Page 1

LESS THAN E-FFECTIVE

DN WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15, 2014

THE DAILY NEWS

Research shows students learn less when studying online textbooks for class

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

Flu causes 3 deaths statewide

RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER

|

rmpodnar@bsu.edu

« You can’t learn as efficiently. Anybody who tells you they are as good or better is wrong. »

Health Center out of vaccines, students sent to local pharmacies RACHEL BARRY STAFF REPORTER | rebarry@bsu.edu

DAVID DANIEL, a psychology professor at James Madison University

As the flu season reaches its height, three Hoosiers have died due to the illness. The H1N1 virus, also called type A influenza and “swine flu,” killed the three people. The first death came in December and two others died afterward, said Ken Severson, media relations coordinator for the Indiana State Department of Health. All three deaths occurred north of Indianapolis. Flu vaccines are no longer available at the Amelia T. Wood Health Center, so students are being deferred to places like Walgreens and CVS. Last week, the Health Center experienced students coming in with flu symptoms and many tested positive for the H1N1 virus. In 2009, the H1N1 pandemic killed 40 Hoosiers, although officials don’t expect this year’s outbreak to affect the same number of people, The Associated Press reported. Deidre Dorman, the director of the Health Center, said the center has a plan to work with the Office of Housing and Residence Life and other offices on campus to better clean up the campus and accommodate students if another outbreak like 2009 were to happen. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends an annual flu shot to reduce the likelihood of contracting the flu.

See FLU, page 3

DN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION TAYLOR IRBY

T

he e-textbook program Ball State officially adopted this semester to lower the cost of textbooks may not be the most efficient way to learn, according to some studies. Courseload eContent Readiness Program allows professors to opt-in for an e-texbook versus a conventional textbook. Students are automatically charged for the book and the content is accessible on Blackboard. See E-BOOKS, page 3

Step off campus, head downtown ‘GOLF FAMILY’ REMEMBERS Muncie’s independent shops showcase music, cycling, photography SEE PAGE 6

ROTATING POSITIONS

Men’s volleyball player makes jump from offense to defense after tearing rotator cuff, labrum SEE PAGE 4

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

April 25, 1933 Born in Evansville, Ind. 1955 Earned bachelor’s degree from Ball State

FORMER BALL STATE COACH Students, coworkers honor 35-year career, service to university |

ANTHONY LOMBARDI CHIEF REPORTER ajlombardi@bsu.edu

For about 60 years, Earl Yestingsmeier stood in the crowd and supported Ball State’s golf team. On Tuesday at his funeral, about 50 current and former team members stood up in his honor at the request of Ball State golf head coach Mike Fleck. Then Fleck paused, fighting back tears. “Coach not only impacted the lives of all these men,” he said. “He impacted the lives of their

parents, spouses, children, Ye s t i n g s grandchildren ... so many oth- meier came ers that are associated with to Ball State these team members. This from Evansright here, this is Coach’s golf ville, Ind., and family and legacy.” received his After Yestingsmeier retired in bachelor’s de1998, the former coach missed gree in 1955 three tournaments. and his masEarl Yestingsmeier “It was amazing; it blows me ter’s degree in in 1993 away,” Fleck said of Yestings- 1958. Alumnus, meier’s dedication. “You name After gradu- former coach it — Coach was there.” ation, he died Thursday And if Yestingsmeier was worked his unable to make it to an event, way up from he’d pay a visit to Fleck’s office athletic ticket manager to asasking for results the next day. sistant director of alumni rela“It’s an honor to be associ- tions. He was later named both ated with the greatest family in sports information director college golf,” he said. and golf coach, a dual title he 1. CLOUDY 2. MOSTLY CLOUDY “The impact that Coach had carried for 36 years. 3. PARTLY CLOUDY on Ball State University, college golf and golf around the See MEMORIAL, page 4 world is well documented.”

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

MUNCIE, INDIANA

Yestingmeier’s career

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6. RAIN

7. PERIODS OF RAIN

FORECAST TODAY  Chance for snow High: 24 Low: 18

11. SNOW FLURRIES

12. SCATTERED FLURRIES

1958 Earned master’s degree from Ball State 1959 Started as sports information director at Ball State 1963 Became men’s golf head coach at Ball State 1985 Received the Alumni Association Benny Award for dedicated service and leadership 1994-96 Served as president of the Golf Coaches Association of America THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

1998 Retired from Ball State

2004 Earned Ball State’s Distinguished Alumni 5. SUNNY 4. MOSTLY SUNNY Award 2007 Press box at Scheumann Stadium named in the Yestingsmeiers’ honor

9. SCATTERED SHOWERS

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

10. DRIZZLE

A rain and snow mix is on the way later today. The temperature will fall and snow could take over for the rest of the week. - Michael Behrens, chief weather forecaster 13. SNOW SHOWERS

VOL. 93, ISSUE 67

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY EGYPT DECIDES ON DRAFT NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

5 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT EGYPT’S CONSTITIONAL VOTE

4.

CHARTER REVISION The new charter has been heavily amended from the Morsi-era version, which was among the key catalysts of anger over his administration. The new charter would ban political parties based on religion, give women equal rights and protect the status of minority Christians.

5.

WHAT’S NEXT The adoption of the draft constitution will be taken as an endorsement of the postcoup political roadmap. But it is not likely though to stop the chaos that has engulfed Egypt or the near daily street protests by Morsi supporters.

