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DN WEDNESDAY, JAN. 29, 2014

Losing the edge in blocking

HJR-3 PASSES HOUSE

The men’s volleyball team looks to improve its once stellar net defense SEE PAGE 3

Same-sex unions won’t be part of bill if it comes to vote in 2016

THE DAILY NEWS

SEE PAGE 6

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

BUDGET ON THIN ICE Snowstorms, temperature worst in 35 years, uses most of state’s $33.8 million budget

RACHAEL BARRY STAFF REPORTER | rebarry@bsu.edu

T

he harsh winter in Indiana has affected more than campus — decreasing blood donations, nearly wiping out the state’s winter funding and increasing hospital visits. And the season isn’t over yet. David Call, a Ball State associate

WINTER SEASON

professor of geography and weather expert, said the last time the state experienced weather like this was in 1979. Although temperatures are expected to rise this week, Call said this month will be colder than 90 percent of Indianapolis’ recorded winters.

4.3 million

miles logged by Indiana Department of Transportation plow trucks this winter

265,000 tons of salt have been used this winter

$33.8 million

were budgeted for winter each year in last five years

See COLD, page 6

$31 million

has been spent this year on winter operations

SOURCE: in.gov DN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION TAYLOR IRBY AND ROSS MAY

Professors discuss Saturday options PRESIDENT VOWS TO UTILIZE POWERS Commission makes Ball State have class TO INCREASE PAY to make up lost time |

KAITLIN LANGE CHIEF REPORTER kllange@bsu.edu

Students aren’t the only people on campus worried about getting to class Saturday. Many professors are doing more than just requiring students to show up as part of the makeup classes for time lost when Ball State canceled the first two classes of the semester. Kevin Smith, the Department of History chairperson, emailed faculty in his department to see what they were doing for makeup classes. He has received 18 responses so far with ideas ranging from having standard classes,

MUNCIE, INDIANA

posting class work online, holding office hours for students and simply not meeting. Smith said those who choose not to meet said they had made up the lost time. Smith, who teaches a 9:30 a.m. class Tuesdays and Thursdays lost another class Tuesday when classes before 11 a.m. were canceled. To make up, he is planning to have an extra class during the week with his students instead of Saturday. Michael Doyle, an associate professor of history, is using the opportunity to take his American culture in the 1960s honors symposium class to the David Owsley Museum of Art to look at a section showcasing artwork from the time period. “I’ve always wanted to take my students to the Ball State museum of art, but I’ve never

DISNEY’S “SLEEPING BEAUTY” IS 55 YEARS OLD TODAY. STILL LOOKING GOOD.

CONTACT US

MICHAEL DOYLE

SNOW DAY MAKEUP CLASSES

An associate professor of history

JAN. 6 CLASSES

• Classes scheduled for before 6:30 p.m. will meet during their regular hours Feb. 1. • Classes scheduled for after 6:30 p.m. will meet during their regular hours Jan. 31

KEVIN SMITH

Chairperson of the history department

JAN. 7 CLASSES

• Classes scheduled for before 6:30 p.m. will meet during their regular hours Feb. 8. • Classes scheduled for after 6:30 p.m. will meet during their regular hours Feb. 7. gotten around to setting it up,” Doyle said. He realized he couldn’t just hold a standard class after seeing students’ reactions the day after Provost Terry King made the announcement.

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

KIP SHAWGER An associate professor of theatre

See SATURDAY, page 6

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter. 1. CLOUDY

2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

State of Union focus includes immigration, retirement savings | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Seeking to energize his sluggish second term, President Barack Obama vowed Tuesday night in his State of the Union address to sidestep Congress “whenever and wherever” necessary to narrow economic disparities between rich and poor. He unveiled an array of modest executive actions to increase the minimum wage for federal contract workers and make it easier for millions of

FORECAST TODAY  Mostly sunny High: 14 Low: 10 3. PARTLY CLOUDY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

low-income Americans to save for retirement. “America does not stand still and neither do I,” Obama declared in his prime-time address before a joint session of Congress and millions of Americans watching on television. Draped in presidential grandeur, Obama’s hour-long address served as the opening salvo in a midterm election fight for control of Congress that will quickly consume Washington’s attention. Democrats, seeking to cast Republicans as uncaring about the middle class, have urged Obama to focus on economic mobility and the gap between the wealthy and poor.

Temperatures will increase closer to average throughout the week gradually, with chances for snow later. - Ashley Baldwin, a WCRD weather forecaster 5. SUNNY

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

See UNION, page 7

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

VOL. 93, ISSUE 74

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY ‘TWERKING’ TO SURVIVE NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

Male black widow spiders perform low-amplitude abdomen vibrations to court, avoid attacks from females

THE FORECAST POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

THURSDAY Scattered snow showers High: 30 Low: 19 14 - SCATTERED SNOW SHOWERS

FRIDAY Scattered snow showers High: 30 Low: 25

ERIKA ESPINOZA GRAPHICS REPORTER | efespinoza@bsu.edu

A recent study shows that male black widow spiders make low-amplitude vibrations, or “twerk,” as a part of their mating rituals. Female black widows are sensitive to web vibrations and can easily mistake the male spiders for prey, so the male spiders approach slowly and start twerking. In the

Frontiers in Zoology study, male black widow vibrations were compared to prey vibrations. Male spiders had longer vibrations without patterns than struggling prey. While the female spiders would pounce the high-amplitude prey vibrations, they weren’t aggresive to the mating vibrations.

14 - SCATTERED SNOW SHOWERS

SATURDAY Scattered snow showers High: 34 Low: 11 14 - SCATTERED SNOW SHOWERS

1.

2.

‘TWERKING’ VIBRATIONS After cautiously approaching the female’s web, the male performs low-amplitude abdomen vibrations. The vibrations are transmitted through the web.

SUNDAY Mostly cloudy High: 23 Low: 13

RESPONDING BACK After several vibrations, some female black widows respond with abdomen twitches or simply turn toward the source without attacking.

