Issuu on Google+

«goByintobeing a Sugar Baby, you are essentially ... a sex worker. ... You have to it knowing you’ll be objectified and the whole purpose of you doing this is to satisfy the male’s sexual fantasy. »

DN SUGAR TUESDAY, JAN. 21, 2014

A SENIOR BALL STATE SUGAR BABY

THE DAILY NEWS

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Scoring problems evident

BABIES Adults pay Ball State students for relationships, meet online

Latest loss highlights issues pertaining to perimeter shots

KARA BERG STAFF REPORTER

See BASKETBALL, page 3

As Ball State senior Harper Creo got ready for a first date with a man she met on the Internet, she went through the typical routine: shave, put on makeup, paint her nails and struggle to decide what to wear. It would be a standard first date, the two would get to know each other and figure out what the other person wants from the relationship. The only difference is that Creo is being paid. Creo is a Sugar Baby — a young adult who is in a relationship with an older person, or a benefactor, in exchange for money or gifts. “By being a Sugar Baby, you are essentially ... a sex worker, that’s what it is,” she said. “So even though sometimes you don’t have sex, sometimes they just want company ... there’s just kind of a mindset. You have to go into it knowing you’ll be objectified and the whole purpose of you doing this is to satisfy the male’s sexual fantasy.” Creo went to a pricey restaurant to meet her potential Sugar Daddy, a 35-year-old man more than 10 years her senior. She said it was very similar to online dating, except for her motive.

See SUGAR BABY, page 5

Musicians tour through Indianapolis, Fort Wayne SEE PAGE 4

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL

NEW LINEUP CONTAINS PROBLEMS Struggles force adjustments, have players moving around, bring inconsistency to team SEE PAGE 3

Sugar Babies maintain a relationship with older people in exchange for money or gifts. DN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION JONATHAN MIKSANEK

ONLINE COURSES RANK ABOVE CLASSROOMS Learning with laptops earns some programs national recognition KAITLIN LANGE CHIEF REPORTER | kllange@bsu.edu Ball State’s recent rankings for online courses show a disparity between resources and engagement in a classroom and learning on a computer. The U.S. News and World Report ranked the university’s business, education and nursing programs in the top 20 of their respective categories. Ball State was ranked No. 29 for best online bachelor’s program.

Know about concerts starring big names

knberg2@bsu.edu

Editor’s Note: The names Harper Creo and Kip Ellis are pseudonyms. The students’ names were changed to protect their identities.

MATT McKINNEY CHIEF REPORTER | @Matt_D_McKinney

Saturday’s 52-64 loss to Miami highlighted a key flaw in the Ball State men’s basketball team: a lack of shooting. As a team, Ball State shot 33.3 percent from the field against Miami, down from its 40.5 percent season average. “We are just going to have to get back in the gym and shoot,” freshman point guard Zavier Turner said. “We just have to keep shoot- INDIVIDUAL STATS ing.” • Field goal: Turner leads 54-120, 45 Ball State’s percent • Three-pointers: scoring. He 11-31, 35.5 averages 13.3 percent points per CHRIS BOND, game, with al- A SENIOR GUARD • Average points per game: 11.5 most seven of those points coming from three-pointers. Second on the team in scoring is senior forward Chris Bond. Last season, Bond averaged 8.9 points per game. He’s taken on a larger scoring role this season with 11.5 points per game. Bond has tried to extend his shooting range this season, as well. In his first three years at Ball State, Bond didn’t make or attempt a single threepointer until this season. He connected on his first one in the season opener at Indiana State on Nov. 9. He’s now 11-of-31 from long range. Despite his newfound range this season, opponents aren’t scared of him from deep. On Saturday, Miami would routinely guard him from deep, helping inside against senior forward Majok Majok and daring him to shoot the three-pointer. “[Miami] took [Bond]’s guy and put him in the lane,” Ball State head coach James Whitford said. “They didn’t guard him. He’s a good enough shooter right now where, to me, that’s undeserved. ... I see him every day.”

|

These numbers contrast with the overall on-campus classes at No. 181 out of 200 public schools, the lowest in Indiana, according to the U.S. News & World Report. Jennifer Bott, associate provost for learning initiatives, said the difference could come from how the report looks at the two areas. While many universities agree on how to approach online, there are significant disagreements when it comes to classroom learning. “There is more opportunity in online, because of that agreement around criteria that are effective, to see a change in the rankings,” she said. “That doesn’t translate to the rest of the rankings.” Bott said there is one leading

factor backing up the relationship between online and offline learning. “Our online classes are a reflection of our main campus courses and the quality of our faculty and the quality of their instruction,” she said. “Our online classes are taught by the same faculty who teach on campus, so they bring the same enthusiasm and expertise to the online world as they do already to the lecture halls across campus.” Bott said students should decide whether or not to take online classes based on their own learning techniques.

See ONLINE, page 6

ONLINE COURSES ONLINE CLASSES ARE BECOMING MORE PROMINENT FOR BALL STATE.

• 66 degrees and certificates offered • 2,984 students took only online courses in Fall Semester 2013 • 3,560 students took at least one online and one classroom course in Fall Semester 2013 U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT RANKED THE ONLINE PROGRAMS IN A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT CATEGORIES, INCLUDING:

• student engagement • faculty credentials and training • peer reputation • student services • technology SOURCE: The U.S. News & World Report and Nancy Prater, director of marketing and communications of online and distance education

BUS FIRE RESULTS IN NO INJURY

No one was hurt when a Ball State bus caught fire before pulling to the side of Interstate 69 south Monday afternoon. The only person on the bus was the driver, who was unharmed, said university spokesperson Tony Proudfoot. The bus was on its way to the Indianapolis airport to pick up the cheerleading team, he said. The fire blocked traffic near the 208-mile marker, north of Indianapolis, as heavy black smoke rolled east across the highway. “[The driver] smelled smoke, followed his training and immediately pulled off and got out before any harm came to him, so we’re thankful for that,” Proudfoot said. The cheerleading team had been in Orlando for the UCA & UDA College Cheerleading and Dance Team National Championship, said Tara Spitzer-Long, a senior exercise and physical science major and a member of the team. She had just gotten to the airport when she saw photos of the bus. “It looked really bad in the pictures, so we were thankful that the bus driver was OK, and thankful that none of our team was on there,” she said. Another bus had arrived for the team by about DN PHOTO MARIA STRAUSS 2:30 p.m. Monday. A Ball State bus caught on fire on the side of Interstate 69 south. The bus was going to Indianapolis to pick up Ball THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

1. CLOUDY

– STAFF REPORTS

2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

3. PARTLY CLOUDY

4. MOSTLY SUNNY

5. SUNNY

State cheerleaders from the airport. No one was injured.

