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DN WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13, 2013

LIVING WITH CANCER AS NEW NORMAL SEE PAGE 6

Ball State student discusses latest challenges, struggles in ongoing battle against life-threatening disease

IT’S BIG. THE DAILY NEWS

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RAIN Band brings The Beatles back to life

SEE PAGE 3

Wenning, Lynch face off in key MAC West game, many seniors’ last chance to beat rival

Senior quarterback Keith Wenning

Northern Illinois University quarterback Jordan Lynch

SEE PAGE 4

DN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION STEPHANIE REDDING, BREANNA DAUGHERTY, JONATHAN MIKSANEK

SGA TO VOTE TODAY ON HJR-6 STANCE, MAKE UNIVERSITY RECOMMENDATION Ball State would join several universities speaking against bill RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER | rmpodnar@bsu.edu Approximately 300 students sponsored a Student Government Association resolution to take a stance against House Joint Resolution 6. If HJR-6 passes, it will define valid and recognized marriage as between one man and one woman in the state’s constitution. This will essentially bar legal structures like civil unions and threaten domestic partnership benefits. During the SGA meeting this afternoon, they will vote on the resolution, which was

MUNCIE, INDIANA

introduced to the Student Senate during its meeting Wednesday. SGA introduced this resolution at the encouragement of Terry King, Ball State provost. “We must maintain an environment where students can reach their full potential in their academic pursuits, where faculty members can realize the goal of being excellent teachers and scholars and where everyone is respected and valued,” King said in a statement read to the Faculty Council on Oct. 31. If SGA’s resolution is passed, it will be introduced during the University Senate meeting Thursday afternoon. According to the agenda for the meeting, University Senate will vote to recommend that Ball State opposes HJR-6.

THE VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIAL WAS DEDICATED IN WASHINGTON, D.C., ON THIS DAY IN 1982.

CONTACT US

The SGA president, vice president and pro tempore act as the student members of University Senate, so Chloe Anagnos’, Alyssa France’s and Jack Hesser’s votes on this issue will represent the view of the student body. SGA senators were encouraged at the meeting last week to reach out to their constituents for opinions on the issue. The senators also circulated an informal survey, which Hesser said 596 people have taken. Members of Call to Action were among the bill’s first student sponsors. Call to Action is an educational and awareness group for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community political issues.

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

WHAT HAPPENS NOW • At 3:15 p.m., SGA will vote on the resolution during its meeting in the L.A. Pittenger Student Center. • At 4 p.m. Thursday in Burkhardt Building Room 109, SGA’s President Chloe Anagnos, Vice President Alyssa France and Pro Tempore Jack Hesser will take the resolution if it passes to the University Senate meeting. • Before 6 p.m. Thursday, University Senate will vote on whether or not to make a recommendation against HJR-6. • After the vote, the recommendation will go to the administration. • If the Ball State administration makes a public statement against HJR-6, it will join Indiana University, DePauw University and Wabash College in taking a stand.

See SGA, page 3

STUDENTS SIGN UP FOR SHUTTLE RIDE TO FOOTBALL GAME, LISTS ALMOST SET Spots for the shuttle going to Ball State’s game at Northern Illinois University filled before the waiting list sign-ups opened at 11 a.m. today in the Atrium. The seating for the shuttle allowed for 240 students — 150 seats for the general student population, 25 for Black Student Association students, 25 for journalism majors and 40 seats for students in the top for Charlie’s Crew Student Rewards program. In an email to journalism students sent Tuesday, the chairman of the department said several spots were still open for the journalism students. “We started sign-ups for the bus seats following the women’s volleyball game last Thursday and again on Friday in the Atrium, and they pretty much filled then,” said Kevin Thurman, a graduate assistant for athletics and student initiatives. “Today, when we were open from 11 [a.m.] to 1 [p.m.], we had 30 to 40 people sign up for the waiting list.” Thurman said Tuesday was basically a day for people to sign up for the waiting list. “Every day, we are seeing the waiting list whittle down little by little,” he said. “But, at this point the list is pretty set [on who is going].” Some people h ave had to cancel because of class conflicts, Thurman said. “We want people to come so they can support the team, not miss class,” he said. He also said there has been a lot of enthusiasm behind the shuttle. “We are pretty excited because the student body has rallied behind the team this year because they are doing so well,” Thurman said. “If you walk around campus, you can feel how different it is with people excited about Ball State athletics.” THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

– STAFF REPORTS

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

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VOL. 93, ISSUE 49 After a chilly start this week, high pressure builds into East Central Indiana to give a slight warm up just in time for the weekend, with another chance of showers Sunday. - Erin DeArmond, WCRD weather forecaster

FORECAST TODAY Mostly sunny High: 39 Low: 25 4. MOSTLY SUNNY

5. SUNNY

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY IN THE WAKE OF HAIYAN NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

AID TRICKLES INTO HARD-HIT AREAS TACLOBAN, Philippines (AP) — Desperately needed food, water and medical aid are only trickling into this city that took the worst blow from Typhoon Haiyan, while thousands of victims jammed the damaged airport Tuesday, seeking to be evacuated. “We need help,” pleaded a weeping Aristone Balute, an 81-year-old woman who failed to get a flight out of Tacloban for Manila, the capital. “Nothing is happening. We haven’t eaten since yesterday afternoon.” Her clothes were soaked from a pouring rain and tears streamed down her face. Five days after what could be the Philippines’ deadliest disaster, aid is coming — pallets of supplies and teams of doctors are waiting to get into Tacloban — but the challenges of delivering the assistance means few in the stricken city have received help. “There is a huge amount that we need to do,” U.N. humanitarian chief Valerie Amos said in Manila, launching an appeal for $301 million to help the more than 11 million people estimated to be affected by the storm. “We have not been able to get into the remote communities.”