02 - MOSTLY CLOUDY

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

SOURCE: frontiersinzoology.com

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens ASST. NEWS EDITOR Sam Hoyt

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz 72HRS EDITOR Kourtney Cooper

SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Taylor Irby ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty

DESIGN EDITORS Daniel Brount Ellen Collier

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITOR Cooper Cox

WEDNESDAY

24/7 Crossword

ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile GRAPHICS EDITOR Stephanie Redding

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

SPORTS

TODAY Can the men’s basketball team defeat Akron on the road? Follow along for coverage starting at 7 p.m.

SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

The women’s basketball team hosts Western Michigan in a pivotal conference game set to begin at 7 p.m.

FRIDAY The gymnastics team looks to follow up on its best score of the season in a home meet against Bowling Green.

Attackers look to improve blocks Graduating players highlight defensive lack of production

TEAM BLOCKING

DAVID POLASKI ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR @DavidPolaski

Year 2014

Blocks per set 2.59

2013

3.05

|

2012

2.72

2011

3.07

2010

3.25

For years, Ball State has been one of the top blocking teams in the Midwest Intercollegiate Volleyball Association, often ranking first in the conference in blocks per set during previous seasons. The men’s volleyball team takes pride in preventing opponents from getting the ball across the net, shutting down the offense before the ball has a chance to hit the floor. “Blocking well starts before the ball is even served,” head coach Joel Walton said. “You’re looking at the other side to determine who’s most likely to get the ball and who the setter will give it to.” This season, Ball State isn’t seeing the same level of blocking as it has in the past. Walton’s team ranks in the middle of the pack when it comes to blocks per set with 2.59. Lewis, Lindenwood and Loyola all rank ahead. Part of the difference could be the losses of Jamion Hartley and Greg Herceg, two outside attackers who combined for nearly 100 blocks last season. Even without them, Ball State still has senior middle attackers Kevin Owens and Matt Leske. The pair stands at 6-foot9 and 6-foot-7, respectively, giving the Cardinals the size necessary to hinder opposing offenses. To go along with the size, both players are agile and react quickly, offering redemp-

blocker would either point his fingers toward the ball or lose his timing and his hands end up in an awkward position,” Walton said. “We’ve broken a lot of guys’ fingers.” Assistant coach Kevin Furnish is one who knows that danger. During a practice, Furnish was hit by a middle attacker and broke his pinky finger. Despite the risk, Owens and Leske know how valuable putting up a strong block is. Together, the duo each scored 21 solo blocks last season and had more than 100 block assists each, a key to Ball State’s 21-6 season. “Primarily, you can score with your block right away,” Owens said. “It also allows the backcourt defense to set up and dig balls.” A good block doesn’t necessarily have to reject the attack, but redirect it out-ofbounds or tool the block and into the waiting forearms of a defender. To get there, players have to know where the attack will come from. A difficult task, defenders will watch the opposing setter’s eyes to see where he’s looking. Sometimes, the setter will accidently tip off where he’s sending the ball. “You have to be able to read the setter and react to where he’s going so you can get in front of whoever’s attacking,” Leske said. From there, it’s all technique.

DN FILE PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Sophomore outside attacker Marcin Niemczewski and senior middle attacker Kevin Owens go up for a block in the second set against McKendree on Friday at Worthen Arena. Owens has had 16 total blocks in this season, second on the team.

tion if a mistake is made. “Leske is a little bit better with his movement along the net and he’s deceptively quick,” Walton said. “Both are persistent and recover well, they can jump late and still get blocks [and] they both work hard at fulfilling their responsibilities.” Leske’s ability has earned

him a No. 8 ranking in the MIVA in blocks per set with 1.06, and Owens is just behind at No. 11 with 0.94. Owens credits prior experience and intuition as keys to his team’s success, and the team practices blocking often. At practice, assistant coaches stand on blocks and fire

practice attacks at the top of the net, while solo or double blockers practice leaping and knocking the ball back onto the other side of the court. The drills teach proper technique in order to avoid injury to hands, wrists and fingers, injuries that Walton said

team’s scoring effort. Against Ball State on Jan. 8, Diggs and Treadwell combined for 34 points, well above their average. Treadwell also is fourth in the conference in rebounding, pulling in an average of 8.4 rebounds per game. He will once again be matched up with Ball State senior center Majok Majok. On Jan. 8, Majok scored 16 points and pulled down 13 rebounds against Akron’s front line. Freshmen Mark Alstork and Zavier Turner rank No. 4 and No. 5 in the conference for three-point shooting percentage. Though, Alstork has attempted about half as many as Turner from deep. The game Jan. 8 was as physical as any game Ball State will play this season. A total of 53 fouls were called in the game. Akron’s Carmelo Betancourt and Ball State’s Franko House fouled out dur-

ing the game. Whitford said he’s seen an improvement in the team’s defense since the start of the season. “Defense is a matter of effort,” he said. “Offense is often a matter of skill.” A Ball State win could depend on senior guard Jesse Berry’s performance. Berry played six minutes in the loss to Miami. However, since then, his performance and playing time has flipped. Against Buffalo, Berry scored a team-high 21 points in 32 minutes. He played 31 minutes, tied for third on the team in the loss to Western Michigan on Sunday. Ball State is currently ranked 10th for scoring defense in the MAC, allowing 71.9 points per game. “I feel like we’re a better defensive team now than we were when we played them here,” Whitford said.

are common. During drills, the team uses practice balls called squishies. Made of foam and covered with a soft rubber, coaches use them instead of regulation volleyballs to increase player safety. “We’ve seen when we’d hit a regular ball off a box, the

Conference foes set for gritty rematch 4-point loss at home brings opportunity for revenge in game MATT McKINNEY CHIEF REPORTER | @Matt_D_McKinney

