

’ DN PHOTO EMMA ROGERS

Denise Blankenberger, a sophomore architecture major, works on a model that she based on zebra stripes. Architecture students spend many hours working on their projects in the Architecture Building.

CAP students stick together, constantly toiling over projects

|

BETHANNIE HUFFMAN STAFF REPORTER bnhuffman@bsu.edu

What may seem like a disaster zone at first to the naked eye is really controlled chaos in the mind of an architecture student. It’s their studio, where the desks are worn with age and covered in the marks of students past. Models, pens, foamcore and chipboard cover the large wooden desks, a fair representation of a day in the life of a Ball State architecture student. “[It’s] as difficult as you want it to be,” Nick Dodge, a graduate student, said. “I’m a graduate assistant for the first years. Checking on them is most important [and] takes first priority.”

The College of Architecture and Planning houses six floors worth of students from freshmen to grad students. Students, who are laboring in “the Tower” day and night, sometimes spend hours working on a project to meet their deadline. “The longest I’ve spent here is three days last semester,” Karen Garcia, a sophomore, said. “I had a portfolio, a board and a model due. My average amount of sleep was every other day.” First year students apply to the program and then reapply at the end of the year to one of three separate sections: architecture, urban planning or landscape architecture. While the work environment may seem daunting and sometimes stressful, the students still manage to have a good time. One of the studios for the freshmen is full of humor and pranks.

‘YOU KNOW YOU’RE A CAP STUDENT WHEN ... ‘ STUDENTS IN CAP FINISH THE SENTENCE IN VARIOUS WAYS: • Aimee King, a sophomore: “When you don’t know what to do with your free time.” • Bryce Derhammer, a sophomore: “When you get more than four hours of sleep and you think it’s a lot.” • Shelby Harris, a sophomore: “When you love to watch HGTV because you love to look at all the houses.” • Karen Garcia, a sophomore: “When you live up in the studio.”

• Alex DeKemper, a sophomore: “When you spend more money on your laptop than your first vehicle.” • Andrew Brindley, a graduate student: “When people are saying, ‘Good morning,’ and you haven’t slept.” • Nick Dodge, a graduate student: “When you walk around and point out architecture things to your non-architecture friends. When you haven’t slept in several days. When you become a critic of everything you see.”

“We have paper football tournaments and play baseball with paper balls,” Sabrina Senninger, a freshman, said. “We like to mess with each other sometimes.” Once, Senninger brought a container of brownies to the studio, and they were combination locked to the hammock that hangs from one

of the beams. Some students take to listening and singing to Disney music and movies to help them along late nights or long days. Even if they started their first day by seeing “Abandon all hope, ye who enter here” — from the gate of Hell in Dante’s “Divine Comedy” — at the entrance to their first year studio, they

have aspirations that reach past getting a degree. Aimee King, a sophomore, is a part of the Army ROTC program and said she hopes to own her own firm one day. “I want to go into houses,” Bryce Derhammer, a sophomore, said. “Houses are ugly, and I want to change the way they look.” Students from CAP support and look after each other, offering opinion, both good and bad. They share a bond in the demanding nature of their major, where sometimes students see the sunrise from their studio after a long night of toiling with cardboard and a box cutter. “Everyone knows what you’re going through,” Garcia said. “You’re not the only crazy person here.” Shelby Harris, a sophomore, has made friends through her two years in the program. “It’s a giant family,” she said.

PROTEST: Activism makes a difference

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

They gathered materials like the orange jumpsuits they wore during their march from the L.A. Pittenger Student Center to Bracken Library, researched the legislative piece that they were supporting and planned their demonstration exactly how they had imagined it. “We had to get materials together and find out exactly how we wanted it to go and how we wanted it to look,” Smith said. “There was a pretty significant amount of planning.” Many people the protesters talked to didn’t know Guantanamo Bay was a national controversy. When people saw them protesting and doing a mock waterboarding, Smith said they started asking questions and becoming more engaged with the protesters. “We weren’t standing around complaining about something,” he said. “We were actually getting stuff done.”

KNOW THE RULES

The “Use of Property for Expressive Activities” in the Ball

State Student Handbook Appendix N is the activist students’ bible. The policy is a year old and is still being reworked. “Since this ... policy was developed last year, we really didn’t have a separate policy for it,” Kevin Kenyon, associate vice president of facilities, said Oct. 9. “It was sort of a paragraph in the student rights manual. It was broken out as a policy.” All demonstrations or protests must be approved in advance, unless it will be outdoors, include no booths or tables and include less than 50 people. To get a demonstration approved, contact Kenyon, the campus reservationist, at least three days prior to be approved. Students also must fill out the “On-Campus Space Requisition Form” on bsu.edu.

DO’S AND DON’TS

Make sure the demonstration won’t interfere with the flow of students and vehicles trying to get around campus. Additionally, avoid times and places where another campus activity would be disrupted.

To make sure the demonstration won’t break any rules, flip through the student handbook. This includes staying away from obscenity. Megaphones or any amplification device aren’t allowed near classroom areas without permission. Students can do indoors demonstrations in John R. Emens Auditorium, Pruis Hall and the Student Center. Groups of more than 50 can only demonstrate on the Quad, University Green or LaFollette Field, according to Appendix N. The demonstrations must be 60 feet or more away from any window or door of a classroom, office or residence hall.

IT’S WORTH IT

For Smith, being an American citizen brings the responsibility of knowing what is going on nationally and globally. “Students bring a new perspective,” he said. “It is really important, especially for students, to get out there and get their voices heard. If we don’t speak out, then no one else will. This is what our country is about — speaking out about injustices.”

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DN 11-5-13  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013.

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