Page 1

DN MONDAY, OCT. 14, 2013

THE DAILY NEWS

BSUDAILY.COM

SUN SHINE ENERGIZES REFUGES SEE PAGE 6

Florida Georgia Line performs at Emens Auditorium

Ball State students travel to California to compete in sustainability challenge, design solar, green home

SEE PAGE 4

Conflicts between national statistics and local reports suggest sexual assaults go

unreported.

RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER | rmpodnar@bsu.edu

Ball State’s reported statistic of 11 sexual offenses in 2012 tells a very small part of the story. The sexual offenses reported in the 2012 Ball State Campus Crime Report only applies to incidents that were both reported and that occurred on Ball State’s campus, university-controlled property or public streets immediately adjacent to campus. The statistic does not include sexual offenses occurring on private property off campus, said Michael Gillilan, director of student rights. Nor does it include crimes that are impossible to factor in because no one reports them. See ASSAULTS, page 4 DN ILLUSTRATION ROSS MAY

Homecoming attendance total short of Twitter goal

UNIVERSITY WON’T ACT ON FACEBOOK $20 ESSAY SERVICE

Quarterback says ‘sky’s the limit’ for 2013 season

Bsu Research Papers targets Ball State students specifically

|

MAT MIKESELL CHIEF REPORTER @MatMikesell

Ball State didn’t reach the goal of 20,000 fans at Scheumann Stadium, called #Operation20k on Twitter, but it didn’t mean the athletic department was disappointed. Saturday’s attendance for the 27-24 Homecoming win over Kent State University was 16,861. All of Ball State’s home games this season have seen attendance numbers more than 15,000 fans. Two seasons ago, the stadium was half full during the Homecoming game, when 11,874 watched Ball State lose to Temple University 42-0 on Oct. 8, 2011. “It’s just funny that two years ago, we were disappointed with the low atten-

dance numbers,” Bill Scholl, athletic director, said. “Now we have 16,000 show up, and that’s supposed to be a disappointing number.” Scholl said the goal for every home game is to fill Scheumann Stadium to its capacity of 22,500. The athletic department pushed for 20,000 fans in the days leading up to Saturday’s game. Had the goal been reached, it would have been the first time 20,000 fans at Scheumann since the 2008 season. Five seasons later, the winning and higher attendance numbers are starting to become the norm at Ball State as the team is bowl eligible for the third straight season. “We’re mature enough of a team to know we have a lot of potential,” senior quarterback Keith Wenning said “We’re happy to get our sixth win, obviously, but we’re not satisfied by any means. The sky’s the limit for this team.”

See FOOTBALL, page 3

RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER | rmpodnar@bsu.edu

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Fans cheer on Ball State against Kent State University on Saturday at Scheumann Stadium. Ball State missed its 20,000 attendance mark for the Homecoming game, instead 16,861 people went to the game.

2013 HOME GAME ATTENDANCE OPPONENT

Illinois State University Army University of Toledo Kent State University

Aug. 29 Sept. 7 Sept. 28 Oct. 12

ATTENDANCE

OUTCOME

16,327 15,106 18,329 16,861

51-28 Win 40-14 Win 31-24 Win 27-24 Win

Student Academic Ethics Policy: SECTION 7.2.1 C

Communication with, providing assistance to, or receiving assistance from another person in a manner not authorized by the faculty member. SECTION 7.2.1 D

Possessing, buying, selling, obtaining, giving, or using a copy of any unauthorized materials intended to be used as or in the preparation of a quiz or examination or similar evaluation. 7.2.2 A

Submitting an assignment purporting to be the student’s original work which has been wholly or partly created by another person. 7.2.2 D

Knowingly permitting one’s work to be submitted by another person as if it were the submitter’s original work. THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

7.2.4

Cooperating with another person in academic dishonesty, either directly or indirectly as an intermediary agent or broker. THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

See FACEBOOK, page 4

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

MUNCIE, INDIANA

TODAY MARKS THE 33RD ANNIVERSARY OF BOB MARLEY’S LAST CONCERT.

DATE

The university will not take action against a Facebook page offering to write essays for students for as little as $20. The Facebook page, Bsu Research Papers, reads, “We write research papers — it’s that simple. Serving BSU & Ivy Tech since 2006.” The Facebook page was created Sept. 23. Director of Student Rights Michael Gillilan and Associate Provost Marilyn Buck both said they are not aware of anyone taking action against the page at this time. Gillilan said because the page does violate the university’s Student Academic Ethics Policy, his office encourages faculty to discuss the page with their students.