Three weeks after the first matchup, the Ball State men’s basketball team will have a chance to avenge the 68-72 loss against Akron tonight. Akron leads the Mid-American Conference in three-point percentage and total threepointers made, with .355 and 143, respectively. Despite Akron’s proficiency for shooting from outside, Ball State held Akron to 13 percent from the three-point range. “I feel like I am a defensiveoriented coach,“ head coach James Whitford said. “I believe in playing excellent defense. I think if you look at

BALL STATE VS. AKRON Ball State 4-13 65.1 40.5 35.9 12.4 16.9

Akron

Record Points per game Field goal percentage Rebounds per game Assists per game Turnovers per game

13-6 70.3 43.4 35.8 11.7 14.2

the four teams in this year’s Final 4, I think you find four head coaches who all believe in that.“ Akron is led by senior forwards Demetrius Treadwell and Quincy Diggs, who combine for 37.6 percent of the

DN FILE PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Senior guard Jesse Berry attempts a free throw after a Buffalo foul during the game Thursday in Worthen Arena.


PAGE 4 | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

FEATURES FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

WEDNESDAY The Superbowl is right around the corner. Get tips on how to best celebrate the game Sunday.

Do you believe in magic? ‘Magic: the Gathering’ is a game with a wide fanbase. Learn more about the culture.

FRIDAY Not sure what to do this weekend? Check out the local bar specials and special events going on around Muncie.

App aims to help thrifty students

GET SPLITWISE Creators bring site’s rental calculation know-how to Ball State BETHANNIE HUFFMAN CHIEF REPORTER

|

bnhuffman@bsu.edu

N

o longer do roommates have to squabble over who owes what for rent, utilities or groceries. Splitwise, a web tool and app, calculates how to split living costs among roommates and also gathers data on average renting prices in an area. For thrifty Ball State students, the creators of Splitwise recently calculated costs of living in Muncie with and without roommates at colleges.splitwise.com/ball-state-university. The app is run full time by co-founders Jon Bittner, Ryan Laughlin and Marshall Weir. Starting off as a website in May 2011 and called “Split the Rent,” Splitwise was created to ease the stress of calculating how much each roommate would pay. The app works by having a person put in a zip code into what is called a “Fairness Calculator.” “The point of the tool is to show people how having roommates can save them money,” said Zoe Chaves, business development and marketing at Splitwise. The app can calculate rent cost, renter’s insurance, taxes, furniture costs and travel costs. Once the region and zip code are selected, the buyer has a chance to explore their options. Prices are determined by arrangement, monthly rent per bedroom and savings per year. For example, the average studio apartment rent per month in Muncie is $381, but the average cost per room for a threebedroom household is $211. “There are no specific expensive or cheap rents,” Chaves said. In September 2011, the app version of Splitwise launched. “The app has taken years to get it at the point it is now,” Bittner said. “We’ve just improving it nonstop.” Splitwise employees work to change the format and hide major math calculations to make it easier for customers to understand. Splitwise also has manufactured an app that can be used for splitting up big dinner bills called Plates by Splitwise. “People have been excited about it since the first time,” Bittner said. “Everyone thinks about money in a different way. We try to make it easier and less confusing.”

THE COST OF LIVING IN MUNCIE

Co-founders Jon Bittner, Ryan Laughlin and Marshall Weir created Splitwise to help ease the stress of splitting rent between roommates. The app started in 2011 and added numbers for Muncie this year.

NA O BREAN DN PHOT

AVERAGE MONTHLY RENT PER BEDROOM IN MUNCIE (ZIP CODE 47303)

YEARLY SAVINGS FROM HAVING A ROOMMATE COMPARED TO LIVING ALONE

Studio: $381 One bedroom: $440 Two bedrooms: $276 Three bedrooms: $211

One bedroom: $2,640 Two bedrooms: $1,968 Three bedrooms: $2,748 Source: Splitwise

TY DAUGHER

Comic book creator uses art for activism

Williams to speak in lecture on gender, riots, graphic novel

|

ABOUT THE EVENT WHAT

Marilyn K. Cory Lecture Series WHO

Rachel Marie-Crane Williams

KATHRYN HAMPSHIRE STAFF REPORTER kmhampshire@bsu.edu

WHERE

One comic book creator shows that comic books aren’t just for superheroes or humor — they can be a tool for activism. Rachel Marie-Crane Williams has resurrected riots into the pages of comic books and has used art to empower female prisoners. Williams will speak about gender in comics at 7:30 tonight in Burkhardt Building Room 109 as part of the Marilyn K. Cory Lecture Series. Williams grew up reading the “funny pages” in the newspaper. Today, she ties together historic research with social activism through illus-

7:30 tonight

Burkhardt Building Room 109 WHEN COST

Free

The next speaker in the Marilyn K. Cory Speaker Series is Ramzi Fawaz, who will visit in April.

trated narratives. Originally from North Carolina, Williams came into the art of comic narratives as an adult when she read “American Splendor,” in which author Harvey Pekar told the story of his life through comics. The fact that it was a nonfictional, autobiographical series

struck Williams since the stories were not the regular comic strips she was used to reading in the paper. “I thought, ‘Wow, this is amazing,’” she said. “I started off as a reader more than a maker.” Since Williams is both a qualitative researcher and an artist, she found that the world of nonfictional comics was a way to put these two strengths together. Today, she is an associate professor at the University of Iowa and teaches classes about comics, which has inspired her to write a graphic novel of her own. “I’ve taught about it, and now I’m doing it myself,” she said. “I don’t want to ask my students to do something if I haven’t done it myself.” For this novel, Williams said she is focusing on the 1943 Detroit race riots, which marked the beginning of the civil rights movement.

