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DN TUESDAY, OCT. 1, 2013

SHUTDOWN After a year, budget indecision leads to a federal government

THE DAILY NEWS BSUDAILY.COM

MCT PHOTO

Congress and the White House has yet to come to a decision after negotiations over next year’s budget before the deadline. This caused a government shutdown that will shutter national parks, museums and monuments, and furlough hundreds of thousands of employees. The last federal government shutdown was 17 years ago under President Bill Clinton.

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — From New York’s Liberty Island to Alaska’s Denali National Park, the U.S. government closed its doors as a bitter budget fight idled hundreds of thousands of federal workers and halted all but the most critical government services for the first time in nearly two decades. A midnight deadline to avert a shutdown passed amid Congressional bickering, casting in doubt Americans’ ability to get government services ranging from federally-backed home loans to supplemental food assistance for children and pregnant women. For many employees of the federal government, today’s shutdown meant no more paychecks as they were forced onto unpaid furloughs. For those still working, it meant delays in getting paid. Park Ranger and father-tobe Darquez Smith said he already lives paycheck to paycheck while putting himself through college. “I’ve got a lot on my plate right now — tuition, my daughter, bills,” said Smith, 23, a ranger at Dayton Aviation Heritage National His-

torical Park in Ohio. “I’m just confused and waiting just like everyone else.” The impact of the shutdown was mixed — immediate and far-reaching for some, annoying but minimal for others. In Colorado, where flooding killed eight people earlier this month, emergency funds to help rebuild homes and businesses continued to flow — but federal worker furloughs were expected to slow it down.

CITY EXPECTS TO SEE MINOR LOCAL IMPACT

SHUTDOWN CONSEQUENCES •A  ll park services will close. Campers have 48 hours to leave their sites.

Muncie official says construction, positions should not be affected EMMA KATE FITTES NEWS EDITOR | news@bsudailynews.com

•T  he Board of Veterans Appeals will stop issuing rulings, meaning decisions about some disability claims by veterans will wait even longer than usual. •N  ew patients won’t be accepted into clinical research at the National Institutes of Health, including 255 trials for cancer patients; care will continue for current patients.

The effects of the federal government shutdown will have minimal effects on the city of Muncie, said an official from the city controller’s office. The government shutdown at 12:01 a.m. Tuesday after the Senate was unable to pass the two amendments that the House made to the budget Saturday. Audrey Jones, Muncie city controller, said only one department runs completely from federal funds, the Community Development Department. She said the department will still receive their drawdowns, which have already been planned for, but will not be able to speak with anyone on issues they have. According to its website, the

•M  ost routine food inspections by the Food and Drug Administration will be suspended. •T  he government won’t be able to do new car safety testing and ratings or handle automobile recall information. For more, see PAGE 3

See FEDERAL, page 3

SOURCE: The Associated Press

Black 64/55 MAPS AND GEOGRAPHY Road names

INDIANA

RSITY

OHIO 69

Muncie

70

ILLINOIS

McKinley Ave. 31

465

442

Muncie Natural Formations

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Attendees the student Lsection A ND MAduring R KS the football game against the University of Toledo on Saturday. The game had the highest attendance since 2008, with 18,329 people. 32 pack 332

Single callouts

Cities

CALLOUTS here and here

Athletic director has high hopes for CALLOUTS team’s here and here last 3 home games DAKOTA CRAWFORD CHIEF REPORTER | @DakotaCrawford_ MILES

clear that the numbers are nothing of the sort. While attendance 71 against Army dipped to 15,106 sville earlier this month, 18,329 people poured into Scheumann Stadium KENTUCKY to see Ball State beat the University of Toledo. Attendance for Saturday’s game was the highest of any home FEVER CHART game since Ball State’s undefeatWhen evaluating a crowd ofPIE CHART In millions of U.S. dollars 2008 campaign. 16,327 that attended the BallFirst:ed40% Fifth: 3% Scholl said attendance is graduState football team’s season $8 opener, athletic director Bill ally improving. Fourth: 12% “I’ve been using the word ‘moScholl was hesitant to call it any6 thing more than an “opening day mentum,’” Scholl said. “I think there’s a lot of momentum gatherphenomenon.” Third: 4 are realizTwo home games later, it’s ing, and I think our fans 20% 0

A columnist talks about being misdiagnosed, outcomes don’t look as good as they did before SEE PAGE 5

Family weekend crowd largest since ‘08 Places

innati

See LOCAL, page 3

NO HONEST PREPARATION FOR CANCER

little more in-depth than the main headline

69

main function of the Community Development Department is to administer grants from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to help “develop and revitalize viable urban communities.” Grants the department plans to receive are a Community Development Block Grant, Home Investment Partnership Program, Neighborhood Stabilization Program and Community Development Block Grant-Recovery Act. Other departments also receive some federal funding, including the Muncie Fire Department, Muncie Police Department, Street Department, Prairie Creek and General Fund. Jones said, no positions will be cut as a result of the shutdown and no construction will stop. Even though the impact tangibly is going to be minimal, Sen. Joe Donnelly said the shutdown leaves room for people to doubt their elected representatives.

30

TOP 10 KINGS, QUEENS TAKE THE SHOW

ATTENDANCE AT FAMILY WEEKEND FOOTBALL GAMES

ing how much fun it is to come out and watch the football team.” With three home games, this year’s average attendance is 16,587. In last season’s Family Weekend game against South Florida, 16,397 fans filed into to the stadium — 3,657 more than the 2012 average. After Scheumann Stadium was renovated to include 22,500 seats in 2007, it has been filled completely five times. Once in 2003, 2004 and 2006 and twice in 2008.

In thousands 25

2008: 20,948 2013: 18,329

20 15

A total of 48 candidate pairs walked the runway for the Homecoming Fashion Show THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

10 5

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

SEE PAGE 6

SOURCE: ballstatesports.com DN GRAPHIC

See ATTENDANCE, page 4

2

MUNCIE, Emphasized INDIANA time period

OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. 2012

Second: 25%

THE UNIVERSITY DIDN’T CONTACT US desk: 285-8245 SHUT DOWN, AS WELL. News Sports desk: 285-8245 DN GRAPHIC FIRST LASTNAME BUMMER. GO TO CLASS. Features desk: 285-8245

FEB. MARCH APRIL 2013

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter. 1. CLOUDY

2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

5. SUNNY

FORECAST

TODAY  Mostly sunny  High: 79 Low: 58 3. PARTLY CLOUDY

Sunny skies will stick around for Wednesday and Thursday. A rainy, stormy pattern will take over afterward. - Michael Behrens, WCRD Weather 4. MOSTLY SUNNY

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21. SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS

VOL. 93, ISSUE 25

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

5 THINGS TO KNOW

1.