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

MUNCIE, INDIANA

IT’S NATIONAL HUG DAY. SPREAD THE LOVE.

CONTACT US

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter.

6. RAIN

7. PERIODS OF RAIN

9. SCATTERED SHOWERS

Accumulating snow fell overnight. Expect blowing snow and cold temperatures today. - Michael Behrens, chief weather forecaster

FORECAST TODAY  Snow High: 12 Low: 10 11. SNOW FLURRIES

12. SCATTERED FLURRIES

13. SNOW SHOWERS

VOL. 93, ISSUE 69 10. DRIZZLE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

5 THINGS TO KNOW

1.

OBAMA PROPOSES NEW RESTRAINTS TO SURVEILLANCE

TODAY OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Omaha officials say two people are dead and all other workers are accounted for in the animal feed plant that exploded. The explosion Monday morning brought down part of the International Nutrition plant. Two people were killed and 10 others seriously hurt. Omaha Police Lt. Darci Tierney said

all of the other people who were working have been accounted for. Authorities don’t know what caused the blast. Interim Omaha Fire Chief Bernie Kanger noted that there were no hazardous chemicals at the plant. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration will find the cause.

4. IRAN WORKS TO EASE NUCLEAR CONCERNS

MCT PHOTO

TEHRAN (AP) — Iran on Monday unplugged banks of centrifuges involved in its most sensitive uranium enrichment work, prompting the United States and European Union to partially lift economic sanctions, putting into effect a landmark deal aimed at easing concerns over Iran’s nuclear program. The steps start a six-month clock for Tehran and the world powers to negotiate a final accord that the Obama administration and its European allies said will be intended to ensure Iran cannot build a nuclear weapon.

In the meantime, the interim deal puts limits on Iran’s program — though it continues low levels of uranium enrichment. Tehran denied its nuclear program is intended to produce a bomb. The payoff to Iran is an injection of billions of dollars into its crippled economy over the next six months from the suspension of some sanctions, though other sanctions remain in place. British Foreign Secretary William Hague called the deal “an important milestone,” but not the ultimate goal.

2. SYRIAN PEACE TALKS FACE TROUBLE WITH IRAN 5. RUSSIAN SLUMS DETRACT FROM OLYMPIC CITY

EDITORIAL BOARD

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

executive powers “in which killers and criminals do not participate.” The invitation, extended Sunday by the U.N. secretary-general, set off a flurry of diplomatic activity to salvage the talks. The U.S. said the offer should be rescinded, and the opposition threatened to skip the event entirely. The conference beginning Wednesday in the Swiss city Montreux, with delegations from the U.S., Russia and close to 40 other countries attending.

NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens ASST. NEWS EDITOR Sam Hoyt

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz ASST. FEATURES EDITOR Ryan Howe

SOCHI, Russia (AP) — A shining new $635 million highway on the outskirts of Sochi stands next to a crumbling apartment block with a red “SOS!” banner on its roof. The residents of 5a Akatsy street have lived for years with no running water or sewage system. Construction for the 2014 Winter Games has made their lives more miserable: the new highway has cut them off from the city center. Even their communal

SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

outhouse had to be torn down because it was found to be too close to the new road and ruled an eyesore. The slum is one of the many facets of a hidden dark side in the host city of next month’s Winter Olympics, which stands side-by-side with the glittering new construction projects that President Vladimir Putin is touting as a symbol of Russia’s transformation from a dysfunctional Soviet leviathan to a successful economy.

72HRS EDITOR Kourtney Cooper MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Taylor Irby

ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile

WEDNESDAY Scattered snow High: 15 Low: 5 14 - SCATTERED SNOW SHOWERS

THURSDAY Scattered flurries High: 13 Low: 3 12 - SCATTERED FLURRIES

FRIDAY Mostly sunny High: 17 Low: 6 04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

SATURDAY Snow High: 30 Low: 13 11 - SNOW FLURRIES

SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

DESIGN EDITORS Daniel Brount Ellen Collier GRAPHICS EDITOR Stephanie Redding

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITOR Cooper Cox

TUESDAY $2.00 Bells Two Hearted

24/7 Crossword

POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

3. TWO DEATHS RESULT FROM NEB. EXPLOSION

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama is calling for major changes in the way the U.S. intelligence community collects and stores information about people. Some of the changes will take effect immediately. Others will require further study and may take action by Congress to be implemented. The National Security Agency will be required to get a secretive court’s permission before accessing phone records collected from hundreds of millions of Americans, except in emergencies. Those records, which include numbers dialed but not the content of calls, are currently stored by the government. But Obama is calling for that to change. He is directing the attorney general and the intelligence community to come up with a new plan for another party to store the data. Some proposals that have been floated previously include having phone companies or a third party store the data.

GENEVA — A last-minute U.N. invitation for Iran to join this week’s Syria peace talks threw the long-awaited Geneva conference into doubt Monday, forcing U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon to rescind his offer after the opposition threatened to boycott. With the invitation withdrawn, the main Western-backed Syrian opposition group said it would attend the talks, which it said should aim to establish a transitional government with full

THE FORECAST

Sudoku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Michael Mepham

Level: Medium

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY

ACROSS 1 SPEEDER’S UNDOING 6 TIVO ANCESTOR 9 WHEREWITHAL 14 ERIE CANAL CITY 15 LETTERS FOR DEBTORS 16 BIG NAME IN COMPUTER CHIPS 17 SIGHTING IN THE SCOTTISH HIGHLANDS 20 ACCIDENT SCENE FIG. 21 GALLOP OR CANTER 22 “BY JOVE!” 23 CREAM OF THE CROP 24 LIKE PLUGS VIS-À-VIS OUTLETS 25 USING ONLY ONES AND ZEROS 28 __-CHEAP: FOR A SONG 29 RECIPE AMT. 32 AIR FRESHENER TARGETS 33 SIGHTING IN DOUGLAS, WYOMING 35 BELGRADE CITIZEN 36 SINGER HORNE AND ACTRESS OLIN 37 CONTINENTAL COIN