“In our country, there is this pattern of war creating social turmoil and strife,” she said. “Then, we find an ‘other’ to blame for it.” Williams also is an active volunteer in prisons where she teaches art to women. In hearing the stories of the inmates and learning about their lives, Williams questions the function of prisons and what they’re accomplishing. “Prisons demonstrate how society continues to oppress people, such as women or minorities,” she said. “I like being able to make a difference in how these people see their opportunities in life.” Throughout her career, Williams has had published work in the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, the Journal of Cultural Research in Art Education and the International Journal of Comic Art. Deborah Mix, a Ball State English associate professor,

said one interesting facet of Williams’ work is how she explores “how comics can shape our thinking about gender and ethnicity.” “Williams writes her articles in comic book form, so she is using imagery to talk about imagery,” Mix said. “In this way, she is participating in visual culture.” Amit Baishya, a Ball State English assistant professor, teaches several courses about comics and selected Williams to speak for the inaugural Marilyn K. Cory Speaker Series. Baishya said Williams is “three in one” since she combines historic research with a public consciousness to create comics. She often encourages others to write comic autobiographies, Williams said, which is a way for individuals to contribute to “a genre that is really flourishing right now.” Williams said she hopes those

PHOTO PROVIDED BY RACHEL MARIE-CRANE WILLIAMS

Rachel Marie-Crane Williams will speak about her comics at 7:30 tonight in Burkhardt Building Room 109. Williams’ talk is part of the inaugural Marilyn K. Cory Speaker Series.

who attend her talk can take away that “the world of comics is wide and that there is more to it than just superheroes.”


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

NEWS

Students walk in warm tunnels at Wis. university At northern college people go to class in shorts, flip flops

sistant at Augsburg Hall. “It’s been nice with the semester starting back up. Everybody has been able to stay warm unless they’re a commuter or had to go out for something.” The tunnels can get a bit crowd| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ed at times, she said. About 7,900 MEQUON, Wis. — While many graduate and undergraduate stuMidwestern college students pile dents from 46 states and 28 foron layers to brave the frigid walk eign countries are enrolled at the to classes in subzero weather, university, which is a member of those attending one Wisconsin Concordia University System, a university on the windy shores nationwide network of colleges of Lake Michigan can leave their and universities. “It turns into coats in their like rush hour on dorms and take a Honestly, I the freeway,” Wemuch cozier trek. ber said. “EveryConcordia Uni- haven’t been body just lines up versity Wisconsin and goes.” has nearly 4 miles outside in two The private, libof connecting tun- days. Everybody eral arts school nels and hallways ranks 13 in a list of that keep stu- has been able to 21 coldest coldents out of the stay warm unless the leges in the counharsh winter elements. The elabo- they’re a commuter try, according to website College rate underground or had to go out for the Prowler, a resource system connects for student reresidence halls something. views, majors and and academic scholarships. The buildings. LINDSEY WEBER, ranking is based “Actually, it’s a resident assistant at on student reviews pretty funny to Augsburg Hall of weather, aversee students age high and low walking around campus in flip flops and temperatures and average preshorts,” during the winter, cipitation in summer and winter, said university spokesman according to its website. Built 20 years before Concordia Craig McCarthy. He said some of the tunnels bought the property, the cement date back to when the School floor of the underground maze Sisters of Notre Dame owned was conducive to bikes and roller the 200-acre lakefront proper- skates the nuns used to navigate ty before Concordia bought it the long tunnels, said Lawrence in 1982. The Lutheran univer- Sohn, 76, who maintains the unisity, north of Milwaukee in the versity’s archives. “This was all the sisters’ idea in suburb of Mequon, has added to the maze of tunnels when the first place,” Sohn said. Twenty-two of the 23 buildconstructing new buildings, including the School of Phar- ings on campus are connected and clustered in the middle of macy, which opened in 2011. “Honestly, I haven’t been out- the sprawling property with side in two days,” said junior parking lots and roads encirLindsey Weber, a resident as- cling the buildings.

«

»

17 HUNDRED

VILLAGE PROMENADE

LIVING IN LUXURY

THE GROVE DN PHOTOS

An upscale apartment still not full as new complex built in Village ALAN HOVORKA CHIEF REPORTER | afhovorka@bsu.edu

A third luxury apartment complex has began leasing for August in Muncie, and another semester-old complex in a similar price range has yet to fill up. The Grove, which opened in the fall, still has units available for August, while 17 Hundred apartments are full. Village Promenade will be ready Aug. 16. Erik Sheets, regional property manager for Provence Properties, said when the 17 Hundred complex first opened in 2012, it wasn’t full. Sheets said it took until the next academic year for the demand to fill every unit. Village Promenade has not released the price of its apartments, but the 17 Hundred apartments cost between $600 and $650 per person, $1,200 and

$1,300 per unit. The Grove costs $500 or $565 per person. Demand for The Grove and Village Promenade may increase as Ball State continues to grow. University enrollment numbers have increased overall during the last five years. Village Promenade will generate revenue for the city over the course of several years because of tax increment financing districts. TIF districts invest money into properties within its borders to raise the value of not only the original structure but those around it as well. This leads to an increased property value and then subsequently more profit for the city. The rise in property value may lead to a rise in property taxes

BALL STATE STATE LUXURY LUXURY APARTMENTS APARTMENTS BALL

VILLAGE TAX INFORMATION •

W. Riverside Riverside Ave. Ave. W. W. Riverside Ave.

17 HUNDRED 171700 HUNDRED N. Rosewood 1700 N. Rosewood N. Mckinley Ave. N.N. Mckinley Ave. Mckinley Ave.

N. Tillotson Ave. N.N. Tillotson Ave. Tillotson Ave.

EXPLAINING A TIF DISTRICT

THE GROVE THE 3174GROVE N. Winston Drive 3174 N. Winston Drive N. Ave. N.Oakwood Oakwood Ave. N. Oakwood Ave.

W. B W eetth W..BB ethheeell AAvvee. l Av . e.

SOURCE: maps.google.com, 17hundred.net, gogrove.com, villagepromenade.com SOURCE: maps.google.com, 17hundred.net, gogrove.com, villagepromenade.com

Breaking news, comments, interactive graphics and more.