WAYS TO HELP

• UNICEF is a worldwide aid organization shipping food and medicine to help children affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Donate at unicef.org, or if you have a Verizon phone text RELIEF to 864233. • Red Cross helped to evacuate hundreds of thousands before the storm hit and continues to provide shelter and food to those in need. Donate at redcross.org. • World Food Programme is a frontline United Nations organization shipping food to the Philippines. Donate at wfp.org.

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THURSDAY Mostly sunny High: 47 Low: 33 04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

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SATURDAY Partly cloudy High: 53 Low: 45 03 - PARTLY CLOUDY

SUNDAY Rain showers High: 56 Low: 49 08 - RAIN SHOWERS

SERVICE DIRECTORY

MCT PHOTO

A resident sits on debris in typhoon-hit Leyte Province on Nov. 12. The United Nations said it had released $25 million in emergency funds to pay for emergency shelter materials, household items and assistance with the provision of emergency health services, safe water supplies and sanitation facilities. It’s launching an appeal for more aid.

DESPERATE SURVIVORS SEEK TO FLEE RECORD STORM ONLY ONE OF MANY TO HIT AREA YEARLY

TACLOBAN, Philippines (AP) — Thousands of typhoon survivors swarmed the airport on Tuesday seeking a flight out, but only a few hundred made it, leaving behind a shattered, rain-lashed city short of food and water and littered with countless bodies. Four days after Typhoon Haiyan struck the eastern Philippines, assistance is only just beginning to arrive. Authorities estimated the storm killed 10,000 or more across a vast swath of the country, and displaced around 660,000 others. Tacloban, a city of about 220,000 people, bore the full force of the winds and the tsunami-like storm surges. Most of the city is in ruins, a mess of destroyed houses, cars and trees. Malls, garages and shops have all been stripped of food and water by hungry residents.

THE FORECAST

TACLOBAN, Philippines (AP) — While Typhoon Haiyan appears to be the deadliest natural disaster on record to hit the Philippines, the country is no stranger to major storms. Doomed by geography and hobbled by poverty, the Philippines has long tried to minimize the damage caused by the 20 or so typhoons that hit the sprawling archipelago every year. But despite a combination of preparation and mitigation measures, high death tolls and destruction persist. The Philippines’ location in the northwestern Pacific puts it right in the pathway of the world’s No. 1 typhoon generator, according to meteorologists. The country of more than

7,000 islands is hit by more storms each year than any other nation — about four times more than countries around the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal, said government meteorologist Jori Loiz. It’s often the first to welcome storms that eventually hit Vietnam and China to the west and Taiwan, Hong Kong and Japan to the north. The Philippine archipelago also is located in the Pacific “Ring of Fire,” where earthquakes and volcanic activity are common. A strong quake last month that killed more than 220 people and destroyed thousands of homes in the central Philippines was sandwiched between two powerful typhoons — Haiyan and Usagi, which nipped the northern Philippines in September.

Here are the top natural disasters in the last decade that had higher death tolls than the up to 10,000 that may have died in Haiyan:

Jan. 12, 2010 A 7.0 earthquake devastated Haiti’s capital and surrounding cities, killing 314,000 people. May 12, 2008 A 7.9 temblor in China’s Sichuan province killed 87,000 people, many children. May 2, 2008 The storm surge from Cyclone Nargis washed up densely populated areas around the Irrawaddy River delta in Myanmar, around 138,000 people died. Dec. 26, 2004 A 9.1 earthquake off western Indonesia triggered a tsunami in the Indian Ocean, killing 230,000 people in a dozen countries. SOURCE: The Associated Press

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Steven Williams

NEWS EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes ASST. NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens

Crossword

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz ASST. FEATURES EDITOR Jeremy Ervin

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

SPORTS EDITOR Matt McKinney ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

72HRS EDITOR Ryan Howe FORUM EDITOR Devan Filchak

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Corey Ohlenkamp ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Jonathan Miksanek

24/7 Sudoku

DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITOR Daniel Brount

By Michael Mepham

Level: Medium

SOLUTION FOR TUESDAY:

ACROSS 1 TUCKED-IN PART OF A DRESS SHIRT 4 COCOON CONTENTS 9 GLARINGLY VIVID 14 “__ YOU KIDDING ME?” 15 WORDS AFTER MAKE OR CLOSE 16 CARNE __: ROASTED MEXICAN DISH 17 FORD MODEL T, COLLOQUIALLY 19 SIESTA TAKER 20 EIGHT-ARMED CEPHALOPOD 21 SPEED DEMON 23 OPEN-__ SHOES 26 TV PRODUCER NORMAN 27 ONLINE “YIKES!” 30 CHINESE LEADER 33 BUS DEPOT: ABBR. 36 MATURE MALE GORILLA 38 PURIM OBSERVERS 39 ESSAYIST DE BOTTON 40 MATCH FOR A POCKET HANDKERCHIEF 41 WEST POINTER