SECTIONS VIOLATED

CONTACT US

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

TWEET US

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter. 1. CLOUDY

2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

5. SUNNY

FORECAST

TODAY Sunny High: 69 Low: 52

3. PARTLY CLOUDY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

5. SUNNY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

Expect warm days and chilly nights this week. Rain may come Tuesday into Wednesday, with lower temperatures later this week. - Lexi Meyer, WCRD weather

21. SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS

VOL. 93, ISSUE 33

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY TODAY’S BULLETIN BOARD NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

TODAY

WEDNESDAY

EQUAL PAY BAKE SALE

OPEN MIC NIGHT

Be Here Now will host a comedy open mic night between 8-10 p.m. This comedy underground event costs $1 for those 21 and older and $3 for younger than 21 attendees. Drink specials will include $1 PBR before the comedy begins. Other drink specials include $1 wine and $5 PBR pitchers throughout the night.

From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Amnesty International BSU will host an Amnesty Equal Pay Bake Sale. The group will sell cupcakes at the Scramble Light. For men, the cupcakes will cost $1 and 75 cents for women to represent the wage gap, according to the press release. They also will give information about a showing Wednesday of the documentary “Miss Representation.”

“MISS REPRESENTATION”

WHEN

11 a.m. to 1 p.m. WHERE

Scramble Light DN FILE PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

COST

$1 for men 75 cents for women to represent wage gap

Amnesty International BSU will screen “Miss Representation” at 7:34 p.m. in Bracken Library Room 104. “Miss Representation” is a documentary that shows a connection between the portrayal of women in the media and their positions of power, according to the press release.

TUESDAY ALCOHOL AWARENESS

Student Government Association will host an Alcohol Awareness event at 7 p.m. in the L.A. Pittenger Student Center. Students are invited to attend this public event that will explain how Indiana’s Lifeline Law can protect underage students. Sen. Jim Merritt, the author of law, and Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller will speak at the event.

SAFE ZONE TRAINING

Safe Zone Training will take place at 5:30-9:30 p.m. in the L.A. Pittenger Student Center Room 303. These trainings are available for the Ball State and Muncie community members to become an advocate for the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and questioning population, according to the press release. Sign up by sending an email to safezone@bsu.edu and putting “SAFEZONE” and the date of the session in the subject line.

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT ON THIS PAGE?

Email us at news@bsudailynews.com.

WASHINGTON CENTER INTERNSHIPS The Washington Center for AREAS OF INTERNSHIPS

Internships and Academic Semi- • Advocacy, service and arts nars will give students and re• Business and global trade cent graduates an opportunity to • International affairs intern and earn academic credit • Law and criminal justice • Media and communications in Washington, D.C. TWC will give an hourlong presentation at • Political leadership 5 p.m. in North Quad. Applicants • Science, technology and society must have a GPA of at least 2.75, according to the press release. Fall Semester and Spring Semester interns earn 12 hours of Ball State credit, and summer interns earn 6 hours of credit. Interested students can schedule one-on-one appointments from 2:30-4:30 p.m. with a TWC representative by emailing bstedman@bsu.edu.

THE FORECAST POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

TUESDAY Rain showers High: 74 Low: 54 08 - RAIN SHOWERS

WEDNESDAY Periods of rain High: 61 Low: 41 07 - PERIODS OF RAIN

THURSDAY Partly cloudy High: 57 Low: 39 03 - PARTLY CLOUDY

FRIDAY Partly cloudy High: 61 Low: 42 03 - PARTLY CLOUDY

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Steven Williams

NEWS EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes ASST. NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz ASST. FEATURES EDITOR Jeremy Ervin

SPORTS EDITOR Matt McKinney ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

72HRS EDITOR Ryan Howe FORUM EDITOR Devan Filchak

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Corey Ohlenkamp ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Jonathan Miksanek

DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITORS Daniel Brount Marisa Hendrickson

Updated 24/7 Crossword

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Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

SPORTS

TUESDAY Check out how Willie Snead got open for the game-winning catch in this week’s Anatomy of a Play.

FRIDAY Soccer will try to rebound from a weekend loss in a conference match against the University of Toledo at 4:30 p.m.

SATURDAY The Ball State football team will attempt to rock Western Michigan University’s boat when it plays at 2 p.m.

SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

Varied threats boost offensive output Outside hitter leads team with 254 kills despite balPOLASKI ASST. SPORTS EDITOR | DAVID @DavidPolaski

Leading 16-12, Ball State was ready to put the first set against Northern Illinois University on ice. Sophomore outside hitter Alex Fuelling threw down a kill, followed by two from senior opposite hitter Lauren Grant. Senior middle blocker Mindy Marx added two more and senior setter Jacqui Seidel finished off the scoring before Ball State took the set. It was a team effort from the offense over the weekend that helped the women’s volleyball team knock off Western Michigan University and Northern Illinois.

SOCCER

Fuelling leads the team with 254 kills while Marx and sophomore middle blocker Hayley Benson are approaching 200. The balanced offense keeps opponents on their feet, never allowing Western Michigan or Northern Illinois to key in on a specific offensive player. “It’s awesome because there’s not just one go-to hitter,” Seidel said. “It’s not just Mackenzie [Kitchel] or Lauren every night, you never know what to expect.” Even Kitchel and senior outside hitter Kylee Baker have amassed more than 100 kills, giving Seidel a potent arsenal in which she can pick and choose who she wants the ball to go to. She said it’s predetermined who the ball goes to before the point actually begins, although the team will change the play if a rally goes wrong. With five offensive weapons, it’s not difficult for her to find someone who can send a fast attack over the net.