‘DAY OF HEALING’ AT PURDUE AFTER DEATH WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP) — Purdue University is bringing in counselors and therapy dogs for a “Day of Healing” following last week’s killing of a student who was shot and stabbed on campus. The counselors and dogs will available Friday at the France Cordova Recreational Sports Center on the West Lafayette campus. Purdue also has invited student groups to hold their own healing events Friday in response to the Jan. 21 killing of 21-year-old An-

drew Boldt, who a fellow student is charged with murdering. The therapy dogs for Friday’s event specialize in working with college students after tragedies and will come from Indiana’s K-9 Assisted Crisis Response Team. The use of dogs in comforting students was documented following deadly shootings at Virginia Tech University, Northern Illinois University and the University of Alabama-Huntsville. –

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DRUG ABUSE SCREENING BILL PASSES INDIANAPOLIS — A contentious bill to screen welfare recipients for drug abuse and limit residents to buy only “nutritional” foods with food stamps is moving forward. State representatives voted 7122 in favor of the bill Tuesday. The bill would require residents who receive money from Temporary Assistance for Needy Families to take a questionnaire screening for substance abuse and possibly face drug testing.

The bill also would restrict what can be bought through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps. Recipients only would be able to purchase foods deemed “nutritional” by the state, which state Rep. Jud McMillin of Brookville said likely would prohibit using benefits to buy candy and soda. Both the full Senate and governor also must approve the bill before it becomes law. –

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

VILLAGE PROMENADE VILLAGE 1624 W.PROMENADE University Ave. 1624 W. University Ave.

FEET FEET N N FEET 00 2000 N 2000 0 2000 SOURCE: maps.google.com, 17hundred.net, gogrove.com, villagepromenade.com

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM BALLSTATEDAILY.COM BALLSTATEDAILY.COM BALLSTATEDAILY.COM BALLSTATEDAILY.COM BALLSTATEDAILY.COM BALLSTATEDAILY.COM BALLSTATEDAILY.COM BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

vvee.. e. nggAA Av eeeelilinling Whh hee NN..W N. W

W. McGalliard McGalliard Rd. Rd. W. W. McGalliard Rd.

A tax increment financing district manages construction and renovation within a given area of a city. •T  he TIF district works to raise property values within its borders, which will subsequently raise property taxes. •T  he revenue is then used to enhance the district by building sidewalks, street lights and other beautification or enhancement projects.

for the surrounding area. Todd Donati, director of the Muncie Redevelopment Commission, said money raised through taxes is funneled back into the community through projects, including building sidewalks, roads and street lights. Standards for the Village, as set by the Village Review Committee, nearly derailed the Village Promenade project by raising material prices. The committee set the quality of style and materials necessary for the project to match other buildings in the area. The city stepped in to build the parking garage. Otherwise, the cost for construction would have been too high for the developer to handle alone. As a result, the city will handle parking permits when the garage is finished.

DN GRAPHIC GRAPHIC STEPHANIE STEPHANIE REDDING REDDING DN DN GRAPHIC STEPHANIE REDDING

Nomination forms for the JOHN R. EMENS Outstanding Senior Award, sponsored by the Office of Student Affairs, are available for pick up in the Student Center, room 133.

Applications must be returned to AD 238 by: 5:00 pm on Wednesday, February 26, 2014.


PAGE 6 | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

NEWS WHERE DOES HJR-3 GO FROM HERE?

WHERE HJR-3 FROM HERE?3 to be Now that theDOES House amended theGO House Joint Resolution without toJoint any public ballot3has a few Now thatthe thesecond Housesentence, amended the path House Resolution to be more steps without theleft. second sentence, the path to any public ballot has a few more steps left.

3 3

The original version of HJR-3 The original version of HJR-3

3 3

The amended version of HJR-3 The amended version of HJR-3

3 3

The defeated version of HJR-3 The defeated version of HJR-3

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

HJR-3 IS SENT TO THE SENATE JUDICARY COMMITTEE HJR-3 goes to theTO Senate There, the HJR-3 IS SENT THE Judicary SENATECommittee. JUDICARY COMMITTEE committee the second sentence. There, the HJR-3 goescould to thereinstate Senate Judicary Committee. committee could reinstate the second sentence.

3 3

3 3

3 3

HJR-3 IS SENT TO THE SENATE FOR SECOND READING

The Senate will hearTO HJR-3 a secondFOR reading. The billREADING cannot be HJR-3 IS SENT THE for SENATE SECOND defeated here, as reinstating sentence. The Senate willonly hearamended, HJR-3 forsuch a second reading. the Thesecond bill cannot be defeated here, only amended, such as reinstating the second sentence.

3 3

3 3

HJR-3 IS SENT TO THE SENATE FOR THIRD READING Third readings are TO designed for votes of passTHIRD or fail.READING HJR-3 IS SENT THE SENATE FOR

3 3

The House is forced into a second vote The House is forced as not vote intoit adid second vote through as it did the not original vote version, the through just the original amended HJR-3. version, just the amended HJR-3.

3 3

Indiana law requires that any proposed amendments Indiana law requires that go theamendments General anythrough proposed Assembly twoGeneral go throughinthe consecutive in Assembly in legislations two the same language before consecutive legislations in going on alanguage public ballot. the same before going on a public ballot.