12 - SCATTERED FLURRIES

SATURDAY Scattered snow showers High: 25 Low: 15 14 - SCATTERED SNOW SHOWERS

SUNDAY Mostly sunny High: 32 Low: 20

1. 2. 3.

THURSDAY Scattered flurries High: 33 Low: 20

12 - SCATTERED FLURRIES

SIXTH TIME IS A CHARM Before this week’s vote, Egyptians have gone to the polls five times since the 2011 revolution that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

FEARS OF VIOLENCE Turnout was relatively high, especially in Cairo and other big cities, as the polls opened, with lines of dozens of jubilant voters in some areas, but worries about Islamic militant violence kept many people at home after the bombings and gun battles that followed Morsi’s ouster.

POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

FRIDAY Scattered flurries High: 24 Low: 12

CAIRO (AP) — Egyptians voted on a draft constitution Tuesday, in a referendum that will decide whether the country adopts a text drawn up under the military-backed interim government that ousted Egypt’s Islamist president in a July coup. Here are five things to know about the vote.

THE STAKES ARE HIGH The vote is officially for a revised constitution that would eliminate Morsi’s Islamistdrafted charter and enshrine the military’s vision of their nation’s future. But the balloting is widely seen as a referendum on whether military chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, who led the coup against Morsi, should himself run for president.

THE FORECAST

04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

SERVICE DIRECTORY

MCT PHOTO

Sayed Ahmed, 27, visits his brother, Moustafa, 36, in intensive care at Cairo’s Kasr El Aini Hospital. Moustafa Ahmed was shot in the head by police in Alexandria on Jan. 28, 2011, caught in the crossfire as police clashed with anti-government protesters.

6 MONTHS AFTER MILITARY COUP AID BILL WOULD BRING BACK VIOLENCE HIGHLIGHTS TROUBLES $1.5 BILLION TO GOVERNMENT CAIRO (AP) — A referendum on a new constitution laid bare the sharp divisions in Egypt six months after the military removed the elected Islamist president, with pro-army voters lining up Tuesday outside polling stations, singing patriotic songs, kissing images of Egypt’s top officer and sharing upbeat hopes for their troubled nation. Sporadic violence flared across much of the country, leaving 11 dead, with protesters burning tires and pelting police with rocks and firebombs, creating just enough tension to keep many voters at home. Still, the first of two days of voting yielded telling signs that the national sentiment was overwhelmingly behind military chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, whose possible presidential run later this year has grown more likely by the day. That a career army officer might be Egypt’s next president has raised questions about the future of democracy in Egypt.

WASHINGTON (AP) — A spending bill in Congress would restore $1.5 billion in aid to Egypt, but only on condition that the Egyptian government ensures democratic reform. The bill links the $1.3 billion in military aid and $250 million in economic aid to Egypt’s sustaining its security relationship with the U.S. and abiding by the Egypt-Israeli peace pact. A Senate Appropriations Committee summary of the bill says some of the aid would be given only if the secretary of state certifies that Egypt has held a national referendum, supports a democratic transition and holds democratic elections. The U.S. cut hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Egypt in October in response to the military coup that overthrew the Cairo government and to a crackdown on protesters.

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens ASST. NEWS EDITOR Sam Hoyt

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz ASST. FEATURES EDITOR Ryan Howe

SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

72HRS EDITOR Kourtney Cooper MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Taylor Irby

ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile

DESIGN EDITORS Daniel Brount Ellen Collier GRAPHICS EDITOR Stephanie Redding

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITOR Cooper Cox

WEDNESDAY

24/7 Crossword

ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty

50¢ 22oz MUGS

Sudoku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Michael Mepham

Level: Hard

SOLUTION FOR TUESDAY.

ACROSS 1 UNDER SIEGE 6 RAUL CASTRO’S COUNTRY 10 IRATE 14 SHEEPLIKE 15 A LONG WAY OFF 16 LILY VARIETY 17 GIVE BIRTH TO A BABY ELEPHANT, SAY 18 *BROADCASTER OF MANY TV GAMES 20 ACTING THE QUIZMASTER 22 MINK KIN 23 LIKE SOME SIMPLE QUESTIONS 25 DRESS LIKE A KING OR FOR THE RING 28 “I’D RATHER NOT” 30 SAY CONVINCINGLY 32 BROTHER 34 HIGHER LIMB 35 VASE-SHAPED JUG 36 “THE TREASURE OF THE __ MADRE” 38 __ BALLS: HOSTESS TREATS 39 DOG BREED, A TYPE OF WHICH BEGINS THE AN-

SWERS TO STARRED CLUES 41 DAWN TO DUSK 42 “BETTER LUCK NEXT TIME!” 44 CHOOSES 45 IT MAY BE MASSIVE OR MASSAGED 46 __ SAX 47 NARROW STRIP 48 LODE DEPOSITS 49 GREG’S SITCOM WIFE 52 IMPERSONATING 54 THIN-LAYERED ROCK 56 NANCY DREW, E.G. 59 *SEEMINGLY UNFITTING NAME FOR WRIGLEY FIELD VINES 63 BRITISH COLUMBIA NEIGHBOR 64 JIM DAVIS POOCH 65 OPTIC LAYER 66 GO ALONG 67 MAKE (ONE’S WAY) 68 AUTOMATIC “P”? 69 YIELDS (TO) DOWN 1 __ BURGER, VEGGIE BRAND THAT ORIGINATED IN