38 SIGHTING IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST 40 GRAMMY WINNER CARPENTER 41 PUB BREW 42 CHRISTIE’S “DEATH ON THE __” 43 LARGE CROWDS 44 MANI’S SALON GO-WITH 45 UNCOVERED 46 FIND A NEW TABLE FOR 49 GAUCHO’S WEAPON 50 “__ THE SEASON ...” 53 ONE STUDYING THIS PUZZLE’S SIGHTINGS 56 “JE __, DONC JE SUIS”: DESCARTES 57 CORN UNIT 58 SHADE OF GREEN FROM IRELAND 59 PROMOTIONAL PLOY 60 SKID ROW AFFLICTION 61 LAUDER OF COSMETICS DOWN 1 RUN THE KINGDOM 2 ELECTRON HOME

3 WEBSTER’S, E.G.: ABBR. 4 ESSEN EXCLAMATION 5 MADISON SQUARE GARDEN HOCKEY TEAM 6 DROP IN ON 7 WHAT YOU PAY 8 PIÑA COLADA LIQUOR 9 KONICA __: JAPANESE CONGLOMERATE 10 HAPPEN NEXT 11 BUSINESS LETTER ABBR. 12 ON A __-TO-KNOW BASIS 13 CAMERA TYPES, FOR SHORT 18 “A SNAP!” 19 MISSOURI RANGE 23 POTATO CHIP FLAVOR, BRIEFLY 24 PROPHET WHOSE NAME SOUNDS LIKE A MINERAL 25 __ NOVA: BRAZILIAN MUSIC GENRE 26 EXEMPLARY 27 VIKING LANGUAGE 28 HULA OR HORA 29 TRAVELS WITH THE BAND 30 BINGE

31 LOWLY LABORERS 33 BEIJING-BORN MARTIAL ARTS ACTOR 34 APARTMENT CONTRACT 36 STOPPED THE SHIP, IN NAUTICAL LINGO 39 STILL ON THE PLATE 40 BAR SING-ALONG 43 EXPANSE NEAR THE CAPITOL, WITH “THE” 44 COKE COMPETITOR 45 CHURLISH TYPES 46 SALES SLIP: ABBR. 47 “... __ SAW ELBA” 48 “AULD LANG __” 49 TUB TOY 50 PINBALL FOUL 51 __ OF WIGHT 52 EYE SORE 54 LAST LETTER, IN LEEDS 55 SOME REFRIGERATORS

ballstatedaily.com

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY

$2.00 Bells Two Hearted


TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

SPORTS | SETTING THE BAR

Junior Angie Hosbach performs the start of her beam routine Friday. Ball State beat Iowa, 189.975 to 188.875. Ball State’s record for the season is 2-3.

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Inconsistency plagues offense Changes occurring with starting lineup hinder chemistry

|

DAVID POLASKI ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR @DavidPolaski

Losing the top two offensive threats for any team can instantly create problems. It’s no different for the Ball State men’s volleyball team after graduating Greg Herceg and Jamion Hartley, the two top offensive players last season. Head coach Joel Walton’s team is experiencing an adjustment period on offense, unsure of which players should get the most opportunities to attack. The starting lineup constantly changes, and Walton said he expects it to continue to change until the offense starts producing better. “We’re trying to find a group that can produce offense, play good defense [and] work together well on the court,” Walton said. “They need to play with energy, competitiveness and the passion we’re looking for.” He mixed things up Friday by starting junior Shane Witmer at libero against Saint Francis. Normally an outside attacker, Witmer finished with a teamhigh eight digs in the game.

Ball State lost three out of four sets, in a fashion Walton described as “lackluster.” Throughout the first four matches, nothing seems to have gone as planned. Sophomore outside attacker Marcin Niemczewski led the team with a career-high 18 kills, breaking his old career-high just one match after he set it against Sacred Heart. Although his sudden emergence has been a needed blessing for Ball State, both Walton and Niemczewski said after the Sacred Heart match that the rise was unexpected. His 45 kills are close to doubling the 26 from senior outside attacker Larry Wrather, who is the next highest kill leader. Wrather’s contributions have been necessary, but also have not been a part of Walton’s original offseason plans. He intended for Wrather to play a more secondary role in the offense and take on a more dominant role as libero, but that opportunity hasn’t surfaced because they’ve needed him for offense. The offense, which could be best described as both varied and inconsistent, has had three different players lead the team in kills through four matches. Senior middle attacker Kevin Owens led with eight kills against UC Irvine and Niemczewski led with 15 and 18 against

Sacred Heart and Saint Francis. For the Penn State game Saturday, Niemczewski and Wrather tied for the high with 11. “We’re still early in the year, and I need to see what some of these guys are capable of,” Walton said. “I’m trying to put them into situations where they’ll be successful.” Players like Witmer and junior outside attacker Matt Sutherland have combined for 20 kills through the first four matches, a low number after Walton said during the offseason that he was hoping for them to be strong contributors to the offense. “We’re still really tweaking our group and essentially played two different starting groups over the weekend,” Walton said. “A big change for us was when we brought in Shane as an attacker and blocker against Penn State.” Witmer had seven total blocks against the Nittany Lions as the Cardinals took the first set before dropping the next three, but provided energy that Walton was looking for. He said he also liked what he saw out of freshman outside attacker Brendan Surane and junior libero David Ryan Vander Meer over the weekend and wants to see them have expanded roles in the future.

CARDINAL JOB FAIR #PrepareForTheFair

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 12 11 A.M. – 3 P.M. WORTHEN ARENA DN PHOTO EMMA ROGERS

Sophomore outside attacker Marcin Niemczewski serves the ball during the match against Sacred Heart. The team is trying to rebuild after the two top offensive players last season graduated.

BASKETBALL: Shooting woes hurt team | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “He’s more than a good enough shooter than you shouldn’t be able to play him that way.” Upon receiving the ball on the wings, Bond attempted six three-pointers, a new season and career high. He made two of them. “I got on him a couple times,” Whitford said. “I told him ‘Hey, if you’re open, shoot it.’” The other Ball State start-

ers against Miami, freshmen Franko House and Mark Alstork, made 0-of-7 shots from the field and contributed one point — a House free throw. With opposing teams not scared of Ball State’s outside shooting, they can contribute more focus on stopping Majok, one of Ball State’s biggest offensive threats. Majok scored eight points on 3-of-4 from the field, but he had trouble receiving entry passes from his post position

throughout the game, leading to turnovers. “We have to get [the ball] to Majok,” Whitford said. “That’s a point of frustration for him and for me and for our team.” Turner leads the team in assists with almost 3.7 per game, but it could be higher. “When guys are open on my team, I give them the ball,” he said. “Sometimes when they’re open, they don’t shoot, and I get mad at them. I want to see my teammates shoot.”