BP ACCUSED OF LYING TO U.S. GOVERNMENT DURING GULF OIL SPILL

TODAY 2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

3. PARTLY CLOUDY

THE FORECAST POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

WEDNESDAY Mostly sunny High: 81 Low: 59 4. MOSTLY SUNNY

5. SUNNY

3. SHOPKEEPERS SUSPECT KENYAN TROOPS NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Jewelry cases smashed. Mobile phones ripped from displays. Cash registers emptied. Alcohol stocks plundered. For the second time in two months, poorly paid Kenyan security forces that moved in to control an emergency are being accused of robbing the property they were supposed to protect. First, the troops were accused of looting during a huge fire in August at Nairobi’s main airport.

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — BP lied to the U.S. government and withheld information about the amount of oil spilling into the Gulf of Mexico after its well blew out in 2010, attorneys told a judge Monday. But lawyers for the London-based oil giant denied those accusations and said there was no way to prepare for such a blowout a mile below the sea floor. Second-guessing the company’s efforts to cap the well was “Monday morning quarterbacking at its worst,” BP attorney Mike Brock said during opening statements of the second phase of a trial over the spill. This part focuses on BP’s response to the disaster and is designed help U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier determine much oil spewed into the Gulf. The government’s estimate is some 70 million gallons more than what BP said spilled. Establishing how much oil leaked into the Gulf during BP’s struggle to cap the well will help figure out the penalties the oil company must pay. Billions of dollars are at stake.

Now, shop owners at Westgate Mall are returning to their stores after last week’s devastating terrorist attack to find displays ransacked and valuables stolen. One witness told The Associated Press that he saw a Kenyan soldier take cigarettes out of a dead man’s pocket. Shopkeepers spent Monday carting merchandise and other valuables out of their stores and restaurants to prevent any more thefts.

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MCT PHOTO

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

SATURDAY Scattered t-storms High: 80 Low: 62

5. SUNNY

ite-led government has announced new security measures, conducted counter-insurgency sweeps of areas believed to hold insurgent hideouts, and sponsored political reconciliation talks, but has not significantly slowed the pace of the bombing campaign. No group immediately claimed responsibility for the bombings, but they bore the hallmarks of al-Qaida’s local branch in Iraq, known as the Islamic State of Iraq.

2. ISRAELI LEADER URGES TO KEEP SANCTIONS

5. U.N. DEMANDING AID ACCESS IN SYRIA

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite soothing assurances from Iran’s new leaders, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu implored President Barack Obama on Monday to keep punishing sanctions in place against Tehran — and even tighten them if the Islamic republic advances its nuclear programs while negotiating with the U.S. Netanyahu nevertheless signaled he would not block Obama’s efforts to seek a diplomatic resolution to the nuclear

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The president of the U.N. Security Council said many members are pressing to follow up on last week’s resolution to eliminate Syria’s chemical weapons with a demand that President Bashar al-Assad’s government allow immediate access to the country for desperately needed humanitarian aid. Australian Ambassador and council president Gary Quinlan said Monday the draft statement calls for deliver-

impasse, even as he expressed skepticism about the Iranian government. “If diplomacy is to work, those pressures must be kept in place,” Netanyahu said of the sanctions during an Oval Office meeting with Obama. The two men met three days after Obama’s historic phone call with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, which marked the first direct conversation between a U.S. and Iranian leader in more than three decades.

FRIDAY Scattered t-storms High: 81 Low: 62

5. SUNNY

4. BOMB WAVE ACROSS BAGHDAD KILLS 55 BAGHDAD (AP) — A new wave of bombs tore through Baghdad on Monday, officials said, killing at least 55 people. Most of the blasts were car bombs detonated in Shiite neighborhoods, the latest of a series of well-coordinated attacks blamed on hard-line Sunni insurgents determined to rekindle large-scale sectarian conflict. Multiple coordinated bombing strikes have hit Baghdad repeatedly over the last five months. The Shi-

THURSDAY Scattered t-storms High: 80 Low: 63

ing access in “the most effective ways, including across conflict lines and, where appropriate, across borders from neighboring countries ...” if necessary to bypass meddling from Assad’s regime in Damascus. Council members are striving to adopt the statement by Wednesday. Quinlan said he sees “strong unanimity” to quickly adopt a non-binding statement rather than spend weeks trying to pass an enforceable resolution.

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Steven Williams

NEWS EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes ASST. NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz ASST. FEATURES EDITOR Jeremy Ervin

SPORTS EDITOR Matt McKinney ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

72 HRS EDITOR Ryan Howe FORUM EDITOR Devan Filchak

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Corey Ohlenkamp ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Jonathan Miksanek

DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITORS Daniel Brount Marisa Hendrickson

Updated 24/7 Crossword

Sudoku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Michael Mepham

Level: Mild

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.

ACROSS 1 2012 BEN AFFLECK POLITICAL THRILLER 5 ORGANIZES BY DATE, SAY 10 IS ABLE TO 13 FORMER DEFENSE SECRETARY PANETTA 14 CAME INTO PLAY 15 “MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE” THEME COMPOSER SCHIFRIN 16 NOVELIST TYLER 17 MOST POPULOUS CITY IN SOUTH DAKOTA 19 SECOND-IN-COMMAND IN THE KITCHEN 21 DEMEAN 22 BABY GOAT 23 LEGGED IT 24 MERCEDES RIVAL 26 BUS. GET-TOGETHER 27 SHARP RIDGE 29 ADMAN’S CONNECTION 31 DIGITAL CAMERA BATTERY, OFTEN 32 LEGAL THING 34 HOOPS GP.

35 SUPERFICIALLY CULTURED 36 MICHIGAN OR ONTARIO CITY ON THE SAME BORDER RIVER 40 UNIT OF COTTON 41 CARRY A BALANCE 42 YEATS’ LAND: ABBR. 43 LAND PARCEL 44 CONTINENTAL BORDER RANGE 46 LAST SUPPER QUERY 50 UNBARRED, TO A BARD 51 FALL MO. 52 MARLINS’ DIV. 54 ISP OPTION 55 INDIAN DRESSES 57 CANAL PASSAGE CONNECTING LAKE SUPERIOR AND THE LOWER GREAT LAKES 59 “W IS FOR WASTED” MYSTERY AUTHOR 62 MARGIN JOTTING 63 GYMNAST KORBUT 64 PART OF BYOB 65 PRICE 66 LOW IN THE LEA 67 BETSY ROSS, FAMOUSLY