HJR-3 IS ON THE HJR-3PUBLIC IS ON THE 2014 BALLOT 2014 PUBLIC BALLOT

HJR-3 IS ON THE HJR-3PUBLIC IS ON THE 2014 BALLOT 2014 PUBLIC BALLOT

SOURCE: ind.gov, nuvo.net

DN GRAPHIC LAUREN CHAPMAN

SOURCE: ind.gov, nuvo.net

DN GRAPHIC LAUREN CHAPMAN

Lawmakers pass HJR-3 in House Same-sex unions no longer affected by passage of bill | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana lawmakers pressed ahead Tuesday with an effort to outlaw gay marriage under the state constitution, but the version that cleared the House wouldn’t be able to take effect until 2016 at the earliest because of a late change leaving open the possibility of same-sex civil unions someday. The proposed ban, which the House approved in a 5740 vote Tuesday, now heads to the Indiana Senate, where members of the Senate Judiciary Committee are set to take up the issue. “The future of marriage belongs in the hands of Hoosier voters; not judges, not the media, not activists, not lobbyists,” said Rep. Eric Turner, R-Cicero, and the author of proposed ban. House lawmakers removed a sentence in the proposed ban that would have banned civil unions and potentially barred employers from providing benefits to same-sex employees. Republicans who joined with House Democrats to alter the measure expressed concerns that the ban went too far by barring future approval of civil unions. However, that alteration potentially pushes back the soonest the measure could go before voters to Novem-

The snow, winds and ice in January created several potential problems for local hospitals. An increase in car crashes has put more people in the hospital, and several blood centers were forced to close due to the cold. Lucy Wehking, media relations for Indiana Blood Center, said 550 donors are needed each day in order to meet patient demands. After extra blood drives and many Hoosiers taking action, Wehking said the combined eight donor centers in Indiana had maintained the supply. “Donating blood has an immediate impact on Hoosier patients,” she said. “[Donating

ber 2016. Indiana’s constitutional amendment process requires the same measure be approved in two consecutive two-year sessions of the General Assembly then be placed on the ballot for consideration by voters. But legislative attorneys counseled Republican leaders that altering the language of the ban would likely require lawmakers to give it a second approval when they convene their next two-year session. The question could easily become moot, however, depending on what the Senate does. Senators have the ability to amend the measure back to its original form. If senators restore the measure to its original form, they could set the ban back on track for an appearance on November’s ballot. House Democrats delivered emotional pleas in opposition of the ban Tuesday afternoon. Rep. Linda Lawson, D-Hammond, said the ban reminded her of the discrimination she faced as the first woman to join the Hammond police force decades ago. “Discrimination is an ugly, mean thing,” she said. “There’s absolutely no reason that anybody in this world should be discriminated against.” Eleven House Republicans joined with 29 House Democrats in opposing the measure, but 57 Republicans delivered a strong margin of victory for supporters of the proposed ban, House Joint Resolution 3.

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is] an easy process, it takes less than an hour to donate blood typically and makes a life saving difference.” The donations through the Indiana Blood Center are usually available for use the next day. Muncie’s location is at 1609 W. McGalliard Road. To donate, people are asked to schedule an appointment ahead of time. The weather also caused the Indiana Department of Transportation to use most of the year’s budget and made employees work 12-hour days when needed. According to INDOT, its yellow plow trucks have logged 4.3 million miles and have used 265,000 tons of salt this winter. Will Wingfield, an IN-

DOT media relations spokesperson, said this year is the second harshest January in terms of road conditions the department has ever faced. For the last five years, the department budgeted $33.8 million for winter operations, according to its website. As of Jan. 18, INDOT estimated that more than $31 million has been spent on winter operations, including overtime, fuel and salt. INDOT is responsible for state roads, interstates and U.S. routes, including adjacent overpasses and ramps. Its maintenance budget gains funds from vehicle registration fees and an 18-cent tax on each gallon of gas, according to its website.

« If I just try to conduct

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

CARDINAL JOB FAIR

SATURDAY: Professor teaches students on trip to museum instead of in class | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Third readings are designed for votes of pass or fail.

3 3

COLD: Around $3 million left in budget for INDOT snow removal this winter

“Not only is the university requiring us faculty to give up our time and now plan curriculum, but the students are up in arms about this, too,” Doyle said. “If I just try to conduct this as yet another class, I’ll probably be the only one there and then I’m the only one who gets screwed over by this.” Doyle said the university instructed professors to enforce attendance policies that were listed in the syllabus. If students can’t make it to Doyle’s class, it will count as one of two unexcused absences that won’t impact a student’s grade. Though students will have to make up just the class time, professors can spend much more time planning what to do on the makeup day. Doyle said he spent three hours planning for the trip to the museum, something he would not have had to do if classes hadn’t been re-

this as yet another class, I’ll probably be the only one there [Saturday] and then I’m the only one who gets screwed over by this. » MICHAEL DOYLE, an associate professor of history scheduled. The Saturday classes don’t just take up time, for the Department of Theatre and Dance, the classes will use something almost as valuable — space. Kip Shawger, an associate professor of theatre, said there are multiple rehearsals all day Saturday. Students participating in the production of “Major Barbara” have a technical rehearsal, which includes 22 cast members and around 60 staff and support members. The play starts at 7:30 p.m.

Are you attending Saturday classes? Let us know online. bit.ly/1fakiOu

Feb. 8, the second Saturday for making up class time, which could cause more conflict for students. Theater students who have to be at rehearsals will be excused from classes, but they will be responsible for making up missed work. Additionally, an estimated 130 high school seniors will audition for Ball State’s department Feb. 8. Shawger said the department lost some space it normally uses for auditions and now must find places to host the auditions. “It interferes a lot with what we do,” Shawger said. “But it is what it is, and that’s the directive we’ve been given by the administration. So we’re just going to try to deal with it as best as we can.”

BALL STATE UNIVERSITY

RICH DEMILLO Distinguished professor of computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology Director of the Center for 21st Century Universities Lumina Foundation Fellow Chief scientist at the Qatar Computing Research Institute

“NEW ECOSYSTEMS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION: THE ROAD AHEAD” Tuesday, February 4 7:30 p.m. | Pruis Hall DeMillo discusses how 2012 brought a global conversation about the nature and value of universities that defined a new ecosystem for higher education and looks to the road that lies ahead.