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Senior forward Chris Bond goes for a shot as Miami defenders try to block him Saturday at Worthen Arena.

Brought to you by

Lucina Hall 220 765-285-1522 www.bsu.edu/careers


TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 4

FEATURES

WEDNESDAY A comic book creator and veteran shares his story and takes readers into his futuristic, action-packed world.

FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

Is juicing just a fad or a means to getting a more balanced diet? Find out the facts from experts and learn how it works.

THURSDAY Check out crafty, cheap ideas, along with tips from interior design experts, for your home away from home.

TUNES TUESDAY: CONCERT ROUNDUP Big names to perform in Indiana venues LINDSEY RILEY CHIEF REPORTER

|

features@bsudailynews.com

W

hether fans of Cher to contemporary country stars, students can get their concert fix with the diverse amount of acts that are coming into Indianapolis and Fort Wayne, Ind., in the next few months.

MCT PHOTO

PHOTO

UNCLE KRACKER

POP

RAP AND HIP-HOP

COUNTRY MUSIC DARIUS RUCKER

2 CHAINZ

EMBLEM3

When: Jan. 30 Venue: Allen County War Memorial Coliseum in Fort Wayne, Ind. Tickets: $40-$55 Darius Rucker will bring his True Believers Tour to Indiana soon. Rucker, known for his hit song “Wagon Wheel,” was recently nominated for a Grammy for Best Country Solo Performance. Fellow country music artists Eli Young Band and David Nail will open for Rucker.

When: March 1 Venue: The Egyptian Room in Indianapolis Tickets: $49.50 Rapper 2 Chainz released his second studio album, “B.O.A.T.S. II: Me Time,” to lackluster sales figures and positive reviews in the middle of 2013. He is starting the new year with a tour to support his follow up to Grammy-nominated and gold-certified album “Based on a T.R.U. Story.” The 2 Good to be T.R.U. Tour will also include Pusha T and August Alsina.

When: Feb. 16 Venue: The Egyptian Room in Indianapolis Tickets: $35 After finishing in fourth place on “The X Factor USA,” brothers Wesley and Leaton Stromberg and their friend Drew Chadwick hit the studios to record their debut album, “Nothing To Lose.” The trio, which made Billboard’s Hot 100 list with the single “Chloe (You’re The One I Want),” is starting off the new year with a headlining tour.

DEMI LOVATO

ROCK

THE PINK FLOYD EXPERIENCE When: March 9 Venue: The Egyptian Room in Indianapolis Tickets: $25-$35 The Pink Floyd Experience will bring the psychedelic traditions of the influential progressive rock band to Indianapolis. Labeled as a “must-see experience” for Pink Floyd enthusiasts, six musicians work together to create an authentic concert with a light show.

When: Feb. 7 Venue: 8 Seconds Saloon in Indianapolis, 21 and older Tickets: $13-$20 Uncle Kracker, known for his hit singles “Smile” and “Follow Me,” visited Indianapolis last summer with Kid Rock and ZZ Top on the Best Night Ever Tour. He will return in February.

BRAD PAISLEY

WE THE KINGS

When: Feb. 27 Venue: Allen County War Memorial Coliseum in Fort Wayne, Ind. Tickets: $50 to $71 Brad Paisley will bring a little Southern warmth into the Indiana winter with his Beat This Winter Tour. Paisley, whose hits include “Mud On The Tires” and “Old Alabama,” extended his summer tour with a few wintertime dates. Joining him for these dates are Danielle Bradbery, winner of “The Voice,” and Chris Young, known for his single “You.”

When: March 23 Venue: Deluxe in Indianapolis Tickets: $25 We The Kings made a debut in 2007 with an album and the platinum single “Check Yes Juliet.” The band brought 2013 to an end by releasing its fourth album, “Somewhere Somehow,” and announcing dates for its latest tour. This Century and Crash the Party also will perform on The Art Of Tour.

MCT PHOTO

CHER

When: March 30 Venue: Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis Tickets: $35 to $80 Demi Lovato will hit Indianapolis on her Neon Lights Tour in support of her fourth studio album, “Demi.” The tour includes 27 shows across North America, and her show in Indianapolis will bring the tour to an end. Lovato will share the stage with artists Cher Lloyd, Little Mix and Fifth Harmony.

When: April 11 Venue: Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis Tickets: $39 to $150 Cher is touring to support her latest album, “Closer To The Truth,” with the Dressed To Kill Tour. Cher is expected to blow away audiences across North America on her eighth concert tour. All tickets purchased online through Ticketmaster include a copy of Cher’s latest album.

Coach Carter talks success, integrity Renowned speaker to discuss passion during Unity Week

|

LINDSEY RILEY CHIEF REPORTER features@bsudailynews.com

PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE MULTICULTURAL CENTER

Ken “Coach” Carter will speak at 7:30 tonight in Pruis Hall as part of Unity Week.

In 1999, Ken “Coach” Carter, head coach at a high school in California, locked out his undefeated basketball team from the gym to enforce his policy: if they didn’t make the grades, they couldn’t play the game. Since then Carter has caught national attention and has been portrayed in film. At 7:30 tonight in Pruis Hall, Carter will talk as part of Unity Week, which is in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Carter will share his life story and talk about using passion to succeed and change communities. “We looked at a number of other presentations he had done and felt he would be able to deliver a message

about passion, success, education and community engagement, which are things that honor the legacy of Dr. King,” Royer Engle said. “His focus on education is important at an institution where teaching is one of the main areas of study. His role as a basketball coach is very relatable in the state of Indiana, where basketball seems to be a way of life.” Six years after Carter’s tough-love effort with his team, Carter’s no-nonsense coaching was depicted on the big screen in the 2005 Blockbuster film “Coach Carter.” In the movie, Samuel L. Jackson portrayed Carter and starred alongside Channing Tatum, Ashanti and Octavia Spencer. Ro-Anne Royer Engle, director of the Multicultural Center, said Carter was selected as this year’s speaker because of how prominent he is and how relevant his message is to students and the community. His hard-hitting advice also has been captured in his

UNITY WEEK EVENT

ABOUT THE COACH

WHO

• From 1997 until 2002, Ken “Coach” Carter served as head coach of the Richmond High School boy’s basketball team in Richmond, Calif.