68 LODGE GROUP DOWN 1 “NORTH TO THE FUTURE” STATE 2 PIERRE-AUGUSTE OF IMPRESSIONISM 3 TAKE IT ALL OFF 4 SMALL BILLS 5 BARACK’S YOUNGER DAUGHTER 6 “MURDER ON THE __ EXPRESS” 7 SKI RACK SITE 8 LONE STAR STATE SCH. 9 GENDER 10 RISTORANTE SQUID 11 “GOOD HANDS” COMPANY 12 BOUQUET OF FLOWERS 15 CHEM CLASS REQUIREMENT 18 BABY DEER 20 FISHING BASKET 24 NEUWIRTH OF “CHEERS” 25 HOME OF BASEBALL’S MARLINS 28 “YOU’RE RIGHT”

30 VERY BIG MAKER OF VERY LITTLE CHIPS 33 MALL UNIT 35 “ILIAD” WAR GOD 36 HOME TO MILLIONS OF BRAZILIANS 37 HALF A SUPERHERO’S IDENTITY 38 SWITCH 39 ANIMATED MERMAID 40 OPEN, AS A BUD 44 KGB COUNTRY 45 TAKE A NAP 47 “NO WORRIES, MAN” 48 “SHAME, SHAME!” 49 DETAILED MAP WINDOWS 53 RECLUSE 56 FRANCHISED SUPERMARKET BRAND 57 PUT AWAY 58 ALMOST NEVER 60 SIT-UP TARGETS 61 OPPONENT

www.bsudaily.com

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

20 reports of bicycle theft filed with university police UPD chief of police encourage students to register property

|

PAIGE SOUTHERLAND STAFF REPORTER pesoutherlan@bsu.edu

MCT PHOTO

President Barack Obama delivers a statement on the budget, a possible U.S. government shutdown and foreign policy Friday at the White House in Washington D.C. The Affordable Care Act enrollment goes live today.

Enrollment for Affordable Care markets open Half of 50 million uninsured expected to receive coverage with new program

|

RAYMOND GARCIA STAFF REPORTER ragarcia@bsu.edu

Students will not see any changes in health services after the Affordable Care Act enrollment goes live today. Kent Bullis, Amelia T. Wood Health Center former medical director, said students don’t need to worry about seeing changes at the health center due to the federal insurance program. The Affordable Care Act enrollment will start regardless of the government shutdown. The act is, however, one of the main contingencies between the two parties keeping them from making a deal. According to The Associated Press, nearly half of the 50 million uninsured Americans are expected to get coverage through the program when it is sold in new markets or through an expanded version of Medicaid in states that accept it. Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, because of the program, most Americans will have a legal obligation to carry health insurance or they will face fines. While federally operated markets are expected to open at 8 a.m., polls from the AP reported that the American population is divided over act. A survey from the Kaiser Family Foundation showed 56 percent of Americans don’t want to cut funding to expand uninsured people’s coverage, and around threefourths of uninsured people didn’t know about the new insurance markets. In Indiana, there are more than 500,000 Hoosiers without health insurance, according to the AP. People can purchase from 34 health plans, which range from $100 a month for an individual to nearly $1,000 a month for a family of four. To help with the expected rush of buyers, Indiana has hired 150 employees, reported the AP. Phone systems have been tested to ensure it will handle a heavy flow of calls.

AFFORDABLE CARE ACT ENROLLMENT The Affordable Care Act enrollment will start regardless of the government shutdown. The act is one of the main contingencies between the two parties keeping them from making a deal. WHO

Nearly half of the 50 million uninsured Americans are expected to get coverage. WHEN

Enrollment begins today at 8 a.m., the program will go into effect Jan. 1, 2014. WHAT

Most Americans will have a legal obligation to carry health insurance, or they will face fines. SOURCE: The Associated Press

The website for online enrollment, healthcare.gov, open today and run through March 31, 2014. Coverage will start at the beginning of the year. The website helps visitors with questions involving age, employment and earnings to determine eligible plans. Lucinda Nord, vice president of public policy for United Way of Indiana, told the AP that the application looks exactly like it does online and the only difference is that people can submit it today. Many Ball State employees will see changes by 2015, when the 30-hour rule comes into effect. The rule requires Ball State to provide health insurance to employees working 30 hours or more a week. In addition to the health care for full-time employees, Ball State provides benefits for part-time faculty and contract faculty, said Marie Williams, Ball State associate vice president of Human Resources and Administrative Services. Williams said she believes that while the Affordable Care Act broadens the coverage Ball State pays for, the plan will save money in the long run.

IND. SUPREME COURT PASSES ON SUSPENDING JUDGE IMMEDIATELY

INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana Supreme Court has turned down a request to immediately suspend a Marion County judge facing misconduct allegations. The decision by court made public Monday means Superior Court Judge Kimberly Brown will remain on the bench while she defends herself against 45 counts of misconduct alleging her actions delayed the jail release of at least nine defendants. The Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualification sought the immediate suspension when it filed charges Aug. 26 that also accused Brown of not adequately staffing her court, neglecting her judicial duties and creating a hostile environment for attorneys, court staff and others. The Indianapolis Star reported the Supreme Court appointed a three-judge panel to review the allegations against Brown. Brown is a Democrat who has served on the bench since 2009. – THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Twenty on-campus bicycle theft reports have been filed this semester, said a University Police Department official. UPD encourages students to register their bicycles to help return the property if it is stolen. Each year, about 1.5 million bicycles are stolen, according to UPD’s website. Gene Burton, UPD chief of police, said bicycle theft is an issue that they take seriously. “A bicycle can be a primary mode of transportation for some

students and some bicycles can be quite expensive,” he said. Burton said this isn’t uncommon compared to previous years for this time in the semester. “We generally have more bicycle thefts in the fall and spring,” he said. The department has a bicycle registration program that allows students to be proactive. “[Registering your bike] accomplishes two things,” Burton said. “First, it gives police who might recover your bike a way to return your property back to you. It also helps establish proof of ownership of the bike. Lastly, we recommend bicycle owners to purchase a good lock and diligently use it.” Registering your bicycle with UPD can help even if you graduate or move. According to the UPD website, the bicycle regis-

tration information will stay on file and the Ball State police can provide ownership information. Additionally, if a bicycle is found with the registration sticker attached, any agency in the U.S. can contact UPD to identify the owner. Bicycle registration is available to any Ball State student, faculty or staff. To register, visit UPD from 8:30 a.m.-8 p.m. MondaySunday at 200 N. McKinley Ave. with the bicycle or receipt that has the color, brand, model and serial number. Students in the residence halls can register their bicycles with the front desk. “Keep a written record of your bike,” Burton said. “... Also record any distinguishing marks or additions to your bike. Take a photograph of your bike. Keep the receipt of the purchase of your bike.”