FLORIDA 2 PERÓN AND GABOR 3 *LIKE NEWLY SHAVED LEGS, PER SOME RAZOR ADS 4 WISHES ONE HAD 5 MANY “GLEE” CHARACTERS 6 HALF-__: COFFEE ORDER 7 WHAT WEATHER BALLOONS MAY BE MISTAKEN FOR 8 RON BURGUNDY’S DOG 9 BURNING CRIME 10 PRÍNCIPE’S ISLAND PARTNER 11 NHL GREAT BOBBY 12 TOUGH THING TO BE STUCK IN 13 WHAT MOM HAS THAT DAD DOESN’T? 19 LINKS GOAL 21 WORKED ON, AS A BONE 24 IN THE PAST 26 *ONE CHECKING CROSSINGS 27 INCENSE 28 RIBBONS ON A PLATE 29 TURNCOAT BENEDICT 31 FLASHY FLYNN

33 SENDS TO THE CANVAS 35 GREEK VOWEL 36 SQUABBLES 37 RECIPIENT OF MANY RETURNS: ABBR. 40 POPULAR TABLET 43 SANG ONE’S OWN PRAISES 47 MOUTH MOISTURE 48 ANTSY 50 LETTER BEFORE SIGMA 51 NOT WIMP OUT 53 SACRO- ENDING 55 CONTINUALLY 57 QUAKER PRONOUN 58 TILLING TOOLS 59 HOOD’S WEAPON 60 LAUDATORY POEM 61 REASON FOR CONTRITION 62 SHAGGY OX

ballstatedaily.com

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

Snow removal costs thousands Clearing sidewalks, streets after extreme weather means long hours and tons of salt good access path to all buildings [and that] emergency exit doors [are] clear and operable,” he said. “[Doors] can’t open when there are piles of snow behind the door.” Freshman Ben Mcintosh thought campus would have beewn safer if the crews had not shown up to work at all. “They ended up simply packing the snow down until it was as slick as ice,” he said. “It would have been safer for students had they just left the snow and done nothing.” Some students complimented Ball State’s road crews, saying the roads on campus were better than those off campus. “I had no issues with any of the roads on campus,” Gabbi Boyd, a sophomore theater major, said. “The second you stepped off campus, all the roads were still covered in snow and ice. They’re not Ball State’s responsibility, though.” Grounds crew members had to put in overtime hours in order to prepare campus for the return to school.

As students returned to classes after a snowstorm last week, adaptations to extreme cold and snowfall allowed sidewalks to be manageable, if a little slippery. Kevin Kenyon, associate vice president of facilities, said despite the large amount of snow causing them to change their removal tactics, there was nothing unusual about the snow clearing approach. Crews had to use plows instead of power brooms to clear sidewalks because of the snow threshold, even though it took more time. Twenty tons of salt were used, until temperatures fell below 15 degrees when salt no longer works. Facilities spent $3,600 on ice melter to clear walks, steps and ramps. Kenyon said the clearing priorities were focused on sidewalks, wheelchair ramps and main roadways. “We make sure we have a

EMPLOYEES

GAS

Hours worked each day

Fuel consumed in gallons

15

Unleaded

12

Diesel

9

14.6 573.5 573.50

SALT

Dollars based on weight

6

$1,600 Road salt $1,600

3

$3,600 $3,600

Ice melter

0 J an .5 J an .6 J an .7 J an .8 J an .9 J an . 10 J an . 11

|

RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER rmpodnar@bsu.edu

COST OF STORM CLEANUP Ball State crews worked overtime to clear campus after extreme weather dropped more than a foot of snow. Here is a breakdown of cost, resources and time.

CAMPUS

Acreage cleared Types of vehicles deployed

Students walk past Bracken Library as it continues snow Jan. 5. Twenty tons of salt were used around campus, said Kevin Kenyon, associate vice president of facilities.

A total of 29 grounds crew members worked 26 hours of overtime from Jan. 5 through Tuesday. During the school closure days, eight grounds crew employees stayed in local hotels so they could avoid the commute home and continue working. Kenyon said the grounds

16

Trucks 77

Loaders Miscellaneous vehicles

Service drives/ roads

35 35

8

Tractors

crew understands it’s their responsibility during the winter to take on extra hours. “[It] may take additional hours than a normal work schedule,” he said. “They realize the reason they are here in the winter is for snow removal; we don’t do a lot of planting flowers in winter.

68

Parking lots

EQUIPMENT

DN FILE PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Miles cleared 34

Sidewalks

2

Streets

SOURCE: Kevin Kenyon, associate vice president of facilities

12.5 12.5 DN GRAPHIC ALAN HOVORKA

E-BOOKS: University program FLU: Misconceptions may keep some from vaccination HOW A VACCINATION PREVENTS INFLUENZA saves cost of cover price, may cost extra study time by using electronic books 111 | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