“We’ve got the luxury of having so many weapons that if someone has an off night, it’s not a big deal,” head coach Steve Shondell said. “Being able to go to more than one player every night makes a difference.” Against Northern Illinois, Fuelling led with 11 kills. Kitchel finished right behind with 10. Grant and Marx both had six while Benson and Seidel added five each. The distribution is an intricate part of Shondell’s offense, which he refers to as “Ball State-style volleyball.” The style is dictated by pinpoint passing that requires players to be unselfish, willing to give up the ball even though it means they might not get the kill. In the comeback win against Western Michigan, Benson finished with 15 kills and Marx had 13, Fuelling finished with 11. Just a week earlier, Baker finished just one kill shy of the team

‘Controversial’ calls shift conference weekend loss Team had chance to take overall lead in MAC standings

|

EVAN BARNUM STEGGERDA CHIEF REPORTER @Slice_of_Evan

Ball State’s soccer team entered the weekend poised to reassert itself atop the MidAmerican Conference standings with two victories over MAC leaders. But after shutting out Eastern Michigan University on Friday, the latter half of that plan was thwarted by a 2-1 loss to Western Michigan University. “It was a very disappointing loss for us because we felt we played [Western Michigan] to at least a stalemate, but there were a few controversial calls that changed the game,” head coach Craig Roberts said. In the first five minutes of the match, Western Michigan’s sophomore forward Gina Maddi lofted a ball over the Cardinals’ back line, which sophomore midfielder Madison Oyer legged after to track down. Oyer was overrun by Ali Russo, and Roberts said she was taken down in what should have been a free kick, but instead turned into an one-on-one with the keeper and the first of two goals for the sophomore forward. Now in sole possession of first place in the MAC at 7-33 (5-0-1), Western Michigan’s attacking mentality, highlighted by starting three forwards and two attacking midfielders, generated offensive success that most teams have not found against Ball State’s defense.

FIELD HOCKEY

TEAM SHUT OUT BY SPARTANS OVER WEEKEND The Ball State field hockey

team saw why it’s hard to win on the road, losing 8-0 to Michigan State University on Sunday. Junior Tarel Teach had two shots while freshmen Lexi Kavanaugh and Bryce Barnes also had a shot. Sophomore Bianca Velez earned her fourth defensive save this season. Goalkeeping was split in half as Shelby Henley was pulled for Maddi Elliott. Henley has given up 11 goals in the past two games as Ball State’s record drops to 5-8 this season. Led by junior forward Abby Barker, the Spartans didn’t take long to catch fire. Barker made two goals, starting early with a goal in the fourth minute. Six other Spartans also scored a goal in Sunday’s game. Michigan State is 5-1 at home. The Cardinals could break this four-game losing streak as the team returns home to face Kent State University on Saturday at the Briner Sports Complex.

The Broncos outshot the Cardinals 12-8 and forced freshman goalkeeper Brooke Dennis to make seven saves, matching a career-high — though Roberts said he had several discrepancies with the box score’s shot and foul totals and that it was “skewed.” “I thought we contained them well, and we were right there with them,” he said. “We created several nice offensive threats, but we weren’t fortunate to capitalize on them.” Just before half, a long shot from freshman defender Leah Mattingly deflected off a Western Michigan defender and gave Ball State the equalizer from an own goal. At intermission, Roberts said he changed to a more balanced and counter-friendly system to adapt to the Broncos’ offense that generally keeps teams on their heels. In the 79th minute, Russo broke through again off a service into the box from senior midfielder Lauren Fearday to give Western Michigan a lead it would not surrender. One of Ball State’s best opportunities for its second goal was squandered by what Roberts

WEEKEND STATS

VICTORIA JACOBS, A JUNIOR DEFENDER/MIDFIELDER • Shots: 2 • Shots on goal: 1 • Goals: 1 • Assists: 0 BROOKE DENNIS, A FRESHMAN GOALKEEPER • Minutes played: 90 • Goals allowed: 2 • Saves: 7 LAYNE SCHRAMM, A SENIOR GOALKEEPER • Minutes played: 90 • Goals allowed: 0 • Saves: 3

said was a missed penalty kick call, as junior Becca Sutton was taken down in the box. “I’m not going to say calls were going against us, but they weren’t going for us,” he said. “You have to respect what the officials say, but you want it to be the teams who decide the outcome.” Ball State’s now sits tied for second with Eastern Michigan in the MAC West standings, with the best overall record of 9-4-1 (4-2 MAC). “I think Western Michigan was a good team, but by no means were they dominant,” Roberts said. “We’re optimistic about a rematch in different settings.”