42 MIDEAST STRIP 43 ONE ONLY IN IT FOR THE MONEY 45 BATON ROUGE-TO-MONTGOMERY DIR. 46 TWISTING FORCE 47 WWII VENUE 48 LATIN GOD 50 “__ A LIFT?” 52 JAPANESE COOKING SHOW 56 SCHEMER CHARLES 60 GALLIVANTS 61 CERTAIN ROCK MUSIC FAN, AND WHAT 17-, 21-, 36-, 43AND 52-ACROSS EACH HAS 64 LAST OLDS OFF THE LINE 65 MENTAL PICTURE 66 NBC SKIT SHOW 67 ZAC OF “THE LORAX” 68 GLOVE MATERIAL 69 GAME GADGET, OR THE AREA WHERE IT’S USED DOWN 1 BOATERS AND BOWLERS 2 ACTOR LA SALLE 3 IT MAY DROP DOWN OR

POP UP 4 MADE VULNERABLE 5 AXLIKE SHAPING TOOL 6 TRIBAL LAND, INFORMALLY, WITH “THE” 7 COLORADO RESORT 8 OUT OF THE WIND 9 FIRE TRUCK FEATURE 10 LADY LIBERTY’S LAND, FAMILIARLY 11 SOMERSET MAUGHAM NOVEL, WITH “THE” 12 PREFIX WITH LOGICAL 13 PUB MISSILE 18 ON FIRE 22 SOUTH SUDANESE SUPERMODEL WEK 24 GOOF 25 SHORT PERSON? 27 MISSOURI RIVER 28 LA SCALA’S CITY 29 LIKE EYES SHOWING BOREDOM 31 DROPS IN A SLOT 32 STRANDED AT 7-DOWN, PERHAPS 34 CHIRP

35 JETSON DOG 37 BY WAY OF 38 SPREE 41 MULTI-SCREEN THEATER 43 “GEE WHIZ” 44 IT GOES FOR A BUCK 46 SECOND-MOST POPULOUS ARIZONA CITY 49 WARM ARGENTINA MONTH 51 “STUPID ME!” 52 “DIES __” 53 MASSAGE DEEPLY 54 ACTOR JANNINGS 55 EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE GP. 57 COZY HOME 58 WRITER GREY 59 INACTIVE 62 ART ON THE REALITY SHOW “INK MASTER” 63 SINGLE-MALT DATUM

ballstatedaily.com

SOLUTION FOR TUESDAY:


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS/FORUM

Speaker encourages media to use drones Some say UAV use leads to less privacy, journalist disagrees

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RAYMOND GARCIA STAFF REPORTER ragarcia@bsu.edu

Drones are one of many emerging technologies some say threaten citizen’s personal privacy. Gene Policinski, chief operating officer of the Newseum Institute, spoke Tuesday in defense of the “misunderstood” technology. Unmanned aerial vehicles, commonly known as drones, are an emerging technology that journalists can use as new form of storytelling. Policinski spoke Tuesday night about the effective uses of drones, not only for journalists but for police and military applications as well. One of the first things Policinski

said should change about the devices is the name. He said when people hear the word “drones,” they are frightened because of the predatory way the military uses it. “As journalists we must be engaged in new technology and speak up for ourselves,” Policinski said. “[The public] fears new technology.” Drones can provide a more accurate and speedy way to gather information and make it known to the public. Policinski said the public will benefit by the way journalists are beginning to use drones and, although it may be unpopular with some, there is no reason not to allow journalists to use them. Journalists could use drones to cover protests, rallies, marches and other major events more accurately. Drones also allow police to cover crimes and traffic accidents with a quicker response

time while simultaneously lowering risk for officers. While many people are concerned about privacy invasions, Policinski said drone users should adhere to a set of ethics when using the new technology. “We must think in ways to convince ourselves to limit our own actions, not because of legal action or financial loss, but because it’s the right thing to do,” he said. Some students in attendance of the lecture said they left with a better understanding of drone journalism. “I am more comfortable about the idea after the presentation,” said Lauren Dahlhauser, a junior photojournalism major. “I first had the mindset that they were intrusion and invasive, but from the perspective of a journalist I can see how they would be a benefit.” Junior public relations major David Vander does not feel

DRONE FACTS • Federal Aviation Administration first authorized use of unmanned aircraft in 1990. • The FAA has limited its use missions such as disaster relief, search and rescue, firefighting and border patrol. SOURCE: faa.gov

comfortable with the ideas of drones, even after Policinski’s presentation. He said he was afraid of the slippery slope between using drones for purposes that are for the public good and using them to spy on citizens. “I think if it’s okay for journalists to use it, then the government can take control and use the technology to monitor what everyone else is doing,” he said. “We barely have enough privacy as it is.”

DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

Gene Policinski stresses the importance of journalists self-regulating drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles, in an attempt to make the public more comfortable with the use by news organizations. Policinski, an alumnus as well as the chief operating officer at the Newseum Institute and senior vice president at the First Amendment Center, spoke at the “Don’t Call Me a Drone, I’m a Journalist” event Tuesday in the Art and Journalism Building.