DN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION TAYLOR IRBY

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

PRICE COMPARISON

The program gives students “JAVA SOFTWARE a discount of up to 65 percent STRUCTURES: DESIGNING off cover price and one pubAND USING DATA lisher is offering a 70 percent STRUCTURES,” FOURTH discount this semester. For EDITION some classes, the cheapest List price: $118-$123 option would be to rent a traBall State cost: $50.40 ditional book, but Courseload would allow students to have Student payment, including the content for longer. Courseload and Ball State The Ball State eTextbook fee: $64.40 Initiative says e-textbooks Amazon new print copy: “enhance collaboration and $123.58 improve learning.” However, Amazon used print copy: students don’t learn as effi$118.60 ciently, said a James Madison Amazon Kindle edition: University professor, who has $95.29 conducted studies on e-books. Amazon rent: $48.67 David Daniel, a psychology professor at James Madison, has conducted a number of studies the textbook in addition to the concerning e-books. e-textbook for an additional “You can learn just as well fee through Courseload. by giving yourself more time,” Yasemin Tunc, assistant vice Daniel said. “You can’t learn as president for academic solutions, efficiently. Anybody who tells said five more class sections are you they are as good or bet- using the program this semester ter is wrong. The first goal is for a total of 73 sections. they have to be readable and She said this program is meant that’s where they fall to give faculty an down. They are not easy way to switch to as readable.” e-textbooks. They are He thinks the eco“Electronic textnomic reasons are trying to books have been not great enough to pretend the around for quite push e-textbooks some time, and I enbecause “time is computer is couraged them to money.” use it because it was paper, but the New interactive so much cheaper features may not be computer is not than the hard cover beneficial, either. paper. textbook,” she said. Daniel said students The Student Govusually bypass DANIEL, ernment Association those extra features. a university psychology is looking to create “They aren’t stick- professor at James legislation giving the ing to the fundamen- Madison University university feedback tal property, which is in a response to stuhow to make it more dent concerns this readable,” he said. “They are try- semester about the requirement. ing to pretend the computer is “[We] found this important paper, but the computer is not because a number of students paper. There is something about currently enrolled have said reading it on a screen versus pa- they are more so accustomed to per that makes it harder for your having a regular textbook than eyes to fixate.” having an electronic one,” said Students have the option to James Wells, SGA academic afpurchase a printed version of fairs committee chairperson.

«

»

Although the H1N1 virus is this year’s main flu strain, there are several in any given year. Those who received the Health Center’s vaccine got one that protected from the H1N1 virus. Walgreens offers vaccines that protect from four types and CVS offers shots that protect from three. Both pharmacies currently have vaccines available and do not require an appointment. The cost for vaccinations is $31.99 without insurance. Lance Villaluz, a pharmacist at a Muncie Walgreens, said his store had given out more than 1,000 vaccines this flu season. There is often a misconception that the vaccine can give a person the flu. Dorman said this is not the case. Although reactions to the vaccine may feel like flu symptoms, these symptoms persist for a shorter time. She said the most common reaction to the vaccine include redness and tenderness at the site of injection, but around 30 percent of adults that get the vaccine suffer from headaches, muscle aches and fatigue. This mirroring of symptoms may lead some to inaccurately believe the vaccine has given them the flu. Kristen Walters, a senior education major, said she has gotten sick from the vaccine she gets yearly for the past three years. “For me, the benefits outweigh the risk,” Walters said. However, she said her father stopped taking the vaccine because he always seemed to get sick after getting it. If a student believes they have the flu, they should seek medical attention within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms. Dorman said they can get Tamiflu, an antiviral medication, to help reduce the severity of the symptoms and decrease its duration. In addition, she said a person needs to drink fluids, rest and perhaps start a multivitamin.

The flu is a virus that can affect people of all ages. If a person doesn’t get treated, the flu can lead to more serious complications. A way to prevent the illness is with a vaccination.

1

The first step is to get a vaccination from a local provider. There are two vaccination options.

million workdays are lost on average

per year due to the flu.

381,000

A nasal spray can give you a weakened version of the virus.

Americans were hospitalized because of the flu last season.

6.6million

A shot in the arm can administer a dead version of the virus.

cases of flu-associated illnesses popped up last season.

WHEN TO GET VACCINATED

2

• Vaccinations start in October and continue to be available until mid-January. • New flu strains appear every year, so it is important to continue to be vaccinated.

Antibodies form in the immune system and “attack” the flu virus. The antibodies know that the virus is a foreign invader and work to destroy it.

DIFFERENT VACCINES

• monovalent helps to keep the body immune from a single flu virus. • trivalent helps keep the body immune from three flu viruses: H3N2, H1N1 and a type B. • quadrivalent helps to keep the body immune from four flu viruses: H3N2, H1N1 and two type Bs.

The body creates antibodies that attach to the virus. The antibodies destroy the virus.

FLU VACCINATIONS ADMINISTERED in millions of doses Seasonal vaccines H1N1 vaccines in 2009

3

The antibodies are encoded to remember the virus. When your body becomes infected with the live virus, the body knows to send out the antibodies to destroy the virus.

350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

SOURCES: CDC.GOV, FLU.GOV, NLM.NIH.GOV, PUBLICHEALTH.VA.GOV

2009

2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

DN GRAPHIC: ASHLEE HAYES

12-YEAR-OLD SHOOTS CLASSMATES New Mexico student wounds 2 in attack stopped by teacher | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ROSWELL, N.M. — A 12-yearold New Mexico boy drew a shotgun from a band-instrument case and shot and wounded two classmates at his middle school Tuesday morning before a teacher talked him into dropping the weapon and he was taken into custody, officials and witnesses said. Gov. Susana Martinez said a boy was critically injured

and a girl was in serious condition following the shooting at Berrendo Middle School in Roswell. The students were in the gym, where they typically hang out before classes start during cold and inclement weather, she said. The 12-year-old pulled a shotgun and opened fire there at about 8 a.m. He was “quickly stopped by one staff member who walked right up to him and asked him to set down the firearm, which he did,” Martinez said. Superintendent Tom Burris said the school’s faculty had participated in active shooter training, and they responded

appropriately Tuesday. “In the 10 seconds that transpired from the time of this thing starting until the teacher had control of the weapon, there was no cowardice,” Burris said. “There was protection for our kids. Everyone acted and did their duties today at Berrendo Middle School.” Officials at University Medical Center in Lubbock, Texas, said an 11-year-old boy was flown there in critical condition and a 13-year-old girl arrived in serious condition. The governor said a staff member received very minor injuries but declined medical care because he wanted to

stay and help. Odiee Carranza, an eighth grader at Berrendo, said she was walking to the school gym when the suspect bumped into her as he rushed past. She told him to be careful, and he apologized and continued on. The boy ran to the gym, where he pulled a gun from a band instrument case and fired at the students. “Then he shot up in the sky, then dropped the gun, and then some teacher grabbed the kid that had the gun,” Carranza said. Carranza described the shooter as a “smart kid and a nice kid.”