NUMBER OF MATCHES EACH PLAYER HAS LED IN KILLS Hayley Benson: 2

Mackenzie Kitchel: 3 Mindy Marx: 5

Kylee Baker: 1

Alex Fuelling: 12 SOURCE: Staff reports DN GRAPHIC

DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

Sophomore outside hitter Alex Fuelling attempts the kill against Northern Illinois University on Saturday. The Cardinals defeated the Huskies in three sets.

leader, Fuelling, against Buffalo. Despite the number of offensive attackers, Seidel doesn’t favor one player over another. “I love setting everyone — there isn’t one person who stands out,” she said. “It’s great

that I can develop a relationship with everyone so they can all contribute.” Against Western Michigan, Seidel tried to feed Benson the ball early in the match, but the results were varied. She started

giving it more to Fuelling and Marx until Benson’s play improved and the entire offense started clicking. Fuelling has developed into her team’s primary offensive option, but the overall balance allows Ball State flexibility when choosing who to attack with. Seidel knows that firsthand.

FOOTBALL: 6th win earns bowl eligibility | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 After 16,327 people came to watch Ball State’s season opener against Illinois State on Aug. 29, Scholl said he was eager to see the crowds at home games against Kent State and Central Michigan University later in the season. He said he would put more weight on the attendance numbers in October and November games, as higher numbers would mean the fan base is growing. “I think you’re really starting to see the momentum,” Scholl said. “But it doesn’t mean we’re done. We’re still looking for ways to improve the atmosphere and continue to build.” After beating Kent State, Ball State became bowl eligible for

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

The student section of Scheumann Stadium fills with students at kickoff for the Homecoming game against Kent State University on Saturday. Total attendance numbers reached 16,861 for this year’s game compared to 14,192 last year against Western Michigan University.

the third straight season, all under head coach Pete Lembo. The last time Ball State was bowl eligible in three straight seasons was from 1988-91. The focus moves to winless Western Michigan University as Ball State will look to improve to 4-0 in the MidAmerican Conference. The Cardinals will then make a

trip to Akron, Ohio, for a game against the 1-6 Zips. On paper, Ball State will be heavy favorites in both games and could return home Nov. 6 with an 8-1 record and 5-0 in the conference. Should Ball State return to play Central Michigan with an 8-1 record, reaching 20,000 in attendance could be possible.

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PAGE 4 | MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

NEWS

Students compete in California Contestants design net-zero solar homes for disaster victims KARA BERG STAFF REPORTER | knberg2@bsu.edu Two Ball State students teamed up with other area colleges to compete and win in Solar Decathlon competitions in California. For the Oct. 3-Sunday competition in Irvine, Calif., sophomore architecture student Andrea Burks and junior hospitality and food management major Emily Doss partnered up with University of Louisville and the University of Kentucky students to design and build a solar home to serve as a permanent solution for disaster relief housing. “It was inspired by a 2011 tornado that hit Henryville, Ind.,” Solar Decathlon faculty adviser Deanna Pucciarelli said. “The net-zero solar home is more durable and efficient than a typical house.” The students began working on the project two years ago when 19 teams were chosen to compete in 10 individual contests from both national and international university candidates.

In the competition, teams have a week to assemble their house on-site in California and then compete in several different competitions within their structures. “Most of the participation actually occurs before the competition actually begins,” said Burks, who helped with design and worked as an assistant chef. One of the contests required hosting two dinner parties in the solar home, Pucciarelli said. Participants received points based on their performance in each competition and then are tallied to decide the final winner. The Ball State team, dubbed “Kentuckiana” placed first in the dining competitions, which included hosting a movie night for neighbors and simulating home cooking by using a kitchen appliance to vaporize five pounds of water. “My part in this competition was to create and design two full dinner menus, refreshments for an entertainment night and to fully prepare and cook these menus inside the house for eight guests,” Doss, head chef for the event, said. “Six of the guests were contestants from other teams and two VIP guests.” Winning first place wasn’t a

ANDREA BURKS a sophomore architecture major

EMILY DOSS PHOTO PROVIDED BY JESSICA MIKSANEK

The Phoenix House, built by Ball State, University of Kentucky and University of Louisville students for the 2013 Solar Decathlon, took first in dining and tied for first for affordability. The event pitted 20 teams against each other in a challenge to build affordable and sustainable housing.

smooth contest, though. “We had issues with the water because the water pump burned out because of the way it was installed,” Burks said. The team also ended up in a three-way tie for first place in affordability. In the affordability con-

tests, the team’s houses were judged on affordability and energy efficiency to demonstrate how energy saving features can help save money. Doss said she enjoyed the program because she plans to own a restaurant one day. It also gave her a chance to broaden

| BALL STATE HOMECOMING PARADE FOLLOWS THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD THROUGH MUNCIE

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

TOP A float is surrounded by bubbles as it makes its way down McKinley Avenue during the Ball State Homecoming Parade on Oct. 12. Many parade participants incorporated “The Wizard of Oz” into their display. BOTTOM RIGHT A woman dressed as the Glinda the Good Witch waves to the crowd during the Homecoming Parade on Oct. 12. Parade floats followed the “There’s No Place Like Homecoming” theme.