LOCAL: Students could pay higher taxes due to federal shutdown | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “Everyone knows Washington is broken, but too few people are talking about what that means for real people,” Donnelly said in a press release. “The economy suffers, people looking for work suffer and countless families, business owners and farmers simply seeking responsible behavior from the people they elected suffer. This is unacceptable, and we must do better.” Michael Hicks, a Ball State economics professor, said the shutdown may not immediately affect students. He said also, it probably won’t stop the processing of some federal Stafford loans because most of them have already been processed. “Ball State students are very affected by the debate because you all are about to be tax payers,” he said. “And future tax payers, in particular, are going to be affected by the debate.” He said there may not be any affect, even a temporary effect, on the U.S. economy depending on how long the shutdown lasts. “In the past, this has occurred numerous times either in last minute negotiations or government shutdown,” Hicks said. “We will go back to normal, whatever the new normal is, pretty quickly.” Jason Pickell, president of Ball State’s University Democrats, said he is worried about the shutdown, but

doesn’t think many people are. “Honestly, I haven’t heard anyone really talk about it,” he said. “I feel like most students are indifferent to it, not to their own blame, but just because it doesn’t necessarily interest a lot of them. At least in my organization, we are concerned about it just because 700,000 government employees will be let go for a short amount of time, so that will affect the unemployment rate for a short amount of time.” Pickell said they haven’t really been discussing the shutdown with students. “We have been focusing more on different issues right now that are concerning more students, to appeal to more students, because the government shutdown probably isn’t very interesting to most students at Ball State,” he said. No one from Ball State’s College Republicans was available for contact Monday. Hicks said finding a solution is going to be a long process for the U.S. “This debate is not going to go away because we are maybe $15 [trillion], $16 [trillion], $17 trillion in debt, which is above the value of everything made in America in a given year,” he said. “So the amount of spending the government undertakes each year is more than it’s bringing in, so each year that debt is rising. We’re just going to have to reconcile ourselves to a long period of time where there is less spending and more tax dollars.”

FEDERAL: Mail delivery, Medicare benefits, Social Security to be unaffected due to recent bill

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 National Guard soldiers rebuilding washed-out roads would apparently be paid on time — along with the rest of the country’s active-duty personnel — under a bill passed hours before the shutdown. Existing Social Security and Medicare benefits, veterans’ services and mail delivery also were unaffected. Other agencies were harder hit — nearly 3,000 Federal Aviation Administration safety inspectors were furloughed along with most of the National Transportation Safety Board’s employees, including accident investigators who respond to air crashes, train collisions, pipeline explosions and other accidents. Almost all of NASA shut down, except for Mission Control in Houston, and national parks closed along with the Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo. Even the zoo’s popular panda cam went dark, shut off for the first time since a cub was born there Aug. 23. As the shutdown loomed Monday, visitors to popular parks made their frustration with elected officials clear. “There is no good thing going to come out of it,” said Chris Fahl, a tourist from Roanoke, Ind., visiting the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park in Hodgenville, Ky. “Taxpayers are just going to be more overburdened.” Emily Enfinger, visiting the Statue of Liberty, said politicians need to find a way to work together. “They should be willing to compromise, both sides, and it discourages me that they don’t seem to be able to do that,” she said. “They’re not doing their job as far as I’m concerned.” Joe Wentz, a retired federal employee from Lebanon, Va., visiting San Francisco with his wife, bought tickets to visit Alcatraz on Thursday — if it’s open. Wentz said he’s frustrated that some

CONSEQUENCES FROM THE SHUTDOWN •A  bout half the Defense Department’s civilian employees will be furloughed. •T  he Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children could shut down. It provides supplemental food, health care referrals and nutrition education for pregnant women, mothers and their children. •A  three-week shutdown would slow the economy’s annual growth rate in the October-December quarter by up to 0.9 of a percentage point, estimated Goldman Sachs. •E  conomic data will be interrupted as the Bureau of Labor Statistics ceases almost all operations. This will leave the stock market without some of the benchmark economic indicators that drive the market up or down. •S  ome passport services located in federal buildings might be disrupted. • The Federal Housing Administration, which insures about 15 percent of new loans for home purchases, will approve fewer loans for its client base — borrowers with low to moderate income — because of reduced staff. •P  ossible delays in processing new disability applications. SOURCE: The Associated Press

politicians are using the budget to push changes in the Affordable Care Act. “We’ve been disgusted a long time that they’re not working together,” he said. The shutdown was strangely captivating to Marlena Knight, an Australian native visiting Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia. She was confounded that the impasse focused on the nation’s health care system — an indispensable service in her home country. “We can’t imagine not having a national health system,” she said. “I just can’t believe that this country can shut down over something like a national health system. Totally bizarre, as an Australian, but fascinating.”

HOW TO REGISTER YOUR BIKE WITH UPD IF YOU DON’T HAVE A RECEIPT:

• Write down the serial number, found usually on the seat mast, the lower bar, the hanger by the sprocket or one of the rear forks or stay bars • Also record the brand, model and color • Keep this for your records, along with any distinguishing marks FOR OFF-CAMPUS STUDENTS, FACULTY OR STAFF:

• Visit UPD from 8:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Sunday at 200 N. McKinley Ave. • Bring the bicycle or the receipt FOR STUDENTS IN RESIDENCE HALLS:

• Register at your front desk

SOURCE: cms.bsu.edu

HISTORY OF GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWNS

Today isn’t the first time the U.S. government has shutdown. Since the signing of the Constitution, separation of powers has led to arguments of budget cuts and spending. Often, these are smoothed over with last minute budget deals and stopgap measures. Here is a closer look at the history of government shutdowns and what brought us to today. 1789 When the U.S. Constitution was signed, it gave Congress control of spending measures as a way to ensure equal distribution of power. This means the government cannot create a budget or spend money without passage from Congress and a presidential signature. 1884 What is now called the Anti-Deficiency Act was originally signed into law. The ADA made it a punishable offense for the executive branch to use credit for purchases or funding, which is how they used to get around a congressionally accepted budget. 1900s Following the implementation of the ADA, Congress routinely failed to pass budget appropriations. This would lead to “continuing resolutions,” which are short-term funding approvals that allow agencies to continue to function. April 1980 Funding for the Federal Trade Commission ran out as Congress argued over limiting its authority. The FTC canceled any court dates and 1,600 workers were sent home, making it the first agency to close over a budget argument. The agency reopened the next day, and the one-day closure cost $700,000. October 1980 President Jimmy Carter ordered the government to prepare for what would have been the first government shutdown, which lasted for less than a day. While several federal agencies’s funding expired, no workers had to leave. Nov. 20 to Nov. 23, 1981 Under President Ronald Reagan, the federal government ran for a weekend without funding. Congress approved emergency spending measures to keep the government running, but Reagan used his power of veto to stop the budget bill. Later in the day, Congress approved an extension to end the shutdown in its first few hours. The estimated cost of the shutdown was $80 million. Nov. 14 to Nov. 19, 1995 Republicans demanded that President Bill Clinton agree to their version of the budget, which included several spending cuts. Clinton agreed to some of the Republican’s cuts although they could not agree on the timing. This shutdown lasted for five days, ending with a continuing resolution bill to keep the government running and an agreement to balance the budget again in seven years. Dec. 16, 1995 to January 6, 1996 Under Clinton, the government saw the longest shutdown in history. Republican Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich threatened to block an increase in the federal debt ceiling if the cuts were not made. Clinton continued to refuse to make cuts to nondefense spending focusing on Medicare and Medicaid. If the debt ceiling was not raised, it would have meant the government would default on its loans, leading to much higher rates in the future. For 21 days, Clinton and Congress argued over the budget, eventually ending in an agreement to a seven-year budget plan that included spending cuts and tax increases. March 28, 2013 Congress passed a stopgap bill to continue operating under previous budgets instead of passing the 12 appropriation bills that must be approved to continue funding federal agencies. Congress rarely passes these bills on deadline, as they have passed four since 1977 without using some type of a stopgap measure. Today The deadline set in the March continuing resolution was crossed at 12:01 a.m. Congress and President Barack Obama have continued to argue over several portions of the spending bill, made more complicated due to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act that takes place today as well. As with the Clinton-era shutdown, this one comes less than a month before a vote to raise the federal debt ceiling Oct. 17. SOURCES: The Washington Post, The Associated Press, United States Office of Management and Budget, bancroft.berkeley.edu


PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

THURSDAY The volleyball team attempts to extend its winning streak to 12 wins when they travel into Toledo at 7 p.m.

FRIDAY The men’s tennis team will stay in Muncie this weekend for their only home tournament at the Ball State Invitational.

A 3-0 record is in sight for the soccer team as they take on Kent State in the first home MAC match of the season.

Team records close for Wenning Quarterback poised to eclipse mark for career passing yards MAT MIKESELL CHIEF REPORTER | @MatMikesell

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Senior quarterback Keith Wenning prepares to pass the ball downfield Saturday at the game against the University of Toledo. Wenning is close to breaking the career record for passing yards, which is held by Nate Davis with 9,233 yards.

Old business for Shondell Head coach cares more about team than personal wins POLASKI ASST. SPORTS EDITOR | DAVID @DavidPolaski Sometimes, a blank expression means more than carefully chosen words. When Ball State women’s volleyball head coach Steve Shondell was alerted to the fact that the win over Central Michigan University was the team’s 11th in a row — a collegiate personal record for him — he didn’t bat an eye. Instead, he sat staring. There was no nod of the head, no laugh, no teasing joke that friends and players have been accustomed to hearing from him. He didn’t even crack a smile. This is because he said he doesn’t care about personal accolades, and the streak is dwarfed by his previous accomplishments. Ball State’s win streak may be impressive to some, but to Shondell, he said it’s nothing more than business as usual. “After you’ve won 135 matches in a row, and you’ve had winning streaks of 99 and 135, getting to 11 isn’t that high,” Shondell said. “It’s something you come to expect.” As a former high school volleyball coach at Burris Laboratory School, Shondell saw success be-

DN FILE PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

Senior outside hitter Kylee Baker recovers the ball during the game Sept. 4 against IPFW. Ball State is now on an 11-game winning streak.

fore he came to Ball State. For 34 seasons, his Burris teams won 21 state championships and four national championships, with more than 1,100 wins and less than 100 losses. An 11-match win streak doesn’t mean a whole lot when stacked up against his view of success from the time spent at Burris.

Even though collegiate volleyball is played at a higher level than high school, Shondell said he doesn’t separate the two careers. Success is the same for him, no matter which level the team he’s coaching is competing on. “When you win about 94 percent of your matches, you don’t expect anything but suc-

cess,” Shondell said. “Personally, it’s nothing to get over excited about.” The wins don’t faze Ball State’s fourth-year coach not only because he’s seen it before, but because he said there are more important things on him mind. Personal victories are usually hollow unless the final result ends with a championship. Ball State could win every match for the rest of the regular season, but if the team was eliminated at the start of the MAC Tournament, Shondell said he wouldn’t be happy. His players have described him as passionate and undaunted in his pursuit to get his team to win. After being around Shondell for four seasons, senior outside hitter Kylee Baker said she knows her head coach doesn’t get caught up in personal records, but rather wants to see overall achievement. He’s certainly had plenty of the former to fall back on. “For [Shondell], it’s not about the statistics or a winning streak,” Baker said. “That’s his atmosphere; his main focus is on the bigger outcomes for the season.” After all the career accomplishments, it’s in character for him to shrug off a simple double-digit winning streak. Instead he grinned, thinking back to when he coached at Burris before speaking. “Let me know once we get close to 100.”

Fleener plays bigger role in offense Colts second-year tight end fills in for injured teammate | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Colts’ big tight end is catching passes and stretching defenses. He’s helping Indy’s ground game and providing Andrew Luck with a consistent outlet receiver. He’s playing with confidence, becoming productive and emerging as the kind of playmaker the Colts envisioned when they selected him in the 2012 draft. “In practices, he’s fast, he’s not thinking, you can tell when a guy’s thinking and you don’t see that,” head coach Chuck Pagano said Monday. “You see him out there playing fast, a big, tall, fast guy that’s athletic and can make plays. He had a

great day [Sunday]. Any time you can have an outing like he had and make plays, he’s going to build off that and it’s all confidence to me.” When starting tight end Dwayne Allen went down with a season-ending hip injury in the season opener, Fleener knew he would have a bigger role in the offense, and he has responded. On Sunday at Jacksonville, Luck threw seven passes to Fleener. He caught five, matching Reggie Wayne’s total, for 77 yards and a touchdown. And over the last three weeks, the 6-foot-6, 251-pound Illinois native has caught 11 of 15 balls thrown in his direction. What’s different? “I would say that I have to pick up some slack as far as some plays where Dwayne would have been in,” Fleener said. “But ultimately, our game plan I think has stayed

MCT PHOTO

Colts tight end Coby Fleener waits on the sidelines during preseason action against the Buffalo Bills on Aug. 11 in Indianapolis. Fleener is beginning to show growth as a player as the Colt’s season progresses.

pretty true to what it would have been with Dwayne or without him.” As a rookie, Fleener struggled to hold onto the football. His final numbers — 26 catches for 281 yards — were sec-

ond among rookie tight ends behind Allen (45, 521). This year, in four games, Fleener already has 12 catches for 166 yards and has matched his touchdown total from last season, two.