PAGE 4 | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

/////////// THE

HAPS

EVENTS THIS WEEK

TODAY Follow along as the women’s basketball team looks for back-to-back wins against Bowling Green at 6 p.m.

Look for coverage of the men’s basketball team as it travels to Athens, Ohio, for an 8 p.m. start time.

THURSDAY Look for a breakdown of the skills behind serving a volleyball, complete with a demonstration video.

Injuries force veteran to adjust Torn rotator cuff, labrum push player into libero position

|

DAVID POLASKI ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR @DavidPolaski

Most players aren’t asked to learn a new position toward the end of their career. Doing it while rehabbing a torn rotator cuff and labrum almost seems unfair. It’s the scenario that Larry Wrather faced during the offseason. The fifth-year senior was faced with learning how to play libero for the Ball State men’s volleyball team after years of playing as an outside attacker. The injury and subsequent surgery on his right shoulder prevented Wrather from playing the position he was so acquainted with, putting a strain on him both physically and psychologically. “Being in the sling right away and not being able to do anything at all was really frustrating,” he said. “Having to get up at 5 a.m. and cheer on the guys, trying to do whatever I could, it sucked. ... It’s never fun sitting on the side and feeling helpless.” Head coach Joel Walton wanted Wrather to be able to help the team, but it was obvious he wouldn’t have full range of mo-

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Senior Larry Wrather bumps the ball in the match against Scared Heart on Saturday at Worthen Arena. This was the first game he had played since April 2012 because of a torn rotator cuff and labrum.

tion back for a long time. “It’s normally about a sixto nine-month, maybe even 12-month, recovery,” Walton said. “As we were working him back into the mix, we wanted to play him back as a libero.” With such a wide range of recovery time, Walton felt it was best to be safe with Wrather and allow some of his younger outside attackers a chance to prove their worth. Although Wrather hoped to

immediately jump back to his old position, he understood he wasn’t physically ready and that playing libero was a way for him to work his way back onto the court. The rules of playing libero took a while for him to get used to. The new position prevented him from rotating to the front row, dictating he do nothing but play defense and pass. Instead of throwing down attacks, he was digging them while

trying to protect and strengthen his repaired shoulder. He said he believes the injury was caused from all the wear and tear put in his right shoulder since he started playing volleyball. “I had never played in the left back position before, but it felt great to help the team,” he said. Helping the team is all Wrather said he cares about. An emotional player, he rarely tries to hide what he’s feeling on the

court. Making the switch from a glamorous outside hitter position to the more physical libero position didn’t faze him. “As long as you’re out there trying to get a win, there’s no reason to [think] that you’re any less [important] than anybody else,” he said. Staying focused proved to be one of the most difficult tasks for Wrather to overcome. After spending his career attacking, he was forced to reel himself in and remember that all he can do is defend. Not only that, but he was forced to battle the mental aspect of coming back from a serious injury. Despite feeling fully healed after about six months, he occasionally let the fear of reinjury creep into his mind. “I’m basically thinking, ‘Oh, I don’t want to tear it again. What’s going to happen if I hit this ball one way or the other?’” he said. “And it probably took me a good year to get back into the mindset of not being afraid to hit the ball the way I want to.” Over time, Wrather has seen his time in practice increase, playing both libero and outside attacker. He’s showing the ability to play two positions effectively, becoming a dual threat for Walton to use. Walton said he’s watching Wrather’s shoulder closely, not wanting to overwork him and hoping he can last the entire season.

Before Saturday, the last time he played during the season was in a conference tournament match in April 2012. After all the rehab, all the learning that went along with the new position and all the waiting, it was time to step into the starting lineup again. He sat on the bench Saturday, just minutes left before his team began the match against Sacred Heart. The announcer began reading the starting lineups to the crowd. It was his turn. Wrather quickly jumped up and began running through the tunnel his teammates create when starting lineups are announced. He slapped his teammates’ hands, giving high-fives as he made his way onto the court. “The Wizard of Worthen, Larry Wrather,” the announcer said, his voice booming through the arena as fans stood and cheered at the sound of Wrather’s nickname. It was the first time the name has been used in nearly two years. His arms and right shoulder were ready to play outsider attacker if necessary. His legs and feet were prepared for the quick cuts and split-second reactions needed to play libero. He emerged from the manmade tunnel with a smile plastered on his face. Whichever of the two roles he could be asked to play, he doesn’t care. He’ll be ready for either.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Freshmen bring ‘fierce’ mindset during practices, carrying offense Turner leads team in minutes played, points per game