ONLINE

For the story, go to bit.ly/16Z1i5o

ASSAULT: 1 in 5 undergrads experience rape report says | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Ball State releases the annual crime report in compliance with the Clery Act, which mandates all colleges and universities disclose crime on and near their campuses. Gillilan said crimes away from campus are not included in the act. Gillilan said the Department of Education is strict about mandating where crimes qualified for reporting occur so students and parents have numbers from each campus that are comparable.

UNREPORTED CRIME

Gillilan said he is confident the number is correct for crimes that are reported, but there is no way to gather data on crimes that are not. Though Ball State reported 11 sexual offenses on campus in 2012, a study from 2009 in the Journal of American College Health reports approximately one in five undergraduate women experience rape or attempted rape since entering higher education institutions. The ratio of reported, oncampus sexual offense victims to undergraduate students at Ball State is 1:1,514, far from one in five. For 2012, Indiana University reports a comparable ratio of 1:925 with 35 sexual offenses and Purdue University’s ratio is 1:10,049 with three sexual offenses. Traci Bemis-Smiley, victim advocate for A Better Way in Muncie, said the numbers may be accurate for how many victims reported their incidents, but the real total is probably much higher. “Even for on campus, it is going to be much higher because the majority of people do not report,” she said. “Individu-

als on a campus site, it may be their first time away from home and they are worried about what is going to happen or not sure how to handle it, so it will go underreported.” The Justice Department estimates less than 5 percent of college women who are victims of completed or attempted rape report the incident, though 40 percent of the general population report. Jacki Clame, interim director of Muncie Victim Advocate, agreed that many sexual offense crimes go unreported, for various reasons. “Sometimes, believe it or not, they don’t [use victim services in Muncie] because they don’t want anyone to know anything,” she said. “They’ll go to another town like Indy or Anderson because they don’t want anyone to know. You can, [however], get an anonymous rape kit.”

RESOURCES AVAILABLE

When a Ball State student who is a victim of sexual offense reaches out for help, either to the hospital or University Police Department, they are directed to the Ball State victim advocate, Allison Wynbissinger. The victim advocate’s office in the Amelia T. Wood Health Center serves as a confidential, safe place for victims. Wynbissinger does not share specific information with the Office of Student Rights and Community Standards, but she reports totals for sexual offense crimes that meet the conditions to be reported by the Clery Act. Ball State’s sexual offense response team includes the Office of Student Rights and Community Standards, the Health Center, the Counseling Center, the

Multicultural Center, the Office of Health, Alcohol and Drug Education, the Housing and Residence Life and the Office of Victim Services. The greater support network includes the University Police Department, the Muncie Police Department, the Muncie Victim Services and A Better Way. Wynbissinger, who also sits on the Delaware County Sexual Assault Response Team, said she thinks the response policy at Ball State is comprehensive. A university prevention team meets monthly to coordinate efforts and check on each other’s services. “It is a collaborative team effort,” she said. “[We talk about] what is happening on our university, what things come up regarding sexual assault, what are we doing to work together to address these things. We make what is a really bad situation as good as it can be so that person doesn’t have to tell their story multiple times.” In comparison, IU operates a Sexual Assault Crisis Service with counselors to provide psychological services and direct students toward medical care or police authorities. IU has two counselors specifically for sexual assault. Purdue’s Office of the Dean of Students operates an on-call team to help victims of sexual assault and direct them to legal authorities, medical help or psychological help from the Purdue Counseling and Psychological Services or community crisis centers. Ball State is the only university of the three to have its own victim advocate, but Wynbissinger said when she asks groups of students if they are aware of her office, the usual answer is “no.”

SEXUAL ASSAULT

1undergraduate in 5 women experience rape or attempted rape since entering higher education institutions approximately

11 sexual offenses reported on campus in 2012 5 percent of college women who are victims of completed or attempted rape report the incident

SCHOOL COMPARISON

1:1,514

Ball State’s ratio of sexual assaults to undergraduate students on campus

1:925

Indiana University’s ratio of sexual assaults to undergraduate students on campus

1:10,049

Purdue University’s ratio of sexual assaults to undergraduate students on campus SOURCES: The United States Justice Department protect.iu.edu/police/cleryreports/iub purdue.edu/police/pdf/YourCampus.pdf clerycenter.org/summary-jeanne-clery-act

She said sexual assault is the least reported crime for many reasons, and whether to file a police report is a very personal decision. “Unfortunately, I would say a vast majority of students don’t know [about my office] until they need to know,” Wynbissinger said. “[The] decision to report really falls on the individual. Knowing the Office of Victim Services is here would only be helpful. For some students, that may still mean they are not going to report, and that is OK.”

her knowledge and experience with cooking. “My favorite part about the competition was the opportunity to learn so many new things in the solar and green efficiency area and being able to meet and network with so many unique teams and indi-

a junior hospitality and food management major

viduals,” Doss said. Burks said the whole experience was rewarding. “It helped you connect lots of ideas and helps you network,” she said. “I’ve learned a lot in the past two years about being green. It’s very applicable to the real world.”