Food film aims to change mindsets STUDENTS HELP FELLOW SMOKERS Student documentary looks at local farm, asks people to shop at farmers markets FIGHT ADDICTION

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TYLER JURANOVICH STAFF REPORTER tjjuranovich@bsu.edu

Three students are putting the finishing touches on a documentary about food on a global scale. “We want students to be aware of where their food comes from and how it affects everything around it,” said Garret Brubaker, a junior telecommunications and video production major. Brubaker, along with Dan Edwards and Sam Noble, work in the Virginia B. Ball Center for Creative Inquiry on post-production of the full-length documentary “Down to Earth: Small Farm Issues in a Big Farm World”

— their end product from a semester of work with other students in one of Ball State’s immersive learning courses. The main focus of their film is Kyle Becker, a local farmer from Mooreland, Ind., who uses sustainable farming — a practice that the group wants to bring more attention to. The film also focuses on the importance of buying local food. “You have to think as a global citizen and be aware of how your food choices have a huge ripple effect that you aren’t even aware of,” Edwards, a junior telecommunications major, said. “Say you’ve bought a steak at WalMart. You’ve now supported

a store that doesn’t have a amicable relationship with a local farmer, and you now have supported a system that doesn’t treat animals with any sort of care.” The group said students should buy food at Muncie’s Farmers Market, which takes place from 9 a.m. until noon every third Saturday of the month at Minnetrista, to support local farmers and the community as a whole. It’s all part of the film’s push to promote a more sustainable and healthy food culture. “The quickest and biggest way you’re going to affect and drive change is putting money back into your community, back into your local farmers market,” Edwards said. The film will play at the Dec. 5 showcase at the Mun-

cie Fairgrounds and in January at Pruis Hall, but the group hopes the film will be accepted and shown at a local film festival. “We feel our movie would be strong in a lot of the Midwestern film festivals that maybe focus on documentary films,” Edwards said. “The Heartland Film Festival is probably right up our film’s alley.” The three have put in roughly 40 hours a week of work on the film for the past few months, but to them, the final product has been worth it. “I came to college to get experience, and the coolest thing about this is we’re going to have this final product I can be proud of and has a real-world aspect that might change how someone views something,” Brubaker said.

pening because there is a chance it could go to the ballot for a public vote in November 2014. “Ball State is a major employer in the state of Indiana and we offer domestic partner benefits, and if we feel really strongly about this, it might change their minds,” he said.

“The more awareness we have about it, the better.” Anagnos challenged senators to hear the voices of any students who are in favor of HJR-6. Hesser said to his knowledge, no counter legislation has been written. “That isn’t to say someone

hasn’t, it just hasn’t been sent to the agenda committee yet,” he said. “I assume that individuals who are for [HJR-6] will voice their opinions during [SGA] Senate and reach out to a senator that represents them. All senators are expected to vote based on conversations with their constituents.”

SGA: LGBTQ group among resolutions first supporters

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 AJ Owens, Call to Action’s secretary, said it is important for the university to take a public stance and for SGA be involved. Owens also said more people need to hear about HJR-6 and what is hap-

Group meets for 6 weeks to discuss craving, offer advice to start living healthier lifestyle BERG STAFF REPORTER smoking is bad, so we’re not | KARA knberg2@bsu.edu talking down to them, we’re One group of students on campus is gathering each semester to try to live a healthier lifestyle and comply with the university’s smoke-free campus initiative. The six-week program, run by the Amelia T. Wood Health Center, aims to help members quit smoking. Of adults ages 18-24, 18.9 percent smoke in the United States, according the Center of Disease Control and Prevention. Each week, the members talk about whether they smoked, what situations trigger them to smoke and offer support and advice. “It’s pretty open and nonjudgmental,” said Julie Sturek, a health educator and the group’s adviser. “Basically, the point of the group is having accountability with someone, but we do the pros and cons of quitting, and we have people talk about what their fears about quitting are, past quit attempts. “I mean, everyone knows that

trying to help them and give them accountability of someone to support them in their trying to quit effort.” According to the CDC, cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable deaths in the U.S. The national average of smokers in the U.S. is at 18.4 percent, while in Indiana, 26 percent of residents smoke. Also according to the CDC, 68.8 percent of current adult smokers in the U.S. have said they want to quit smoking. Since 2002, the number of smokers who have quit has exceeded the number of current smokers. In Indiana, the Medicaid feefor-service program gives coverage to anyone who needs treatment for tobacco dependence or wants to partake in individual and group counseling. “We’ve had many students go through the program and quit smoking,” Sturek said. “We want students here to be healthy and our campus as a whole to be healthy.”

OF EVERYTHING CANCER TAKES, CHILDREN GOING NO WHERE WORST IS FEELING OF CONTROL AFTER VOTE AGAINST BUSES EVIE LICHTENWALTER PROGNOSIS UNKNOWN EVIE LICHTENWALTER IS A BALL STATE STUDENT TAKING AN ACADEMIC BREAK DUE TO HER CANCER DIAGNOSIS AND WRITES ‘PROGNOSIS UNKNOWN’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO EVIE AT EMLICHTENWAL@BSU. EDU.

FORUM POLICY

Cancer does not pick favorites. It chooses no sides. It’s a destructive, unpredictable, warmongering machine that will infiltrate and destroy anything it can. Everyone has likely heard horror stories of chemotherapy — constant nausea, hair loss and an overall state of just being ill, but stories can’t really prepare you for the reality of the situation. The worst part, the part no one seems to mention, is the sudden lack of control. Part of my treatment includes six rounds of chemotherapy and major surgery in January, followed by six more rounds of chemotherapy. After that, fingers crossed, I’ll be in remission. One day, I feel fine. The next, I wake up in the middle of the kitchen floor with a throbbing headache. I tried to cook some popcorn, but because my red blood cells and white blood cells are so low, all I managed to do was pass out and smash my head into the floor. This isn’t the first time this has happened, and it won’t be the last. I’ve passed out while sitting down for lunch at Puerto Vallarta. I’ve passed out at home, nearly landing on top of a hot stove. I can feel it happening, but I can’t control it. It’s debilitating and embarrassing, but it’s just something I do now. Activities that were so easy just weeks before are no longer easy. Grocery shopping is hard because I can’t stand for more than 10 minutes