|

DAVID K. JONES CHIEF REPORTER @dkjones_BSU

PLAYER COMPARISON M. Alstork

24.5

Minutes per game Average points per game Field goal percentage

Z. Turner

31.7

On a revamped Ball State of12.7 fense, freshman guard Zavier 8.8 Turner has been a consistent contributor. His work ethic is .392 a bright spot for head coach .453 James Whitford. “He won’t ever take a rep Today, Ball State (3-10, 0-2 off of practice ever,” Whit- MAC) will travel to Athens, ford said. “I always give him a Ohio, to face the Ohio Bobchance to have a sub in there cats (11-4, 1-1 MAC). and he won’t do it.” “I feel like our guys are Turner originally signed his making progress,” Whitford letter of intent to play for Ball said. “It’s harder to sell that State during his junior year message when you’re not in 2012 at Pike High School. winning — it really is.” The 5-foot-9 IndianapoBall State played arguably lis native got off to an fast its best basketball at Kent start in his first three games, State on Saturday, holding shooting 10-of-14 from the the lead until the 11-minthree-point distance while ute mark of the second half. averaging 17.7 Turner managed points per game. to score 12 points Since then, he has and grab three reWe’re gained the attention bounds, but he of the opposition moving in turned the ball over and the media as he four times in his 33 leads the nation in the right minutes of play. free throw shooting direction. It “We’re moving in at 95 percent on 38the right direction,” will feel good Whitford said. “It of-40 shooting. “He improved as when we will feel good when a player and playwe can crack a few maker on the court,” can crack a of these [wins].” sophomore forward few of these Whitford will see Bo Calhoun said. “I a familiar face today believe he handles [wins]. in Ohio head coach the pressure that’s Jim Christian, who been put on him JAMES he coached with at WHITFORD, very well.” Miami during the head coach Although his av1995-96 season. erages have levWhitford served as eled off recently, Turner is an administrative assistant averaging 31.7 minutes per while Christian was an assisgame, which is sixth-highest tant coach. in the Mid-American ConferHe isn’t over analyzing ence. Turner now averages the coaching matchup. He’s 12.7 points and four assists remained focused on the a game, which are both team team’s improvement through bests. out the season. Whitford said Turner and “We’re practicing way betfellow freshman Mark Al- ter now than we were in the stork have similar approach- beginning of the year,” Whites to the game. ford said. “We just have to “They are both fiercely keep grinding and keep getcompetitive players,” he said. ting better.”

«

»

Pallbearers take Earl Yestingsmeier’s casket from the funeral Tuesday. The former men’s golf head coach died Thursday at the age of 80.

DN PHOTO LAUREN CHAPMAN

MEMORIAL: Players reflect on former coach’s career | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 As sports information director, Yestingsmeier produced statistics with meticulous detail, said Mark Popovich, who worked as a student assistant under Yestingsmeier in the ’60s. He was the first to assemble a history book of Ball State sport’s statistics and records. He kept the sports information director position even after becoming the men’s golf head coach in 1963, something that is unheard of now, said Joe Hernandez, associate athletic director. “Ball State pay wasn’t that great,” Popovich said with a laugh. “[His work] was a testament to his love of Ball State and his desire to help the institution. ... He advanced the reputation [of the university].” During his time as head coach, Yestingsmeier’s teams won 107 tournament titles, won six Mid-American Conference championships and played in 11 NCAA Tournaments. Four of his players — Brian Tennyson, Jeff Gallagher, Denny Hepler and Scott Steger — went on to play on the PGA Tour, according to Ball State Sports, and 89 of his golfers went on to teach professionals or went to golf management positions. Senior Tyler Merkel said he came to Ball State partially because of Yestingsmeier.

“He went to every men’s and women’s basketball game — he would never miss them,” Merkel said. “Every football game, he was there. He was just Ball State, through and through. He did everything there was to do for Ball State. It was just awesome that he really supported our golf team as much as he did throughout his career.” In the early ’90s, Fleck met Yestingsmeier during a visit to Ball State’s campus. Yestingsmeier initially told Fleck he wouldn’t be able to play golf at the university. Fleck wasn’t “good enough” to play for the coach that was described as a fiery competitor, a title he held even late in his life. By the recommendation of Paul Bessler, one of Yestingsmeier’s former players, Fleck made the team. It was a decision that Yestingsmeier would not regret and one for which Fleck remains thankful. Yestingsmeier never had children of his own, so athletes, students and fellow faculty became part of his family. “The love that he had for his players, whether it be current players, former players or future players ... he wanted to know what all those guys were up to,” Fleck said. “If you talked to the 270 plus letterwinners that have gone through this program in the last 50 years, all of them would say that

« The love that he had for his players, whether it be current players, former players or future players ... he wanted to know what all those guys were up to. » MIKE FLECK, current men’s golf head coach Coach is the guy, that he is the patriarch of Ball State golf.” During his time playing for Yestingsmeier, Fleck learned more than how to improve his game on the green. “The concept of working hard and being passionate and doing it with a purpose and being committed ... all of the things that encompass our program today, he’s had such a huge influence over,” Fleck said. He took over as the team’s head coach after Yestingsmeier’s retirement 16 years ago. “Luckily, Coach saw something along the way that inclined him to give me that chance,” Fleck said. “And here I am 16 years into a coaching tenure at my alma mater and couldn’t be more blessed or honored to be doing what I’m doing.” Yestingsmeier also hired Popovich and Hernandez. “He was concerned with us,” Popovich said of the time he spent working for Yestingsmeier in his 20s. “The people that worked for him in the office — just how we were doing — [he was concerned] with our grades and mind-

ful of the fact that we might have to miss something if we had a test.” Hernandez even met his wife through Yestingsmeier. “[Yestingsmeier] was supposed to take [his wife] to a retirement dinner for a vice president,” Hernandez said. “He couldn’t go because he had a golf tournament, so he asked me to take her to dinner. So I did and my future wife ended up sitting at our table.” Yestingsmeier met his wife, the former Mona Fahl, while they worked together for a 28 years in the sports information department. After they both retired, Yestingsmeier asked for her hand in marriage. They were together for roughly five years before she died in 2003. They married at High Street United Methodist Church. It was the same chapel where the congregation gathered Tuesday. The same chapel where a teary-eyed Fleck summed up his good friend in one word: committed. “I’ll forever be grateful,” he said.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FEATURES

THURSDAY Read about various destinations less than an hour away to visit during the three-day weekend.

FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

‘Things can unravel’

This year, there is a host of new television series and returning favorites. A columnist created a guide of what to watch.

SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER IN THE BRAIN Seasonal affective disorder can cause depression, fatigue, weight gain, social withdrawal and a lack of interest in normal activities during the winter months. SAD is a relatively new disorder; it wasn’t recognized until the 1980s. A specific cause for SAD has not been found, but there are systems in the brain that winter weather affects.

Living with seasonal affective disorder

A

DANIELLE GRADY STAFF REPORTER

t the same time every year, Katrina Hoak remembers suddenly sleeping longer hours and struggling to go about her normal life. The freshman radiology major said she is not quite sure when she first began to sense that something felt wrong. “My grades weren’t so good,� Hoak said. “I was always tired. I couldn’t pay attention. I kind of wondered if I was depressed in general, but I didn’t really think I had seasonal depression.� When she turned 16, she told her mother about her symptoms and they went to a doctor and a counselor. The counselor recommended Hoak undergo light therapy for her now diagnosed seasonal affective disorder. The disorder affects 6 percent of people in the U.S., according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health.

SCIENCE OF SAD

Research by the National Institute of Mental Health has found many of SAD symptoms come from daily body rhythms getting “out of sync� with the sun because of winter’s late dawns and early sunsets. Those with SAD were found in the winter months to have issues with melatonin, a hormone that controls sleep and wake cycles that is released in the body according to light input.

|

IRREGULAR LEVELS OF MELATONIN

dagrady@bsu.edu

The issue is most common starting in October and extends into April or even May, said Ellen Lucas, Ball State’s Outreach Consulting Psychology associate director. Social interactions and activity decrease the darker and colder an environment becomes, Lucas said. Usual activities that help to elevate moods slip away during these months and are replaced with SAD. The symptoms of SAD share similarities with depression, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. People with SAD generally eat and sleep more than usual around the winter months, while those with nonseasonal depression report no consistent change during those months. Hoak’s symptoms faded into the background once she got to Ball State, which gave her a fresh environment and new social scene. For most college students, the added school stress with midterms and long-distance relationships can worsen symptoms of SAD, Lucas said. She said people with SAD typically sense a pattern regarding their thoughts and the time of the year around the ages of 18 to 30. “I always urge students to not wait,� Lucas said. “Usually, we wait and say, ‘It’ll get better’ or ‘We’ll do it on our own,’

but things can unravel really quickly. This is what [the Counseling Center is] here for, to be consultants, to ask those questions and to give people some feedback about what they’re thinking.�

FIGHTING BACK

In the Counseling Center’s Resource and Relaxation Room, a big massage chair sits in a corner, facing a lamp that is used as a tool to fight off SAD symptoms. According to National Alliance on Mental Illness, 50 to 80 percent of people with SAD benefit from light therapy and most people respond to light therapy. The lamp works by targeting the brain center and stimulating the light-dark cycle normally affected by the sun. Researchers also believe the light triggers a chemical reaction in the brain that alleviates depression. Students can make a free appointment with a psychologist or therapist at the Counseling Center in Lucina Hall Room 320. Lucas said students are allowed up to 12 counseling sessions a year, but issues usually resolve within five sessions. During sessions, she said she asks questions about sleeping patterns and social involvement to determine what kind of help a student needs.

Don’t forget your friend’s birthday! 6HQGDFODVVL¿HGELUWKGD\ZLVKLQ WKH'DLO\1HZV

FRIDAY Want to go out but not sure where to go? The team puts together a list of drink specials and events.

THE BIOLOGICAL CLOCK AND THE CIRCADIAN RHYTHM The biological clock, also known as the internal clock, helps to regulate all cycles in the human body, including the circadian rhythm that influenced sleeping cycles and the release of hormones. The circadian rhythm is located in a set of nerve cells in the brain known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus. SAD can occur if the biological clock of any system is affected.

Melatonin is a hormone found in the pineal gland. It is released in the brain when there is reduced light or darkness. The hormone helps to regulate sleeping and waking cycles. So, melatonin can be linked to the biological clock.

Pineal gland

Suprachiasmatic nucleus

Route of serotonin

IRREGULAR LEVELS OF SEROTONIN Serotonin is a chemical released in the brain that normally affects mood. It can be found in the central nervous system. If the levels of this chemical drop, depression can occur.