Ken “Coach” Carter WHAT

Unity Week speaker event WHEN

7:30 tonight WHERE

Pruis Hall COST

Free and open to the public book, “Yes Ma’am, No Sir: The 12 Essential Steps for Success In Life.” The lecture will close out with a Q-and-A session. Afterward, there will be a reception in the lobby where people will have a chance to meet the coach. “We hope the audience learns about overcoming obstacles to success, integrity in decisionmaking, finding and using your passion and the importance of education,” Royer Engle said. “These are all things that are important to Coach Carter and should resonate throughout

• Samuel L. Jackson portrayed him in the 2005 movie “Coach Carter.” The movie also inspired the book, Jasmine Jones’ “Coach Carter.” • Carter wrote the motivational book “Yes Ma’am, No Sir: The 12 Essential Steps for Success In Life.” his message. “We also hope audience members leave with the feeling they know a little more about the person behind the film ‘Coach Carter’ and what made him such an advocate for education and youth empowerment.” Coach Carter’s presentation is free and open to the public. For more information, please contact the Multicultural Center at 765-285-1344.


TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

NEWS

SUGAR BABY: Older men offer money, presents to college students for relationships | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “[The money is] the draw,� she said. “You’re essentially a business person. You’re your own businessman or woman and you’re going into it trying to get something out of it. And you can get a lot of money out of it. You can get thousands of dollars for like a month.� Kip Ellis, a Ball State senior, said he always had trouble paying for school, so he decided to give “sugaring� a try. Ellis made his profile for the first time when he interned in Chicago a few years ago and needed extra money. “It was horribly unsuccessful because I didn’t know what I was doing,� he said. Ellis has had a few online conversations, but he has not gone on any dates because he said there are not a lot of Sugar Daddies looking for gay Sugar Babies. “Being gay in the sugaring world is not a common thing because it’s usually girls who are in their 20s who find older men who just want to spoil them,� Ellis said. Both students use SeekingArrangement.com, a website used to connect potential Sugar Babies to benefactors offering monthly lifestyle budgets ranging from less than $1,000 to more than $10,000. The website recently released a press release announcing the

top 20 fastest growing Sugar Baby schools: Indiana University is No. 18, Ball State at No. 58 and Purdue University at No. 66. Seeking Arrangement targets college students looking to earn money to ease student debt. According to a press release, college students make up 42 percent of the website’s Sugar Baby membership. “A lot of these college students don’t have jobs and they’re fighting to pay student loans with increases in the cost of education,� said Leroy Velasquez, public relations manager for the website. “And rather than graduate with a financial burden on their back before they even get a job, they could just date a Sugar Daddy on Seeking Arrangement and graduate debt free.� Ellis said people often worry that sugaring is illegal, but he said he doesn’t consider it prostitution because they are engaging in a relationship. Indiana law defines prostitution as “a person who knowingly or intentionally: performs, or offers or agrees to perform, sexual intercourse or deviate sexual conduct; or fondles, or offers or agrees to fondle, the genitals of another person for money or other property.� The website maintains that its services are completely legal. Money is just one part of the business, Velasquez said, and it is not required for the

relationships to include sex. “It is considered one of the sex trades,� Ellis said. “But I think what sets sugaring apart is [that] your goal is not just to have one night only sex, that you’re building a relationship with someone, and I think that most people don’t understand that. They just think that what you’re doing is prostituting yourself out.� But Creo said people are correct to link sugaring to prostitution, she does not think either should be illegal. She said if a woman can make money using her body, she should be able to. “You’re a sex worker,� she said. “[Prostitutes] are sex workers, escorts are sex workers. [Sugaring] is just more legal because you’re technically in kind of a relationship.� Creo said being a Sugar Baby may be safer than being a prostitute. “By developing that relationship with the other person, you’re trying to make it safer than a potentially abusive onenight stand, which would be what prostitution and escorting is,� she said. Beyond the money, Creo said she found the idea of having someone older working as a mentor very appealing, which the website advertises as an added perk. So far, she has been on two first dates with different men. She said she hopes having a relationship

Don’t forget your friend’s birthday! 6HQGDFODVVL¿HGELUWKGD\ZLVKLQ WKH'DLO\1HZV

with a businessman can help her become a better businesswoman in the future. “So it’s like, you have these men — who are like 10, 15, 20 years older than you are — who have lived a lot more life than you have,� Creo said. “I find the idea of someone almost in a position of power ... who is willing to also back you as your own person and as for any other future career goals you have, [I] just find that interesting.� Both Ellis and Creo have been unsuccessful at finding a Sugar Daddy on the site, but that hasn’t stopped Ellis from looking. “I think there’s an interesting aspect of the dynamic between you and an older person because sometimes, dating is hard,� he said. “And kind of adding in another aspect to it can make it harder, but I think the allure of it is that you’re getting something more than just a relationship out of it. You’re both getting something that you wouldn’t normally get in a relationship with someone.� Ellis said the things he looks for in a Sugar Daddy are things he would look for in a real relationship, as well. “I want someone who’s an actual person and who doesn’t just want to have sex with you for money,� he said. “Like that’s the hard thing, I think. Most of the people you would find on those sites [are] kind of some-

AJ 276 Muncie, IN 47306 Phone: 765.285.8247 Fax: 765.285.8248

****** 4 bdrm, completely renovated apt. Avail August. Great location. 2 blks from campus. Util Paid. No pets. 896-8105

******* 3 bdrm Apts. 2 blks from campus. Avail May or August. Economical. Util Paid. No Pets. W/D DW A/C. Off street parking. 896-8105 ******** 1,2,3,4 bdrm Apts. Best locations. Avail. May or August. From $250 each. Some or all Util. paid. Walk to class. A/C, DW, W/D 896-8105 ********* 1 bdrm apts. Avail. May or August. 3 blks from campus. A/C, DW, W/D. Off st. parking. Util paid. No pets. Great locations. 896-8105 ********** Affordable! Walk to class. Great locations on 1,2,3,4 bdrm apts. Avail. May or August. Part or all Util. paid. A/C DW W/D. Off st. parking. No pets. walktoballstate.com 896-8105 ****1, 2 & 3 BR avail. Jan & next school yr. Great floor plan, AC, DW only 3 blks to campus! THE 400 APARTMENTS (765)288-6819 www.400apartments.com