The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor,

guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed.

without getting dizzy. Eating is a chore because everything tastes like metal and my mouth is raw, and all I really want to do is sleep. Before my diagnosis, I was a busy person. I worked two jobs and took a full class load, barely leaving time to sleep and function. I’d pull a few allnighters a week, and I existed purely off caffeine and fast food while I tried my hardest to stay caught up. It wasn’t ideal, but it was manageable. It was normal. I recently made an attempt to go back to my part time job at Target. I figured it had been enough time, nearly four months since my diagnosis and surgery, and surely I would be fine. But one five-hour shift taught me that I was not ready. Standing up for 10 minutes left me lightheaded and on the verge of passing out. I made it through that shift, thanks to the kindness of my coworkers who let me sit most of the time and were more than understanding. I went home that afternoon feeling terrible. Not because of the chemo, not because of the cancer. I felt terrible because I could no longer do what I wanted to do. Things I did blindly and without thought months before were suddenly a struggle, and it made me feel frustrated and useless. Cancer has been a constant reminder that right now, life isn’t going to be what it used to be. This is my new normal, and I just have to be along for the ride.

The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides

How would you feel as a 5-year-old kindergartner having to walk two miles or ride the MITS bus to school? Children all over Muncie now have this problem to worry about. Transportation by a school bus has been ripped out from under them. If children do not have a bus and they cannot get to school, they are set up for failure, all because Muncie residents didn’t want their property taxes raised. The Nov. 5 election did not pass the referendum of raising property taxes to pay for school buses. So for the 201415 school year, the school buses for Muncie will no longer exist. There are currently 3,555 students who ride the Muncie school buses daily. What are all those students going to do now? The 2013 data for Muncie Community Schools shows that 73.1 percent of students are currently receiving free or reduced lunches. This is a huge number of students who depend on the school. These families depend on these meals received at school. If these children do not have a school bus to get to school, they might not be able to attend school every day. This will then affect the children on another level. Some of these children might not get lunch and breakfast five days a week. The only students who will be given transportation are those who are required by state law. According to The Star Press, no elementary student is more than two

this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com

miles from their closest school; however, that does not count children who are gifted and talented that attend East Washington Academy or students with special needs that attend a school not close to their home. Junior high students and high school students are currently taking the MITS and will continue to do so. If I were a parent, I would not want my elementary school students taking the MITS to school. A 5-year-old kindergarten student is just learning to read; how are they supposed to be able to read the buses and determine which is the correct one to get them to school? This not only affects the children but also the bus drivers. Think of all the bus drivers who now have to figure out jobs they can apply for starting next year. A situation like this affects so many aspects of a community. Muncie is the first to apply for a waiver so nobody really knows what is going to happen. This is all around not a good situation. As a future teacher, I would never want my students not having an option of taking a school bus to and from school. The children have no idea how much this is going to affect them and everyone in the community. Two miles is quite a far walk in the winter with snow and ice. There needs to be something figured out to keep the buses. Personally, I hope they are not given the waiver and have to come up with something else to do to keep the buses. Children need school buses.

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842

U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

BIANKA TEETERS CHALK TALK

BIANKA TEETERS IS A JUNIOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR AND WRITES ‘CHALK TALK’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO BIANKA AT BMTEETERS@BSU. EDU.

U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814 U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021


PAGE 4 | WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

TODAY Ball State football will play at Northern Illinois University in a battle for the MAC West title at 8 p.m.

THURSDAY The Ball State women’s basketball team will unveil the WNIT banner from last season’s Sweet 16 run.

FRIDAY Ball State women’s volleyball will try to earn a conference win as it plays at Northern Illinois University.

FOOTBALL DN FILE PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Senior tight end Zane Fakes attempts to outrun a Western Michigan defender on Oct. 19 at Waldo Stadium. Today will be Fakes’ last opportunity to play against Northern Illinois University.

LAST CHANCE Fakes, Smith look to avenge previous seasons’ losses to rival team

DAKOTA CRAWFORD CHIEF REPORTER | @DakotaCrawford_

There isn’t a single player on Ball State’s roster that has defeated Northern Illinois University. Instead, it’s been a string of painful defeats. The Huskies defeated the Cardinals in 2009 and haven’t lost any of the four head-to-head games since. Now, an entire locker room of Ball State players long to overcome a haunting Northern Illinois team. “Watching the film from last year and the year before that, it just really hurts,” junior wide receiver Willie Snead said. “Everything is on the line [this week]... And I feel like everybody on this team is really hungry.” Northern Illinois defeated Ball State by a combined 15 points in the last two seasons. Snead said

his team controlled its own fate last season, but didn’t finish — he doesn’t want to feel that pain again this time around. Though the winner’s biggest reward in this game will be a MidAmerican Conference West championship, personal motivations exist, as well. Senior Zane Fakes said it would be rewarding to finally defeat the Huskies. “It’d mean a lot to me,” the tight end said. “I mean, its just another game, but just the fact that I haven’t had the chance to beat them in my career, to get that win under my belt would be big.” Northern Illinois is ranked No. 20 in the Associated Press Top 25 poll going into today’s game. A Ball State win would likely mean a spot on that list in addition to a guaranteed shot at this season’s overall MAC championship. The University at Buffalo, which