As soon as Saturday, Keith Wenning could find himself atop another Ball State record. After throwing for 335 passing yards in the 31-24 win against Toledo, Wenning needs 330 yards to break the school’s record for most career passing yards. Nate Davis, who played from 2006-08, holds the current record. Since Wenning took over the starting quarterback position in his freshman season, he’s gained the respect of opposing coaches in the country and the Mid-American Conference. “He’s a really good football player,” Toledo head coach Matt Campbell said at a press conference. “I thought we had a really good game plan for him. You have to disguise things with him or he’ll pick you apart. He’s got tremendous ability.” His abilities have allowed Ball State to become one of the best passing offenses in the country so far this season. Wenning’s 1,650 passing yards this season is second best in the Football Bowl Subdivi-

sion. He trails Oregon State’s Sean Mannion, who has 2,018 passing yards. Ball State also is the only team in FBS to score touchdowns on its first drive in all five games this season. East Carolina University has scored touchdowns on the opening drive in all four of its games, while Baylor University has done the same in its three games thus far. “That’s been a trend,” Ball State head coach Pete Lembo said. “I think that will be hard to continue. But it’s been a trend for us in the beginning of the season.” The trend to the 2013 season for Ball State has been what the offense has been able to do. Wenning has thrown for more than 300 yards in all five games this season. He and Mannion are the only FBS quarterbacks to accomplish that. The 200 points scored by Ball State this season is second most for the first five games in school history, trailing the 2008 team that scored 207 points. Wenning has said consistently in the past that he doesn’t focus on the records and statistics he puts up each year — his primary focus is the next opponent and winning football games. But whether he’s watching for it, Wenning is soon to be on top of the quarterback record book at Ball State.

ATTENDANCE: Successful season brings more fans | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

BY THE NUMBERS

The most recent was the final home game of 2008 when 23,861 fans watched Ball State defeat Western Michigan University to capture its regular season MidAmerican Conference Championship. He said this season’s fan base hasn’t reached its peak yet though, he hopes to see the growth continue. “There will be ups and downs,” Scholl said. “I don’t think we’re out of the woods, and I don’t think we’re going to sell out every week. But between our community fans and the student fans, I hope people are realizing this is a pretty good team.” The team has won 10 of its last 11 regular-season games dating back to last season. With 200 points through its first five games of the season, Ball State is just seven shy of the mark set in 2008 — that team drew in crowds of more than 20,000 in four of its six home games.

18,329

Pacers still unsure of shooting guard as preseason nears

diana. Teammates Roy Hibbert and David West said Monday that Granger looked good during the sessions, and coach Frank Vogel said Granger was one of the dominant players both days. “He’s been awesome,” Hibbert said. “He’s been kicking the blue team’s [first team’s] butt. He’s been up and down, playing well in the post, hitting threes, making plays.” West said Granger doesn’t appear to be slowed in any way. “Danny looks good,” West said. “Very confident, strong. He’s got no hesitation. He’s been movin’ and groovin.’” Lance Stephenson stepped into Granger’s spot last season and performed well, creating a competition heading into training camp. Vogel wouldn’t commit to a starter, but said he expects both Granger and Stephenson to play starter minutes. Granger expects to play throughout the preseason, but he is focused on being ready for the regular-season opener Oct. 29 against Orlando.

against University of Toledo game, largest attendance since 2008 season

16,587

average attendance for the three home games

16,397

against University of South Florida attendance at 2012’s Family Weekend game Ball State is 3-0 in its home games this season, putting up its highest attendance in three-straight games since 2008 as well. Scholl said Saturday’s crowd was exciting in a number of ways, and he looks forward to seeing the large crowds continue in upcoming games. After Saturday’s road game, Ball State will return to Scheumann Stadium and MAC play on Oct. 12 for its Homecoming game against Kent State University.

GRANGER MAKING RETURN TO COURT | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana Pacers forward Danny Granger’s comeback is off to a good start. The 30-year-old former AllStar missed most of last season after having surgery on his left knee. Granger will not participate in back-to-back practices or practice three days in a row. He got through practices Saturday and Sunday, the first two days of training camp, then sat out Monday to be safe. “I feel fine,” Granger said. “I feel good, feeling healthy. Obviously, they’re being cautious with my knee. They don’t want to overdo it during training camp. This is probably the toughest part of the year. That’s why I have the time restrictions.” So far, he has looked like the scorer who averaged 18.1 points in eight years with In-


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

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You can never truly be prepared, despite having cancer diagnosis EVIE LICHTENWALTER

PROGNOSIS UNKNOWN

EVIE LICHTENWALTER IS A BALL STATE STUDENT TAKING AN ACADEMIC BREAK DUE TO HER CANCER DIAGNOSIS. SHE WRITES “PROGNOSIS UNKNOWN� FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO EVIE AT EMLICHTENWAL @BSU.EDU.

When I was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in July, I spent every waking moment reading everything I possibly could about a disease I had never let cross my mind before. Treatment options, survival rates, chances of recurrence. If you had a question about ovarian cancer, chances are I knew the answer — or I at least thought I did. Three weeks after my staging and debulking surgery, my surgeon’s office finally gave me a call to fill me in on my pathology report. This was the phone call I had been waiting for, a phone call that would help put a plan in motion. Generally, it doesn’t take three weeks to fill a patient in on their pathology, but after mine looked a little unusual, they decided to send it to the Mayo Clinic for confirmation. “See, you don’t have ovarian cancer,� the nurse said. “You actually have mesothelioma.� “Mesothelioma?� I thought. “Isn’t that from asbestos? Don’t 60-yearold men get that?� Before I had a chance to say anything, she went on to explain that there are types of mesothelioma that are not caused by asbestos, and considering my age, gender and lack of asbestos exposure, that’s probably not how I got. I remember hanging up the phone that afternoon feeling like my brain was entirely empty. Every little bit of information that I had shoved into my head in the last three weeks was useless.

Pages and pages of information on a disease I didn’t even have were of no use to me. When you’re sick, the Internet is a scary place. Even when you’re armed with a diagnosis and not just a list of seemingly random symptoms, it’s still a daunting experience. According to the National Cancer Institute, young adults between the ages of 15 and 35 are six times more likely to be diagnosed with cancer than individuals 14 and under. Despite being the highest diagnosed category, death rates for young adults are not changing. CBS News reported in January 2012 that despite medical advances, there are still less options for young adults. Matthew Zachary, cancer survivor and founder of Stupid Cancer, an organization geared toward young adults with cancer, said in the CBS report that a big issue with a proper diagnosis has a lot to do with available testing. “Young adults don’t get cancers that are easily screened,� Zachary said. “... It’s not going to the doctor and saying, ‘Screen me for Hodgkin’s [lymphoma],’ because there is no such test. By the time you realize what you have, at least symptomatically, it’s probably too late or Stage 4.� Researching mesothelioma is scary, and it’s even scarier when you’re told that regardless of what course of action you take, it’s hard to give out a solid prognosis.