1 or 2 br apts available May or August 2014-may or may not include utilities. Required application fee of $35.00 and security deposit for all application forms submitted. Showing appointments will be arraged. Contact Kerry @284-6313 or 744-2998 or email @ kwiggerly@prudentialindiana.com 1&2 bdrm apt. Hardwd fls. Aug lse. Ashland Ave. Some utils pd. Walk to BSU. No Dogs. 317-727-5847 1, 2 & 3bdr apts. Some utils pd. 14 blks from BSU. No Pets. Avil Aug 1st. 765-289-3971 3 bd apt. util pd 2 bth. W/D. close to bsu. 315 person. 315 South Mckinley 744-4649 or 358-4924 FREE INTERNET! Clean & quiet 1 bdrm apts, close to BSU. On site WS/DR,cedarsatbsu.com,286 2806 Free internet, U pay electric only Quality 2-3 bdrms. From $210 each W/D, D/W, 765-744-1079 joecoolproperties.blogspot.com Utilities paid. 811 W. Main. Unique mansion,1&2 br apt.765-744-0185 bsuoffcampus.com. 170 - Houses for Rent

 

- Harper Creo, on one of her dates as a Sugar Baby looked down upon,� she said. “You just have to be safe about it and you just have to be smart about it.� Looking to the future, Ellis said he is planning to move to Chicago after graduation. He said he might try sugaring again, but he doesn’t want it to be a necessity. “I need to try to be successful on my own,� he said. “I can’t just bank on some rich guy finding me attractive and wanting to date me.�

‡)UHHOLQHFODVVLILHGOLPLWHGWRGD\VSULQW ‡)UHHGD\VRQOLQH ‡SNJSHULWHP ‡LWHPVSHUVHPHVWHU ‡HPDLOLWHPVWRGQFODVVLILHG#EVXHGX DORQJZLWKQDPHDGGUHVVDQGSKRQHQXPEHU

Office Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 am - 5 pm www.bsudailynews.com/classifieds

 

***Now leasing for the 2014/2015 school yr. 1 Bdrm apt. $460/mo + utils, Studio apt. $410/mo + util. W/D. Bar-Tel Apartments, 1616 W. Gilbert St. Visit www.bsrentals.com or call Doug at 765-744-3593

“So I broke rule No. 1, which was don’t go to their house ... he also didn’t give me a picture, so that was rule No. 2. ... So I go there, and I’m a little tipsy. Rule No. 3: be clear minded. I met him and he’s a short and squat guy. ... I’m just like, ‘Oh god, I can’t even pretend to find you attractive, you are repulsive looking.’ “He offered to get me a drink and I was like, ‘No, I have my Starbucks. You can’t roofie me if that’s what you were going for.’ “So he said, ‘Let’s watch a movie,’ but we didn’t get to finish it because he was groping me the entire time. ... I don’t think you’re supposed to grope someone on the first date. “Some of the s--t he said was just like, ‘Well, why would I stop if I know you like it?’ and I’m just like, ‘That’s what rapists say. That’s not a good thing to hear.’ Nothing happened to me. He’s just a misogynistic bastard.�

$UH\RXJLYLQJVRPHWKLQJDZD\" New Category in the DN Classifieds! Absolutely Free

DN Classifieds   

A BABY DATE

FREE! FREE! FREE! ABSOLUTELY FREE!

Make checks payable to: The Ball State Daily News

  

one who’s like, ‘I want you to live with me and have sex with me all the time and then I will, in turn, pay for your schooling or give you money,’� A large age difference can strain a relationship, by how others perceive it, and can make it hard to find common friends, according to the National Healthy Marriage Resource Center. Jessica Stebbins, a licensed marriage and family therapist from Florida, said when joining the website for money, Sugar Babies can develop post-traumatic stress disorder as their values change throughout life. She has seen patients who have flashbacks, and the memories can impact their sexual lives because of the shame they may feel. Sugar Babies who keep consistent values through life are less likely to experience emotional conflicts from participating. “As they get older, it’s possible that their values change,� Stebbins said. “They want to be more of the family type of woman, become a mom and they may have a little bit of shame, but it wouldn’t be to the degree that others would. I mean, it’s possible to be a regret just as anybody else would feel regret over a dissonance they made in their past.� While maintaining there is nothing wrong with what she does, Creo has decided not to tell her family for now. “I don’t think it should be

$$ Save $$ 4 or 5 bdrm, 2 ba, 2 kit, bsmt, nice, clean, close to BSU, 317-727-7653 or visit www.ballurentals.com Call for details on Free Monthʟs Rent Nice 1, 3, 4, 5 & 6 Bdrm houses, W/D A/C,close to campus, August 2014-July 2015 Lease Call 765-759-5510 Leave a msg. *** 2 blks to Village. 2,3,4 bdrms for Rent. A/C, W/D, No pets. Avalible August. 1. Call 286-2808 *** 4 bdrm. village area, A/C, D/W, deck & off-str-prkg, Aug lease, no pets. very nice & clean! www.arerentals.com 765-747-9503 ****4 bdrm 2 bath at 825 W. Ashland W/D, C/A, all utils paid, $380/mo, No pets,Aug. lease. Call 765-760-2202 ***5,6,or7 bdr. 2 ba. village area. A/C, D/W, 3 levels, cathedral ceilings, deck, off-str pkrg, Aug. lease, no pets. www.arerentals.com 765-747-9503 ***RATCHFORD PROPERTIES*** •Great Apts. & Houses! •Best Locations for 1,2,3,4 BR on & Near Campus •Affordable Prices! •Some Utilities Paid! Laundry Facility, NO Pets. ***CALL OR TEXT 748-6407*** www.ratchfordproperties.com **Nice large 5 bdrm, 2 kitch. 2 bath C/A, W/D, off st. park 765-228-8458 or 765-749-4688.

 

****2-bdrm house, 1701 New York, W/D, 765-228-8458, 765-749-4688 2011 Washington behind Student CEnter. 3 bdr water & sewage paid. no pets. avail Aug. Walktoballstate.com 896-8105

*Ad must be submitted to dnclassified@bsu.edu to be eligible. * The Daily News has the right to revise or reject any advertisements. * The Daily News assumes no liability for content of the advertisement.