currently leads the MAC East, defeated Ball State in the 2008 MAC championship game. This team’s veterans weren’t around to experience that 42-24 loss, but they’re motivated to reach the championship game all the same. Senior wide receiver Jamill Smith said this week’s game is being treated just like every game up to this point — a championship of its own. The 9-1 Cardinals haven’t lost a game since week three and don’t intend to lose again any time soon. “Every game is a MAC championship game,” he said. “NIU is in our way, so they’re the next one on the ladder. In this conference, every game matters and we know we can’t play in the conference championship unless we get this next one.” The fifth-year senior said this game means “everything” to

him. With 160 career receptions, Smith is fifth all-time in Ball State’s record books. He’s had plenty of time to reflect on the fact that Northern Illinois overlooked him coming out of high school and in all five seasons since. “It’s the only team I haven’t beat in my time here,” Smith said. “They didn’t [give me an offer]. Everything. Just everything is on the top of your head. I’m so ready. But at the same time, we’re going to come out here and prepare like we would for any opponent. “Just trying to keep the emotions low, but knowing that the enthusiasm is high, really high.” It’s been a season-long task for Ball State to focus on its schedule one week at a time. The Cardinals have taken on just two teams with a winning record this year. To put it in perspective, Ball

State’s opponents are a combined 35–64. It would have been easy to look ahead to a Northern Illinois team that is now 9-0, but coaches have made sure to prevent that tendency. Fakes said coaches talk about the team’s upcoming opponent every week, making it easy on him not to lose focus. It’s not uncommon, he said, to completely forget who is two weeks ahead on the schedule. A win this week would allow Ball State to reach for the rest of its goals this season. It’s a chance for seniors to finally put an end to the losses. “We just look at the next week, and then the next week,” Smith said. “Everybody at the same time had that [Northern Illinois] game in the back of their head, because we know that this week is everything.”

TONIGHT’S GAME IS THE BIGGEST IN RECENT PAST MAT MIKESELL MIKED UP MAT MIKESELL IS A SENIOR JOURNALISM MAJOR AND WRITES ‘MIKED UP’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO MAT AT MLMIKESELL@BSU. EDU.

Forget the win over the University of Virginia. Forget the win over the University of South Florida. Forget the last two wins against Indiana University. Tonight’s game against Northern Illinois University is more important to Ball State than all of those. Sure, head coach Pete Lembo called the 48-27 win against Virginia on Oct. 5 the biggest in the history of Ball State football. With fair reason, too, as not many mid-major teams go on the road and beat a BCS team by three touchdowns. Northern Illinois also did that earlier this season with a 55-24 thumping of Purdue University on Sept. 28. Everyone following this Ball State football team knows what’s at stake tonight at Huskie Stadium with the Mid-American Conference West Division title and a spot in the MAC Championship game. Northern Illinois won’t give up the West Division title easy, as the two-time defending MAC champions are on a 24-game home win streak. The last home loss was a 34-31 game against University of Idaho on Sept. 26, 2009. Think about that. The Huskies’ four-year seniors haven’t experienced a home loss. Along with the home-win streak, Northern Illinois hasn’t lost a MAC game since losing to Central Michigan University in the conference opener in 2011. Ball State is in a position tonight to get its biggest win since the 2008 season. That year’s team also had a similar situation with a road game against then-defending MAC champions Central Michigan. Ball State won en route to winning the West Division and a trip to Ford Field. A win tonight and Ball State will make its first trip back to Detroit since 2008. The Cardinals have an opportunity to seal the division title and knock off the defending MAC champion, but the team can do a lot more with a win. Beating Northern Illinois is a major step in turning around the Ball State program that won a combined six games in the 200910 and 2010-11 seasons. A win wipes away those seasons for good as Keith Wenning, Zane Fakes, Jamill Smith and Jeffery Garrett, among others, were on the roster during those years. The buzz around this team that was missing during those years are back, as the buses sending students to Northern Illinois are full for the general student population and some have been put on a waiting list. Ball State hasn’t beaten Northern Illinois since 2008. Beating the Huskies on the path to a division — ­ and perhaps the MAC championship — would make winning tonight that much more satisfying. Games of this magnitude at Ball State don’t come around often, the last being the game against Western Michigan University in 2008. Tonight in DeKalb, Ill., the stakes are just as high, if not higher. A chance to beat the defending MAC champion. A chance to win the MAC West. A chance to claim the biggest win in Ball State’s recent history.

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Senior defensive end Jonathan Newsome goes after Kent State University quarterback David Fisher on Oct. 12 at Scheumann Stadium. Newsome will be tasked with defending Northern Illinois University’s Jordan Lynch in tonight’s game.

Tackling Lynch key to victory Senior rushed for 220 yards, 3 touchdowns in last season’s game MATT McKINNEY SPORTS EDITOR | @Matt_D_McKinney