Don’t forget your friend’s birthday! 6HQGDFODVVL¿HGELUWKGD\ZLVKLQ WKH'DLO\1HZV

ÂŤBthat  eing diagnosed with a disease gives you the possibility of a year and a half to live is paralyzing. Âť EVIE LICHTENWALTER, a Ball State student

Ovarian cancer, however, carries a 44 percent five-year survival rate, with the survival rate getting higher the earlier the disease is diagnosed. If the cancer is found before it spreads outside of the ovaries, the survival rate jumps to a staggering 92 percent. But 21-year-old women aren’t generally diagnosed with mesothelioma, so studying outcomes and statistics can do more harm then good. Mesothelioma doesn’t carry a positive outlook. The American Cancer Society reported in October 2012 that the average survival rate after initial diagnosis is between four and 18 months, and 5 to 10 percent of those diagnosed live five years or more. Being diagnosed with a disease that gives you the possibility of a year and a half to live is paralyzing. Knowing the statistics helps, but statistics are not the only factor to keep in mind. With cancer, there’s only so much worrying you can do before you just accept that some things are better off unread.

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MESOTHELIOMA

4-18 months is the average survival rate after a mesothelioma diagnosis.

5-10 percent of people diagnosed with mesothelioma live 5 years or more.

OVARIAN CANCER

92 percent

is the survival rate for people diagnosed before the cancer spreads.

44 percent

of people diagnosed with ovarian cancer live 5 years or more. SOURCES: National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

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BY THE NUMBERS

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Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 7 -- Let yourself be drawn outside your safety zone. The possibility for hurt feelings is high now. Don’t get stuck. Write down long-range goals today. Goodness comes your way. Act quickly to gain your objective. Balance is essential. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is an 8 -- It’s time to get started. There’s a temporary clash between love and money. Review your current budget. Note all the considerations. Passion grows now that the stress is reduced. Travel boosts your self-esteem. Follow your fascination.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 7 -- Have faith. Negotiate your way through minor adjustments. Temporary confusion could befuddle. Get family to help. Let another take the lead. Invest in your future without gambling. Respect your partner.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 7 -For the next two days, fulfill promises you’ve made. Chores need attention. New information threatens complacency. Communicate with teammates. Caring for others is your motivation. Minimize risks. Catch your dreams in writing. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 6 -- You’ll soon have time to pause and relax. Invest in success. Take a new angle. Keep a dream alive with simple actions. Avoid a controversy. It’s a good time to ask for money ... be creative with your budget.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)Today is a 9 -It’s easier to find family time.You’re extra brilliant today. A solution to an old problem is becoming obvious. Costs are high. Arguments about money inhibit love. Keep a secret. Recount your blessings.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 7 -Allow yourself to dream, but don’t buy treats, yet. Accept the support that’s offered. Stay close to home as much as you can the next few days. Passions get aroused. Make a delicious promise.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 6 -- Give loved ones more attention. They want your time, not money. An invitation says to dress up. Let another person take over, and defer to authority. Accept encouragement. Share your dreams ... the audience is receptive.

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Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 9 -Money’s rolling in over the next few days. Costs are higher than expected, too. Avoid reckless spending. Make sure others know their assignments. Feel the magnetism.Your greatest asset is your own determination.


PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FEATURES FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

WEDNESDAY Ever pass by the “smiley face” house in Muncie? Meet the resident who lives there and hear her story.

One man makes a business out of being a superhero by creating functional batmobile vehicles, grappling hooks and all.

THURSDAY Meet the bats — you heard right — of Cooper Science and the students and professor who take care of them.

Leaving a legacy

Ball State photo services coordinator remembered as a friend ANNA ORTIZ FEATURES REPORTER | features@bsudailynews.com

DN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION COREY BAUTERS AND JONATHAN MIKSANEK

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Jordan Huffer, a sophomore journalism major, speaks about her father, John Huffer, during the memorial service Monday at the Alumni Center. She talked during the service about how being surrounded by her father’s work brought her a sense of pride and that his legacy will be carried through the university and his images.

Everyone in one shape or form has seen the campus through John Huffer’s eyes. His photos stretch across field sidelines and embellish Ball State’s arenas and stadiums. The images he spent his life taking loom on highway billboards and scroll across the university website. They sit framed on university walls and are printed in glossy pamphlets. Huffer, Ball State photo services coordinator, died Thursday at IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital — the same hospital he was born in 54 years ago. Huffer was in the hospital after having a heart attack earlier in the week. He is survived by his wife and his two daughters, Ball State student Jordan Huffer, 25, and Emily Huffer, 22. John Huffer, a Ball State alumnus in photojournalism, worked for 30 years at Ball State and received many awards and recognition for his work. “His photos will be a big part of the university’s history,” Rich Maloney, Ball State baseball head coach, said. “But he was a fan, too. He will leave a legacy, not many people have been able to share the university’s history like he has. John has encompassed a 30-year part of history, from the old football stadium to a new face. He has seen the campus change, new coaches come in.” A winding line of people wove through the Alumni Center into a packed room where attendees lined the walls and filled the chairs for the memorial service Monday. Jo Ann Gora, university president; Tom Taylor, vice president of enrollment, marketing, and communications; Bill Scholl, director of intercollegiate athletics; and Jordan Huffer spoke at the service. “This is a great university because of people like John who do, every day, their best work,”

Gora said. “He truly made a difference in the lives of the people he worked with.” Friends reminisced, whether about his dangerous encounter with a tennis ball at a match where he “took one for the team” or being detained at the Canadian border because of his Hot Wheels cars collection. Don Rogers, Ball State image specialist, was by his side when the two men were detained for a drug search at the Canadian border. They had gone to Canada to collect rare Hot Wheels and had several bags full of tiny cars crammed in the back of the car. “The lady at the border said, ‘Do you expect me to believe two grown men drove from Indiana to get toy cars?’” Rogers said. “She slapped a big form on our wind shield, and we stopped next to the drug sniffing dog, armed officers and cars getting taken apart.” Rogers said he still has to face the fact John Huffer is gone. “You just expect him to be there,” Rogers said. “We knew he had health problems, but he always came back. We called him ‘The Energizer Bunny’ ... We never thought he wouldn’t come back.” During the memorial, the words “good friend,” “caring,” “dedicated” and “loving” constantly came up. Maloney said he was a “gentle giant,” a tireless worker and a passionate fan. “John is a wonderful human being,” Maloney said. “He is gracious and generous. He supported our program financially and through his work. Seeing John — it was a breath of fresh air.” The two would greet each other on the diamond at the baseball games. John Huffer would say, “Coach, I like your team. Go get ‘em,” each time. “That’s how I’ll always remember John,” Maloney said. On Saturday, Jordan Huffer walked among the crowds at Scheumann Stadium as Ball State played against the University of Toledo during Family Weekend. This was the first game she had been to without seeing her father snapping photos on the sidelines. “Usually, the first thing I do when shooting a game is think, ‘I have to find Dad to tell him I’m here,’” she said. “I loved