 

4 HUGE BEDROOMS

1408 W. Bethel

ABSOLUTLEY GORGOUS

2 Bath, C/A, W/D. Aug. $300/each. 749-9792

3 Bdrm House full basement Near BSU campus off street prkg W/D, A/C,Aug-Aug 765-215-4591

4 Huge Bedrooms

3 BDRM, very nice C/A, W/D, low utilities, off-street prkng, close to BSU, 2001 Ball Ave. 765 748 8425

VAULTED CEILINGS-BEAUTIFUL

3 Brdm, 1 full Ba. 2000 1/2 W Jackson. Close to campus. W/D, parking at back. $285ea, all util pd. 765-284-3646 or 765-744-5008 www.munciecollegerentals.com 3 or 4 bdr C/A, C/H ,W/D + Utils. Ball Ave 4 blks from Bethel Aug 1st. 765-289-3971 3-5 bedroom house. North Ball. bsuoffcampus.com 765-744-0185 4 & 5 bdrm houses, 3 blcks to student center. W/D, plenty of parking. Really nice. Call 765-228-3883 www.ludwickrentals.com 4 bdr Very Nice, Hrdw floors. W/D, off street prkg, Walk dist to campus, Call Eric at 317-825-8683 www.ballurental.com 4 BDRM, 1 & 1/2 bths, C/A, gas heat, W/D,o ff-street parking.1608 New York, garage, close to BSU 765 748 8425

1,2,3,4 bdrms. Lease 2014-2015. www.clunerentals.blogspot.com 765-744-1400 or 729-9321

4 bdrm. 609 N. Alameda. Spacious,1800 sq ft. 2 full baths, W/D, D/W, C/A, Finished bsmt, Off-Str Prkg. Call 286-1943

1520 N. WHEELING

Avail. Aug. 1st. $275/each C/A, W/D, D/W, 749-9792

4 Lg bdrms, 2 baths. 824 W. Beechwood. Behind SAE. C/A, D/W, W/D. Call 286-1943

4 Lg. bdrms, 2 full baths. 828 W. Beechwood. Behind SAE. W/D, D/W, 286-1943

4, 5, or 6 bdrm. Lrg. rooms, 2 lrg. ba., W/D, off st prkg, all utils includ. 501 N. Alameda. (765) 744-8269.

5 Bdrm. 1.5 Ba. 1428 W. Gilbert. Close to village. W/D bsmt, Off-srt prkg. Call 286-1943

5 Large Bedrooms 829 W. North St.

Spectacular 3 baths big rooms Dishwasher, Central Air, W/D $275/each Avail Aug 1. 749-9792

Clean 4 BR, 2 ba, Aug-Aug.215 S. Talley.W/D,C/A $285/ea.748-6175 D/W, bsmt. tiffanydpt@gmail.com

Great 3-5 bdrm. 2 ba. Dill St. C/A, W/D, crpted bsmt, good prkg, Aug. lease., $250-270/each, no pets. 765-396-9308 , 317-979-4335

 

Must See! 5 BR w/ swimming pool, built in fire pit, lg deck, bike racks, off st. prkg, W/D, C/A, D/W, landlord does yard & pool maint. 2014 lease. $1300 /mo. 765-405-1105 Nice 3 bdr. Close to BSU. 2 ba. Avail. Aug. A/C, stove, fridge, W/D. $395 /ea, utils incl. 765-348-6413 www.jahrentals.com, Nicest houses on campus. Many extras. Even a 6 bdrm. Also student parking available. Call 286-5216. Pd. Utilties & High Spd Internet Qlty 3-6 bdr. From $300 ea. Some hottubs 765-744-1079 joecoolproperties.blogspot.com Spring semester releases! 1-5 bedroom homes, new renovations, room leases available, low rates! Call now 765-286-2806

**

U.A.L.A.

**

University Area Landlord Association Why Rent from a UALA Landlord 1. We provide well-maintained

off-campus properties, 2. We respond promptly to the

needs of our tenants, and 3. Our landlords own properties

in the neighborhoods near campus‌ you can walk to class –no shuttles!

Search for properties at:

***BSU apts, close to campus, 1,2&3 bdrm,utils includ off-st prkg, Call765-228-8458 or 765-749-4688

!1505 Kimberly (behind LaFollette) 4@$325; 4bds; great house/yard /loc. full bsmt W/D May 760-3002

2 bdrm very nice house + sunrm, bsmt, gar, W/D, A/C, near BSU, Aug lse. 765- 289-0815

4 Brm House @1220 Neely. Avail Aug 1, 2014. $1200/mo + utils 765-649-8377

Newley renovated. 1-6 BR homes. Close to BSU. W/D, A/C, D/W. Rent:$300-$400 ech. 765-286-2806

www.UALAonline.org

Today’s birthday (1-21-14)

Your health and intellect grow stronger this year. Meditation builds power and peace. Fun remains a regular priority, so play with friends, family and kids. Enlist support to realize a dream. Being true to yourself pays off. Faith and generosity can be contagious. Patiently balance desires for both freedom and commitment. You can have it all. Share your love.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)Today is an 8 -- Your partnership harmony increases. Advance your big picture plan today and tomorrow. Do it for home and family. Work out any conflicts. A very profitable condition is in effect. Gather as many nuts as possible.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is an 8 -- You and a partner can stir things today and tomorrow. Follow a strong leader. Pay off old debts. Renew family bonds. Accept an offer of assistance. Offer support. Listen carefully, and be receptive. Negotiations resume.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is an 8 -- The pace and emotion runs high at home today and tomorrow. Calm your thoughts. Share what you’ve gathered. The boss is feeling generous.Your home and family require more attention. There’s enough to go around.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8 -- Today and tomorrow, you’re more assertive and innovative. Freedom and justice inspire you. Teach someone as you learn. Involve the group in the plan. Listen to the mood. Keep yourself grounded with time in nature.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)Today is a 7 -- Peak performance occurs now. Consider attending a class or seminar over the next two days. Do the numbers for your business plan. The news affects your decisions. Excellent party conditions tempt you to play.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)Today is a 7 -- Focus on work for the next two days.You have what you need at home. Provide great service and earn more money. Dig into a big job. Build your egg’s nest, stick by stick.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 9 -- The next two days are excellent for studying. Think and grow rich.You can learn quickly, so pay attention. Get ready to take action.You’re extra brilliant. Express your passion for a cause.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)Today is a 7 -- Love and fun are priorities today and tomorrow. Fly and be free. Have fun. You get what you want. Use your connections. Enjoy your love, surrounded by family and kindred spirits. Determine your stand. Say so.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)Today is a 7 -The next two days reveal a contemplative phase.Your credit rating’s going up. Your connections grow with synchronicity. Keep an eye on the competition. Venture farther out. Relax in hot water and re-charge.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)Today is an 8 -- A new assignment brings in more revenue. Work hard and make lots of loot today and tomorrow. Talk over details privately. Make a beneficial connection. A blinding insight could provide freedom.