JEFF SELINGO Contributing editor and former top editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education Professor of practice at Arizona State University Author of College (Un)bound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students

“COLLEGE (UN)BOUND: THE FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION” Monday, February 10 7:30 p.m. | Pruis Hall

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 12 11 A.M. – 3 P.M. WORTHEN ARENA

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Lucina Hall 220 765-285-1522 www.bsu.edu/careers


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 7

NEWS

UNION: President declares 2014 ‘year of action,’ focuses on revising old ideas | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 His emphasis on executive actions was greeted with shouts of “Do it!� from many members of his party. Declaring 2104 a “year of action,� Obama also sought to convince an increasingly skeptical public that he still wields power in Washington even if he can’t crack through the divisions in Congress. Burned by a series of legislative failures in 2013, White House aides said they’re now redefining success not by what Obama can jam through Congress but by what actions he can take on his own. Indeed, Obama’s proposals for action by lawmakers were slim and largely focused on old ideas that have gained little traction over the past year. He pressed Congress to revive a stalled immigration overhaul, pass an across-the-board increase in the federal minimum wage and expand access to early childhood education — all ideas that gained little traction after he proposed them last year. The president’s one new legislation proposal calls for expanding an income tax credit for workers without children. Republicans, who saw their own approval ratings fall fur-

ther in 2013, have also picked up the refrain of income inequality in recent months, though they have cast the widening gap between rich and poor as a symptom of Obama’s economic policies. “Republicans have plans to close the gap, plans that focus on jobs first without more spending, government bailouts and red tape,� said Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, RWash., in the Republicans’ televised response to the president’s speech. The economy and other domestic issues, including health care, dominated the president’s address. He touched only briefly on foreign policy, reiterating his threat to veto any new sanctions Congress might levy on Iran while nuclear negotiations with the Islamic republic are underway and touting the drawdown of American troops from Afghanistan this year. Even as Washington increasingly focuses on income inequality, many parts of the economy are gaining strength, with corporate profits soaring and the financial markets hitting record highs. But with millions of Americans still out of work or struggling with stagnant wages, Obama has found himself in the

sometimes awkward position of promoting a recovery that feels distant for many. “The cold, hard fact is that even in the midst of recovery, too many Americans are working more than ever just to get by, let alone get ahead,� Obama said. “And too many still aren’t working at all.� The president garnered some of his loudest applause — at least from Democrats — when he took on lawmakers who oppose his signature health care law, which floundered in its initial rollout last fall. Obama said that while he doesn’t expect to convince Republicans on the merits of the law, “I know that the American people aren’t interested in refighting old battles.� Though Obama sought to emphasize his presidential powers, there are stark limits to what he can do on his own. For example, he unilaterally can raise the minimum hourly wage for new federal contractors from $7.25 to $10.10, as he announced, but he’ll need Congress in order to extend that increase to all of America’s workers. The executive order for contractors, which Obama will sign in the coming weeks, is limited in its scope.

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President Barack Obama gives his State of the Union address Tuesday night on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

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Today’s birthday (1-29-14) ___ (c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

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********* 1 bdrm apts. Avail. May or August. 3 blks from campus. A/C, DW, W/D. Off st. parking. Util paid. No pets. Great locations. 896-8105 ********** Affordable! Walk to class. Great locations on 1,2,3,4 bdrm apts. Avail. May or August. Part or all Util. paid. A/C DW W/D. Off st. parking. No pets. walktoballstate.com 896-8105 ****1, 2 & 3 BR avail. Great floor plan, AC, DW only 3 blks to campus! THE 400 APARTMENTS (765)288-6819 www.400apartments.com ***Now leasing for the 2014/2015 school yr. 1 Bdrm apt. $460/mo + utils, Studio apt. $410/mo + util. W/D. Bar-Tel Apartments, 1616 W. Gilbert St. Visit www.bsrentals.com or call Doug at 765-744-3593 1 bdrm Nice, walk to BSU W/D, A/C, Avail Aug. We Pay Utils! No pets. $450/mo 317-439-3763

Office Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 am - 5 pm www.bsudailynews.com/classifieds

Affordable village living University village apartments 1000 mo free cable reserved parking 765-729-9618 www.bsurentals.com Cardinal Villas close to campus 3 bdrm 2 ba. W/D in every unit, utils paid, free wifi call 317-679-0681 FREE INTERNET! Clean & quiet 1 bdrm apts, close to BSU. On site WS/DR,cedarsatbsu.com,286 2806 Utilities paid. 811 W. Main. Unique mansion,1&2 br apt.765-744-0185 bsuoffcampus.com.

 !!3 or 4 bdrm house, W/D, Walk to campus, off st. prkg., Call for an Appointment today! 877-867-5118 !1505 Kimberly (behind LaFollette) 4@$325; 4bds; great house/yard /loc. full bsmt W/D May 760-3002

1 or 2 br apts available May or August 2014-may or may not include utilities. Required application fee of $35.00 and security deposit for all application forms submitted. Showing appointments will be arraged. Contact Kerry @284-6313 or 744-2998 or email @ kwiggerly@prudentialindiana.com

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Nice 1, 3, 4, 5 & 6 Bdrm houses, W/D A/C,close to campus, August 2014-July 2015 Lease Call 765-759-5510 Leave a msg.

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***RATCHFORD PROPERTIES*** •Great Apts. & Houses! •Best Locations for 1,2,3,4 BR on & Near Campus •Affordable Prices! •Some Utilities Paid! Laundry Facility, NO Pets. ***CALL OR TEXT 748-6407*** www.ratchfordproperties.com

1,2,3,4 bdrms. Lease 2014-2015. www.clunerentals.blogspot.com 765-744-1400 or 729-9321

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2 Bdrm, extra room, nice, walk to BSU, A/C, W/D, $560 a month, no pets.Avail Aug. 317-439-3763 ****2-bdrm house, 1701 New York, W/D, 765-228-8458, 765-749-4688 2011 Washington behind Student CEnter. 3 bdr water & sewage paid. no pets. avail Aug. Walktoballstate.com 896-8105

3 & 4 Brdms, W/D, D/W, C/A, off-st parking, Aug-Aug. call Rob for showing 765-748-7278 3 Bdrm House full basement Near BSU campus off street prkg W/D, A/C,Aug-Aug 765-215-4591

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*Ad must be submitted to dnclassified@bsu.edu to be eligible. * The Daily News has the right to revise or reject any advertisements. * The Daily News assumes no liability for content of the advertisement.