SOLEDAD O’BRIEN TO SPEAK ON CAMPUS

Emmy Award-winning journalist Soledad O’Brien will be on campus at 7:30 tonight at John R. Emens Auditorium as the first speaker of the Excellence in Leadership Speaker Series. O’Brien has been a part of NBC and CNN and in the summer, it was announced she will work with Al Jazeera America and HBO’s “Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel.” She also was a feature on the cover of Newsweek magazine as one of the “15 People who make America Great.” “An Evening with Soledad O’Brien: Her Life O’BRIEN Stories,” is a free event that is open for all SOLEDAD Emmy Awardstudents and public to attend. winning “Her message isn’t just about journalism, journalist and it isn’t just about her life as a journalist, but it really is about overcoming obstacles and doing things that she didn’t think that she could’ve done,” Lauren Berger, assistant director of Student Life, said. “Making a difference or making an impact in the world — that is something that all students can do whether you’re a journalism major or whether you’re not.” Berger said Excellence in Leadership is important because it allows students to hear different opinions. “When you’re able to hear messages from different people, I think it’s really motivational and students might be encouraged from something that [O’Brien] says to make a difference in their profession that otherwise they might not be charged with before seeing her,” Berger said. – STAFF REPORTS

FACEBOOK: ‘I don’t think it is a crisis’ professor says | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “Information [about the page] has been distributed to a number of university personnel, including faculty members, some of whom are using this as an opportunity to discuss academic integrity and ethics in their classrooms,” he said in an email. Buck reviews academic dishonesty cases and said she has not seen a case yet where a professor has caught a student using this page. She also has never seen a web service for writing essays marketed specifically to Ball State students before and said she was disappointed when she heard about the Facebook page. “They are trying to find vulnerable students, and it makes it more enticing when they highlight a group in particular,” Buck said. “They are preying on students who they think they may have an advantage [over] to get them to succumb to what they want to do. They are a business.” The Facebook page has 53 likes and posts a disclaimer stating students who purchase the essays should use them only for reference. They call themselves a “paid tutoring service.” Bsu Research Papers does business through a Squareup page, where purchases are made online via credit card. Services include annotated bibliographies and research papers are available for between $20-$80 and can be expedited for an extra fee. “We cannot prevent students from turning in our papers, that is not our con-

cern,” the page states. “Our only goal is to help students become better writers.” The page does, however, advertise that “All papers are 100% custom to order, we NEVER EVER reuse papers. You’ll never need to worry about plagiarism.” Efforts by the Daily News to contact the Facebook page were unsuccessful. Jackie Grutsch McKinney, Writing Program director and English professor, said she was not alarmed or surprised when she heard about the page. “There are hundreds of way students can cheat if they want to,” Grutsch McKinney said. “I don’t think it is a crisis.” She said the English department sees about five cases of academic dishonesty a semester in 125 classes, so she does not see it as a large problem. Grutsch McKinney sent an email with details about the page to her department and is aware some English faculty have flagged the page on Facebook. Similarly to Buck, she suspects the page is run as a business by professionals and not by students. Grutsch McKinney said it is often easy to tell when a student is being academically dishonest, and it is usually not good writing. “It’s pretty easy to detect in most cases,” she said. “Do we probably miss some? Yeah. That’s not on us; it’s on the students. It’s up to them to learn something. We aren’t plagiarism hunters who try and weed out the few people who want to pull one on us.”


NEWS|FORUM

MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

Got beef? Want your opinion heard? Email us at opinion@bsudailynews.com to get your voice out there.

OPINION@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

INDIANA SCHOOL VOUCHERS UP State poised to lead private school tuition supplement program | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana could soon become the nation’s leader for use of school vouchers if unprecedented growth in the state’s school choice program continues. The Indiana Department of Education reported more than 20,000 students have signed up for the 3-year-old voucher program for the 2013-2014 school year. That’s more than double last year’s number. The numbers put Indiana sec-

ond in the nation for use of the vouchers, which give qualifying families public money to offset tuition costs at private schools. Milwaukee has more than 24,000 students enrolled in its program, while Ohio has just under 16,000. But both of those programs grew slowly over many years, The Indianapolis Star reported. School choice advocates said they aren’t surprised by Indiana’s rapid growth, especially in Indianapolis. Marion County accounted for 30 percent of all voucher students statewide last year. “The growth in Indiana’s voucher program is amazing, but not totally unexpected given the quality of the non-public schools in and around Marion County,�

said Robert Enlow, CEO of the Indianapolis-based Friedman Foundation, which advocates for vouchers nationally. How much money a student receives depends on the family’s income and the school district they live in. The maximum is $4,700 for elementary school students. Experts said they don’t expect to see the number of students applying for vouchers to continue to double because there aren’t enough spaces available in private schools. A 2010 study indicated that there were about 22,000 vacant seats available in private schools in Indiana. That number has likely grown, but another space study is planned.