___ (c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Visit us online Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)Today is an 8 -- Figure out your finances today and tomorrow. Review income and especially fixed expenses like insurance. Increase responsibility and earn more. Move a passionate cause forward simultaneously. Keep planning the logic. Entertain outrageous ideas.

www.ballstatedaily.com

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)Today is a 7 -- Schedule meetings for today and tomorrow.You’re gaining confidence. Being polite is a virtue worth practicing. Others respect your growing wisdom. You can always include another into your circle of friends. Integrate yourself deeper into your community.


PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

NEWS

Service, diversity last as legacy

ONLINE: Ranks for 4 online courses rise, several areas see changes

Groups use events as yearly reminder for civil rights leader

|

LAUREN CHAPMAN AND AUSTIN RUSSELL news@bsudailynews.com

For the last 11 years, Ball State has played host to a breakfast to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. The community breakfast, which led into youth retreats and a job fair, serves to bring representatives from Muncie to discuss bridging gaps in diversity and work toward fulfilling the dream of racial equality. Sanovia Garrett, a senior and student assistant at the Multicultural Center, has been a part of the breakfast since her childhood in Muncie. “It’s important to remember that programs like these shouldn’t be pushed to the side,” Garrett said. “They should be things that we put up at the forefront. We can’t say this is a day off just because it’s Martin Luther King [Jr.] Day, but it should be a day of volunteering, a day of sharing, a day of learning and growing.” Tasha Griffin, president of the Indiana Black Expo Muncie chapter, said she hopes the success of these kind of diversity focused community programs are a signal of hope for the future. “The events here at Ball State are great,” Griffin said. “I’m just excited to see what the future holds. I just hope that [students] rally around each and support each other in a nonjudgmental way so that we can continue to let Dr. King’s dream ring true.” The volunteer programs Monday focused primarily on King’s civil rights campaign, but the programs also highlighted diversity efforts in the community today, Ball State President Jo Ann Gora said. “It’s just a wonderful example of the collaboration between the university and the community,” Gora said.

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Troy McElvaney, a senior pre-medicine major, leads the Unity March with a poster of Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday. The march started at the Multicultural Center and went to the Scramble Light on McKinley Avenue. Students, faculty members and members of the community participated in the march, which was one of the starting events of Unity Week in honor of Martin Luther King Jr.

TODAY’S EVENTS “I STAND FOR” WALL AND “I AM” PHOTO SHOOT

9 a.m.-2 p.m. today L.A. Pittenger Student Center Participants will take photos with their “I Am” statement. MINORITY WORKSHOP

5-7 tonight L.A. Pittenger Student Center Participants go through simulation activities of various cultural and identity groups. KEN “COACH” CARTER

7:30 tonight Pruis Hall Ken Carter will speak about the importance of passion when it comes to success. Events, like the interactive exhibit Tunnel of Oppression and the Latino Student Union’s Latinopalooza, will be part of the Unity Week’s focus on diversity and will be open to the public.

DN PHOTO EMMA ROGERS

Ball State’s chapter of NAACP President Ebony Gray and Cameron Christian, a junior telecommunications major, hold signs during the Unity March on McKinley Avenue. The march was in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

“I think students need to understand who they are as learners,” she said. “If they need the classroom environment to set structure and keep them on track, then I think they should stay in the classroom. If they are self-motivated and can manage their own calendars and due dates without a lot of reminders, perhaps online is a good option.” Joe Pierson, a sophomore psychology and criminology major, took two online classes at Ball State after changing his major. “I do not think it’s better than actual classes since there is no monitoring, and the professor is not readily available to you,” he said. Despite this, Pierson said there were some advantages to these classes. “I loved the online classes because you were able to do the homework whenever you wanted, it just had to be completed by the last day of classes,” Pierson said. “I need to get more credits, and it’s convenient because I don’t live close to campus.” Classroom comparisons aside, Bott said the rankings show the work Ball State has put into online courses. She said the first push came with the Integrated Learning Institute, known as iLearn. The program uses instructional designers, instructional technologists and custom media developers to teach faculty members how to transition to teaching online. She said in the last two years, the school also became a part of the Quality Matters Program, a group that helps ensure quality online instruction. Last fall, online undergraduate courses changed from self-paced 71371 instruction to regular 8-week or 16-week classes, Bott said.

NEVER TRUST

A MARKET NAMED AFTER AN ANIMAL THAT TRAMPLES PEOPLE. Bull markets tempt investors with short-term gains. At TIAA-CREF, we invest wisely, for the long haul. It’s earned us the 2013 Lipper Award for Best Overall Large Fund Company. That’s how we deliver Outcomes That Matter.

Intelligent, informed investing. Award-winning performance. Get started at TIAA.org/award.

BEST OVERALL LARGE FUND COMPANY The Lipper Award is based on a review of 36 companies’ 2012 risk-adjusted performance.

The Lipper award is given to the group with the lowest average decile ranking of three years’ Consistent Return for eligible funds over the three-year period ended 11/30/12. TIAA-CREF was ranked against 36 fund companies with at least five equity, five bond, or three mixed-asset portfolios. TIAA-CREF mutual funds have achieved high rankings over various asset classes and market cycles. The 2012 Lipper/Barron’s overall ranking was determined by weighting five fund categories in proportion to their overall importance within Lipper’s fund universe. TIAA-CREF’s overall ranking was 10th out of 62 mutual fund families for one-year performance, and 29th out of 53 mutual fund families for five-year performance. TIAA-CREF did not qualify for the 10-year ranking. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

Consider investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses carefully before investing. Go to www.tiaa-cref.org for product and fund prospectuses that contain this and other information. Read carefully before investing. TIAA-CREF Individual & Institutional Services, LLC, and Teachers Personal Investors Services Inc. ©2013 Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association – College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF), 730 Third Avenue, New York, NY, 10017. C11806A

50210003 C11806A FTM Never Trust 11.125x10.5 NWSPRNT_1.indd


DN 1-21-14