Northern Illinois University quarterback Jordan Lynch has terrorized the Mid-American Conference this season as the key force behind the Huskies’ undefeated 2013 record. Ball State will try to stop both Lynch and his offense tonight. Lynch has 19 touchdown passes to just five interceptions and 1,871 passing yards, averaging 207.9 per game. Adding to his passing totals, Lynch is third in the MAC in rushing yards per game, with 127.8. He is tied with Ball State’s Jahwan Edwards for 12 touchdowns on the ground. All in all, Lynch leads the MAC with 335.7 offensive yards per game. Ball State head coach Pete Lembo predicted defensive coordinator Jay Bateman wouldn’t get much sleep

the week before the game. When asked if he had been getting sleep, Bateman said, “No, but that’s OK.“ Senior cornerback Jeffery Garrett said this season’s Northern Illinois team isn’t much different than previous seasons. “They’re just a good team,“ Garrett said. “Special teams, offense, defense. ... They’re just athletic. You just have to stay focused.“ Garrett stressed the importance of consistent tackling against Lynch. “If he breaks one tackle, he’s gone,“ he said. Last season, Lynch gashed Ball State’s defense for 220 rushing yards and three touchdowns on 29 carries. He had one 71-yard touchdown run with three minutes remaining in the game. “We have to rally with all our players and not tackle him one-on-one,” Garrett said. “It’s going to be difficult. He’s a really good player.“ On Oct. 19 against Central Michigan University, Lynch rushed for 316 yards and set the NCAA record for the most single-game rushing

yards for a quarterback. Lembo said one thing he’s impressed with in Lynch’s game is his toughness. “You watch him take hit after hit after hit, and he just bounces up and lives to play another down,” he said. “For a big, thick guy, he is really fast.” Senior defensive end Jonathan Newsome said he’s “ready to go“ against the Huskies. “We have to just make sure that he can’t change the game,“ he said. “We can’t let one player change the game.“ Not only is Lynch one of the top players in the MAC in rushing, he’s the top quarterback in the country in rushing yards. Ranked seventh in the country, surrounded by running backs. Lynch has 1,150 yards. The next-highest quarterback in the country in rushing yards is Brigham Young University’s Taysom Hill, who is No. 29. There is a 256-yard difference between Lynch and Hill. “We have to tackle him,” Garrett said. “We have to tackle him.”


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

SPORTS

Whitford earns first win as head coach Freshman has 17 in 20-point victory over NAIA team

|

EVAN BARNUM-STEGGERDA CHIEF REPORTER @Slice_of_Evan

Veggie pizza and a late night film session. A pedestrian night, and hardly the celebration one would expect from someone after winning his first game as a head coach. But that’s exactly what Ball State coach James Whitford planned to do after defeating Taylor University 73-53 in the Cardinals’ home opener. “I thought we all played well as a team,� said freshman Zavier Turner, who had a gamehigh 17 points and was the Cardinals’ only double-digit scorer. “We stuck together, had a little mental lapse on defense, but we shared the ball well.� The Cardinals jumped out to a 15-6 lead, and only trailed once (2-0), a stern juxtaposition from their slow starts against Marian University in the exhibition and Indiana State University on Saturday. Whitford said he was

pleased with his team’s perimeter defense on sharpshooters Ben Raichel and Jesse Coffey, who combined for just 6-18 (33 percent) from the field and 16 points after coming in averaging 51.5 percent from the field and nearly 26 points a game. In the first half, Ball State was given numerous opportunities on the offensive end by holding Taylor to 29 percent (9-31) from the field. The extra possessions help cover the few blemishes Ball State had, like the 7-8 assistto-turnover ratio. At halftime, Turner, who had no assists and three turnovers, said that Whitford told him to start looking to involve his teammates more after putting up the most shots on the team — though he was 4-7 from the field and 2-3 from threepoint range. “I’ve been a point guard all my life, so I’ve always kind of been pass first,� said Turner, who logged four assists and no turnovers in the second half. “I just try and take what the defense gives me.� While many of the same pressing concerns burdened Ball State — like its 16 turnovers and 6-24 shooting from behind the

arc — the Cardinals seem to be figuring out their new up-tempo system and which rotations fit. Whitford implemented a new, youthful rotation, with freshmen Turner, Mark Alstork, Quentin Payne and Franko House and sophomore Bo Calhoun, that provided energy in spurts. “We love playing together,� said Payne, who had game-high five assists and a dunk to cap a 9-0 run that ended the first half. “[Turner] has that fast mentality and makes great reads off ball screens and makes a two [guard]’s life easy. ... Bo brings the energy ... We all just contrast each other really well.� After a frustrating game against Indiana State, senior big man Majok Majok returned to his top-20 rebounding form from a year ago and pulled in a game-high 16 rebounds, including seven on the offensive glass. Majok’s offensive game (2-7 from the field with six points), however, looked rushed at times and still is adjusting to the new, fast style of play. “I had a few easy misses,� Majok said. “I try to stay within the flow of the offense, but

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BALL STATE FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE

41 THREE-POINT PERCENTAGE

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TOTAL REBOUNDS

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TAYLOR

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE

37.9 THREE-POINT PERCENTAGE

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I need to take my time when I go up.� Although Taylor, out of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, isn’t a marquee opponent, the win still marked an important accomplishment for a team in transition. Everything is still new to the Cardinals — Whitford referred to Greek’s Pizzeria as “the one over there on University, whatever it’s called� — and the learning curve is DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY still there, but obvious prog- Freshman guard Zavier Turner tries to block a Taylor University player on Nov. 12 at Worthen Arena. Ball State won 73-53. ress is being made.