| THE DAILY NEWS COMIC

BALL STATE WILL CONTINUE USE OF HERBICIDE ON LAWNS Ball State University is moving ahead with plans

to spray herbicides on the lawns around its K-12 school despite objections from parents worried it will expose their children to chemical toxins. The parents concerned about spraying weed-killer around Burris Laboratory School include Dave Ring, who owns a Muncie organic grocery. He told The Star Press that he wants to reduce his children’s long-term exposure to chemicals. Ring said long-term exposure to chemicals “can lead to a horrible death from cancer or other ailments.� Ball State associate vice president of facilities Kevin Kenyon said the herbicide, Trimec 992, is the most studied broadleaf weed-killer in history. But Hoosier Environmental Council staff attorney Kim Ferraro said just because a product is registered with the EPA doesn’t “mean that exposure is safe.� – THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FORUM POLICY The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor, guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed. The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community: REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842 SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467 U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623 U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814

Josh Shaffer is a sophomore visual communications major and draws “Strange Gods� for the Daily News. His views do not necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Josh at jashaffer@bsu.edu.

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Discovery and adventure flavor this year. Develop and renew work habits, honing skills for the next five months. New avenues open regarding finances, education, partnership and social life. A simple lifestyle comes naturally. New players enter and exit the scene. Strengthen your spiritual connections. Nurture health and wellness. Cultivate love.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 6 -Don’t fret about household expenses. It’s not good timing to shop either, but worrying is futile.You see what needs to be done. Clean up messes. People vie for your attention. State your case clearly.You’re earning admiration.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 6 -- Get ready for another great learning experience. Ask for more and get it. Expand your territory. Meetings could conflict with family time. Keep your wits about you. Discover talents you didn’t know you had. Love wins again. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 6 Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 5 -- Manage finances over the next two -- Increase your profits through organi- days. Keep it simple and organized. It zation. Make up an outline to minimize could be quite profitable. Suddenly confusion. Follow the money trail, and you understand someone else’s view. provide value. No need to be hasty. Make your feelings public. Find the right Your life gets easier. Make more time handyman and go for durable quality. for love and fun. Explore the neighborhood for a quick break. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)Today is a 6 -- Form a solid communications con- Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 5 -Give yourself time for feelings and logic nection where it was missing. Choose faith over doubt.You’re entering a more to mesh. Review the facts before taking action. Listen to all the considerations. domestic phase. Review objectives. You’re getting more sensitive. Rest up Projects at home offer fun and beauty and enjoy simple pleasures, like playto balance the recent workload. Get time and peace. creative.

 

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Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 5 -- A blissfully insightful moment interrupts mundane affairs. Add some creative spice to the package. Listen and watch. Pay attention. Keep any secrets. Balance your interests. Learn as quickly as possible. Friends help out.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 6 -- You see the direction to take. Get farther than expected.You may need to scrape change for gas money.You feel somewhat compulsive; improve organization. Provide excellent service. A crazy assignment is quite profitable.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 5 -- You work well with others, and your attention is in demand.Visualize solving a work-related problem. Stand firm. Follow a definite strategy.You land right side up. Take it slow. Stay in tonight.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 6 -- Remain open to new ideas as you provide well for family. Store provisions for the future, and use what you’ve kept. Order something that you can’t obtain locally. Consider an investment in your own education. Plan ahead.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 5 -- Make creative, inexpensive repairs. Report on your activities. It may take preparation. Go for the raise or status rise. Watch out for hidden agendas. Don’t assume the new way is better yet. Take careful action.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 6 -Pay back a debt. Postpone travel. Spend time with an attractive person, and let deadlines ride.You’ll have more help. It could be very nice. Don’t spend impulsively. Harvest your earlier efforts.

www.bsudaily.com


PAGE 6 | MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FEATURES FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

TUESDAY Buy this, not that. Check out which popular products participate in fair trade practices and which don’t.

WEDNESDAY Living with HIV hasn’t stopped this Ball State freshman from living her life. Paige Rawl shares her story.

THURSDAY Metal artists converge on campus for an invitational art exhibition of female metalsmiths.

DN PHOTOS JONATHAN MIKSANEK

LEFT Brian Kelley holds a pose during one of Florida Georgia Line’s songs. MIDDLE Tyler Hubbard, left, and Kelley motion to the audience at the conclusion of their song “Party People.” Florida Georgia Line played to a sold out crowd Friday in John R. Emens Auditorium. RIGHT Hubbard interacts with the crowd as he sings during the concert. The group has won the Academy of Country Music New Artist of the Year and Top New Vocal Duo or Group.