DN GRAPHIC STEPHANIE REDDING

SOURCE: mayoclinic.org, nigms.nih.gov, drugabuse.gov, SOURCE: mayoclinic.org, nigms.nih.gov, drugabuse.gov, theatlantic.com

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Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)Today is a 6 -- Insist on a contract in writing. Double-check the data. A female fills in the blanks. Do your share of the work. Start by finishing an old project. Plan to re-organize your nest. Make it cozy.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 6 -- Abundance returns.You’ve got everything you need. Don’t gamble now.Your home provides peaceful sanctuary. Use what you’ve just learned and choose appropriate tools. Then pass on your knowledge to another.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)Today is a 6 -- Compromise is possible, although still elusive.You can have abundance. Defend your position. Negotiate face to face. Write an action list. Jealousies could erupt, so sidestep them.You’re gaining status and strength. Review the instructions. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)Today is a 6 -Don’t lose focus. There’s another way to solve your problem, and the stakes are interesting. Update equipment. Listen to considerations. Everyone vies for your attention, including someone who thinks the job is easy. Withhold judgment. Encourage optimism.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)Today is a 5 -Research before spending more money. Don’t try to buy love; it’s expensive and doesn’t work. Consider the consequences. Take a trip.You’re learning through experience. Seek expert assistance. New opportunities arise. Bide your time. Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 7 -- Follow your dream. Revise your spending and strategic plan. Previous actions provide results. Make sure you got what was promised. There are financial matters to discuss. A lucky break blesses you. Don’t play favorites.

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This is the perfect year to build physical stamina, endurance and energy. Show that fitness off at abundant parties and gatherings, especially before your career gets busy (around 2/19). A personal transformation flowers around 7/16, and you align financial infrastructure and career to that. Love deepens your spiritual and philosophical discoveries. Share them.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 7 -- Take a practical path. Co-workers tell you the score. Take off in a new direction. Confidently build short-term income. Emotional energy eases. Good friends understand the circumstances. Bake until done and share. Practice restraint. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 6 -You’re onto something. Dig into the books. Organize your notes. March past old barriers. Consider your cash situation. If you’re going to be late, call. Postpone a romantic interlude. Explain later. Ignore detractors. Capture brilliance. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7 -Circumstances could prove tumultuous. Someone doesn’t do what he or she promised. Some explaining may be necessary. Listen, and get a new promise. Don’t shop until the check clears.You have more than you expected anyway. Schedule carefully.

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Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 7 -- Maintain objectivity.You have everything you need to succeed, and more. Romance takes over. Get practical in private.You have nothing to be jealous about. Be patient. Put an agreement into practice. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7 -- Do the research. Think everything over carefully before taking action, even if someone is pressuring you. There’s no need to talk about it. Make inquiries to get the facts. Take a long walk and consider. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)Today is a 6 -- Identify the major barrier to success. Take the philosophical high road, even if it’s longer. A female lays the groundwork.You’ve got the right stuff. Devise a plan. Work together. Finish up a project.


PAGE 6 | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

FEATURES

DN PHOTOS MARCY BURTON

‘You can always go ’

DOWNTOWN

Dan’s Downtown Records sits at 105 N. High St. The record store is home to one of the largest collections of used and new vinyl records in Central Indiana, according to its website.

Jack’s Camera Shop fills four floors of a downtown building at 300 E. Main St. in downtown Muncie. The local camera store has been in operation since 1948.

Check out four independent shops in Muncie BETHANIE HUFFMAN CHIEF REPORTER

bnhuffman@bsu.edu

Dan’s Downtown Records | 105 N. High St.

Kirk’s Bike Shop | 124 S. Walnut St.

Hours: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday through Friday 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday 12 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday

Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday through Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday Closed Sunday

Dan’s Downtown Records has rows upon rows of CDs and crates of vinyl. Audiophiles can browse vintage oldies to new releases from contemporary artists. Going on its 11th year in Muncie, owner Dan Walter has more than 10,000 items in the store. For more than 25 years, Walter has worked in the music business. “I have records — that is my appeal,” Walter said. “[My shop is] the ‘vinyl experience’ [as] I like to call it.” Dan’s Downtown Records offers a variety of vinyl, CDs, Tshirts, tapes, books, antiques and collectibles.

For seasoned cyclists to those just learning the ropes, Kirk’s Bike Shop has the equipment to get a cyclist started and offers services to help with maintenance for worn-out bikes. The current location of the store is on the same block where it was established in 1865. Kirk’s Bike Shop offers more than 300 bikes along with biking accessories and clothing. “We’re a close enough location to walk to and have inexpensive bikes for budget oriented students,” Dave Roane, an employee, said. Kirk’s Bike Shop also offers bicycle repair and services.

Jack’s Camera Shop | 300 E. Main St. Hours: 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday Closed Sunday

Toys Forever Models & Hobbies is located at 300 S. Walnut St. in downtown Muncie. The store provides products that include railroad equipment, static cars, aircrafts and boat models.

|

Jack’s Camera Shop, a family owned business, has four floors of photography gear, new and used. In 1948, Jack Walters III opened the store that sells everything from darkroom to digital equipment and tools. It also offers classes in photo techniques and editing programs like Photoshop. “[Jack’s Camera Shop employees] are wizards with photography,” Lenny Baierwalter, a store employee, said.

Toys Forever Models & Hobbies | 300 S. Walnut St. Hours: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday through Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday Closed Sunday

Toys Forever Models & Hobbies offers something for those wanting to reconnect with their childhood, said owner Brandon Mundell. Having owned the store for more than six years, Mundell said he thoroughly enjoys his job and is happy to assist finding a new toy, whether it be building model trains or flying a remote control helicopter. “We’re just big kids,” he said. “We get stuff out of boxes and play with them. You can’t own a toy store and not touch it.”

DN 1-15-14  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News for Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014.

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