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Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7 -- Do like the bees, and get busy collecting nectar. There’s plenty of work to be done around the hive. Use safe cleaning supplies. It’s not necessarily the best time for romance. Make long-term plans. Creature comforts are nice.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 7 -An unexpected bonus arises. It’s easier to achieve your goals.You’re getting smarter by the minute, but don’t get cocky. There’s a lesson here. Postpone romance until you get it. Write your musings.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is an 8 -- For the next seven months with Neptune direct, work and career flow forward. Decisions seem easier. Take care, but don’t get stopped by old fears. Consider what you want. Slow down and contemplate.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 9 -- There’s room for conflict and disagreement but also for love and pampering. Find the balance you strive for. Things are falling into place. For the next few months, it’s easier to understand abstract thoughts.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 9 -- Focus on making honest money.Your dreams are more achievable, now and for the next seven months. Complete one project, and then dream up new ones. Remain obsessed with details.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 7 -- This week spins some good party days. Avoid excesses that could cloud your thinking, as tempers run a bit short now. Relaxing is a priority. Plan a vacation, even just by scheduling time to do nothing.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 8 -Focus on what you love, and the money will come. Tailor your passion to the market. Track your finances to increase the bottom line. Reaching an agreement could seem like a balancing act. Divining fact from fantasy gets easier.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is an 8 -- Home is where the heart is. The next two days are good for domestic projects. And your income seems to rise naturally, now that Neptune’s direct. Trust your own good judgment. Keep in action, and pace yourself.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 9 -You’re on top of the world in a variety of ways. There are some interferences in romance. Invent something new in your relationship.Your self-confidence helps, but don’t get arrogant. Try listening for what’s wanted.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 9 -Consider new opportunities; however, don’t take a job you don’t understand. Listen to your heart before saying yes. Until about the middle of next year, it’s easier to save money. Take advantage.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 9 -Everything works better together with a reliable partner now. Supporting each other, you both get farther.Your romantic fantasies seem more achievable. But there’s still room for misunderstanding. Listen more than speaking.

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Creativity abounds this year, quite profitably. Write, record and document your expressions. This autumn and next spring prove especially fertile, with late next summer a perfect launch. Partnership grows and gets romantic. Career communications peaks with new opportunities around July 25. Work may include travel. Rest up next October for a busy winter season. Play.

 

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Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 8 -Travel is appealing, although it could be challenging. Expand your boundaries. Team actions move toward goals you set some time in the past. Be polite.


PAGE 6 | WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

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THURSDAY Travel the world with your tastebuds. Amazing Taste is back- take a look at the cuisine that shapes cultures.

Laugh out loud at Jim Gaffigan, who is coming to town on Friday. Get to know him and meet the biggest fans of BSU.

WEEKEND Catch up on all the laughs you missed out on when Jim Gaffigan made his visit and get great recipes from the Taste.

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Guitarist Jimmy Irizarry plays a solo for “Yesterday” on stage during the Rain Concert Tuesday at John R. Emens Auditorium. The concert mixed songs and video effects in a tribute to The Beatles..

TRIBUTE TO

LEGENDS British invasion overtakes Emens, Rain depicts evolution of The Beatles |

ALICIA KELLY STAFF REPORTER aakelly@bsu.edu

Beatlemania surged throughout John R. Emens Auditorium Tuesday night when four men posing as John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr played tribute to some of the most monumental moments in music history. From “I Want To Hold Your Hand,” to “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds,” Rain: A Tribute to The Beatles took the audience on a journey that began in 1964 on “The Ed Sullivan Show.” Ian Garcia, who plays the part of McCartney in the band, said he was raised on The Beatles records, and while Rain follows in their footsteps, the Fab Four can never really be replaced. “I still believe there will never be another Beatles,” Garcia said. “The timing was just right and America was ready to explode with rock music.” Garcia has been a part of other Beatles tribute bands throughout his life, but stumbled upon Rain in 2010. “I heard about Rain a few years ago from a friend, went to audition, and the rest is history,” he said. Rain has toured all over the world, with multiple casts and multiple people to play each character. “The Beatles are huge in Japan,” said Jimmy Irizarry, who plays John Lennon. The tribute band played a wide range of songs chronologically from The Beatles’ discography for two-and-a-half hours. “It is a lot of pressure to live up to

The Beatles. We put on a Beatles fantasy show with fantastic lights and costume changes,” Garcia said. “We want people to have a good time.” Each set Rain plays represents a different era of The Beatles’ history. It begins with the Beatlemania time period and ends with the “Let It Be” album, the last one released in 1970. Along with portraying the original band, Rain’s set includes audience involvement, authentic clothing and projected images of The Beatles’ history. The audience didn’t hesitate to sing along, clap and dance with the group. Fog machines and a continuous light show brought the stage alive. Footage from the Vietnam war and commercials from the ‘60s took the audience back in time. Ball State alumna Holly Brown came back to Emens for her second Rain experience. “The last one I went to was really awesome,” she said. “It was very similar to what I would think the real Beatles would sound like.” Albany resident Kyle Cook has been to many Beatles tribute shows before and will travel near and far to hear his favorite band’s songs. “I think Rain does a great job at portraying The Beatles and putting on a stage performance in general,” he said. “I have been to others and this is the best one.” The performance ended with the crowd waving their hands back and forth and singing along to “Hey Jude.”

THE BEATLES FIRSTS •T  he Beatles’ debut single “Love Me Do” was released in the UK in October 1963. •T  he Beatles performed on “Thank Your Lucky Stars” to promote its new single

“Please Please Me” in February of 1963. • The Beatles’ first album “Please Please Me” was released in March 1963. • “I Want to Hold Your Hand” becomes the band’s first No. 1 song in the United States in November 1963. • “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” was released along with the premiere of the band’s multi-colored sergeant suits in June of 1967. SOURCE: beatles-tribute-band-uk.co.uk

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Rain plays a song during its set on Tuesday The band used no backing tracks during its songs.

DN 11-13-13  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News for Nov. 13, 2013.

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