shooting with him, it was like we were colleagues.” She said she always wanted to be like her father, which led her to photography. John and Jordan Huffer were on the sidelines, camera in hand, for almost every type of sporting event on campus. When trying to get the same shot, the father and daughter would bump cameras and he would shoo her out of the way. Jordan Huffer said she and her dad will always share a special bond. During one of their first shoots together, they were both covering a volleyball game and using rapid shutter on their cameras to catch the action. “I noticed we were both clicking at the same time,” she said. “It’s weird, but I felt a very strong connection.” As a sophomore photojournalism major and a photographer for The Ball State Daily News, Jordan Huffer has followed her dad’s path. Before his surgery, she told her father he was her hero, that she loved him and how proud she was of him. As she followed him into the hospital hallway to the operating room, she kept saying, “I’ll see you in a few hours.” He replied, “I’ll see you soon.” Before the football game’s start Saturday, there was a small memorial service dedicated to John Huffer. His best photos flashed across the screens, one of which had a picture of Jordan Huffer. At the end, she listened to her dad’s voice as a video played of him working in his studio for a photo shoot, echoing his well-known line, “One more time.” “It was hard to hear his voice again,” she said. After the football game memorial, Jordan Huffer left early to get her bearings. She stopped to look at her dad’s athletic photos covering the outside of the stadium, and she said she knew as long as she is here, she is surrounded by his passion, his life’s work. “I’m looking at something he created,” she said. “I know I will always see it. I will see it at this university.” Editor’s note: Jordan Huffer is a chief photographer for The Ball State Daily News.

JOHN HUFFER

The alumnus was an award-winning Ball State photographer for 30 years.

GET TO KNOW JOHN HUFFER •G  raduated from Ball State in 1982 with a photojournalism degree. Shortly after, he became a photographer for the university

•W  orked for Ball State for 30 years •T  wice named national photographer of the year by the University Photographers Association of America and also won the Meritorious Service Award by Ball State • Was a shareholder to the Green Bay Packers •C  ollected Hot Wheels cars as a hobby •S  erved as an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Technology, where he taught a digital photography class. • F an of Macklemore • Famous quote: “Smile, just smile ... that’s all we want.” SOURCE: Jordan Huffer, obituary, memorial service speakers

Homecoming Fashion Show announces top 10 royalty Costumed couples represent student organizations, halls

TOP TEN KINGS CATHOLIC STUDENT UNION

Marcus Kelly

Ryan Noll

ALPHA KAPPA PSI

DEHORITY COMPLEX

Brandon Morgeson

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KOURTNEY COOPER CHIEF REPORTER kcooper2@bsu.edu

Miley Cyrus, Gatsby, Progressive’s Flo and Prince William look-alikes all strutted their stuff in the Homecoming Royalty Fashion Show on Monday night. A total of 48 Ball State organizations were represented, including greek organizations and residence halls. “I’m glad to see so many organizations, not just greek, involved in Homecoming,” Junior Public Relations major Annika Miller said. Miller attended to support Sigma Chi’s Tara Cahill and Chi Omega’s Megan Kiefer. Some candidates stuck to “Wizard of Oz” inspired costumes to match the “There’s No Place Like Homecoming” theme, such as Alpha Gamma Delta candidate Robyn Miley, who dressed as Dorothy. Seniors Jessica Feltz and Ryan Noll from Catholic Student Union put a spin on a classic. “We wanted to be out of the box, but to go with the theme,” Feltz said. Feltz and Noll dressed up as a cow and the Kansas tornado that transports Dorothy to the land of Oz. They won best dressed by the Homecoming Steering Committee. Noll, a visual communications major, made his tornado costume after collaborating with multiple people on ideas for building the structure. “The tornado took me four

NATIONAL RESIDENCE HALL HONORARY

Jordan Larson

PHI MU

SPECTRUM

KINGHORN HALL

ST.A.R.T.

Tyler Noragon Trevor Bly

Jamie Goebel

BLACK STUDENT ASSOCIATION

Sidney Staples

Ben Fredrickson

PHI GAMMA DELTA

BLACK STUDENT ASSOCIATION

STUDENT ATHLETE ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Sean Ratkus

TOP TEN QUEENS STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

Giang Tran DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Kellie Snyder, as Wonder Woman, and Adam Strahan, as Superman, from the Legal Studies Student Association run across the stage at the Royalty Fashion Show on Monday night at Pruis Hall. The fashion show ended with the announcement of the top 10 candidates.

acher came out swinging at exhours to build,” he said. Noll used a hula hoop for the husband Woods and the crowd top of the tornado, and twisted erupted in laughter. Freshman Jackee Stevens, a wire into a cage to surround his body. Noll then covered the criminal justice major, said the Robin Thicke and Cyrus pair, wire in colored tulle and toys. impersonated by Phi Feltz had not seen Gamma Delta’s Sean the tornado costume ONLINE Ratkus and Caitlyn until 10 minutes beSprong, were her fafore the show. vorite. “I was nervous, but I “It’s so recent and trusted Ryan’s genius,” everyone could reFeltz said. late,” Stevens said. Both Feltz and Noll “They were hilarious made top 10 for To view more Homecoming student photos from the in general.” “[The event went] king and queen and event go to will move on to the in- bit.ly/16SiyC9 a lot smoother than I thought it would,” said terview process. Some candidates deviated Nathan Hesher, Homecoming from the theme, including the Steering Committee royalty Knotts/Edwards Hall candi- chairman. “All the candidates dates, Ellyn Fritz and James were cooperative and excited.” New this year, there was a Long, who impersonated the man and woman in the “Ameri- short break halfway through can Gothic” painting, pitchfork the candidates modeling their costumes. The hosts took the included. Student Athlete Advisory time to test the Homecoming Committee’s Albert Jennings Steering Committee on their and Brooklyn Schumacher Toto impressions and their best dressed as Tiger Woods and Wicked Witch laugh. Hesher said there were 570 Elin Nordegren. They were voted crowd favorite after Schum- people who attended the event.

SPECTRUM

Natalie Roman

VOICES OF TRIUMPH GOSPEL CHOIR

Sanovia Garrett ST.A.R.T.

Jessica Sweney

LAMBDA CHI ALPHA

Danica Craig

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA

Robyn Miley

DEHORITY COMPLEX

Amy Yorko

Brandi Bennett

CATHOLIC STUDENT UNION

Jessica Feltz

Brooklyn Schumacher


DN 10-1-13  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News on Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013.

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