HERE’S TO THE GOOD TIMES Florida Georgia Line performs at Emens on first headline tour |

LINDSEY RILEY STAFF REPORTER lnriley@bsu.edu

Energy filled John R. Emens Auditorium as more than 3,200 people watched Dallas Smith, Colt Ford and Florida Georgia Line perform as part of the Here’s To The Good Times Tour. Muncie was the sixth stop on Florida Georgia Line’s first headlining tour. The night began with a performance from Dallas Smith, a newcomer in the country music genre. He performed a few original songs, including his new single “Tipping Point,” which was just released on iTunes. “‘Tipping Point’ is a song that was brought to me by my producer,” he said. “When I first heard the demo, I was freaked out by it because it’s a little outside of the box from what I normally do. It was a challenge for me. I wasn’t really sure about the song, but once we recorded the music and were ready to do the vocals, I was able to figure out my

own way of doing it.” Smith said he liked playing at Ball State. He had compliments for Emens as a venue and said the performance from the stage sounded great. He also said he hoped that it sounded great in the audience, as well. Second on the stage was Colt Ford. His set included his latest single “Drivin’ Around Song.” During his performance, Ford paid tribute to the American troops overseas and to country music legend George Jones, who performed at Emens in March before he died in April. Ford wasn’t available for an interview before or at the event, but he took to Twitter to express his excitement over his performance. “Good God O’Mighty it’s Crazy at Ball State,” he tweeted. “What a night in Indiana y’all were ROCKING can’t wait to come back.” When Florida Georgia Line took to the stage, Emens exploded with screams and cheers. The duo opened their set with “It’z Just What We Do” and lots of smoke and lights. After a set including its hit songs, hip-hop and pop covers and a dance party with Colt Ford,

the band ended the night with its first No. 1 single, “Cruise.” For Anne Haben, a Ball State alumna, it was hard to pick her favorite part Florida Georgia Line’s performance. “I didn’t really ONLINE care about the two openers,” she said. “I mean I knew who they were and some of their songs, but the night really To see more kicked off when photos go to bit.ly/GWsKEZ Florida Georgia Line got on stage.” One of Haben’s friends camped out for the tickets. She said the event was worth it and returning to campus for Homecoming. “A top moment for me was probably when [Florida Georgia Line] sang ‘Tell Me How You Like It,’” Haben said. “It’s mine and my friend’s favorite song of theirs, and we got a little crazy.” Ball State graduate Mo Smith also returned to campus for the event. She described the concert as an experience.

“I’ve seen around 150 shows — from clubs to stadiums — and this had the energy a stadium show on the Emens stage,” she said. “It was cool to see everyone in the crowd singing along. I even saw some of the older ladies that work for Emens singing and dancing, which was entertaining by itself. It was proof that country music fans come in all shapes, sizes and kinds.” The only major problem of the night happened during Florida Georgia Line’s performance when the duo invited members of the audience to come to the pit, resulting in a stage rush. After a few songs, people were told to return to their seats or the show would be over. Kristi Chambers, Emens’ marketing assistant, said they were able to identify who bought pit tickets by pink wristbands, a last minute decision that she was grateful for. “Our focus as an auditorium is to provide great entertainment while maintaining safety at all times,” Chambers said. “Though we know everyone would love to have pit seats for the concert, the fire code requires us to maintain only 100 people whom purchased those seats in the

| RHYTHMIC CIRCUS’ ‘FEET DON’T FAIL ME NOW’ LEFT Rhythmic Circus performs “Feet Don’t Fail Me Now” on Saturday at John R. Emens Auditorium. Rhythmic Circus will tour Broadway in November. RIGHT Galen Higgins dances during the Rhythmic Circus performance of “Feet Don’t Fail Me Now” Eleven musicians and dancers make up the main cast of the show that has won multiple awards nationwide.

DN PHOTOS TAYLOR IRBY

pit area. Therefore, we want to thank everyone for working with us when Florida Georgia Line asked for a stage rush so that everyone could have a great and safe concert experience.” While safety played a part in this situation, Chamber said the jumping and pushing toward the stage could potentially cause damage to the auditorium. “What many people may not know is that below the pit area is roughly a two story hollow drop containing the hydraulics system that operates the platform’s rise and fall,” she said. “The pit is completely safe and sturdy, and we want to keep it that way.” The Here’s To The Good Times Tour will continue to travel across the country until the middle of December. For more information on the band, the tour and upcoming performances, visit floridageorgialine.com or connect with the band on Twitter at @flagaline. Colt Ford will return to Indiana very soon. He has a performance scheduled at the 8 Seconds Saloon in Indianapolis on Oct. 25. Information on this event is available at 8secondssaloon.com.

DN 10-14-13  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News for Oct. 14, 2013.

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