3-5 bedroom house. North Ball. bsuoffcampus.com 765-744-0185 3/4 Bedroom, 2108 N. Ball Ave. August lease, $975 plus utilities. Call 317-716-7174 4 & 5 bdrm houses, 3 blcks to student center. W/D, plenty of parking. Really nice. Call 765-228-3883 www.ludwickrentals.com 4 bdr Very Nice, Hrdw floors. W/D, off street prkg, Walk dist to campus, Call Eric at 317-825-8683 www.ballurental.com 4 BDRM, 1 & 1/2 bths, C/A, gas heat, W/D,o ff-street parking.1608 New York, garage, close to BSU 765 748 8425 4 Bdrm, 2 Ba., Nice! Walk to BSU, UTIL pd! W/D, A/C, avail Aug, No pets. $1200/mo. (317) 439-3763 4 bdrm. 609 N. Alameda. Spacious,1800 sq ft. 2 full baths, W/D, D/W, C/A, Finished bsmt, Off-Str Prkg. Call 286-1943 4 Brm House @1220 Neely. Avail Aug 1, 2014. $1200/mo + utils 765-649-8377

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4 Lg bdrms, 2 baths. 824 W. Beechwood. Behind SAE. C/A, D/W, W/D. Call 286-1943

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)Today is a 7 -- You can solve a challenging puzzle. Others vie for your attention. Do the homework. The data you’re amassing comes in useful later. It’s not a good time to gamble. Run a reality check. Postpone having company over. Indulge in mindless diversions. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)Today is a 6 -- Fall in love all over again. Intuition points the way... follow your heart. Keep digging for the best deal, and drive a bargain. A female records decisions. Mean what you say. Circumstances dictate the direction to go.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)Today is a 6 -- Begin a new project, but finish the old stuff first. Don’t get intimidated by constructive criticism. Keep more in reserve than in your pocket. Bring excitement to the bargaining table. Insist on complete honesty. Exude confidence.

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Clean 4 BR, 2 ba, Aug-Aug.215 S. Talley.W/D,C/A $285/ea.748-6175 D/W, bsmt. tiffanydpt@gmail.com Great 3-5 bdrm. 2 ba. Dill St. C/A, W/D, crpted bsmt, good prkg, Aug. lease., $250-270/each, no pets. 765-396-9308 , 317-979-4335 Must See! 5 BR w/ swimming pool, built in fire pit, lg deck, bike racks, off st. prkg, W/D, C/A, D/W, landlord does yard & pool maint. 2014 lease. $1300 /mo. 765-405-1105 Newley renovated. 1-6 BR homes. Close to BSU. W/D, A/C, D/W. Rent:$300-$400 ech. 765-286-2806 Nice 3 bdr. Close to BSU. 2 ba. Avail. Aug. A/C, stove, fridge, W/D. $395 /ea, utils incl. 765-348-6413 www.jahrentals.com, Nicest houses on campus. Many extras. Even a 6 bdrm. Also student parking available. Call 286-5216. Pd. Utilties & High Spd Internet Qlty 3-6 bdr. From $300 ea. Some hottubs 765-744-1079 joecoolproperties.blogspot.com Spring semester releases! 1-5 bedroom homes, new renovations, room leases available, low rates! Call now 765-286-2806

3 or 4 bdr C/A, C/H ,W/D + Utils. Ball Ave 4 blks from Bethel Aug 1st. 765-289-3971

4 Lg. bdrms, 2 full baths. 828 W. Beechwood. Behind SAE. W/D, D/W, 286-1943

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 6 -Think up solutions from a new vantage point. New opportunities open up to advance the prosperity of your community. Opposites attract, now even more. Plan actions before taking them. Get into strategy.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) There’s a problem at work, but you can solve it. Create an elegant social event. Being generous doesn’t have to be expensive. Let the responses come. Quiet, donothing time and meditation allow for innovative thinking.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)-Today is a 6 -New skills make you even more interesting. Take risks with home projects, while willing to accept consequences good or bad. Wisdom prevails.You have more in reserve than you thought. Tally up, then celebrate the results.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)Today is a 7 -- You don’t need to spend to have fun. Play music, draw or write. There’s nothing wrong with changing your mind. Take small steps toward your goal. Solve a household problem while you’re at it.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is an 8 -- Continue your good work, and advance to the next level. It starts with the first step. Postpone cleaning house. A mess is fine. Gamble or take risks another day. Celebrate and appreciate a loved one.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)You can get whatever you need. Let your partner take the lead. Meeting a deadline conserves your good reputation. Finances become more optimistic. Share your gratitude with your team. It does take a village.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)Today is a 6 -- Select colors and designs.You’re very attractive now. Sparks fly, creatively and otherwise, and it’s all good. Emotional speeches are par for the course. Limit your spending considerably. Slow down and accomplish more.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)--Today is a 6 -- Consider an interesting suggestion from someone beloved. Strengthen your foundation, to avoid losing a deal to another. Have faith, plus a backup plan. Borrow to regain balance. Don’t bite more than you can chew.

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Get into some creative fun this year. Build spiritual, mental and physical health with playful routines. If things seem too serious, get with kids. Plan a family gathering in April, after home renovation in March. In August, curtains open on a new romantic stage. You’ve got your lines, so shine. Take frequent peace breaks. Cultivate joy.

5 Bdrm. 1.5 Ba. 1428 W. Gilbert. Close to village. W/D bsmt, Off-srt prkg. Call 286-1943

www.ballstatedaily.com

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)Today is a 7 -- Decline a party in favor of a private activity. Confirm attendance. Express your true feelings. Do the homework. Anticipate controversy. Let go of how you thought it had to be. Flattery will get you everything.


PAGE 8 | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

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